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IN T H I S ISSUE Martin County Golf Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Palm Beach County Golf Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 History of Intracoastal Waterway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Recreational Saltwater Fishing Regulations . . . . . . 13-19 Hurricane Preparation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Green Boating Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-25 Nautical Knots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 How to Boat Smart: Navigation Bouys . . . . . . . . . . 31-33 Fishing Knots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Martin County Boat Launch Ramps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Key Lime Pie Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Lightning Protection Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Moveable Bridge Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Pirate Word Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Boat Safety Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Manatee Markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Natural and Artificial Reefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57-58

Martin/PB County Florida Cobia Edition N o r t h e a s t O ffice ICW Publications 716 Centre of New England Blvd. Coventry, RI 02888

www.icwresourceguide.com

Southeast Office ICW Publications 4781 N. Congress Ave. Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Publisher: Jon Jolls Graphic Design: CAC Designs, Inc. 3


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MARTIN COUNTY GOLF GUIDE 76 Golf World 6801 S Kenner Hwy Stuart, FL 34997 561-220-7676 Eagle Marsh Golf Club 130 NW Jensen Beach Blvd Jensen Beach, FL 34957 772-692-3322 Gold/Blue 2000 SE Saint Lucie Blvd Stuart, FL 34996 772-287-3747 Hammock Creek GC 2400 Golden Bear Way Palm City, FL 34990 888-841-5225

Ocean Club at Hutchinson Isl Beach Resort & Marina 555 Ne Ocean Blvd Stuart, FL 34996 772-225-6819 Palm Cove Golf & Yacht Club 755 SW Mapp Rd. Palm City, FL 34990 772-287-5605 Sailfish Point Golf Club 2203 Sailfish Point Blvd Stuart, FL 34996 772-225-1500 The Florida Club 1380 SW Kanner Hwy Stuart, FL 34997 772-287-3680

Hills 1800 SE Hill Club Terrace The Flor idian Tequesta, FL 33469 14020 Nw Gilson Rd 561-746-5228 Palm City, FL 34990 772-781-1000 Jupiter Island Club The Fox Club 1 Bunker Hill Rd Hobe Sound, FL 33455 10664 SW Whooping Crane Way 561-546-2301 Palm City, FL 34990 772-597-4222 Martin County Golf & CC 2000 Se Saint Lucie Blvd Stuart, FL 34996 772-287-3747

The Green 6490 SE Mariner Sands Dr Stuart, FL 3499 561-221-7304 The Little Club 9601 SE Little Club Way N Tequesta, FL 33469 561-746-1869 The Yacht & Country Club 3883 SE Fairway E Stuart, FL 34997 772-283-1966 Tower 3801 SW Greenwood Way Palm City, FL 34990 561-286-6818 Turtle Creek Club 2 Club Circle Tequesta, FL 33469 561-746-8884 Village 1800 SE Hill Club Terrace Tequesta, FL 33469 561-746-5228

McArthur Golf Club 6500 Se Osprey St Hobe Sound, FL 33455 772-545-3838 Medalist Golf Club 9908 Se Cottage Ln Hobe Sound, FL 33455 772-545-9600 www.icwresourceguide.com

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PALM BEACH COUNTY GOLF GUIDE Atlantis Country Club Atlantis 561-965-7700

Boca Dunes Golf and CC Boca Raton 561-451-1600

The Club at Winston Trails Lake Worth 561-439-0009

North Palm Beach GC North Palm Beach 561-691-3433

Westchester Golf and CC Boynton Beach 561-734-6300

Wellington Golf and CC Wellington 561-795-3510

Polo Trace Golf Club Delray Beach 561-495-5300

The Links at Boynton Beach Boynton Beach 561-742-6500

West Palm Beach Golf Course West Palm Beach 61-687-1700

Links at Madison Green Royal Palm Beach 561-784-5225

www.icwresourceguide.com

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561-689-0872 www.advanceddentalgrp.com • Academy of General Dentistry • American Dental Association • American Dental Society of Anesthesiology • Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry • International Congress of Oral Implantology • Academy of Laser Dentistry • ACLS Accredited Sedation Licensing 10


HISTORY OF THE INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. Some lengths consist of natural inlets, salt-water rivers, bays, and sounds; others are man-made canals. The waterway runs for most of the length of the Eastern Seaboard, from its unofficial northern terminus at the Manasquan River in New Jersey, where it connects with the Atlantic Ocean at the Manasquan Inlet, to Brownsville, Texas. The waterway is toll-free, but commercial users pay a fuel tax that is used to maintain and improve it. The ICW is a significant portion of the Great Loop, a circumnavigation route encircling the Eastern half of the North American continent. The creation of the Intracoastal Waterway was authorized by the United States Congress in 1919. It is maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Federal law provides for the waterway to be maintained at a minimum depth of 12 ft (4 m) for most of its length, but inadequate funding has prevented that. Consequently, shoaling or shallow water are problems along several sections of the waterway; some parts have 7-ft (2.1-m) and 9-ft (2.7-m) minimum depths. The waterway consists of two non-contiguous segments: the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, extending from Brownsville, Texas to Carrabelle, Florida, and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, extending from Key West, Florida to Norfolk, Virginia (milepost 0.0). The two segments were originally intended to be connected via the Cross Florida Barge Canal across northern Florida, but this was never completed due to environmental concerns. Additional canals and bays extend a navigable waterway to Boston, Massachusetts. The Intracoastal Waterway has a good deal of commercial activity; barges haul petroleum, petroleum products, foodstuffs, building materials, and manufactured goods. It is also used extensively by recreational boaters. On the east coast, some of the traffic in fall and spring is by snowbirds who regularly move south in winter and north in summer. The waterway is also used when the ocean is too rough to travel on. Numerous inlets connect the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico with the Intracoastal Waterway. Taken from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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Get on Board With Responsible Boating These environmentally responsible products are designed to repel water while absorbing petroleum-based fluids in marine applications. Ask about these fine products at your local marina or call us at 800-233-1959 ext. 2548. 16


RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

www.icwresourceguide.com

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No need for a marine technician. Our Barnacle Buster™ and Port-O-Flush Jr.™ can easily be used to flush out all internal parts of sea water cooled systems like main engines, generators and air conditioning. With minimal dismantling needed, Barnacle Buster™ is faster and more economical than any other mechanical option, and is safe to use, non toxic and biodegradable. Port-O-Flush Jr.™

For product information, contact your supplier or phone us directly at 954.987.2722 18

Visit our TECH DATA page online at www.trac-online.com for more information and detailed instructions.


RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

www.icwresourceguide.com

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Sunset Shrimp Special Daily at $9.95 - 4 to 6:30 PM Voted Readers’ Choice Award for the Best Seafood Restaurant & Restaurant with a Waterfront View.

“ON THE WATER AT THE MANATEE POCKET” 4903 S.E. Dixie Hwy. • Stuart, FL 34997 • (772) 220-EATS Hours: Sun - Thurs 11:30a- 10p; Fri - Sat 11:30a - 11p • Happy Hour Daily

Serving the best seafood, steaks and pub menu... 20


GREEN BOATING TIPS Make plans early to harbor your boat There are lots of ways to protect your boat from a hurricane. Advice varies greatly, depending on the size of your vessel, availability of dock space, marina rules and local laws. That makes planning now for a hurricane all the more essential. Safeguard your car “Comprehensive� auto coverage should protect your car from damage caused by a hurricane, including flood damage. Emergency information to keep handy Here is a list of emergency phone numbers to keep handy in the event of a hurricane. Shutters are first line of defense No matter how well-constructed, a house without shutters or hurricane glass is not a smart place to stay in a storm. Without protection, windows can be smashed by flying debris. And once the wind gets inside the house, it can quickly splinter or tear off the roof. Make plans now to protect your family Your hurricane plan should be detailed and cover not just what to do now, but also what to do as the storm threatens and as it hits -- and what you should do afterward, when you could be on your own without help for weeks. Protect your pets and animals To keep your pet safe in the event of a hurricane, your choices are to keep the pet with you at home, take it with you if you evacuate, leave it with a friend or board it at a kennel. Find the safest place in your home Finding a strong refuge in your home and keeping it stocked with the right supplies can mean the difference between life and death during a hurricane. Here's how to stay safe during a storm. Go early if you plan to leave If you are absolutely determined to leave town before the hurricane comes, experts have two pieces of advice: 1. Don't do it. 2. If you still insist on leaving, do it early. Very early. Go to shelters only if there is no place else A hurricane shelter should always be considered a last option, a place to go if you can't stay at home or with a relative or friend. Finding shelter for your family Where will you go during a storm? It's a decision best made now, when you're calm, long before a storm hits. But in some cases, the choice may not be yours. Talk to kids, but don't scare them Long before the season begins, parents should begin explaining to children what hurricanes are, the dangers they pose and the safety measures to take against them. Plan for people with special needs A person with special needs is anyone who may need specialized help during or after a hurricane threat, either in or outside an evacuation zone. That can include anyone with a disability, serious illness, or the need for life-support equipment that requires electricity. www.icwresourceguide.com

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Boat Care 101: Use What the Pros Use. 100% acid and caustic free Used by U.S. Navy/Coast Guard Non-corrosive Non-fuming Safe on all boat surfaces

Now the technology used by the world’s leading cruise lines, U.S. Navy and Coast Guard is available to private boat owners and boat repair shops. Triton Marine products replace the harsh acids, caustics and solvents you are using now, without sacrificing the cleaning power you want. Try the Non-Skid Deck Cleaner that cleans the decks of aircraft carriers. Or the flushes that clean the engines and water lines of the world’s largest cruise and naval ships. Triton Marine products are so safe and effective that they are endorsed by some of the industry’s premiere yacht manufacturers.

