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Forest Johnson/Show Management 2010


IN T H I S ISSUE Fishing and Nautical Knots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Hurricane Preparation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Recreational Saltwater Fishing Regulations . . . . . . 11-17 Green Boating Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 How to Boat Smart: Navigation Bouys . . . . . . . . . . 21-23 Public Boat Launch Ramps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Petroleum Control & Bilge Oil Containment . . . . . . . . 29 Moveable Bridge Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Boat Safety Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Florida Word Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Mahi Mahi Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Lightning Protection Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Rip Currents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39-41 Pirate Word Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Manatee Markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45-46

West Palm Beach Boat Show 2010 N o r t h e a s t O ffice ICW Publications 716 Centre of New England Blvd. Coventry, RI 02888

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Southeast Office ICW Publications 6883 Spider Lily Lane Lake Worth, FL 33462

Publisher: Jon Jolls Graphic Design: CAC Designs, Inc. 3


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FISHING & NAUTICAL KNOTS

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HURRICANE PREPARATION GUIDE Make plans early to harbor your boat There are lots of ways to protect your boat from a hurricane. Advice varies greatly, depending on the size of your vessel, availability of dock space, marina rules and local laws. That makes planning now for a hurricane all the more essential. Safeguard your car “Comprehensive� auto coverage should protect your car from damage caused by a hurricane, including flood damage. Emergency information to keep handy Here is a list of emergency phone numbers to keep handy in the event of a hurricane. Shutters are first line of defense No matter how well-constructed, a house without shutters or hurricane glass is not a smart place to stay in a storm. Without protection, windows can be smashed by flying debris. And once the wind gets inside the house, it can quickly splinter or tear off the roof. Make plans now to protect your family Your hurricane plan should be detailed and cover not just what to do now, but also what to do as the storm threatens and as it hits -- and what you should do afterward, when you could be on your own without help for weeks. Protect your pets and animals To keep your pet safe in the event of a hurricane, your choices are to keep the pet with you at home, take it with you if you evacuate, leave it with a friend or board it at a kennel. Find the safest place in your home Finding a strong refuge in your home and keeping it stocked with the right supplies can mean the difference between life and death during a hurricane. Here's how to stay safe during a storm. Go early if you plan to leave If you are absolutely determined to leave town before the hurricane comes, experts have two pieces of advice: 1. Don't do it. 2. If you still insist on leaving, do it early. Very early. Go to shelters only if there is no place else A hurricane shelter should always be considered a last option, a place to go if you can't stay at home or with a relative or friend. Finding shelter for your family Where will you go during a storm? It's a decision best made now, when you're calm, long before a storm hits. But in some cases, the choice may not be yours. Talk to kids, but don't scare them Long before the season begins, parents should begin explaining to children what hurricanes are, the dangers they pose and the safety measures to take against them. Plan for people with special needs A person with special needs is anyone who may need specialized help during or after a hurricane threat, either in or outside an evacuation zone. That can include anyone with a disability, serious illness, or the need for life-support equipment that requires electricity. www.icwresourceguide.com

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s Weather Resistant Nylon Hook & Loop Fastener s Custom Made Inner Liner with open tip for Maximum Drainage

