Page 1


The ICS Vision By 2017, ICS will be a premier “Program of Excellence” providing quality comprehensive services by: • Improving Employee Morale • Improving Internal and External Communications • Building and Strengthening Partnerships • Enhancing Leadership • Exceeding State Licensure Requirements • Improving School Readiness. • Establishing an Accountability and Liability Plan for the Program

The ICS Mission ICS provides high quality comprehensive child and family services which ensure the development of skills for success throughout life.


Table of Contents 2

From the Executive Director

4

From the Board Chair

5

From the Policy Council

6

Classroom Quality Academic Qualifications of Head Start Teaching Staff

7

Child Development Testing

8

Performance of Head Start Children on the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP III) 2010-2011

10

Performance Quality and Accountability Analysis of Child Outcome Data Results

12

Performance Quality and Accountability Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP III) 2010-2011

12

Performance of Head Start Students on K-SEALS 2011

13

All Sites 2011 K-SEALS Vocabulary Mean Scores

14

Performance of Dual Language Learners on the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP III) 2010-2011

16

K-SEALS Average Scores Spring 2011

17

Interpretation of K-SEALS Scores

18

Parents as Co-Educators

19

Parental Involvement in Head Start

20

Parent Activities

21

Parent Engagement Report

22

Pre-School and Head Start Family and Health Services

24

Budget and Audit Report Statement of Financial Position

25

Statement of Activities

26

Statement of Functional Expenses

28

Note from Public Relations

1.


From the Executive Director ICS looks forward to publishing our accomplishments in the Annual Report. Our continuous aim in this organization is to obtain great outcomes for our children and families, to ensure that staff are satisfied and believe that ICS is a great place to work, and to develop everlasting partnerships with our communities. Eloise McClinton As the economy continues to take a down-turn, ICS is blessed to continue to grow through the American Reinvestment Recovery Act. Our agency has increased the number of children we serve in Head Start by 150 and Early Head Start by 72. We have hired new employees to work in the Expansion areas. This change is helping people in the community earn an income as well as providing quality services for our children. The Stimulus Package has enabled the agency to improve our playgrounds, renovate some of our Head Start buildings, and even to consider constructing a new eightclassroom Head Start Center in Crenshaw, MS. Enrollment of Head Start and Early Head Start at ICS has increased from 3819 to 4041, and we still have a large waiting list of eligible families in some counties. This shows that we still have families who need their children to get a great “head start” prior to kindergarten. ICS, public schools, and day care centers are working diligently to achieve the agency’s slogan “Making Small Miracles a Great Success”, by preparing them to meet challenges of tomorrow. Not only are we preparing our children for success, but we are training and preparing our young employees to step into the role of their leaders once they retire. ICS must have a solid foundation for our succession plan program.

2.


ICS is faced with many challenges this year. This agency is up for a monitoring review from the federal government. Every three years this review occurs, and we are up for this challenge. We are encouraging all of our employees, parents, and community partners to work laboriously together to achieve the Gold Star on this review. If we are cited with a deficiency, our agency can be re-competed and it’s possible that another organization will be in control of ICS, and we definitely do not want that. We should always be mindful of the purpose of ICS. We are here to provide high quality services for our children and families and ensure that the children are ready to proceed to the next level. At ICS we pride ourselves with speaking words that encourage, inspiring others to reach their full potential and motivating our children and parents that together we can make a difference. Please review our accomplishments in this annual report, and help this organization stay at the forefront of providing quality services to children and families. Regards, Eloise McClinton Executive Director

3.


From the Board Chair We are always faced with challenges, and over the years we have always been able to turn those challenges into successes. Today with the ever presence of re-competition, it is more imperative that all stakeholders fulfill their obligation to the children and families that we serve. Now is not the time to live in the past. Today we must focus more on school readiness. We Howard Hollins welcome this challenge as we have prior challenges. I would like to assure parents, staff, and the general public that the Institute of Community Services, Inc., is totally committed to the success of the children regardless of the instrument used to measure success. I commend the individuals that have been recognized for their years of service, and we will always be thankful for the level of dedication and commitment to the agency’s mission, objectives, and values that we hold dear. The most important thing we can do each day is be thankful for the honor and privilege of working with children and families that need our services. Regards, Howard Hollins Chairman of the Board

4.

