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IN THIS ISSUE Hurricane Preparation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Petroleum Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Bilge Oil Containment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Rip Currents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 Pirate Word Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Boating Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Fishing & Nautical Knots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 How to Boat Smart: Navigation Buoys . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 Green Boating Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Waterway Marker System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Texas Saltwater Fishing Regualtions . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-25 Nautical Party Word Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Safe Boating Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Lightning Protection Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Houston, Texas 2010-2011

ICW Publications, LLC 6001 Broken Sound Parkway, Suite 510 Boca Raton, FL 33487 877-55-ICWRG (42974)

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Publisher: Jon Jolls Graphic Design: CAC Designs, Inc.

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HURRICANE PREPARATION GUIDE Make plans early to harbor your boat There are lots of ways to protect your boat from a hurricane. Advice varies greatly, depending on the size of your vessel, availability of dock space, marina rules and local laws. That makes planning now for a hurricane all the more essential. Safeguard your car “Comprehensive� auto coverage should protect your car from damage caused by a hurricane, including flood damage. Emergency information to keep handy Here is a list of emergency phone numbers to keep handy in the event of a hurricane. Shutters are first line of defense No matter how well-constructed, a house without shutters or hurricane glass is not a smart place to stay in a storm. Without protection, windows can be smashed by flying debris. And once the wind gets inside the house, it can quickly splinter or tear off the roof. Make plans now to protect your family Your hurricane plan should be detailed and cover not just what to do now, but also what to do as the storm threatens and as it hits -- and what you should do afterward, when you could be on your own without help for weeks. Protect your pets and animals To keep your pet safe in the event of a hurricane, your choices are to keep the pet with you at home, take it with you if you evacuate, leave it with a friend or board it at a kennel. Find the safest place in your home Finding a strong refuge in your home and keeping it stocked with the right supplies can mean the difference between life and death during a hurricane. Here's how to stay safe during a storm. Go early if you plan to leave If you are absolutely determined to leave town before the hurricane comes, experts have two pieces of advice: 1. Don't do it. 2. If you still insist on leaving, do it early. Very early. Go to shelters only if there is no place else A hurricane shelter should always be considered a last option, a place to go if you can't stay at home or with a relative or friend. Finding shelter for your family Where will you go during a storm? It's a decision best made now, when you're calm, long before a storm hits. But in some cases, the choice may not be yours. Talk to kids, but don't scare them Long before the season begins, parents should begin explaining to children what hurricanes are, the dangers they pose and the safety measures to take against them. Plan for people with special needs A person with special needs is anyone who may need specialized help during or after a hurricane threat, either in or outside an evacuation zone. That can include anyone with a disability, serious illness, or the need for life-support equipment that requires electricity.

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PETROLEUM CONTROL FACT: A single gallon of fuel can contaminate over a million gallons of water. The cumulative effect of small spills has a serious impact on coastal and fresh water areas. GOAL: Reduce pollution in Florida’s surface waters and maintain a healthy and esthetically pleasing recreational environment that can be enjoyed by all boaters. ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE WHILE FUELING: • Use caution in filling your fuel tank to avoid spillage into the water. • Listen to your boat, it gurgles before your tank is full. • Use a vent collection device to capture escaping fuel. • While fueling your vessel attend the fuel nozzle at all times. • For safety, have all passengers exit the boat during gasoline fueling. • If you overfi ll your fuel tank, wipe it up with a rag. Do not hose down the fuel into the water. Give the soiled rags to your marina operator for proper disposal. • If a spill occurs, do not apply detergents or soaps. This only spreads the problem and is a violation of Federal law. • If a spill occurs in a marina, notify marina management immediately. • No smoking while fueling. • Use containment while fueling Personal Water Craft (PWC) (absorbent pad, nozzle pad or vent cover to catch overflow.

BILGE OIL CONTAINMENT ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE FOR BILGE OIL: Use drip pans with absorbent pads while draining oil from the bilges. • Keep all engines well tuned: regularly check seals, gaskets, hoses and connections for leaks and drips. Change oil filters often. • Place oil absorbent material or bioremediating bilge boom in the bilge. • Clean and maintain bilges and do not use detergents while cleaning. • Remove oil from the bilge with absorbent pads. • Before pumping bilge, use water/oil separators or absorbents to soak up oil hydrocarbons. • Trailer your boat to an area that provides containment before removing bilge or boat plugs. • Recycle or properly dispose of used oil and absorbents. Contact your local authorities or marina management for petroleum disposal regulations. Report oil pollution to the State Warning Point at 1-800-320-0519 and the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802. Find Oil Recyclers by zip code at www.recycle oil.org or call 202-682-8000.Report oil pollution to the State Warning Point at 1-800-320-0519 and the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802. Find Oil Recyclers by zip code at www.recycleoil.org or call 202-682-8000.