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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GREEN BOATING TIPS Looking for ways to be more eco-friendly when you're out on the water? Following are tips and information that will help you minimize your impact on the environment while maximizing the efficiency and performance of your boat. 1. Choose Green Products: Look for the 7 . P revent Fuel Spills: Use or install a EPA-certified “Design for the Environdevice to prevent overboard discharges ment” DfE label, which assures you that the from your tank vent. Benefit: Save gas and product has minimal environmental impact reduce water pollution and is safer for the person using it. Benefit: 8. Use an autopilot: Modern autopilots Safer products. Reduce water pollution. can steer better than most helmspersons— 2. Use T he Right Prop: Use a prop with the and they don’t have a limited attention span. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption right pitch so your engine reaches its designed wide-open-throttle RPM. An 9. Recyc le Yo u r M o n o fi l a m e n t F ishing adjustable-pitch propellerallows you to dial L i n e : If your harbor doesn’t have a recyin the optimum pitch angle in single degrees. cling location, see the website fishingModular props, let you swap props while linerecycling.org. keeping the same hub. Benefit: Reduce fuel 10. Eat Responsib ly H a rvested Seafood: consumption, improve performance. Choose sustainable seafood at a restau3. Don’t P u s h Wa t e r : Install and use trim rants or grocery stores to ensure that the tabs or hydrofoils. Most planing powerfish stocks are plentiful for your children boats can improve hole-shot acceleration and for generations to come. or reduce fuel consumption with properly adjusted trim tabs and hydrofoils. Keeping on a plane at lower engine RPMs can extend your range and reduce your time on passages. Benefit: Improve boat performTT’S E N ance & save gas. BAR 4. Keep T he Bilge Clean: Avoid the acciCARPET SERVICE dental discharge of oily water by using a www.barnettscarpetservice.com sorbent in each bilge area. Consider a bioremediation product designed to convert Trust an expert for your carpet service! hydrocarbons into safe compounds Benefit: When the job turns from difficult to Safer products. Reduce water pollution worse we always try to come up with a solution! No job impossible! 5 . R e t i re T h a t 2 - S t ro ke O u t b o a r d : Although it may be possible to get a few • Servicing Palm Beach, Martin and more years out of your old-technology outSt. Lucie County board, you’ll be much happier with the • 33 Years in business reduced noise, fumes, fuel consumption, • Turn Key Consultant will come to you and pollution of a modern injected four• Specialize in quality not quantity stroke outboard. For an even quieter ride, • Professional Yardage Measurement try an electric outboard. Benefit: Save gas • Installations: New and Used and reduce water pollution. • Yachts (See References) • Wholesale Carpet, Tile & Wood 6. Recyc le your Lead-Acid Ba t t e r ies: • Repairs: No Job too small 12V batteries are among the most recycled • Wholesale show room with the best deals products in the world. Benefit: Save money and conserve resources. *Amount varies 561-747-1033 19 by state.


HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS Buoys and markers are the "traffic signals" that guide vessel operators safely along some waterways. They also identify dangerous or controlled areas and give directions and information. As a recreational boat or PWC operator, you will need to know the lateral navigation markers and non-lateral markers of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System. L AT E R A L M ARKERS These navigation aids mark the edges of safe water areas; for example, directing travel within a channel. The markers use a combination of colors and numbers, which may appear on either buoys or permanently placed markers. Colors and Numbers The colors and numbers have the same meaning regardless of the kind of buoy or marker on which they appear. Buo y a n d M a r k e r C o l o r a n d N u m b e r D e s c r i p t i o n s Red Colors, Red Lights, and Even Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream.

Green Colors, Green Lights, and Odd Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Red and Green Colors and/or Lights: These are placed at the junction of two channels to indicate the preferred (primary) channel when a channel splits. If green is on top, the preferred channel is to the right. If red is on top, the preferred channel is to the left. These also are sometimes referred to as "junction buoys." Buo y S h a p e D e s c r i p t i o n s Nun Buoys: These cone-shaped buoys are always marked with red markings and even numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream.

Can Buoys: These cylindrical-shaped buoys are always marked with green markings and odd numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream. Other Kinds of Buoy s a n d M a rk e rs Lighted Buoys: These buoys use the lateral marker shapes, colors, and numbers discussed above. In addition, they have a matching colored light.

Daymarks: These are permanently placed signs attached to structures, such as posts, in the water. Common daymarks are red triangles (equivalent to nuns) and green squares (equivalent to cans). These may be lighted also.

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS NON-LAT E R A L M ARKERS Non-lateral markers are navigation aids that give information other than the edges of safe water areas. The most common are regulatory markers that are white and use orange markings and black lettering. These markers are found on lakes and rivers and are used to:

Give Directions and Information. • Warn of hazards and obstructions. • Mark controlled areas. • Mark exclusion (closed) areas. • Descriptions of Non-Lateral Markers Information Squares provide information such as places to find food, supplies, and repairs; and they give directions, distances, and other non-regulatory information. Danger Area Diamonds warn of dangers such as rocks, shoals, construction, dams, or stumps. Always proceed with caution and keep a safe distance. Never assume that every hazard will be marked by a buoy. Controlled Area Circles indicate a controlled area such as no wake, idle speed, speed limit, or ski zone. Exclusion Area Crossed diamonds indicate areas off-limits to all vessels such as swimming areas, dams, and spillways. Safe Water Marker These are white with red vertical stripes and indicate unobstructed water on all sides. They mark mid-channels or fairways and may be passed on either side. Inland Waters Obstruction Marker These are white with black vertical stripes and indicate an obstruction to navigation. You should not pass between these buoys and the nearest shore. Mooring Buoy These are white with a blue horizontal band. They usually are placed in marinas and other areas where vessels are allowed to anchor. These are the only buoys you may tie up to legally.