100% biodegradable Strongest products available Approved DfE by the EPA Choice of leading cruise lines

Triton Marine products include: ‡%RDW:DVK ‡1RQ6NLG'HFN&OHDQHU ‡%ODFN6WUHDN5HPRYHU ‡(QJLQH)OXVKDQG'HVFDOHU ‡+XOO&OHDQHUDQG6FDOH5HPRYHU ‡'LHVHO6RRW5HPRYHU ‡$&6\VWHP)OXVKDQG'HVFDOHU ‡6KRUH*ULS%RDWHUV3XWW\

“Your marine descaler removed four years' accumulation of deposits from our ship’s interior piping system. The environmental friendliness of your product resulted in a cost savings in water disposal fees of $1,000. TCLP tests were conducted on the effluent and no unacceptable levels of trace (RCRA) metals were found. I consider your product to be ideal for the system cleaning on U.S. military vessels." Lt. P.D. Stukus U.S.S. Vigilant

”I used the Triton Engine Flush and it’s revolutionary. It worked 10 times faster than the dangerous acids and without any of the problems I’ve dealt with over the years.” John Duvall Certified Silverton Marine Technician ”The EMS product outperformed all others we tested in cleaning power. There were no fumes at all, which can not be said of even the most benign cleaners we’ve tried. We consider your cleaner to be our product of choice.” Greg Hoffer U.S. Naval Engineer

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Triton Marine products not only clean faster and are safer than any other products on the market, they treat the boat surfaces making them easier to keep clean over time. And because Triton Marine products are built on EMS’ patented synthetic SynTech® and SynClean® technologies, they have earned triple-zero HMIS scores and have been recognized by the EPA’s Design for Environment for safer chemistry www.epa.gov/dfe.

www.tritonmarineproducts.com


GREEN BOATING TIPS Looking for ways to be more eco-friendly when you're out on the water? Following are tips and information that will help you minimize your impact on the environment while maximizing the efficiency and performance of your boat. 1. Choose Gre e n P ro d u c t s : Look for the EPA-certified “Design for the Environment” DfE label, which assures you that the product has minimal environmental impact and is safer for the person using it. Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution.

ogy outboard, you’ll be much happier with the reduced noise, fumes, fuel consumption, and pollution of a modern injected four-stroke outboard. For an even quieter ride, try an electric outboard. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution.

2. Use T h e R i g h t P ro p : Use a prop with the right pitch so your engine reaches its designed wide-open-throttle RPM. An adjustable-pitch propellerallows you to dial in the optimum pitch angle in single degrees. Modular props, let you swap props while keeping the same hub. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption, improve performance.

6. Recycle your Lead-Acid Ba t t e ries: 12V batteries are among the most recycled products in the world. Benefit: Save money and conserve resources. *Amount varies by state.

3. Don’t P u s h Wa t e r : Install and use trim tabs or hydrofoils. Most planing powerboats can improve hole-shot acceleration or reduce fuel consumption with properly adjusted trim tabs and hydrofoils. Keeping on a plane at lower engine RPMs can extend your range and reduce your time on passages. Benefit: Improve boat performance & save gas.

8. Use an autopilot: Modern autopilots can steer better than most helmspersons—and they don’t have a limited attention span. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption

4. Kee p T he Bilge Clean: Avoid the accidental discharge of oily water by using a sorbent in each bilge area. Consider a bioremediation product designed to convert hydrocarbons into safe compounds Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution

7 . P revent Fuel Spills: Use or install a device to prevent overboard discharges from your tank vent. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution

9. Recycle Yo u r M o n o fi l a m e n t F ishing Line: If your harbor doesn’t have a recycling location, see the website fishinglinerecycling.org. 10. Eat Responsib ly H a rvested Seafood: Choose sustainable seafood at a restaurants or grocery stores to ensure that the fish stocks are plentiful for your children and for generations to come.

5 . R e t i re T h a t 2 - S t ro k e O u t b o a r d : Although it may be possible to get a few more years out of your old-technolwww.icwresourceguide.com

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Don’t Let Pests Be Guests!

OFFBoard® is a registered trademark of Foothills Products.

OFFBOARD® is a spring-loaded device created to lock onto your mooring lines to keep the critters off board.

We pride outselves that the shields are "Made in the U.S.A.”

www.offboard.com 1-800-643-0353

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GREEN BOATING TIPS T I P S F O R R EDUCING F U E L USAG E Slower speeds on the water will reduce fuel usage. Proper use of trim tabs reduce drag, especially while accelerating up to planing speeds. Minimize the amount of time that you idle at the dock Minimize the use of onboard generators. Use dock-side electrical power in lieu of generators. Have a float plan so you know exactly where you’re going. Make sure the hull is clean. Don’t under-power your boat. It’s important you have enough motor to handle the load. Check your propeller. If your boat is slow "out of the hole" or lacks top-end speed, you might have the wrong propeller. A well-tuned engine uses less fuel. Use the grade of gasoline specified by the engine manufacturer.