Sitting left to right: Latanya Norwood, Keyshana King, Lucy Carpenter, Boyce Blackmon, Linda Mahoney, Betty JoDulaney. Standing left to right: Frank Dobbs, Marvin Johnson, Howard Hollins, Chairperson, Jerry Hentz Not pictured: Joseph Grantham, Juanita Jones, Gwendolyn Baptist-Hewlett, Katrina Wiley, Tekata Kelson, Judy Dees, Gloria Davidson, Kenneth Logan, Felecia Woods, Gladys Tubby, Sheldon Herrington, Charles George and Zipora Hudson


From the Policy Council During my two years of experience with the Institute of Community Services, Inc., I have been increasingly impressed with the staff and students I have come in contact with. The Holly Springs Central Office and the Charleston Head Start center display such positive effects on the students.

Zipora Hudson

I have had the opportunity to make spontaneous visits and always find a professional atmosphere. Finding students in a learning environment where the student is the focus, is a true blessing. All staff members are to be commended for making the motto, “Making small Miracles a Great Success� a true and valid statement. Community awareness is the key and the Public Relations director has done an amazing job in keeping the community informed. Having staff members to take such pride in their jobs as the Parent Involvement director and Executive director makes my involvement such a pleasure. Zipora Hudson Policy Council Chairperson

Sitting left to right: Crystal Batteast, Zipora Hudson, Leslie Washington and Lakeisha Hall. Standing from left to right: Gladys Ellis, Johnnie Reed, Billie Mills Not pictured: Marketta Outlaw, Willie Mae Greer, LaDonna Jenkins, Brenda Robertson, Stacy Johnson, Ellen Vaughn, Shynekwa Adams, Doris Irons, TeresaKing-Porter, Shirley Salter, Leketha Wilburn, Pamela McNutt, Latonya smith, Kanequa Willis, Brenda Robertson and Patrina Carlisle.

5.


Classroom Quality The following table shows the number of teachers and teacher assistants holding the various academic degrees. Table 1. Academic Qualifications of Head Start Teaching Staff

Teachers ICS Head Start Sites Expansion Sites Partner Sites Total Teacher Assistants ICS Head Start Sites Expansion Sites Partner Sites Total

MS 9 9

BS 151 10 29 190

AS 0 0 0 0

CDA 0 0 4 4

Total 160 10 33 203

BS 9 2 3 14

AS 56 0 3 59

CDA 20 0 0 20

H.S. Diploma Total 71 156 8 10 32 38 111 204

Class Size The average class size for ICS Head Start is 20. Three-year-old classrooms have an enrollment of 17 children. Some mixed-age groups will have 17 children in order to comply with Mississippi licensure requirements for the physical size of the classroom. Other classrooms may be limited in child enrollment due to the physical size of the classroom.

Child:Adult Ratio Teachers and children have been assigned to classrooms in order to meet the Head Start Performance Standards. In mixed-age groups, the age of the youngest child in the group determines the staff-tochild ratio. There are two paid staff members, teacher and teacher assistant, in the classroom. Special needs teacher assistants are assigned to classrooms that have children with severe disabilities. Volunteers are also encouraged to participate in classroom experiences.

6.


Child Development Testing Head Start provides a foundation for learning both academically and socially that will help children succeed in elementary school. Head Start is an opportunity to learn, to share, to follow instructions, and to begin a foundation that will continue in elementary school. The Head Start environment is structured, but the structure is largely invisible to children. The ICS Head Start program has staff and teachers who understand the particular ways that young children develop and learn. The Head Start child’s cognitive skills are strengthened by engaging in a wide range of hands-on activities (which we call “play”) that challenge children to observe closely, ask questions, test ideas, and solve problems. Progress in learning and achieving child outcomes is a logical result of the Head Start Child Development program. The information gathered from the ICS assessment process responds to the need to not only address child outcomes, but to contribute to continuous program planning and program improvement. The assessment process is designed to answer the following questions: 1. Have the children’s language development, literacy, math and science skills improved over time? 2. How do ICS children compare with Head Start children in the state, across the region, and in the nation? 3. Which teaching and learning styles are most effective in promoting school readiness in Head Start children? 4. What do ICS Head Start children know and what can they do at the completion of the Head Start program?