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P h i l Fo s t e r P a r k 900 E. Blue Heron Blvd (East side of the Intracoastal Waterway at the Blue Heron Bridge, Singer Island/Riviera Beach.)

O k eeheelee P a r k 7715 Forest Hill Blvd West Palm Beach Stub Canal 2140 Oglethorpe Rd. West Palm Beach J o h n S t retc h P a r k 47225 US Hwy 27 Lake Harbor P a u l R a r d i n Pa r k 4600 Bacom Point Rd Pahokee

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B e r t W i n t e r s Pa r k 13425 Ellison Wilson Rd. Juno Beach (South of Donald Ross Road) J u n o Pa r k 2090 Juno Road Juno Beach off Ellison Wilson (North of PGA Blvd.)

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PETROLEUM CONTROL FAC T: A single gallon of fuel can contaminate over a million gallons of water. The cumulative effect of small spills has a serious impact on coastal and fresh water areas. G OA L : Reduce pollution in Florida’s surface waters and maintain a healthy and esthetically pleasing recreational environment that can be enjoyed by all boaters. AC T I O N S YOU CAN TAKE W H I L E F U E L I N G : • Use caution in fi lling your fuel tank to avoid spillage into the water. • Listen to your boat, it gurgles before your tank is full. • Use a vent collection device to capture escaping fuel. • While fueling your vessel attend the fuel nozzle at all times. • For safety, have all passengers exit the boat during gasoline fueling. • If you overfi ll your fuel tank, wipe it up with a rag. Do not hose down the fuel into the water. Give the soiled rags to your marina operator for proper disposal. • If a spill occurs, do not apply detergents or soaps. This only spreads the problem and is a violation of Federal law. • If a spill occurs in a marina, notify marina management immediately. • No smoking while fueling. • Use containment while fueling Personal Water Craft (PWC) (absorbent pad, nozzle pad or vent cover to catch overflow.

BILGE OIL CONTAINMENT AC T I O N S YOU CAN TA K E F O R B I L G E O I L : Use drip pans with absorbent pads while draining oil from the bilges. • Keep all engines well tuned: regularly check seals, gaskets, hoses and connections for leaks and drips. Change oil filters often. • Place oil absorbent material or bioremediating bilge boom in the bilge. • Clean and maintain bilges and do not use detergents while cleaning. • Remove oil from the bilge with absorbent pads. • Before pumping bilge, use water/oil separators or absorbents to soak up oil hydrocarbons. • Trailer your boat to an area that provides containment before removing bilge or boat plugs. • Recycle or properly dispose of used oil and absorbents. Contact your local authorities or marina management for petroleum disposal regulations.

Report oil pollution to the State Wa rning Point at 1-800-320-0519 and the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802. Find Oil Recyclers by zip code at www.recycle oil.org or call 202-682-8000.Report oil pollution to the State Wa rning Point at 1-800-320-0519 and the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802. Find Oil Recyclers by zip code at www.recycleoil.org or call 202-682-8000. www.icwresourceguide.com

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MOVEABLE BRIDGE GUIDE

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BOAT SAFETY CHECKLIST By using this checklist, or one fine-tuned by yourself, you’ll be sure that everything is on board and in good working order. Your passengers will appreciate knowing you're concerned about boating safety. • Float plan - let a friend or relative know when you're leaving, where you’re going, when you expect to return, what to do if you don’t, and a description of your boat • Registration certificate or documentation • Personal Flotation Devices (wearable and throw able) - USCG approved, good condition, readily accessible, assigned and fitted • Fire Extinguishers - right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible • Visual Distress Signals - current dates on flares, proper number, batteries good if lights or EPIRB • Anchors and Line - adequate anchor for bottom, adequate line for water depth • Bilge device - bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device available • Watch or clock - operable • Bright flashlight or searchlight • Navigation lights - tested and operable, spare bulbs • Batteries - fully charged, encased in plastic boxes or terminals covered, securely fastened down • Sound-producing device - horn, whistle appropriate for boat • Alternate propulsion - paddle or oar • First Aid Kit • Tools, spare outboard prop and lock nut • Compass • Sunscreen • Weather Radio

