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IN THIS ISSUE Natural and Artificial Reefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Rip Currents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9 History of Intracoastal Waterway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Recreational Saltwater Fishing Regulations . . . . . . 13-19 Hurricane Preparation Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Green Boating Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-25 Nautical & Fishing Knots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 How to Boat Smart: Navigation Bouys . . . . . . . . . . 31-33 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Things to do in South Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Key Lime Pie Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Lightning Protection Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Crossword Puzzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Fish Word Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Boat Safety Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Manatee Markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Petroleum Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Bilge Oil Containment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-62

Ft. Lauderdale Boat Show Northeast Office ICW Publications 716 Centre of New England Blvd. Coventry, RI 02888

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Southeast Office ICW Publications 4781 N. Congress Ave. Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Publisher: Jon Jolls Graphic Design: CAC Designs, Inc.

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NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL REEFS NATURAL REEFS A natural reef is a raised hard surface that provides a home for encrusting creatures. Some examples of these creatures are anemones, bryozoans, hydroids and sponges. Different kinds of fish are also attracted to reefs for shelter, protection from predators and to find food. Reefs also encourage seaweed and invertebrates. Coral reefs support 25 percent of sea creatures and are one of the most fragile and threatened of the world's ecosystems. Just under a hundred country's natural reefs have been impaired by human activity. If this rate of deterioration continues, 70 % of our planet's reefs will be annihilated within 60 years. An effect of this would be the erosion of coastal shorelines which in some cases would result in the disappearance of small islands. The major threats to coral reefs are: sedimentation caused by construction, mining and farming; dynamiting fishing sites; fishing with cyanide; collecting and dredging of coral reefs; water pollution; garbage dumped into the oceans; human run off; careless recreation; global warming. ARTIFICIAL REEFS The word "reef" usually conjures up visions of the beautiful coral reefs that can be seen in certain parts of South Florida, the Bahamas, and the Caribbean. However, coral may actually make up less than half of the material in a reef with other organisms binding the various components together as a habitat. Any submerged feature, including those made of rock or manmade materials may be referred to as a reef. Reefs are primarily a habitat for a wide variety of plants and animals. They flourish when the surrounding seawater is relatively nutrient poor, largely because they can utilize nutrients very effectively. Their species diversity is rivaled only by tropical rain forests. Reef inhabitants include many types of algae and several invertebrates, such as hard and soft corals, anemones, sponges and many species of arthropods, such as lobster, crabs and shrimp. An amazing variety of fish is also characteristic of reefs. These organisms use this unique habitat for feeding, breading and sleeping. Over the last several decades, nursery habitats for many fish and shellfish have been significantly reduced by the development of our coastal areas. The reduction of these habitats, along with increased pressures on our remaining coastal resources, has led to tremendous decline in the marine life population. This is why artificial reefs are so important. They provide food, shelter, protection and spawning areas for hundreds of species of fish and other marine organisms. But artificial reefs are not just for fish. They also provide alternate areas for SCUBA divers and fisherman to use, reducing the "user-pressures" that natural reefs endure. Almost anything placed on the ocean floor can become the hard base needed for reef development under the right conditions. Artificial reefs are manmade habitats built from various materials including rock, old ships, heavy-gauge steel structures, and precast concrete structures They may also be constructed of a variety of prefabricated reef modules, designed to attract certain types of fish or other marine creatures. To create a permanent reef; however, the base material must not be tossed around by wave action, or rust away. Bundles of tires and appliances are no longer used for artificial reefs because they are too light and are moved around by storms. Additionally, the area selected for placement of the artificial reef must be relatively stable and hard, thus preventing the new reef base from sinking into the sand and rendering it useless. www.icwresourceguide.com