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RIP CURRENTS Why Rip Currents Form As waves travel from deep to shallow water, they will break near the shoreline. When waves break strongly in some locations and weakly in others, this can cause circulation cells which are seen as rip currents: narrow, fast-moving belts of water traveling offshore. Why Rip Currents are Dangerous Rip currents are the leading surf hazard for all beachgoers. They are particularly dangerous for weak or non-swimmers. Rip current speeds are typically 1-2 feet per second. However, speeds as high as 8 feet per second have been measured--this is faster than an Olympic swimmer can sprint! Thus, rip currents can sweep even the strongest swimmer out to sea. Over 100 drownings due to rip currents occur every year in the United States. More than 80% of water rescues on surf beaches are due to rip currents. Rip currents can occur at any surf beach with breaking waves, including the Great Lakes. When Rip Currents Form Rip currents can be found on many surf beaches every day. Under most tide and sea conditions the speeds are relatively slow. However, under certain wave, tide, and beach profile conditions the speeds can quickly increase to become dangerous to anyone entering the surf. The strength and speed of a rip current will likely increase as wave height and wave period increase. They are most likely to be dangerous during high surf conditions as the wave height and wave period increase. Where Rip Currents Form Rip currents most typically form at low spots or breaks in sandbars, and also near structures such as groins, jetties and piers. Rip currents can be very narrow or extend in widths to hundreds of yards. The seaward pull of rip currents varies: sometimes the rip current ends just beyond the line of breaking waves, but sometimes rip currents continue to push hundreds of yards offshore. How to Identify Rip Currents Look for any of these clues: A channel of churning, choppy water, an area having a notable difference in water color, a line of foam, seaweed, or debris moving steadily seaward, a break in the incoming wave pattern. None, one, or more of the above clues may indicate the presence of rip currents. Rip currents are often not readily or easily identifiable to the average beachgoer. For your safety, be aware of this major surf zone hazard. Polarized sunglasses make it easier to see the rip current clues provided above. How to Avoid and Survive Rip Currents Learn how to swim and never swim alone. Be cautious at all times, especially when swimming at unguarded beaches. If in doubt, don’t go out! Whenever possible, swim at a lifeguard protected beach. Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards. 10


RIP CURRENTS If caught in a rip current, remain calm to conserve energy and think clearly. Don’t fight the current. Swim out of the current in a direction following the shoreline. When out of the current, swim towards shore. If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, float or calmly tread water. When out of the current, swim towards shore. If you are still unable to reach shore, draw attention to yourself: face the shore, wave your arms, and yell for help. If you see someone in trouble, get help from a lifeguard. If a lifeguard is not available, have someone call 9-1-1. Throw the rip current victim something that floats and yell instructions on how to escape. Remember, many people drown while trying to save someone else from a rip current. Rip Current Myth A rip current is a horizontal current. Rip currents do not pull people under the water–-they pull people away from shore. Drowning deaths occur when people pulled offshore are unable to keep themselves afloat and swim to shore. This may be due to any combination of fear, panic, exhaustion, or lack of swimming skills.

PIRATE WORD SEARCH

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BOATING TERMINOLOGY

All across the country, boating is growing in popularity as people discover the fun and enjoyment that this recreational pastime offers. Although boating provides hours of enjoyment, it can also be very dangerous if the participants are not aware of the safety factors that must be considered. It is the intent of this curriculum to lay out the basics that must be considered in order to make your boating experience a pleasant one.

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FISHING AND NAUTICAL KNOTS

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS Buoys and markers are the "traffic signals" that guide vessel operators safely along some waterways. They also identify dangerous or controlled areas and give directions and information. As a recreational boat or PWC operator, you will need to know the lateral navigation markers and non-lateral markers of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System. LATERAL MARKERS These navigation aids mark the edges of safe water areas; for example, directing travel within a channel. The markers use a combination of colors and numbers, which may appear on either buoys or permanently placed markers. Colors and Numbers The colors and numbers have the same meaning regardless of the kind of buoy or marker on which they appear. Buoy and Marker Color and Number Descriptions Red Colors, Red Lights, and Even Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Green Colors, Green Lights, and Odd Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Red and Green Colors and/or Lights: These are placed at the junction of two channels to indicate the preferred (primary) channel when a channel splits. If green is on top, the preferred channel is to the right. If red is on top, the preferred channel is to the left. These also are sometimes referred to as "junction buoys." Buoy Shape Descriptions Nun Buoys: These cone-shaped buoys are always marked with red markings and even numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream. Can Buoys: These cylindrical-shaped buoys are always marked with green markings and odd numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream. Other Kinds of Buoys and Markers Lighted Buoys: These buoys use the lateral marker shapes, colors, and numbers discussed above. In addition, they have a matching colored light. Daymarks: These are permanently placed signs attached to structures, such as posts, in the water. Common daymarks are red triangles (equivalent to nuns) and green squares (equivalent to cans). These may be lighted also.