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MAHI MAHI RECIPES Pistach i o - C rusted Mahi-Mahi 2 mahi-mahi filets Extra virgin olive oil Kosher salt and pepper 1/4 cup pistachios, more if needed 1/4 cup panko, more if needed Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Season both sides of the mahi-mahi filets with salt and pepper, and rub the filets with olive oil. Process the pistachios in a food processor until finely chopped, or chop them with a knife. Mix the pistachios with the panko, and place the filets into the pistachio mixture to coat the top. Place the filets in a greased baking dish, and add more of the pistachio mixture on top, patting to coat. I pressed a lot of the extra mixture onto the top, which resulted in a super crunchy topping. Bake the filets for approximately 15 minutes in the oven, or until the fish flakes easily with a fork. C a r ibb e a n M a h i M a h i 1 1/2-2 lbs mahi mahi vegetable oil cajun seasoning, to taste 1 cup mango, diced into 1/4 inch pieces 1 cup plum tomato, diced 1/3-1/2 cup olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (can also use lime juice) 1 cup red onion, diced 2-3 tablespoons jalapenos, seeded, minced 2-3 tablespoons fresh mint, julienned (can also use a mixture of mint and tarragon) jasmine rice Preheat the broiler. Plance the mahi mahi on a broiling rack. Coat with vegetable oil, then sprinkle with Cajun seasoning to taste. Let sit at least 15 minutes. Meanwhile, gently toss together the mango, plum tomatoes, olive oil, lemon juice, onions, and jalapeno. Do not overmix. Broil the fish until cooked through without turning. As mahi mahi is a dense fish, this will take anywhere from 10-15 minutes. Just before serving the salsa, stir in the mint. a mound of jasmine rice in the center of a serving platter, surrounded with the fish, then garnish with half of the salsa. Put the remaining salsa in a bowl and pass. www.icwresourceguide.com

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LIGHTNING PROTECTION GUIDE Even though the odds are in your favor that your boat may never be hit by lightning, if it happens it can have devastating effects. Don’t take a chance, protect yourself. If you are in a small boat and close to shore when a thunderstorm approaches, get in and off the water immediately. Better yet, don't go out if thunderstorms are predicted. But what if you are miles offshore and a storm pops up? Hopefully, you have prepared in advance. The voltages involved in lightning are so high that even materials that would normally be considered non-conductive become conductors, including the human body. The voltages are so massive that if they start to travel through a boat's structure - say through its mast - then meet with high resistance (for instance, the hull skin) the current discharge, in its attempt to reach ground, may simply blow a hole in the non-conductive barrier. The safety conscious Captain should make sure that his vessel is properly protected. In theory, a lightning protection system is used to create what is know as a “Faraday’s cage,” so called after the late nineteenth-century scientist Michael Faraday. The principle is to provide a surrounding, well-grounded, metal structure, in which all of parts are bonded together and carry the same electrical potential. Such a “cage” attracts and carries any lightning strike to ground much like lightning rods on buildings. You need to provide an unobstructed way for the lightning to dissipate its energy to ground (the water surrounding you). The additional benefit of a lightning protection system is that it tends to bleed off any charge build-up in the general vicinity, possibly averting a lightning strike in the first place. So how does a lightning protection system work? In a boat, the “cage” is formed by bonding together, with heavy conductors, the www.icwresourceguide.com

vessel's mast and all other major metal masses. A marine electrician must tie in the engines, stoves, air conditioning compressors, railings, arches etc. with a low resistance wire which would ultimately provide a conductive path to ground (the water) usually via the engine and propeller shaft, keel bolts, or better yet, a separate external ground plate at least 1 sq. ft. in dimension. It is important that you ensure that your crew fall within the protection of the cage,” something not always feasible when the vessel is not built of steel or aluminum. On fiberglass or wooden boats it is advantageous to have a mast or other conductive metal protrusion extending well above the vessel, creating what is known as a “cone” or zone of protection. It is generally accepted that this cone of protection extends 45 degrees, all around, from the tip of the metal protrusion. If the aluminum mast of the average sailing vessel is properly bonded to the vessel’s other major metal masses and is given a direct, low-resistance conductive path to ground, the entire boat should fall within the protected zone. If the vessel has a wooden or composite mast, a marine electrician can achieve the same effect by installing a 6 to 12 inch metal spike at the top and running a heavy conductor down the mast and as directly as possible to ground, usually through the engine and propeller shaft. Again, refer to the ABYC standards and have a professional marine electrician install your lightning protection.This is not a do-it-yourself project. 37