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RIP CURRENTS Why Rip Currents Form As waves travel from deep to shallow water, they will break near the shoreline. When waves break strongly in some locations and weakly in others, this can cause circulation cells which are seen as rip currents: narrow, fast-moving belts of water traveling offshore. (more info) Why Rip Currents are Dangerous Rip currents are the leading surf hazard for all beachgoers. They are particularly dangerous for weak or non-swimmers. Rip current speeds are typically 1-2 feet per second. However, speeds as high as 8 feet per second have been measured--this is faster than an Olympic swimmer can sprint! Thus, rip currents can sweep even the strongest swimmer out to sea. Over 100 drownings due to rip currents occur every year in the United States. More than 80% of water rescues on surf beaches are due to rip currents. Rip currents can occur at any surf beach with breaking waves, including the Great Lakes. When Rip Currents Form Rip currents can be found on many surf beaches every day. Under most tide and sea conditions the speeds are relatively slow. However, under certain wave, tide, and beach profile conditions the speeds can quickly increase to become dangerous to anyone entering the surf. The strength and speed of a rip current will likely increase as wave height and wave period increase. They are most likely to be dang erous dur ing high surf conditions as the wave height and wave per iod increase . Where Rip Currents Form Rip currents most typically form at low spots or breaks in sandbars, and also near structures such as groins, jetties and piers. Rip currents can be very narrow or extend in widths to hundreds of yards. The seaward pull of rip currents varies: sometimes the rip current ends just beyond the line of breaking waves, but sometimes rip currents continue to push hundreds of yards offshore. How to Identify Rip Currents Look for an y of these clues: a channel of churning, choppy water an area having a notable difference in water color a line of foam, seaweed, or debris moving steadily seaward a break in the incoming wave pattern www.icwresourceguide.com

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RIP CURRENTS None, one, or more of the above clues may indicate the presence of rip currents. Rip currents are often not readily or easily identifiable to the average beachgoer. For your safety, be aware of this major surf zone hazard. Polarized sunglasses make it easier to see the rip current clues provided above. How to Avoid and Survive Rip Currents Learn how to swim! Never swim alone. Be cautious at all times, especially when swimming at unguarded beaches. If in doubt, don’t go out! Whenever possible, swim at a lifeguard protected beach. Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards. If caught in a rip current, remain calm to conserve energy and think clearly. Don’t fight the current. Swim out of the current in a direction following the shoreline. When out of the current, swim towards shore. If you are unable to swim out of the rip current, float or calmly tread water. When out of the current, swim towards shore. If you are still unable to reach shore, draw attention to yourself: face the shore, wave your arms, and yell for help. If you see someone in trouble, get help from a lifeguard. If a lifeguard is not available, have someone call 9-1-1 . Throw the rip current victim something that floats and yell instructions on how to escape. Remember, many people drown while trying to save someone else from a rip current.

Rip Current Myth A rip current is a horizontal current. Rip currents do not pull people under the water–they pull people away from shore. Drowning deaths occur when people pulled offshore are unable to keep themselves afloat and swim to shore. This may be due to any combination of fear, panic, exhaustion, or lack of swimming skills. In some regions rip currents are referred to by other, incorrect terms such as rip tides and undertow. We encourage exclusive use of the correct term – rip currents. Use of other terms may confuse people and negatively impact public education efforts.

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HISTORY OF THE INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. Some lengths consist of natural inlets, salt-water rivers, bays, and sounds; others are man-made canals. The waterway runs for most of the length of the Eastern Seaboard, from its unofficial northern terminus at the Manasquan River in New Jersey, where it connects with the Atlantic Ocean at the Manasquan Inlet, to Brownsville, Texas. The waterway is toll-free, but commercial users pay a fuel tax that is used to maintain and improve it. The ICW is a significant portion of the Great Loop, a circumnavigation route encircling the Eastern half of the North American continent. The creation of the Intracoastal Waterway was authorized by the United States Congress in 1919. It is maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Federal law provides for the waterway to be maintained at a minimum depth of 12 ft (4 m) for most of its length, but inadequate funding has prevented that. Consequently, shoaling or shallow water are problems along several sections of the waterway; some parts have 7-ft (2.1-m) and 9-ft (2.7-m) minimum depths. The waterway consists of two non-contiguous segments: the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, extending from Brownsville, Texas to Carrabelle, Florida, and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, extending from Key West, Florida to Norfolk, Virginia (milepost 0.0). The two segments were originally intended to be connected via the Cross Florida Barge Canal across northern Florida, but this was never completed due to environmental concerns. Additional canals and bays extend a navigable waterway to Boston, Massachusetts. The Intracoastal Waterway has a good deal of commercial activity; barges haul petroleum, petroleum products, foodstuffs, building materials, and manufactured goods. It is also used extensively by recreational boaters. On the east coast, some of the traffic in fall and spring is by snowbirds who regularly move south in winter and north in summer. The waterway is also used when the ocean is too rough to travel on. Numerous inlets connect the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico with the Intracoastal Waterway. Taken from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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RECREATIONAL SALTWATER FISHING REGULATIONS