The overriding question is: “Are ICS children ready for kindergarten when they leave Head Start?”

7.


Performance of Head Start Children on the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP-III) 2010 - 2011 Assessment is the ongoing procedure used by appropriate qualified personnel throughout the period of a child’s eligibility to identify the child’s unique strengths and needs and the services appropriate to meet those needs. As a criterion-referenced assessment instrument, the LAP-3 provides a systematic method for observing children’s skill development in the eight Child Outcomes Domains: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Language Development Literacy Mathematics Science Creative Arts Social and Emotional Development Approaches to Learning Physical Health and Development

The domains of Language Development, Literacy, and Mathematics (as denoted by asterisk) contain the domain elements and indicators mandated by the 1998 Head Start reauthorization legislation. The following table shows the progress that children made in each of the domains.

8.


Domain

Language Development*

Domain Elements

Number of Milestones Mastered

Number of Milestones Mastered

Beginning of Year

End of Year

Percent Gained End of Year Progress Made

Listening & Understanding Speaking & Communicating

63.57

80.96

27.36%

Literacy*

Phonological Awareness Book Knowledge Print Awareness & Concepts Early Writing Alphabet Knowledge

31.01

56.16

81.10%

Mathematics*

Number & Operations Geometry & Spatial Sense Patterns & Measurement

47.40

71.62

51.10%

Science

Scientific Skills & Methods Scientific Knowledge

36.37

63.69

75.12%

Creative Arts

Music Art Movement Dramatic Play

62.46

85.87

37.48%

Self-Concept Self-Control Cooperation Social Relationships Knowledge of Families & Communities

80.09

91.67

14.46%

Initiative & Curiosity Engagement & Persistence Reasoning & Problem Solving

96.59

99.34

2.85%

Fine Motor Skills Gross Motor Skills Health Status & Practices

73.16

89.50

22.33%

Social / Emotional Development

Approaches to Learning

Physical Health and Development

9.


Performance Quality and Accountability Analysis of Child Outcomes Data Results Major findings from the 2011 end-of-year LAP-3 assessment show that children have not met the 85 percent ICS goal in the domains of Literacy, Mathematics, Science, and Creative Arts. Although the 85 percent goal was not met in Language Development, significant progress was made to the 81 percent achievement level. The following graph shows the rate of children’s progress at the beginning, middle, and the end of the year. In each of the areas, children did make significant progress although the 85 percent goal was not reached.

Findings from the 2011 LAP-3 assessment show that children did meet the 85 percent goal in the domains of Social/Emotional Development, Approaches to Learning, and Physical Health and Development.

10.


Performance of Head Start Children Transitioned from Early Head Start on the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP-III) 2010-2011 Domain

Number of Milestones Mastered

Number of Milestones Mastered

Percent Gained at End of Year

Beginning of Year

End of Year

Progress Made

Listening & Understanding Speaking & Communicating

49.70

79.50

60.46%

Literacy*

Phonological Awareness Book Knowledge Print Awareness & Concepts Early Writing Alphabet Knowledge

15.94

47.22

196.24%

Mathematics*

Number & Operations Geometry & Spatial Sense Patterns & Measurement

33.55

65.00

93.74%

Science

Scientific Skills & Methods Scientific Knowledge

21.25

55.83

162.73%

Creative Arts

Music Art Movement Dramatic Play

46.77

85.16

82.08%

Self-Concept Self-Control Cooperation Social Relationships Knowledge of Families & Communities

72.02

94.41

22.58%

Initiative & Curiosity Engagement & Persistence Reasoning & Problem Solving

95.97

100.00

4.20%

Fine Motor Skills Gross Motor Skills Health Status & Practices

63.00

84.97

34.87%

Language Development*

Social / Emotional Development

Approaches to Learning

Physical Health and Development

Domain Elements

11.