BOAT I N G ACCESSORIES G O G R E E N E nv i ro n m e n t a l ly-Fr iendl y Cleaning Products Many marine cleaning products developed today demonstrate a commitment to clean water. Companies have developed non-toxic based biodegradable boat soaps, which have a minimal impact on the aquatic environment. We've also seen the introduction of color safe, oxygen release gels and cleansers that remove spots off of boats without using bleach or other hazardous materials. E nv i ro n m e n t a l ly-Fr iendl y M a rine A f t e rm a rk et Accessories Innovative companies in our industry have developed ways to extend the life of batteries in harsh marine environments. Some products are designed to reduce premature battery failure caused by periods of inactivity. These systems utilize the power of the battery and return it as a surge or pulse. These products can also revive many older batteries back to their original state. Improvements in Marine Sanitation Since the passage of the Clean Vessel Act in 1992 marine sanitation has seen remarkable improvements. Marine sanitation manufacturers are providing consumers with new products to protect the marine environment from boat sewage. Manufacturers have developed and marketed innovative technologies that treat, store and contain waste more effectively.

www.icwresourceguide.com

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Ray Gavin Wood & Yacht Quality Woodworking

561-744-1304

Since 1972 Jupiter, Florida rayboat@mac.com

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NAUTICAL KNOTS

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GELCOAT REPAIR & RESTORATION IMPACT & STRUCTURAL REPAIR CUSTOM FABRICATION

Over 25 Years Experience

561-891-1925 30

LICENSED & INSURED #2007-06772


HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS Buoys and markers are the "traffic signals" that guide vessel operators safely along some waterways. They also identify dangerous or controlled areas and give directions and information. As a recreational boat or PWC operator, you will need to know the lateral navigation markers and non-lateral markers of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System. L AT E R A L M ARKERS These navigation aids mark the edges of safe water areas; for example, directing travel within a channel. The markers use a combination of colors and numbers, which may appear on either buoys or permanently placed markers. Colors and Numbers The colors and numbers have the same meaning regardless of the kind of buoy or marker on which they appear. Buo y a n d M a r k e r C o l o r a n d N u m b e r D e s c r i p t i o n s Red Colors, Red Lights, and Even Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream.

Green Colors, Green Lights, and Odd Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Red and Green Colors and/or Lights: These are placed at the junction of two channels to indicate the preferred (primary) channel when a channel splits. If green is on top, the preferred channel is to the right. If red is on top, the preferred channel is to the left. These also are sometimes referred to as "junction buoys." Buo y S h a p e D e s c r i p t i o n s Nun Buoys: These cone-shaped buoys are always marked with red markings and even numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream.

Can Buoys: These cylindrical-shaped buoys are always marked with green markings and odd numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream. Other Kinds of Buoy s a n d M a rk e rs Lighted Buoys: These buoys use the lateral marker shapes, colors, and numbers discussed above. In addition, they have a matching colored light.

Daymarks: These are permanently placed signs attached to structures, such as posts, in the water. Common daymarks are red triangles (equivalent to nuns) and green squares (equivalent to cans). These may be lighted also.

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS NON-LAT E R A L M ARKERS Non-lateral markers are navigation aids that give information other than the edges of safe water areas. The most common are regulatory markers that are white and use orange markings and black lettering. These markers are found on lakes and rivers and are used to:

Give Directions and Information. • Warn of hazards and obstructions. • Mark controlled areas. • Mark exclusion (closed) areas. • Descriptions of Non-Lateral Markers Information Squares provide information such as places to find food, supplies, and repairs; and they give directions, distances, and other non-regulatory information. Danger Area Diamonds warn of dangers such as rocks, shoals, construction, dams, or stumps. Always proceed with caution and keep a safe distance. Never assume that every hazard will be marked by a buoy. Controlled Area Circles indicate a controlled area such as no wake, idle speed, speed limit, or ski zone. Exclusion Area Crossed diamonds indicate areas off-limits to all vessels such as swimming areas, dams, and spillways. Safe Water Marker These are white with red vertical stripes and indicate unobstructed water on all sides. They mark mid-channels or fairways and may be passed on either side. Inland Waters Obstruction Marker These are white with black vertical stripes and indicate an obstruction to navigation. You should not pass between these buoys and the nearest shore. Mooring Buoy These are white with a blue horizontal band. They usually are placed in marinas and other areas where vessels are allowed to anchor. These are the only buoys you may tie up to legally.

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NOEL DISTRIBUTING, INC. Wholesale Marine Supplies (Custom Rope Splicing) Rope, Chain, Orion Flares Canoes, Kayaks Taylor Made Products Rob or Tom Noel 6913 Norton Ave., WPB, FL 561-585-2387 Office 1-888-866-6635 Toll Free

TT’S E N BAR CARPET SERVICE www.barnettscarpetservice.com Trust an expert for your carpet service! When the job turns from difficult to worse we always try to come up with a solution! No job impossible! • Servicing Palm Beach, Martin and St. Lucie County • 33 Years in business • Turn Key Consultant will come to you • Specialize in quality not quantity • Professional Yardage Measurement • Installations: New and Used • Yachts (See References) • Wholesale Carpet, Tile & Wood • Repairs: No Job too small • Wholesale show room with the best deals

561-747-1033

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FISHING KNOTS

Stuart Stained Glass Custom Designed Artwork On Board, On Site Glass Etching Dress Up Your Cockpit Contact Jim at 772-286-0612 stuartstainedgla@bellsouth.net • www.stuartstainedglass.com