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HURRICANE PREPARATION GUIDE Make plans early to harbor your boat There are lots of ways to protect your boat from a hurricane. Advice varies greatly, depending on the size of your vessel, availability of dock space, marina rules and local laws. That makes planning now for a hurricane all the more essential. Safeguard your car “Comprehensive� auto coverage should protect your car from damage caused by a hurricane, including flood damage. Emergency information to keep handy Here is a list of emergency phone numbers to keep handy in the event of a hurricane. Shutters are first line of defense No matter how well-constructed, a house without shutters or hurricane glass is not a smart place to stay in a storm. Without protection, windows can be smashed by flying debris. And once the wind gets inside the house, it can quickly splinter or tear off the roof. Make plans now to protect your family Your hurricane plan should be detailed and cover not just what to do now, but also what to do as the storm threatens and as it hits -- and what you should do afterward, when you could be on your own without help for weeks. Protect your pets and animals To keep your pet safe in the event of a hurricane, your choices are to keep the pet with you at home, take it with you if you evacuate, leave it with a friend or board it at a kennel. Find the safest place in your home Finding a strong refuge in your home and keeping it stocked with the right supplies can mean the difference between life and death during a hurricane. Here's how to stay safe during a storm. Go early if you plan to leave If you are absolutely determined to leave town before the hurricane comes, experts have two pieces of advice: 1. Don't do it. 2. If you still insist on leaving, do it early. Very early. Go to shelters only if there is no place else A hurricane shelter should always be considered a last option, a place to go if you can't stay at home or with a relative or friend. Finding shelter for your family Where will you go during a storm? It's a decision best made now, when you're calm, long before a storm hits. But in some cases, the choice may not be yours. Talk to kids, but don't scare them Long before the season begins, parents should begin explaining to children what hurricanes are, the dangers they pose and the safety measures to take against them. Plan for people with special needs A person with special needs is anyone who may need specialized help during or after a hurricane threat, either in or outside an evacuation zone. That can include anyone with a disability, serious illness, or the need for life-support equipment that requires electricity. www.icwresourceguide.com

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GREEN BOATING TIPS Looking for ways to be more eco-friendly when you're out on the water? Following are tips and information that will help you minimize your impact on the environment while maximizing the efficiency and performance of your boat. 1. Choose Green Products: Look for the EPA-certified “Design for the Environment” DfE label, which assures you that the product has minimal environmental impact and is safer for the person using it. Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution.

ogy outboard, you’ll be much happier with the reduced noise, fumes, fuel consumption, and pollution of a modern injected four-stroke outboard. For an even quieter ride, try an electric outboard. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution.

2. Use The Right Prop: Use a prop with the right pitch so your engine reaches its designed wide-open-throttle RPM. An adjustable-pitch propellerallows you to dial in the optimum pitch angle in single degrees. Modular props, let you swap props while keeping the same hub. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption, improve performance.

6. Recycle your Lead-Acid Ba tter ies: 12V batteries are among the most recycled products in the world. Benefit: Save money and conserve resources. *Amount varies by state.

3. Don’t Push Water: Install and use trim tabs or hydrofoils. Most planing powerboats can improve hole-shot acceleration or reduce fuel consumption with properly adjusted trim tabs and hydrofoils. Keeping on a plane at lower engine RPMs can extend your range and reduce your time on passages. Benefit: Improve boat performance & save gas.

8. Use an autopilot: Modern autopilots can steer better than most helmspersons—and they don’t have a limited attention span. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption

4. Kee p The Bilg e Clean: Avoid the accidental discharge of oily water by using a sorbent in each bilge area. Consider a bioremediation product designed to convert hydrocarbons into safe compounds Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution

7. Prevent Fuel Spills: Use or install a device to prevent overboard discharges from your tank vent. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution

9. Recycle Your Monofilament Fishing Line: If your harbor doesn’t have a recycling location, see the website fishinglinerecycling.org. 10. Eat Responsibly Harvested Seafood: Choose sustainable seafood at a restaurants or grocery stores to ensure that the fish stocks are plentiful for your children and for generations to come.

5. Retire Tha t 2-Stroke Outboard: Although it may be possible to get a few more years out of your old-technolwww.icwresourceguide.com

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GREEN BOATING TIPS TIPS FOR REDUCING FUEL USAGE Slower speeds on the water will reduce fuel usage. Proper use of trim tabs reduce drag, especially while accelerating up to planing speeds. Minimize the amount of time that you idle at the dock Minimize the use of onboard generators. Use dock-side electrical power in lieu of generators. Have a float plan so you know exactly where you’re going. Make sure the hull is clean. Don’t under-power your boat. It’s important you have enough motor to handle the load. Check your propeller. If your boat is slow "out of the hole" or lacks top-end speed, you might have the wrong propeller. A well-tuned engine uses less fuel. Use the grade of gasoline specified by the engine manufacturer.