Performance of Head Start Children on K-SEALS - 2011 At the end of the 2010-2011 program year 843 kindergarten-ready children were assessed.

Domain

ICS Mean

National Mean

Difference

Vocabulary Numbers, Letters, Words

96.79

98.4

-1.61

105.43

98.3

7.13

Expressive Skills

103.57

98.4

5.17

Receptive Skills

101.28

98.4

2.88

101.35

98.6

1.09

Early Academic & Language Skills For children ages 5 (N=547)

Domain

ICS Mean

Number Skills

100.90

99.3

1.6

Letter and Word Skills

105.10

99.8

5.3

12.

National Mean

Difference


Only “Vocabulary” remains as the area where ICS children are not exceeding the national mean as shown in the following table:

Center

Number Tested

Anderson Grove Batesville Clay County Clen Moore Coleman (Columbus) Crenshaw Erma Rogers (Byhalia) Eva Covington (Charleston) Grenada County Hernando Holly Springs (M. Myatt) Mary Cathey (Oxford) Mt. Pleasant (K. Gipson) Noxubee Oktibbeha Quitman County Southaven (E. McClinton) Tunica County Walls West Tallahatchie Batesville Elementary Bramlett Elementary Dundee Elementary East Oktibbeha Elementary Emerson Robinsonville Stokes-Beard (Columbus) Tunica Pre-K Wilson Elementary Young’s Academy

30 30 30 29 30 28 29 32 29 27 31 30 27 30 26 29 41 30 35 30 30 30 16 18 18 32 30 36 18 19

Vocabulary 94.97 99.73 86.97 95.4 91.10 93.18 98.90 95.06 86.2 91.33 104.74 104.80 99.81 83.07 92.23 100.83 111.06 97.23 93.71 98.37 103.00 113.07 102.49 85.17 99.94 81.2 87.57 97.56 96.67 91.11

13.


Performance of Dual Language Learners on the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP-III) 2010-2011 It is essential that all Head Start and Early Head Start programs have systems, policies, and procedures in place to meet the needs of children and families who speak languages other than English. The largest number of children who are dual language learners are Hispanic children. The child development area tracked the gains of 76 Hispanic children who entered Head Start with limited English proficiency.

14.


Domain

Language Development*

Domain Elements

Number of Milestones Mastered

Number of Milestones Mastered

Percent Gained at End of Year

Beginning of Year

End of Year

Progress Made

Listening & Understanding 5 8 . 3 5 Speaking & Communicating

73.52

26%

Literacy*

Phonological Awareness Book Knowledge Print Awareness & Concepts Early Writing Alphabet Knowledge

32.23

50.80

57.62%

Mathematics*

Number & Operations Geometry & Spatial Sense Patterns & Measurement

48.07

71.25

48.22%

Science

Scientific Skills & Methods Scientific Knowledge

38.75

62.27

60.70%

Creative Arts

Music Art Movement Dramatic Play

63.90

85.58

33.93%

Self-Concept Self-Control Cooperation Social Relationships Knowledge of Families & Communities

73.39

90.24

22.96%

Initiative & Curiosity Engagement & Persistence Reasoning & Problem Solving

94.74

99.35

4.9%

Fine Motor Skills Gross Motor Skills Health Status & Practices

74.23

88.89

19.75%

Social/Emotional Development

Approaches to Learning

Physical Health and Development

15.


K-SEALS Average Scores

Spring 2011

Center

All Sites Anderson Grove Batesville Clay County Clen Moore (Coldwater) Coleman (Columbus) Crenshaw Erma Rogers (Byhalia) Eva Covington (Charleston) Grenada County Hernando Holly Springs (M. Myatt) Mary Cathey (Oxford) Mt. Pleasant (K. Gipson) Noxubee Oktibbeha Quitman County Southaven (E. McClinton) Tunica County Walls West Tallahatchie Batesville Elementary Bramlett Elementary Dundee Elementary East Oktibbeha Elem. Emerson Robinsonville Stokes-Beard (Columbus) Tunica Pre-K Wilson Elementary Young’s Academy

16.