315 SW Ocean Blvd. Stuart, FL 34994 37


• U.S. Coast Guard documentation • Registration of Vessels • Assist in incorporating in the following countries: British Virgin Islands Canada Cayman Islands Marshall Islands St. Vincent & The Grenadines

Serving the Marine Industry since 1981

www.SaxtonYachtDoc.com

Member FYBA, MIA/F, Founding Member of AVDA and Past President of MIASF

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CROSSOWRD PUZZLE

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Weddings Proms Night on the Town Cruise Ship Transport Bachelor Party Clubs Sporting Events Funerals Graduations Sweet 15/Quinceaneras Corporate Transport Homecoming Concerts Birthday Parties for Kids Airport & Transport

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One Way Transfers New Born Baby Pickups Night Clubs Retirement Parties Private Tours Anniversaries Awards Buiness Meetings Casinos Conventions Dinners Engagements Out of Town Trips

Abes s Limousine e Service

www.AbesLimousineService.com 561.547.7773 • Toll Free: 888.547.7773


MARTIN COUNTY BOAT LAUNCH RAMPS Shepherd Park: South of the Roosevelt Bridge (West Ocean Blvd. & US) in Stuart. Good access to the St. Lucie River. Palm City Bridge: Facilities are located at the bridge’s west side. Good access to the Okeechobee Waterway. Sandsprit Park: St. Lucie Blvd, just east of A1A in Port Salerno. Nice ramps and facilities (children’s play area, bathrooms, freshwater hose.) Good access to the St. Lucie Inlet and St. Lucie Inlet area sandbars/islands east of the Intracoastal Waterway.

www.icwresourceguide.com

C-23 Canal at Bessie Creek (Fresh Water): From intersection of Florida Turnpike at Stuart exit and SR 714, go west on SR 714 for 2.1 miles. Turn right onto Boat Ramp Road and go 3.5 miles to ramp. Single ramp. Parking for 15 trucks. St. Lucie Canal at Phipps Park (Fresh Water): From intersection of I-95 and SR 76, go west on SR 76 for 0.6 mile to Locks Road. Turn right and go 1.2 mile to entrance to Phipps Park. Turn right into park and go 0.8 mile to ramp. Open 6 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Double ramp. Parking for 30 trucks.

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L a n d i n g L o o pT M by Gadgets Unlimited, Inc. Say good-by to banged-up knees, twisted ankles, or broken arms while docking a boat. N E V E R J U M P O F F YOUR BOAT AGAIN. JUST REAC H F O R YOUR LANDING LOOP™. This new and exciting boat docking invention can greatly reduce or eliminate costly damage to your boat and personal injuries stemming from docking a boat. Your boat mate effortlessly extends the Landing LoopTM and lays a docking line over a dock cleat, piling, or post without leaning or jumping off the boat. Use it on any size (up to 75 ft) or type of boat. When the wind is blowing off the dock, the current is strong, or the water is choppy, the Landing LoopTM will assist in bringing the boat and the dock together effortlessly and safely. With a reach of up to 11 feet, the Landing LoopTM will become your third boat mate. The Landing LoopTM will allow the captain to tie up a boat even if he or she is unable to get closer than 6-8 feet from the dock. The Landing LoopTM is used with any existing dock line. It is light weight, has no moving parts, and has a detachable frame for easy storage. The pole collapses to less than four feet. It works especially well when trying to tie to the center posts between slips. Each Landing LoopTM package includes a complete step by step instructional DVD. To order, watch a video, or get more information about the Landing LoopTM, go to www.landingloop.com or call 800-2509545. Check out Captain Al’s Blog for our exciting new products and customer testimonials.

REMEMBER: NEVER JUMP OFF YOUR BOAT AGAIN, JUST REACH FOR YOUR LANDING LOOPTM

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KEY LIME PIE RECIPE 4 egg yolks

1 egg white

Key Lime juice (more than 1/3 cup; less than 1/2 cup)

1 (9 inch) pie crust (graham craker or regular, your preference)

1 (14 oz) can condensed milk

Whipped Topping

In a glass bowl, beat egg yolks; blend in condensed milk and lime juice. Beat egg white in a separate bowl until fairly dry; blend into filling mixture. Pour into pie shell; bake in a 350-degree oven for about 15 minutes. Cool thoroughly; cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or so. Top with whipped topping before serving. Yield� 6 to 8 servings.