BOATING ACCESSORIES GO GREEN Environmentally-Friendl y Cleaning Products Many marine cleaning products developed today demonstrate a commitment to clean water. Companies have developed non-toxic based biodegradable boat soaps, which have a minimal impact on the aquatic environment. We've also seen the introduction of color safe, oxygen release gels and cleansers that remove spots off of boats without using bleach or other hazardous materials. Environmentally-F riendly Mar ine Aftermarket Accessories Innovative companies in our industry have developed ways to extend the life of batteries in harsh marine environments. Some products are designed to reduce premature battery failure caused by periods of inactivity. These systems utilize the power of the battery and return it as a surge or pulse. These products can also revive many older batteries back to their original state. Improvements in Marine Sanitation Since the passage of the Clean Vessel Act in 1992 marine sanitation has seen remarkable improvements. Marine sanitation manufacturers are providing consumers with new products to protect the marine environment from boat sewage. Manufacturers have developed and marketed innovative technologies that treat, store and contain waste more effectively.

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NAUTICAL & FISHING KNOTS

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS Buoys and markers are the "traffic signals" that guide vessel operators safely along some waterways. They also identify dangerous or controlled areas and give directions and information. As a recreational boat or PWC operator, you will need to know the lateral navigation markers and non-lateral markers of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System. LATERAL MARKERS These navigation aids mark the edges of safe water areas; for example, directing travel within a channel. The markers use a combination of colors and numbers, which may appear on either buoys or permanently placed markers. Colors and Number s The colors and numbers have the same meaning regardless of the kind of buoy or marker on which they appear. Buo y and Mar ker Color and Number Descriptions Red Colors, Red Lights, and Even Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream.

Green Colors, Green Lights, and Odd Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Red and Green Colors and/or Lights: These are placed at the junction of two channels to indicate the preferred (primary) channel when a channel splits. If green is on top, the preferred channel is to the right. If red is on top, the preferred channel is to the left. These also are sometimes referred to as "junction buoys." Buoy Shape Descr iptions Nun Buoys: These cone-shaped buoys are always marked with red markings and even numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream.

Can Buoys: These cylindrical-shaped buoys are always marked with green markings and odd numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream. Other Kinds of Buo ys and Markers Lighted Buoys: These buoys use the lateral marker shapes, colors, and numbers discussed above. In addition, they have a matching colored light.

Daymarks: These are permanently placed signs attached to structures, such as posts, in the water. Common daymarks are red triangles (equivalent to nuns) and green squares (equivalent to cans). These may be lighted also.

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: NAVIGATION BUOYS NON-LATERAL MARKERS Non-lateral markers are navigation aids that give information other than the edges of safe water areas. The most common are regulatory markers that are white and use orange markings and black lettering. These markers are found on lakes and rivers and are used to:

Give Directions and Information. • Warn of hazards and obstructions. • Mark controlled areas. • Mark exclusion (closed) areas. • Descriptions of Non-Lateral Markers Information Squares provide information such as places to find food, supplies, and repairs; and they give directions, distances, and other non-regulatory information. Danger Area Diamonds warn of dangers such as rocks, shoals, construction, dams, or stumps. Always proceed with caution and keep a safe distance. Never assume that every hazard will be marked by a buoy. Controlled Area Circles indicate a controlled area such as no wake, idle speed, speed limit, or ski zone. Exclusion Area Crossed diamonds indicate areas off-limits to all vessels such as swimming areas, dams, and spillways. Safe Water Marker These are white with red vertical stripes and indicate unobstructed water on all sides. They mark mid-channels or fairways and may be passed on either side. Inland Waters Obstruction Marker These are white with black vertical stripes and indicate an obstruction to navigation. You should not pass between these buoys and the nearest shore. Mooring Buoy These are white with a blue horizontal band. They usually are placed in marinas and other areas where vessels are allowed to anchor. These are the only buoys you may tie up to legally.