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS NON-LATERAL MARKERS Non-lateral markers are navigation aids that give information other than the edges of safe water areas. The most common are regulatory markers that are white and use orange markings and black lettering. These markers are found on lakes and rivers and are used to: Give Directions and Information. • Warn of hazards and obstructions. • Mark controlled areas. • Mark exclusion (closed) areas. • Descriptions of Non-Lateral Markers Information Squares provide information such as places to find food, supplies, and repairs; and they give directions, distances, and other non-regulatory information. Danger Area Diamonds warn of dangers such as rocks, shoals, construction, dams, or stumps. Always proceed with caution and keep a safe distance. Never assume that every hazard will be marked by a buoy. Controlled Area Circles indicate a controlled area such as no wake, idle speed, speed limit, or ski zone. Exclusion Area Crossed diamonds indicate areas off-limits to all vessels such as swimming areas, dams, and spillways. Safe Water Marker These are white with red vertical stripes and indicate unobstructed water on all sides. They mark mid-channels or fairways and may be passed on either side. Inland Waters Obstruction Marker These are white with black vertical stripes and indicate an obstruction to navigation. You should not pass between these buoys and the nearest shore. Mooring Buoy These are white with a blue horizontal band. They usually are placed in marinas and other areas where vessels are allowed to anchor. These are the only buoys you may tie up to legally.

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GREEN BOATING TIPS Looking for ways to be more eco-friendly when you're out on the water? Following are tips and information that will help you minimize your impact on the environment while maximizing the efficiency and performance of your boat. 1. Choose Green Products: Look for the 7. Prevent Fuel Spills: Use or install a EPA-certified “Design for the Environdevice to prevent overboard discharges ment” DfE label, which assures you that the from your tank vent. Benefit: Save gas and product has minimal environmental impact reduce water pollution and is safer for the person using it. Benefit: 8. Use an autopilot: Modern autopilots Safer products. Reduce water pollution. can steer better than most helmspersons— 2. Use The Right Prop: Use a prop with the and they don’t have a limited attention right pitch so your engine reaches its span. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption designed wide-open-throttle RPM. An 9. Recycle Your Monofilament Fishing adjustable-pitch propellerallows you to dial Line: If your harbor doesn’t have a recyin the optimum pitch angle in single degrees. cling location, see the website fishingModular props, let you swap props while linerecycling.org. keeping the same hub. Benefit: Reduce fuel 10. Eat Responsibly Harvested Seafood: consumption, improve performance. Choose sustainable seafood at a restau3. Don’t Push Water: Install and use trim rants or grocery stores to ensure that the tabs or hydrofoils. Most planing powerfish stocks are plentiful for your children boats can improve hole-shot acceleration and for generations to come. or reduce fuel consumption with properly adjusted trim tabs and hydrofoils. Keeping on a plane at lower engine RPMs can extend your range and reduce your time on passages. Benefit: Improve boat performance & save gas. 4. Keep The Bilge Clean: Avoid the accidental discharge of oily water by using a sorbent in each bilge area. Consider a bioremediation product designed to convert hydrocarbons into safe compounds Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution 5. Retire That 2-Stroke Outboard: Although it may be possible to get a few more years out of your old-technology outboard, you’ll be much happier with the reduced noise, fumes, fuel consumption, and pollution of a modern injected fourstroke outboard. For an even quieter ride, try an electric outboard. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution. 6. Recycle your Lead-Acid Batteries: 12V batteries are among the most recycled products in the world. Benefit: Save money and conserve resources. *Amount varies by state.