The grated peel from 1 lime adds to the tartness of the filling. The original key lime pie is topped with meringue, but the whipped topping is easier. Persian lime may be substituted. The lime juice, sweetened condensed milk and egg are the signature ingredients for the way a lime pie is prepared in the keys. www.icwresourceguide.com

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LIGHTNING PROTECTION GUIDE Even though the odds are in your favor that your boat may never be hit by lightning, if it happens it can have devastating effects. Don’t take a chance, protect yourself. If you are in a small boat and close to shore when a thunderstorm approaches, get in and off the water immediately. Better yet, don't go out if thunderstorms are predicted. But what if you are miles offshore and a storm pops up? Hopefully, you have prepared in advance. The voltages involved in lightning are so high that even materials that would normally be considered non-conductive become conductors, including the human body. The voltages are so massive that if they start to travel through a boat's structure - say through its mast - then meet with high resistance (for instance, the hull skin) the current discharge, in its attempt to reach ground, may simply blow a hole in the non-conductive barrier. The safety conscious Captain should make sure that his vessel is properly protected. In theory, a lightning protection system is used to create what is know as a “Faraday’s cage,” so called after the late nineteenth-century scientist Michael Faraday. The principle is to provide a surrounding, well-grounded, metal structure, in which all of parts are bonded together and carry the same electrical potential. Such a “cage” attracts and carries any lightning strike to ground much like lightning rods on buildings. You need to provide an unobstructed way for the lightning to dissipate its energy to ground (the water surrounding you). The additional benefit of a lightning protection system is that it tends to bleed off any charge build-up in the general vicinity, possibly averting a lightning strike in the first place. So how does a lightning protection system work? In a boat, the “cage” is formed by bonding together, with heavy conductors, the www.icwresourceguide.com

vessel's mast and all other major metal masses. A marine electrician must tie in the engines, stoves, air conditioning compressors, railings, arches etc. with a low resistance wire which would ultimately provide a conductive path to ground (the water) usually via the engine and propeller shaft, keel bolts, or better yet, a separate external ground plate at least 1 sq. ft. in dimension. It is important that you ensure that your crew fall within the protection of the cage,” something not always feasible when the vessel is not built of steel or aluminum. On fiberglass or wooden boats it is advantageous to have a mast or other conductive metal protrusion extending well above the vessel, creating what is known as a “cone” or zone of protection. It is generally accepted that this cone of protection extends 45 degrees, all around, from the tip of the metal protrusion. If the aluminum mast of the average sailing vessel is properly bonded to the vessel’s other major metal masses and is given a direct, low-resistance conductive path to ground, the entire boat should fall within the protected zone. If the vessel has a wooden or composite mast, a marine electrician can achieve the same effect by installing a 6 to 12 inch metal spike at the top and running a heavy conductor down the mast and as directly as possible to ground, usually through the engine and propeller shaft. Again, refer to the ABYC standards and have a professional marine electrician install your lightning protection.This is not a do-it-yourself project. 45


E AST C OAST ROUTING O PTIONS - BRIAN W H I T L E Y – SE N I O R M E T E O RO L O G I S T, W R I Captains along the US East Coast are looking to make the transit toward their winter grounds. The shortest way may be a straight line, but it may not the best option from the standpoint of time, comfort, fuel efficiency, and ultimately, the safety of the vessel and the people onboard. Here are some general guidelines: G u l f s t ream Routing: Should really only be considered in “light” weather and/or in following winds (SE-S-SW winds), and only when heading northward. The Gulfstream can be a tremendous asset in terms of saving time and fuel, with the fast north to northeast moving currents providing a nice push up the east coast. The Gulfstream gets rough when winds move in the opposite direction of the current. Winds moving opposite the flow of the current tend to “pile up” the water, resulting in high and steep seas that can develop quickly. Watch for the potential for squalls. Coastal Routing: The safest and most flexible option. If the weather is expected to be marginal, routing along the coast usually offers lower winds/seas than more offshore waters. This allows the a vessel to duck into port should conditions become too uncomfortable. Coastal routing is also a good option when there is the potential for squall activity. When heading southward along the US East Coast south of Cape Hatteras this is the way to go, keeping the vessel from fighting the against currents of the Gulfstream. I n t e rcoastal Wa t e r wa y (ICW) Routing: Cruising the ICW takes additional time and fuel and smaller vessels with lower thresholds will find the ICW most helpful. In times of heavy weather, when even coastal routing would not lower conditions to a comfortable/safe level, this is the answer. This is true for captains who are under time constraints and don’t have the option of delaying in port for better weather. It is also handy during longer voyages where only a small portion of the route involves heavy weather. One should be cautious, however, that heavier, more severe squalls can be a hindrance to travel through the ICW, due to reduced visibility and navigational concerns. Skilled, trained Meteorologists, like those at Weather Routing Inc are always mindful of these advantages/disadvantages. Safe travels to all, no matter where your plans take you.


MOVEABLE BRIDGE GUIDE

The signal to request opening of a drawbridge is one prolonged blast followed by one short blast. To contact a bridge with marine radio, use VHF 9 as a calling and working frequency. The bridge will also monitor channel 16. BE ADVISED that opening schedules may change for bridge construction, maintenance, inclement weather conditions, or special events. Please contact the District or the U.S. Coast Guard for a listing of these temporary schedule changes. Fixed bridges crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway are not listed in this guide. All fixed bridges crossing the channel of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Florida have a clearance of 65 feet above MHW except the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, which has a 56 foot clearance. Horizontal clearance between fenders at most bridges is 90 feet or greater, however, some bridges may be less. The Bridge of Lions and the Venetian Causeway have the least horizontal clearances. www.icwresourceguide.com