Early Academic/ Language Skills

101.35 101.43 100.40 94.13 95.90 97.30 95.93 98.03 102.75 99.10 92.07 106.74 109.47 106.85 89.80 102.31 101.00 109.62 97.23 92.94 102.57 107.93 116.47 106.44 93.33 109.00 103.84 98.80 101.31 106.39 101.32

Vocabulary

96.79 94.97 99.73 86.97 95.4 91.10 93.18 98.90 95.06 86.2 91.33 104.74 104.80 99.81 83.07 92.23 100.83 111.06 97.23 93.71 98.37 103.00 113.07 102.49 85.17 99.04 81.2 97.57 97.56 96.67 91.11


Numbers, Expressive Letters, Skills Words

105.43 106.97 100.63 102.60 96.10 103.90 102.79 99.59 109.13 105.69 94.56 106.23 111.37 111.78 99.03 111.54 101.21 104.94 103.03 92.63 105.63 110.47 118.70 98.31 102.94 115.33 107.16 110.03 110.72 114.06 112.63

103.57 104.17 102.70 95.53 99.21 98.40 99.71 103.03 103.47 101.72 93.33 109.10 113.70 107.33 92.17 105.58 99.29 109.24 102.13 92.06 102.30 114.27 119.67 106.81 93.83 113.17 109.13 102.20 104.33 108.56 104.11

Receptive Skills

Number Skills (5-year-olds)

101.28 101.40 99.27 95.63 95.62 98.37 99.18 99.41 105.84 100.90 92.37 103.58 104.90 108.33 89.80 101.38 102.45 104.00 101.37 97.11 104.00 108.37 109.87 106.38 94.17 107.50 100.66 98.67 101.56 106.11 105.05

100.90 102.78 93.50 102.15 92.93 99.65 101.67 99.08 102.95 104.40 95.47 103.33 104.06 105.20 96.36 105.88 96.81 99.72 92.42 84.79 102.24 108.04 113.63 104.73 99.17 107.57 101.61 102.11 98.07 103.42 103.00

Letter & Word Skills (5-year-olds)

105.10 106.94 99.35 103.38 95.79 100.47 104.48 100.46 108.71 107.87 96.12 100.00 106.25 109.80 97.56 111.25 97.19 101.89 97.67 92.16 106.48 114.44 112.71 112.45 102.08 118.21 109.65 110.11 108.30 115.42 110.335

Interpretation of K-SEALS Scores Descriptive Category

Standard Score Range

Percentile Rank

Below Average Average Above Average Well Above Average Upper Extreme

80 – 89 90 – 109 110 – 119 120 – 129 130+

9 – 24 25 – 74 75 – 90 91 – 97 98+

17.


Parents

as Co-Educators

In order to accurately assess a child’s development, parents share their observations and concerns with all appropriate individuals; and, in turn, parents are informed about observations made by others regarding their child. As a part of parent involvement, parents complete a survey of their satisfaction with Head Start comprehensive services. Parents are involved in all decisions and follow-ups for further evaluation and intervention. It is useful for parents and staff to meet frequently to share observations and concerns, and to jointly make plans for further evaluation and intervention. Early Childhood Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Family Services, Parent Involvement and Transition 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Yes

My child’s teacher listened to, respected and supported my family. 9 5 % The teachers respected and accepted my child as an individual. 95% I was involved in the learning activities planned for my child. 92% I was informed of all tests and test results. 96% The home visits and conferences were helpful and informative for me and the teachers. 94% I was comfortable with the style of discipline used by the staff. 96% My child benefitted academically from this program. 96% The teachers provided a variety of learning activities for my child. 9 6 %

Yes

As a parent I feel more confident about my parental skills. I read more to my child. The parent meetings and trainings were helpful to our family. I have made progress toward meeting my goals and needs. Head Start was an effective program. The employees listened to my concerns.

95% 95% 95% 93% 98% 97%

Health, Mental Health, and Nutrition

Yes

1 5 . I was satisfied with the medical services received by my child through the program. 1 6 . I was satisfied with the dental services received by my child. 1 7 . Adequate services were provided for children with disabilities. 1 8 . My child benefitted socially and emotionally from this program. 1 9 . My child liked the food that was served at the Head Start center. 2 0 . I received menus each month that contained nutritional information. 2 1 . My child received the kinds of foods that he/she needed.