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WATERWAY MARKER SYSTEM

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TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS Texas State Waters - Federal Waters Texas recreational and commercial fishermen fishing more than nine (9) nautical miles off the coast of Texas are in federal waters and are subject to rules and regulations that may differ from those in state waters. An example would be the federal requirement to use non-stainless circle hooks when fishing for reef fish. Recreational anglers must have a Texas fishing license and saltwater endorsement to bring any fish taken in federal waters ashore in Texas. To ensure that you are in compliance with federal regulations, you should contact the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council at (888) 833-1844 (toll free) or visit their website The limits and restrictions in this guide apply to aquatic life caught in the public waters of Texas out to nine (9) nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico, and also apply to aquatic life caught between 9 and 200 nautical miles in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and landed in this state. (Federal law also regulates species between 9 and 200 nautical miles managed under a Federal Fishery Management Plan.) Bag and Length Limits for Saltwater Fish Daily bag is the quantity of a species of a wildlife resource that may be taken in one day. Possession limit is twice the daily bag on game and nongame fish, except as provided in this guide. Possession limit does not apply to wildlife resources in the possession of or stored by a person at their permanent residence. There are no bag, possession, or length limits on game or nongame fish, except as listed in this guide.


TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS a Black Drum: No more than one black drum over 52 inches may be retained per person per day and counts as part of the daily bag and possession limit. b Red drum special regulation: During a license year, one red drum over the stated maximum length limit may be retained when affixed with a properly completed Red Drum Tag and one red drum over the stated maximum length limit may be retained when affixed with a properly completed Bonus Red Drum Tag. Any fish retained under authority of a Red Drum Tag or a Bonus Red Drum Tag may be retained in addition to the daily bag and possession limit as stated in this section. c Flounder special regulation: Daily bag is 5 fish except for the period Nov. 1-30 when the daily bag is 2 fish and flounder may be taken only by pole and line. Possession limit is equal to the daily bag.. d Mullet: May not take from public waters, or possess on board a boat, mullet over 12 inches during October, November, December, and January. No limits apply during other months. e Spotted Seatrout: Special Regulation: For the Lower Laguna Madre, the daily bag limit and the possession limit shall be 5 fish in all inside waters south of marker 21 located inside the area known as the Land Cut. Inside waters are all bays, inlets, outlets, passes, rivers, streams, and other bodies of water landward from the shoreline of the state along the Gulf of Mexico and contiguous to, or connected with, but not a part of, the Gulf of Mexico and within which the tide regularly rises and falls. f Spotted Seatrout: No more than one spotted seatrout over the stated maximum length may be retained per person per day and counts as part of the daily bag and possession limit. g Special Regulation: the daily bag limit is 1 fish for all allowable shark species INCLUDING Atlantic sharpnose, blacktip, and bonnethead. h Prohibited shark species: Atlantic angel, Basking Bigeye sand tiger, Bigeye sixgill, Bigeye thresher, Bignose, Caribbean reef, Caribbean sharpnose, Dusky, Galapagos, Longfin mako, Narrowtooth, Night, Sandbar, Sand tiger, Sevengill, Silky, Sixgill, Smalltail, Whale, and White. i Special Regulation: Red snapper may be taken using pole and line, but it is unlawful to use any kind of hook other than a circle hook.

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SAFE BOATING CHECKLIST • Float plan - let a friend know when you're leaving, where you're going, when you expect to return, what to do if you don't, and a description of your boat • Charts of the area and compasses • Registration certificate or documentation • Personal Flotation Devices (wearable and throwable) - cg approved, good condition, readily accessible, assigned and fitted • Fire Extinguishers - right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible • Visual Distress Signals - current dates on pyros, proper number, batteries good if lights or epirb • Anchors and Line - adequate anchor for bottom, adequate line for water depth • DeWatering device - bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device available • Watch or clock - operable • Boarding ladder (or other means of boarding) • Heaving lines - at least 30 feet with monkey fist • Mooring lines - bow, stern, and spring lines, preferably three-stranded nylon with an eye in one end and of adequate length for your boat and mooring conditions • Bright flashlight or searchlight • Navigation lights - tested and operable, spare bulbs • Batteries - fully charged, encased in plastic boxes or terminals covered, securely fastened down • Sound producing device - horn, whistle appropriate for boat • Alternate propulsion - paddle or oar • Boat hook(s) • FCC license - if VHF radio, radar, epirb or other transmitter aboard and you plan to enter a foreign country • Oil discharge and trash placards affixed - if required by boat size • Bell - if required by boat size • First Aid Kit • Gauges - functional and reading properly • Ventilation - power ventilation operable (blower) and natural ventilations cowls open and clear • Tools and spare parts • Depth sounder, lead line, or sounding pole • Compass • Copy of Colregs (NavRules) - if required by boat size • Spare propeller and lock nut • Sunscreen and sunhat • Extra clothing...wool sweater, gloves, socks and other articles for warming if temperature drops or someone gets wet • Binoculars • AM radio...static on AM forewarns of nearby lightning • Drinking water • Personal needs like prescription drugs