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THINGS TO DO IN SOUTH FLORIDA Butterfly World - Amidst thousands of flowers, tropical plants, waterfalls, gardens, and classical music, Butterfly World is a unique, breathtaking site that is one of Florida’s leading tourist attractions. IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum - The IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame’s Museum captures the thrill, beauty and universal appeal of recreational fishing. This new 60,000-sq.ft. building houses 7 galleries, a 4-acre wetland, a virtual reality fishing experience, marina, and a 12,000-book Library of Fishes. Plus the remarkable film “Journeys.” Deer ing Esta te a t Cutler - The 420-acre Deering Estate at Cutler is a center for education and recreation. The Estate offers informative tours of lush natural areas where fossil bones have been found from as far back as 50,000 years, and of some of South Florida's earliest buildings dating from 1896. Gatorpark - Narrated tours with professional guides let you experience the unique natural beauty of the Everglades. See alligator nests, an Indian fish camp and observe wildlife in their natural habitat. Miami Seaquarium - Home of Lolita the Killer Whale and TV Superstar Flipper. See 100 species of sea life, endangered Florida manatees and sea turtles. Monkey Jungle - Escape on a jungle safari. Explore the wilds of South America and Asia. Witness crab-eating monkeys diving for treats. Delve into the lush, tropical Amazonian Rainforest filled with hundreds of exotic monkeys. Enjoy the antics at the Orangutans' Asiatic Ape Exhibit. Parrot Jungle - Parrot Jungle and Gardens, is a world famous bird sanctuary, wildlife habitat and botanical garden. Today, Parrot Jungle is a lush botanical wonderland and home to over 1,100 birds and other animals. Museum of Discovery and Science - The museum features 85,000 square feet of interactive www.icwresourceguide.com

hands-on exhibits. You can also see the world's largest living captive Atlantic coral reef on public display. The museum is also home to the Blockbuster IMAX Theater. Coral Castle - Coral Castle is considered a National Historic Site which has been featured numerous times on TV. Created by Latvian Ed Leedskalnin in 1923, it features a nine-ton gate and one-of-a-kind sundial. Everglades Alligator Farm - South Florida’s oldest alligator farm, at the entrance of Everglades National Park, contains more than 3,000 alligators. Airboat tours offered. Broward Center for the Performing Arts Broward County's Center for the Performing Arts is a comprehensive regional arts & entertainment facility which presents a complete range of entertainment including Broadway musicals, plays, dance, drama, symphony and opera, blues, jazz, film, lecture, pop concerts, comedy, children’s theater, and more. Historical Museum of Southern Florida - Ten thousand years ago, humans first wandered into South Florida. Since then, the region has become a fascinating place, attracting visitors and residents from near and far. Discover why here. Water Taxi - Leave your boat at the dock and let us take you around! Your ticket lets you ride all day, get on and off at 13 different stops throughout the ICW and New River, and receive discounts on your meal at over 25 restaurants with our Cruise & Dine program. Our service area includes the Arts and Entertainment District, Riverfront, Las Olas Blvd., and Convention Center. More than just a boat ride! South Beach Excursion - Take a leisurely cruise down the ICW to Miami Beach Marina and spend four hours shopping, dining, and exploring the cultural offerings of South Beach. Trips leave from the Convention Center Dock Fridays through Tuesdays in season. Trip highlights include trip commentary, trivia, reggae cocktail More than just boat ride! 41


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KEY LIME PIE RECIPE 4 egg yolks

1 egg white

Key Lime juice (more than 1/3 cup; less than 1/2 cup)

1 (9 inch) pie crust (graham craker or regular, your preference)

1 (14 oz) can condensed milk

Whipped Topping

In a glass bowl, beat egg yolks; blend in condensed milk and lime juice. Beat egg white in a separate bowl until fairly dry; blend into filling mixture. Pour into pie shell; bake in a 350-degree oven for about 15 minutes. Cool thoroughly; cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or so. Top with whipped topping before serving. Yield� 6 to 8 servings.

The grated peel from 1 lime adds to the tartness of the filling. The original key lime pie is topped with meringue, but the whipped topping is easier. Persian lime may be substituted. The lime juice, sweetened condensed milk and egg are the signature ingredients for the way a lime pie is prepared in the keys. www.icwresourceguide.com

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LIGHTNING PROTECTION GUIDE Even though the odds are in your favor that your boat may never be hit by lightning, if it happens it can have devastating effects. Don’t take a chance, protect yourself. If you are in a small boat and close to shore when a thunderstorm approaches, get in and off the water immediately. Better yet, don't go out if thunderstorms are predicted. But what if you are miles offshore and a storm pops up? Hopefully, you have prepared in advance. The voltages involved in lightning are so high that even materials that would normally be considered non-conductive become conductors, including the human body. The voltages are so massive that if they start to travel through a boat's structure - say through its mast - then meet with high resistance (for instance, the hull skin) the current discharge, in its attempt to reach ground, may simply blow a hole in the non-conductive barrier. The safety conscious Captain should make sure that his vessel is properly protected. In theory, a lightning protection system is used to create what is know as a “Faraday’s cage,” so called after the late nineteenth-century scientist Michael Faraday. The principle is to provide a surrounding, well-grounded, metal structure, in which all of parts are bonded together and carry the same electrical potential. Such a “cage” attracts and carries any lightning strike to ground much like lightning rods on buildings. You need to provide an unobstructed way for the lightning to dissipate its energy to ground (the water surrounding you). The additional benefit of a lightning protection system is that it tends to bleed off any charge build-up in the general vicinity, possibly averting a lightning strike in the first place. So how does a lightning protection system work? In a boat, the “cage” is formed by bonding together, with heavy conductors, the www.icwresourceguide.com