97% 97% 96% 97% 95% 98% 96%

Source: Office of Parental Involvement

18.

No 5% 8% 5% 4% 6% 4% 4% 4%

No 5% 5% 5% 7% 2% 3% No 3% 3% 4% 3% 5% 2% 4%


Parental Involvement Parental involvement is a key factor in the success of a child’s education. Parents are number one partners in the education of their children. Not all parents have the time or resources to be fully involved in school activities. Therefore, we plan specific ways that enhance parental participation in promoting health and learning and that recognize the many different ways parents can be active. ICS parents are kept abreast of their child’s achievement on a continuous basis. Two home visits and two parent conferences are the minimum requirements for disseminating information to parents. Ways of Informing Parents ICS parents have stated that the following measures are effective for informing parents about their child’s progress and school activities: Home Visits Notes from School Classroom Newsletters Phone Calls from Teachers

Child Reports to Parents Other Parents Volunteering in the Clas

Transition Services Transition from home to Head Start and from Head Start to Kindergarten is a major stepping stone in the lives of children and their families. Services are provided that prepare children for a seamless transition to their next placement. These services include the following: 1. Transfer of necessary records 2. Establishment of channels of communications with school districts, Head Start, and parents 3. Meetings between parents and kindergarten teachers 4. Joint training with Head Start and kindergarten teachers 5. Parental training regarding their rights and responsibilities in the education of their children 6. Appropriate placement and services for children with disabilities Number of School Districts with a Formal Agreement to Coordinate Transition Services for Children and Families 21 Number of Children Entering Kindergarten in the Ensuing School Year 2,101

19.


Parent Activities 2010 -2011

Grand Parent’s Day Meet and Greet Dad’s Read Day Balloon Launch Multicultural Week Banquets/Luncheons Week of the Young Child Head Start Awareness Month Fun Day Closing Activity RIF Distributions Food Drive Health Fair Career Awareness Day Fatherhood Breakfast Carnivals Trike-A-Thon Kite Day Field Trips Zoo-on-Wheels Town Hall Meetings Transitions Activities Hat Day with Dads Fire Safety Programs Grandparent’s Days RIF Reading Rodeo Safety and Fun Day Doughnuts for Dad Muffins for Mom

20.


Parent Engagement Report 2010-2011 Understanding the involvement of parents is crucial in recognizing the achievement of our children. Records for 2010-2011 indicate the following engagement:

Indicator

Percent

Parents attending parental skills training

21.2%

Parents attending 3 or more center-level activities

55% (1,752)

Parents receiving financial training

5%

Dads volunteering in the classrooms

9%

Dads participating in 3 or more center-level fatherhood activities

18%

Dads involved daily in education and life of his child

27%

Dads involved weekly in education and life of his child

15%

Parents who had not completed high school and referred for GED services Parents requesting funds to pay for GED test

100% Less than 1%

Parents who have employment as their number one concern

86%

Parents satisfied with ICS services

96%

Parents receiving and completing CDA certificate (2009-2010)

16 (actual number)

Parents with CDA certificate and were employed (2010-2011)

100%

21.

• A total of 198 parent activities took place during the 2010-2011 Head Start year. • A total of 4791 were in attendance during parent activities of 2010-2011. • 326 parents requested GED information during 2010-2011 Head Start year. • Twenty-seven percent of parents attended three or more events/ activities. • Eighty-nine percent attended at least one activity/event or volunteered at the center.

21.