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PIRATE WORD SEARCH

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BOAT SAFETY CHECKLIST By using this checklist, or one fine-tuned by yourself, you’ll be sure that everything is on board and in good working order. Your passengers will appreciate knowing you're concerned about boating safety. • Float plan - let a friend or relative know when you're leaving, where you’re going, when you expect to return, what to do if you don’t, and a description of your boat • Registration certificate or documentation • Personal Flotation Devices (wearable and throw able) - USCG approved, good condition, readily accessible, assigned and fitted • Fire Extinguishers - right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible • Visual Distress Signals - current dates on flares, proper number, batteries good if lights or EPIRB • Anchors and Line - adequate anchor for bottom, adequate line for water depth • Bilge device - bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device available • Watch or clock - operable • Bright flashlight or searchlight • Navigation lights - tested and operable, spare bulbs • Batteries - fully charged, encased in plastic boxes or terminals covered, securely fastened down • Sound-producing device - horn, whistle appropriate for boat • Alternate propulsion - paddle or oar • First Aid Kit • Tools, spare outboard prop and lock nut • Compass • Sunscreen • Weather Radio

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MANATEE MARKERS M a n atees and the Law Manatees are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act of 1978. It is illegal to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, annoy or molest manatees. The state of Florida has also established regulatory speed zones to protect the manatee and its habitat. Anyone convicted of violating state law faces maximum fines of $500 and/or imprisonment of up to 60 days. Conviction for violating federal protection laws is punishable by fines up to $100,000 and/or one year in prison. W h a t C a n B o a t e r s Do? You can reduce your chances of harming a manatee by following these simple guidelines: Observe and follow all boating speed zone signs. Slow down. Reducing boat speed gives you a greater chance to avoid a manatee. You will also increase your safety margin with other boats. Remember to post a lookout.

Boa t i n g S p e e d Z o n e s To alert the boater and protect the manatee in its sanctuaries, the law provides regulatory zones on wateways. Here are typical signs found on Florida’s waterways:

Use marked channels whenever possible. Manatees have shown signs that they are avoiding heavy boat traffic areas. Channel depth reduces the likelihood of pinning or crushing manatees. Wear polarized sunglasses while operating a boat. Polarized lenses make it much easier to see objects beneath the surface and the “swirling” that occurs when a manatee dives. (The swirls look like a large “footprint” on the water’s surface or a series of half moon swirls.) Post a proper lookout while boating. A proper lookout is a person on board designated to look out for wildlife, other boaters, swimmers or obstructions when the vessel is underway. Plan for safety. www.icwresourceguide.com

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PARTS, SERVICE & SHOWROOM 33 Old Elm St., Salisbury, MA 01952 978-462-7755 • Riverfrontmarine.com

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CP300 / CP300i & CPF300i Combo 7” 800 x 480 Hi-Res Display • CP300 7" Color LCD Plotter External Antenna • CP300i 7" Color LCD Plotter Internal Antenna • CPF300i 7" GPS Fishfinder w/ Internal Antenna

CP180 / CP1800i and CPF180i Combo 5” Color TFT daylight Viewable LCD Display

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• CP180i 5" Color Plotter w/ Internal Antenna • CP180 5" Color Plotter w/ External Antenna • CPF180i 5" GPS Chartplotter Fishfinder Combo w/ Internal Antenna


NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS NATURAL R E E F S A natural reef is a raised hard surface that provides a home for encrusting creatures. Some examples of these creatures are anemones, bryozoans, hydroids and sponges. Different kinds of fish are also attracted to reefs for shelter, protection from predators and to find food. Reefs also encourage seaweed and invertebrates. Coral reefs support 25 percent of sea creatures and are one of the most fragile and threatened of the world's ecosystems. Just under a hundred country's natural reefs have been impaired by human activity. If this rate of deterioration continues, 70 % of our planet's reefs will be annihilated within 60 years. An effect of this would be the erosion of coastal shorelines which in some cases would result in the disappearance of small islands. The major threats to coral reefs are: sedimentation caused by construction, mining and farming; dynamiting fishing sites; fishing with cyanide; collecting and dredging of coral reefs; water pollution; garbage dumped into the oceans; human run off; careless recreation; global warming. ART I F I C I A L R E E F S The word "reef" usually conjures up visions of the beautiful coral reefs that can be seen in certain parts of South Florida, the Bahamas, and the Caribbean. However, coral may actually make up less than half of the material in a reef with other organisms binding the various components together as a habitat. Any submerged feature, including those made of rock or manmade materials may be referred to as a reef. Reefs are primarily a habitat for a wide variety of plants and animals. They flourish when the surrounding seawater is relatively nutrient poor, largely because they can utilize nutrients very effectively. Their species diversity is rivaled only by tropical rain forests. Reef inhabitants include many types of algae and several invertebrates, such as hard and soft corals, anemones, sponges and many species of arthropods, such as lobster, crabs and shrimp. An amazing variety of fish is also characteristic of reefs. These organisms use this unique habitat for feeding, breading and sleeping. Over the last several decades, nursery habitats for many fish and shellfish have been significantly reduced by the development of our coastal areas. The reduction of these habitats, along with increased pressures on our remaining coastal resources, has led to tremendous decline in the marine life population. This is why artificial reefs are so important. They provide food, shelter, protection and spawning areas for hundreds of species of fish and other marine organisms. But artificial reefs are not just for fish. They also provide alternate areas for SCUBA divers and fisherman to use, reducing the "user-pressures" that natural reefs endure. Almost anything placed on the ocean floor can become the hard base needed for reef development under the right conditions. Artificial reefs are manmade habitats built from various materials including rock, old ships, heavygauge steel structures, and precast concrete structures They may also be constructed of a variety of prefabricated reef modules, designed to attract certain types of fish or other marine creatures. To create a permanent reef; however, the base material must not be tossed around by wave action, or rust away. Bundles of tires and appliances are no longer used for artificial reefs because they are too light and are moved around by storms. Additionally, the area selected for placement of the artificial reef must be relatively stable and hard, thus preventing the new reef base from sinking into the sand and rendering it useless. www.icwresourceguide.com