vessel's mast and all other major metal masses. A marine electrician must tie in the engines, stoves, air conditioning compressors, railings, arches etc. with a low resistance wire which would ultimately provide a conductive path to ground (the water) usually via the engine and propeller shaft, keel bolts, or better yet, a separate external ground plate at least 1 sq. ft. in dimension. It is important that you ensure that your crew fall within the protection of the cage,” something not always feasible when the vessel is not built of steel or aluminum. On fiberglass or wooden boats it is advantageous to have a mast or other conductive metal protrusion extending well above the vessel, creating what is known as a “cone” or zone of protection. It is generally accepted that this cone of protection extends 45 degrees, all around, from the tip of the metal protrusion. If the aluminum mast of the average sailing vessel is properly bonded to the vessel’s other major metal masses and is given a direct, low-resistance conductive path to ground, the entire boat should fall within the protected zone. If the vessel has a wooden or composite mast, a marine electrician can achieve the same effect by installing a 6 to 12 inch metal spike at the top and running a heavy conductor down the mast and as directly as possible to ground, usually through the engine and propeller shaft. Again, refer to the ABYC standards and have a professional marine electrician install your lightning protection.This is not a do-it-yourself project. 45


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www.ZenoMattress.com Marine Bedding Specialist “since 1954”

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47


RESTORATION - LUCKY LADY Manufacturer: Craft -1967 Commander With Fly Bridge and Dive Platform added Length: 47 Feet Draft: 3’6 inches Cruising Speed: 12kn Fuel: 450 gallons Air Conditioners: 3 Radar: 24 miles

Beam: 15 Feet Displacement: 35 gross tons. Max Speed: 15kn Range: 450 nautical miles Engines: Detroit diesels 8V53N GPS, 2 VHF radios, etc.

Call 654-661-2355 or 954-816-8928 AKA purchased this 1967 Chris Craft 47 foot Commander for a number of reasons. It is a very unique vessel. It was the first year the Chris Craft Company built the hull of a 47 foot yacht out of fiberglass and was the only year that they paneled the interior and pilot house with mahogany. The hull is virtually bullet-proof and was built to withstand three times the strains and stresses of running full throttle in 6-foot seas. It was also the first year they built-in adjustable fiberglass trim tabs, which allows the pilot to achieve the most efficient planning attitude for speed, fuel economy, and water and wind conditions, creating a smoother ride. More importantly, the 47 foot Commander has an extremely wide beam of 15 feet, which allows for an extraordinarily large interior and cabin space not usually found on yachts of this size.

48


FISH WORD SEARCH

”The 30 Pocket Reversible Tote that Zips Open So You Can Find What’s Inside” Riggers: Extend the strap of the 36 pocket canvas Nantucket Bagg to use as a sling, pockets to the inside or out. Convert your tool roll to a tote or backpack for your tools or as an overnight bagg for travel. Get a second one as a fabulous knitting bag for your first mate. Make sure to check our website for new products coming in December!

www.nantucketbagg.com 508-257-4682

49


before

after

• Complete line of accessories, such as gaskets, vinyls and other hardware • Our primary business is design and manufacturing of the highest quality windows for the custom boat builder or refurbisher • State-of-the-art 3D digitizing service that can handle any complex shaped glass