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LIGHTNING PROTECTION GUIDE Even though the odds are in your favor that your boat may never be hit by lightning, if it happens it can have devastating effects. Don’t take a chance, protect yourself. If you are in a small boat and close to shore when a thunderstorm approaches, get in and off the water immediately. Better yet, don't go out if thunderstorms are predicted. But what if you are miles offshore and a storm pops up? Hopefully, you have prepared in advance. The voltages involved in lightning are so high that even materials that would normally be considered non-conductive become conductors, including the human body. The voltages are so massive that if they start to travel through a boat's structure - say through its mast - then meet with high resistance (for instance, the hull skin) the current discharge, in its attempt to reach ground, may simply blow a hole in the non-conductive barrier. The safety conscious Captain should make sure that his vessel is properly protected. In theory, a lightning protection system is used to create what is know as a “Faraday’s cage,” so called after the late nineteenth-century scientist Michael Faraday. The principle is to provide a surrounding, well-grounded, metal structure, in which all of parts are bonded together and carry the same electrical potential. Such a “cage” attracts and carries any lightning strike to ground much like lightning rods on buildings. You need to provide an unobstructed way for the lightning to dissipate its energy to ground (the water surrounding you). The additional benefit of a lightning protection system is that it tends to bleed off any charge build-up in the general vicinity, possibly averting a lightning strike in the first place. So how does a lightning protection system work? In a boat, the “cage” is formed by bonding together, with heavy conductors, the

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vessel's mast and all other major metal masses. A marine electrician must tie in the engines, stoves, air conditioning compressors, railings, arches etc. with a low resistance wire which would ultimately provide a conductive path to ground (the water) usually via the engine and propeller shaft, keel bolts, or better yet, a separate external ground plate at least 1 sq. ft. in dimension. It is important that you ensure that your crew fall within the protection of the cage,” something not always feasible when the vessel is not built of steel or aluminum. On fiberglass or wooden boats it is advantageous to have a mast or other conductive metal protrusion extending well above the vessel, creating what is known as a “cone” or zone of protection. It is generally accepted that this cone of protection extends 45 degrees, all around, from the tip of the metal protrusion. If the aluminum mast of the average sailing vessel is properly bonded to the vessel’s other major metal masses and is given a direct, low-resistance conductive path to ground, the entire boat should fall within the protected zone. If the vessel has a wooden or composite mast, a marine electrician can achieve the same effect by installing a 6 to 12 inch metal spike at the top and running a heavy conductor down the mast and as directly as possible to ground, usually through the engine and propeller shaft. Again, refer to the ABYC standards and have a professional marine electrician install your lightning protection.This is not a do-it-yourself project. 29


INDEX Alaska Fishing Destination, Wing Shooting, Big Game Hunting, Wildlife Viewing All Alaska Outdoors Lodge ................................................................................. 8 & 9 Boat Lifts and Docks EXCELL Boat Lifts, Inc. ............................................................................................ 2 Boat Lifts, Boat Docks, Boat Houses and Bulkheads Dockside Boat Lifts, Inc. .......................................................................................... 20 Boat Lifts, Dock Products and Pier Products Boat Hoist ................................................................................................................. 28 Boat Ownership Alternative Carefree Boat Club ................................................................................................... 22 Bow and Stern Thrusters, Stabilizers, Swim Platforms S.W.A.T. Marine, Inc. ............................................................................................... 12 Dock Building Materials & Accessories Dock Floats, Ltd........................................................................................................ 16 Fiberglass Swim Platforms Swim Platforms ............................................................................................... 28 & 30 Maritime Law, Business Litigations, Personal Injury and Product Liability Collings LawFirm, PLLC ............................................................................... 27 & 28 Marine Insurance, Boats and Marinas Mobile Marine Insurance .......................................................................................... 26 Marine Products On-Line Carsey Marine.com ................................................................................................... 26 Outdoor and Underwater Lighting, Energy Saving, Eco-friendly Aurora Lighting ................................................................................................ 14 & 15 Precision Bearings for Fishing Reels Boca Bearings ........................................................................................................... 21 Satellite Phones, Electric Outboard Motors Gardline Communications, Inc. .................................................................................. 4 Shrinkwrap Protection Pro-Tect Plastics & Supply, Inc......................................................................... 6 & 30

PRO-TECT Plastics & Supply, Inc. 30

America’s Shrink Wrap Store (800) 889-WRAP www.shrinkwrapboats.com

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