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INDEX A b s o r b a n t M a r i n e P ro d u c t s Oil Dry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 A i r C o n d i t i o n i n g a n d M a rine Refr ige ra tion Atlantis Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Anc h o r s Suncoast Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Baits, Rig ging and Swimming on Circle Hooks Bafefoot Fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Boa t i n g C a rp e t S e rvice Barnett’s Carpet Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Boa t C l e a n e rs, Boa t i n g G reen, E nv i ro n m e n t a l ly Fr iendly Tritan Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 B o a t Doc k L a n d i n g L o o p Landing Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Boa t D o c u m e n t a t i o n Saxton Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Boa t I n s u r a n c e Serrano Insurance Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Boa t M at t resses, M at t ress To p p e r s a n d C u s t o m Sheets Portland Boat Mattress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Boat Sales, R e s t o r a t i o n a n d Vessel Tr a n s p o rt C.V.R., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Blinds & W indow Tr eat m e n t s Indian River Shutter Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bottom Cleaning and Pump-out Ultra Safety Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Business Sales, M e rge rs & Acquisitions Amerist Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 C a s i n o Pa r ty Fun Nights Casino Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Cosmetic Dentistry Advanced Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Diesel Eng ines, M a rine AC, E nv i ro Fr iendly Trac Ecological Marine Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 D i n g hy L a u n c h i n g Dinghy Dumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Dive C h a r t e rs and Div i n g C o u rses Dive In Adventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Doc k i n g a n d Anch o ri n g P roducts, Fe n d e r Accessories Fenderrods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Doc k Lines, Anc h o rs, Boat Fe n d e rs, C a n o e s & C aya k s Noel Distributing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 E n t e rtainment Systems Techno Gurus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 F i n e , M a r i n e a n d W ildlif e A r t Jason Mathias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 H a n dyman Home Re p a i r, P ro p e rt y M a n age m e n t S e rvices Sea Level Handyman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Holding Ta n k Fi l t e rs Big Orange Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Hotel and Conve n t i o n C e n t e r Hutchinson Island Marriott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Lif e R a f t s a n d S a f e t y E q u i p m e n t Winslow Life Raft Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Limousine Service Abe’s Limousine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 M a rine Accessories Unified Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 M a r i n e C h ro m e P l a t i n g , G o l s a n d M e t a l P l a t i n g Mark Plating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 M a r i n e E l e c t r onics Northern Marine Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Riverfront Marine Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 M a r i n e P ro d u c t s SEI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 M a r ine Towing Reviver Marine Towing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

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INDEX M a r ine and Yac h t C l e a n i n g, Degr e a s e r Marine Spray Nine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 M o o r i n g Pe s t S h i e l d Off Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 M a r ine Stained Glass Stuart Stained Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 M a rine Wood Fa b rica tion Ray Gavin Woodworking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 O n l i n e B o a t i n g S u p p l i e s , Boa t D e a l e r S u p p l y P a r t s Go 2 Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 O u t d o o r & U n d e r wa t e r L i g h t i n g , E n e rgy Saving, Eco Fr iendly Aurora Outdoor Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 P l a s t i c s a n d W i n d s h i e l d s , C u s t o m Fa b r i c a t i o n West Palm Beach Plastics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 R e s t a u ra n t , Doc king Shrimpers Grill & Raw Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 S t o r m S a f ety Thunderbolt International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Teak Dec ks, S u r facing and Flooring Nu Teak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Towing and Salva ge Seatow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Ve t e ri n a r i a n Best Friends Veterinarian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Waste Wa t e r Tr eat m e n t a n d S ewa ge Scienco Fast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Wa t e r Fo recast, Sea Weat h e r Weather Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Wa t e r M a ke r s, P l u m b i n g a n d E l e c t ric Murray Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Wa t e rp roof Ba gs, Cases, E l e c t ronics, P e r sonal Wa t e r S a fety Happy Swan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Yach t E q u i p m e n t a n d Pa rts Boat Owners Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

ICW Intracoastal Waterway Resource Guide

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Martin/Palm Beach Guide  

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