Pre-School Head Start

Family and Health Services HEALTH SERVICES AT MID-YEAR 2010/11: Percentage of enrolled children who received medical examinations = 99%; & if children who left & did not complete the program are included = 94%. Percentage of enrolled children who received dental examinations = 99%; & if children who left & did not complete the program are included = 94%. At mid-year, 87% of the served children received MEDICAID; a 10% increase from the previous year. 2011/12 Year End statistics on NUTRITION SUPPORTS: 58% received WIC. This is an 11% increase. 45% received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), FAMILY SERVICES AT MID-YEAR 2010/11; the prior year: Total # of children served = 4089. FAMILY SERVICES 2011/12: Total # of children served = 4054; with 4038 at mid-year. Total # of families = 3816; with 3806 at mid-year. Average Daily Attendance (ADA) = 88.95% (results ranked above the required 85% level.) Mid-year WAITLIST Numbers were at 1271;34% of the funded preschool enrollment of 3704. Percentage of applying children on the Waitlist served (enrolled and entered) was76%; 1% less than last year. Number of children not served and remaining on Waitlist = 1271. Percentage of applying children unable to be enrolled/served = 34%; 7% more than the previous year. Percentage of age eligible children who remained on the Waitlist who were over poverty = 22% (287 children).

22.


Summer 2011 Waitlist # was 2385 children which includes 2010/11 Waitlist & new applications for the 2011/12 year. Using agency COMMUNITY ASSESSMENTTARGET AREA data shows: %AGE eligible children served in the 20011/12 Year = 23%. % INCOME ELIGIBLE (poverty or below) pre-school age children served in the 2011/12 year = 50%. Using a 2nd methodology the % would be 58% income eligible children served. 2011/12 SIGNIFICANT PARENT PARTNER DATA from provision of FAMILY SOCIAL SERVICES & reflection of economy: 3356 Health Education services (88%) –a 20% increase 3652 Parent Education sessions/services (91%) – a 20% increase 3124 Family Services Transportation assistance (82%) -a 37% increase 1082 Adult Education (28%) – an 8% increase 1020 Job Training (27%) – a 7% increase 463 Emergency/Crisis Assistance (12%) A SNAPSHOT OF SIGNIFICANT STATISTICS ON OUR PRE-SCHOOL PATRONS THROUGH 2011/12: 77% single parent homes and 23% in two parent families 93% INCOME ELIGIBLE (at poverty or below); 7% in families with OVER poverty annual family income 73% children with one year prior to kindergarten; 27% children with two years before kindergarten; and 1% children with three years before kindergarten. 72% of the children in 1st year, 26% in the 2nd year, and 2% in the 3rd or higher year (primarily EHS transition children) LANGUAGE = 96% English, 4% Spanish RACE BREAKDOWN = 87% Black or African American, 11% White, 4% of the children are Hispanic or Latino origin, 2% Biracial/Multi-racial, less than 1% Asian, less than 1% Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, and less than 1% American Indian or Alaska Native. 6% of the families received Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) 10% of the families received Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

23.


Budget & Audit Report Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming an opinion on the financial statements of Institute of Community Services, Inc. taken as a whole. The accompaning Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards is presented for purposes of additional analysis as required by U.S. Office of Management and Budget Circular A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Institute of Community Services, and is not required part of the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly statement, in all material respects, in relation to the basic financial statements taken as whole. Frances Reola Young Fiscal Officer

Institute of Community Services, Inc. - January 31, 2012

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS Cash Receivables: Grants Other Prepaid expenses Utility deposits Property and equipment-net Total Assets

1,910,552 23,812

4,002,57 4,026,391 243,219 29,492 232,218 6,441,872

LIABILITIES Accounts payable Accrued salaries Accrued payroll taxes and withholdings Accrued annual leave Deferred contract revenue Total Liabilities

1,580,707 1,202,467 198,074 765,465 1,995,629 5,742,342

NET ASSETS Temporarily Restricted Total Net Assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

24.