18377 18377 NE NE 4th 4th Ct. Ct. •• Miami Miami

305-770-1800 www.oceandynamics.com

50


BOAT SAFETY CHECKLIST By using this checklist, or one fine-tuned by yourself, you’ll be sure that everything is on board and in good working order. Your passengers will appreciate knowing you're concerned about boating safety. • Float plan - let a friend or relative know when you're leaving, where you’re going, when you expect to return, what to do if you don’t, and a description of your boat • Registration certificate or documentation • Personal Flotation Devices (wearable and throw able) - USCG approved, good condition, readily accessible, assigned and fitted • Fire Extinguishers - right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible • Visual Distress Signals - current dates on flares, proper number, batteries good if lights or EPIRB • Anchors and Line - adequate anchor for bottom, adequate line for water depth • Bilge device - bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device available • Watch or clock - operable • Bright flashlight or searchlight • Navigation lights - tested and operable, spare bulbs • Batteries - fully charged, encased in plastic boxes or terminals covered, securely fastened down • Sound-producing device - horn, whistle appropriate for boat • Alternate propulsion - paddle or oar • First Aid Kit • Tools, spare outboard prop and lock nut • Compass • Sunscreen • Weather Radio

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52


MANATEE MARKERS Manatees and the Law Manatees are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act of 1978. It is illegal to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, annoy or molest manatees. The state of Florida has also established regulatory speed zones to protect the manatee and its habitat. Anyone convicted of violating state law faces maximum fines of $500 and/or imprisonment of up to 60 days. Conviction for violating federal protection laws is punishable by fines up to $100,000 and/or one year in prison. What Can Boaters Do? You can reduce your chances of harming a manatee by following these simple guidelines: Observe and follow all boating speed zone signs. Slow down. Reducing boat speed gives you a greater chance to avoid a manatee. You will also increase your safety margin with other boats. Remember to post a lookout.

Boating Speed Zones To alert the boater and protect the manatee in its sanctuaries, the law provides regulatory zones on wateways. Here are typical signs found on Florida’s waterways:

Use marked channels whenever possible. Manatees have shown signs that they are avoiding heavy boat traffic areas. Channel depth reduces the likelihood of pinning or crushing manatees. Wear polarized sunglasses while operating a boat. Polarized lenses make it much easier to see objects beneath the surface and the “swirling” that occurs when a manatee dives. (The swirls look like a large “footprint” on the water’s surface or a series of half moon swirls.) Post a proper lookout while boating. A proper lookout is a person on board designated to look out for wildlife, other boaters, swimmers or obstructions when the vessel is underway. Plan for safety. www.icwresourceguide.com

53


The

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only 1hour from Miami 2, 3, 4 and 5 Bedroom Luxury Condominium Rentals Call Toll Free 800.563.0014 in the Bahamas: 365.8500

LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas

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PETROLEUM CONTROL FACT: A single gallon of fuel can contaminate over a million gallons of water. The cumulative effect of small spills has a serious impact on coastal and fresh water areas. GOAL: Reduce pollution in Florida’s surface waters and maintain a healthy and esthetically pleasing recreational environment that can be enjoyed by all boaters. ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE WHILE FUELING: • Use caution in fi lling your fuel tank to avoid spillage into the water. • Listen to your boat, it gurgles before your tank is full. • Use a vent collection device to capture escaping fuel. • While fueling your vessel attend the fuel nozzle at all times. • For safety, have all passengers exit the boat during gasoline fueling. • If you overfi ll your fuel tank, wipe it up with a rag. Do not hose down the fuel into the water. Give the soiled rags to your marina operator for proper disposal. • If a spill occurs, do not apply detergents or soaps. This only spreads the problem and is a violation of Federal law. • If a spill occurs in a marina, notify marina management immediately. • No smoking while fueling. • Use containment while fueling Personal Water Craft (PWC) (absorbent pad, nozzle pad or vent cover to catch overflow.

www.icwresourceguide.com

55


Marina Power Company OWER PEDESTALS PEDESTALS AND AND ACCESSORIES ACCESSORIES FOR FOR MARINE MARINE AND AND RECREATION RECREATION FACILITIES FACILITIES. POWER

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Distribution Transformers

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Phone: 305.470.0037 E-mail: info@marinapower.net Website: www.marinapower.net 56

Fire Equipment


BILGE OIL CONTAINMENT ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE FOR BILGE OIL: Use drip pans with absorbent pads while draining oil from the bilges. • Keep all engines well tuned: regularly check seals, gaskets, hoses and connections for leaks and drips. Change oil filters often. • Place oil absorbent material or bioremediating bilge boom in the bilge. • Clean and maintain bilges and do not use detergents while cleaning. • Remove oil from the bilge with absorbent pads. • Before pumping bilge, use water/oil separators or absorbents to soak up oil hydrocarbons. • Trailer your boat to an area that provides containment before removing bilge or boat plugs. • Recycle or properly dispose of used oil and absorbents. Contact your local authorities or marina management for petroleum disposal regulations.