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RIP CURRENTS Why Rip Currents Form As waves travel from deep to shallow water, they will break near the shoreline. When waves break strongly in some locations and weakly in others, this can cause circulation cells which are seen as rip currents: narrow, fast-moving belts of water traveling offshore. Why Rip Currents are Dangerous Rip currents are the leading surf hazard for all beachgoers. They are particularly dangerous for weak or non-swimmers. Rip current speeds are typically 1-2 feet per second. However, speeds as high as 8 feet per second have been measured--this is faster than an Olympic swimmer can sprint! Thus, rip currents can sweep even the strongest swimmer out to sea. Over 100 drownings due to rip currents occur every year in the United States. More than 80% of water rescues on surf beaches are due to rip currents. Rip currents can occur at any surf beach with breaking waves, including the Great Lakes. When Rip Currents Form Rip currents can be found on many surf beaches every day. Under most tide and sea conditions the speeds are relatively slow. However, under certain wave, tide, and beach profile conditions the speeds can quickly increase to become dangerous to anyone entering the surf. The strength and speed of a rip current will likely increase as wave height and wave period increase. T hey a re most likel y to be dang e ro u s d u ring high s u r f c o n d i t i o n s a s t h e w a ve h e i g h t a n d w a ve p e r iod i n c r ease . Where Rip Currents Form Rip currents most typically form at low spots or breaks in sandbars, and also near structures such as groins, jetties and piers. Rip currents can be very narrow or extend in widths to hundreds of yards. The seaward pull of rip currents varies: sometimes the rip current ends just beyond the line of breaking waves, but sometimes rip currents continue to push hundreds of yards offshore. How to Identify Rip Currents L o o k fo r a n y o f t h e s e c l u e s : A channel of churning, choppy water, an area having a notable difference in water color, a line of foam, seaweed, or debris moving steadily seaward, a break in the incoming wave pattern. None, one, or more of the above clues may indicate the presence of rip currents. Rip currents are often not readily or easily identifiable to the average beachgoer. For your safety, be aware of this major surf zone hazard. Polarized sunglasses make it easier to see the rip current clues provided above. How to Avo i d a n d S u rvive R i p C u rr ents Learn how to swim and never swim alone. Be cautious at all times, especially when swimming at unguarded beaches. If in doubt, don’t go out! Whenever possible, swim at a lifeguard protected beach. Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards. www.icwresourceguide.com

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RIP CURRENTS If caught in a rip current, remain calm to conserve energy and think clearly. Don’t fight the current. Swim out of the current in a direction following the shoreline. When out of the current, swim towards shore. If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, float or calmly tread water. When out of the current, swim towards shore. If you are still unable to reach shore, draw attention to yourself: face the shore, wave your arms, and yell for help. If you see someone in trouble, get help from a lifeguard. If a lifeguard is not available, have someone call 9-1-1. Throw the rip current victim something that floats and yell instructions on how to escape. Remember, many people drown while trying to save someone else from a rip current. Rip Current Myth A rip current is a horizontal current. Rip currents do not pull people under the water–-they pull people away from shore. Drowning deaths occur when people pulled offshore are unable to keep themselves afloat and swim to shore. This may be due to any combination of fear, panic, exhaustion, or lack of swimming skills.

PIRATE WORD SEARCH

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ICW Intracoastal Waterway Resource Guide

For Advertising Information, Please Call

561-904-6299 Current ICW Projects:

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Jacksonville, FL

Houston, TX

Miami-Dade/Keys, FL

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Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Buzzards Bay, MA


MANATEE MARKERS M a n atees and the Law Manatees are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act of 1978. It is illegal to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, annoy or molest manatees. The state of Florida has also established regulatory speed zones to protect the manatee and its habitat. Anyone convicted of violating state law faces maximum fines of $500 and/or imprisonment of up to 60 days. Conviction for violating federal protection laws is punishable by fines up to $100,000 and/or one year in prison. W h a t C a n B o a t e r s Do? You can reduce your chances of harming a manatee by following these simple guidelines: Observe and follow all boating speed zone signs. Slow down. Reducing boat speed gives you a greater chance to avoid a manatee. You will also increase your safety margin with other boats. Remember to post a lookout.