699,530 699,530 6,441,872


Statement of Activities January 31, 2011 State revenue Local government revenue Other revenue Interest income Total Unrestricted Revenues and Gains

1,795,554 150,000 4,706 1,494 2,696,467

Net Assets Released from Restrictions: Satisfaction of program restrictions Total Net Assets Released from Restrictions Total Unrestricted Revenues, Gains and Other Support

43,189,257 43,189,257 45,885,724

Expenses Head Start Progam Child Care Food Service Program Child Care Development Program ARRA-Head Start 2009 ARRA Cola Quality Improvement Funding ARRA-Head Start Expansion ARRA-EHS FY 09 ARRA Expansion ARRA-2009 CCDF Discretionary Non Federal Program Total Program Services

21,892,321 2,463,682 15,212,082 1,000,828 436,077 1,418,744 68,184 149,436 42,641,408

Management and General Total expenses

3,287,906 45,929,314

Decrease in Unrestricted Net Assets

(43,590)_

Changes in Temporarily Restricted Net Assets Temporarily restricted grant monies Net assets released from restrictions

43,189,257 (43,189,257)

Increase in Temporarily Restricted Net Assets Decrease in Net Assets Net Assets at Beginning of Year Net Assets at End of Year

0______ (43,590) 743,120 699,530

25.


Statement of Functional Expenses Year Ended January 31, 2011

Program Services

Salaries Employees benefits and payroll taxes

Head Start Program

Child Care Food Service

Child Care Development Program

$11,337,543

757,912

351,992

524,769

4,635,244

346,381

108,003

134,299

1,104,293

459,995

Total Salaries and Related Expenses

15,972,787

Travel

381,013

Property and equipment

219,636

Supplies

599,119

Medical and dental services

358,620

Contractual Services Training Insurance Occupancy Child Care providers Transportation Repairs and maintenance Parent/Children Activity Telephone Food Other expenses Construction

37,763

12,061

15,204

21,892,321

6,212

93,229 52,363 14,727,657

44,786 104,433

46,157 229,964 1,200 11,483 104,341

Total Expenses before Depreciation

659,068 85,577

419,424

728,781

1,321,626

2,463,682

15,212,082

Depreciation

26.

0

12,369

316,892 116,143 200,987 945,091 206,445 1,034,238

Value of Other in-kind Services

Total Expenses

NonFederal Program

ARRA Head Start 2009 ARRA Cola Quality Improvement Funding

16

60,006

1,000,882

89,430 $21,892,321

2,463,682

15,212,082

149,436

1,000,882


ARRA HeadStart Expansion

ARRA ARRA EHS FY 09 2009CCDF ARRA Expansion Discretionary

Total Program Services

Management and General

Total Expenses

201,949

316,589

50,356

13,541,110

2,049,422

15,590,532

77,966

77,734

13,894

5,393,521

617,317

6,010,838

279,915

394,323

64,250

18,934,631

2,666,739

21,601,370

10,015

23,449

512,423

64,691

577,114

76,007

545,510

1,291,876

5,868

790

365,278

3,722

47,060 11,642 124 4,800

460,903 180,148 201,111 949,891 14,989,888 1,034,238

178,081 180,148 64,295 47,600 14,989,888 15,155

3,934

11,000

223,570

28,543

49,648

602,048

1,306

1,263 3,417 2,734 333,952

48,726 233,381 1,329,361 11,499 438,293

15,900

32

744,713

436,077

1,418,744

3,801

68,184

42,551,987

223,570 184,193

365,278

67,152 1,329,361

1,418,744

68,184

42,641,408

638,984 265,406 997,491 1,034,238 617,203 48,726 300,533 11,499 438,293 744,713

3,287,906

89,430 436,077

1,476,069

45,839,884 89,430

3,287,906

45,929,314

27.


From Public Relations It is always a challenge gathering the data for our Annual Report and sharing it with our various publics. What a pleasure it is to let our audience know that we take pride in what we do, developing young minds, preparing them as they move forward. Let us all be mindful that they are children now, someday they will be adults and leaders in our various communities. Thanks to each of you as you assist us in what we do in “Making Small Miracles a Great Success�. Fannie L. Lampley Director

28.


Institute of Community Services, Inc. P.O. Box 160 • 160 West Valley Avenue Holly Springs, Mississippi 38635 662.252.1582 • 662.252.7253 Fax www.ics-hs.org The Institute of Community Services, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer. No person shall be discriminated against because of race, religion, color, sex, age, disability, or natural origin.

ICS 2011 Annual Report  

This is the digital edition of the 2010-2011 Annual Report of the Institute of Community Services in Holly Springs, Mississippi.