Report oil pollution to the State Warning Point at 1-800-320-0519 and the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802. Find Oil Recyclers by zip code at www.recycleoil.org or call 202-682-8000.

www.icwresourceguide.com

57


MIAMI PRESTIGE INTERIORS

N

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Upholstery: o o o

Canvas:

Custom seating and bolsters o T-tops, arches Original Equip. Manufacturers o Sun Shades Digital patterning & cutting o Custom covers Family Owned & Operated Since 1971

At Miami Prestige Interiors, we take pride in delivering the highest quality marine upholstery. To that end, we use only the finest materials available to the marine industry, including:

o o o

Nautolex® & Spradling® marine vinyl GORILLA BOARD® marine PVC cores GORE™ Tenara® TR thread

o o o

Biocide treated anti-mildew foam Optional DriFast® foam Duo-fast® stainless steel staples

www.miamiprestige.com th

4798 E. 10 >ĂŶĞ͕ ,ŝĂůĞĂŚ͕ &> ϯϯϬϭϯ ͻ (305) 685-ϯϯϰϯ ͻ info@miamiprestige.com

* Mention this ad and receive 10% off quoted price 59


60


INDEX Air Char ter s Executive Air Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Air Conditioning and Mar ine Refrigeration A/C Atlantis Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Aquae Marine Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Ar tistic Masonr y, Landscape , Waterfalls The Coralman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Bahamas Air Char ters KLM Aviation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Bike Sales and Repair Bicycle Evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Boat Eng ines, Boat Sales, Boats Parts and Service Bob Hewes Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Boat Restor ation AKA Yacht Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Bottom Cleaning , Pump-Out Ultra Safety Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Casino Par ty Fun Nights Casino Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Custom Embroider y, Boat Accessories Nautical Needles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Day Spa, Aroma therapy Diamante Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Day Spa, Health and Wellness Vida Day Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Detailing and Maintenance Hot Yachtz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Detailing, Restoration, Cleaning Attention to Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Dive Equipment and Instr uction, Scuba Gear Grove Scuba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Doc k Accessories, Ladder s, Bumpers & Mooring Whips DockGear.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Dock Cushions, LED LIghts, Mar ine Appliances Sailor Sam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Enter tainment Systems PI Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Exotic Plants, Landscape Design, Topiaries Fraga’s Nursery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fendaso x Praktek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Fine Food , Caviar and Gourmet Items Bemka House of Caviar & Fine Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Golf Outfitter s Edwin Watts Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Hydr aulic Swim Pla tfor ms, Launching TNT Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Inf lata ble Boa ts Alaska Series Inflatables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Kite boar ding Skybandits Kiteboarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Landsca pe & Waterfall Design, Waterfall Upgrades and Repair Sergio Creative Landscape & Waterfalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Marine Chrome Plating, Gold and Metal Plating Mark Plating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Mar ine , Industr ial and Residental Hardware Supplier McDonalds Hardware, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Mar ine Insur ance Davis Marine Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Mar ine Inter ior s, Racing Sea ts, Marine Cushions Twin Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Mar ine Sales, Service , Electronics Dean Marine Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Mar ine Upholster y and Canvas Miami Prestige . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

61


INDEX Mar ine Windows, Windshields and Doors Ocean Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Nautical and Marine Ar t Jack Pumphrey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Oceanfront Casual Dining , Food and Drink Dania Beach Bar & Grill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Plastic Surger y, Skin Care, Weight Loss Take Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Propellor Shafing & Mar ine Hardware S&S Propellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-35 Real Estate, Realtor Century 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sea walls, Doc ks, Mar ine Contr actor Contour Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Scuba Lessons, Divemaster, Scuba Charter Miami Scuba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Stor mSaf ety Thunderbolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 Tote and Tool Bags Nantucket Bagg Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Towing and Salvage Biscayne Towing & Salvage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Trailer s, Transpor t and Repair All American Trailers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Transpor tation, Limousine Service Blue Chip Limo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Transformer s, Power Centers, Fire Equipment Marina Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Underw ater Maintenance and Repair Pier 88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Upholster y and Draper ies M & M Upholstery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Vaca tion Resort Bahama Beach Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Water Forecast, Sea Weather Weather Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Water Skis, Wakeboards, Nautiques Boa ts Miami Nautiques International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Water Taxi, South Beac h Excur sions Water Taxi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Yacht Accounting and Tax Planning Accounting Business Consultants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Yacht and Boa t Insur ance SMI Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Yacht Equipment and Parts Boat Owners Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Yacht Management CYM Yacht Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Siebert Yacht Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Yac ht Ma ttreses Zeno Mattress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Yacht and Residential Secur ity Frankentek Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

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