Boa t i n g S p e e d Z o n e s To alert the boater and protect the manatee in its sanctuaries, the law provides regulatory zones on wateways. Here are typical signs found on Florida’s waterways:

Use marked channels whenever possible. Manatees have shown signs that they are avoiding heavy boat traffic areas. Channel depth reduces the likelihood of pinning or crushing manatees. Wear polarized sunglasses while operating a boat. Polarized lenses make it much easier to see objects beneath the surface and the “swirling” that occurs when a manatee dives. (The swirls look like a large “footprint” on the water’s surface or a series of half moon swirls.) Post a proper lookout while boating. A proper lookout is a person on board designated to look out for wildlife, other boaters, swimmers or obstructions when the vessel is underway. Plan for safety. www.icwresourceguide.com

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INDEX A e rial Photogr a p hy Wrights Helicopter Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Aluminum Boat Tr a i l e rs, Boat Lifts, C a t a m a r a n Tr a i l e r s Float on Boat Trailers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Anch o rs, Anch o r S a fe t y P roducts, M o o r i n g P roducts, E nv i ro-F r iendl y Revolution Anchors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Boa t C a rpeting Service Barnett Carpet Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Boa t C l e a n i n g P roducts, Detailing Accessor ies Good 4 Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 B o a t E q u i p m e n t , A c c e s s o r i e s & M a r i n e E l e c t r onics Boaters Marine Supply.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Boa t I n s u r a n c e Allstate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Boa t R e n t a l a n d B o ating Tr aining Freedom Boat Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Boa ting Ramps & Devices Yacht Boarding Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 C h ro m e & G o l d P l a t i n g , M e t a l Polishing Mark Plating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Cold Beve ra ge Insulation Chilling the Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Complete Vessel Restora tion CVR, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Cosmetic Dentistry Advanced Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 C u s t o m E m b ro i d e ry & Monogr ams, Linen Accessor ies Yachta Yadda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Dive I n s t ruction Dive In Adventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Dive Shop in Local Palm Beach, Dive I n s t r uction, Boa ting Ap p a rel Divers Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Doc k Accessories, P W C Lifts, E n c a p s u l at e d F l o t a tion, Doc k Bo xes Dock Floats Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 D ra p e r y, U p h o l s t e r y, Bedding David's Drapery Workroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 E n gines, M a r ine AC, E nv i ro F r iendl y Trac Ecological Marine Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 E s t a t e P l a n n i n g , P ro b ate Tr ust A d m i n i s t r a tion & Real Esta te Law Offices of Robert J. Longchamps, PLLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 F ishing Knives, Sheat h s Blade Tamer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 F i s h i n g R o d s , Reels, E q u i p m e n t & R o d R e p a i r Connely Rods, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

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INDEX I n fla t a b le Boat Safe t y P roduct, Boa ting Aide’s & Accessor ies, Rail Accessor i e s - E Z - I n E Z - O u t Ding-EZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 I ridium Sa tellite Phones, I n m a rsa t Fleet Bro a d b a n d , E l e c t r ic Motor s, Navig a t i o n a l E q u i p m e n t Gardline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 J ewe l r y, Skeletal Jewe l ry, Nautical Fla gs Mark Edwards Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 M a r ine Audio Systems & Electronics Aqua Acoustics Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 M a r ine Stained Glass Stuart Stained Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 O u t d o o r & U n d e r wa t e r L i g h t i n g , E n e rgy Saving , Eco Fr iendl y Aurora Outdoor Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-25 P owe r Assisted F ishing Reels Dolphin Electreel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Rod Re p a i r, L u b ricat i o n a n d B e a r ings Boca Bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 S c u b a D i ving & Lessons Ocean Quest Scuba Charters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 U n d e r wa ter LED Boat Lighting Liquid Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Waste Wa t e r Tr eat m e n t a n d S ewa ge Scienco Fast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 W i n d o w F ilm Window Tint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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