African Banker Awards 2022

Page 1

N The 16th edition of the

25th May 2022, Accra, Ghana



CONTENTS

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Welcome from African Banker magazine

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Foreword by BusinessInAfrica Events

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High Patron: African Development Bank

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About the African Banker Awards

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he African Banker Awards – T a fascinating journey

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Programme

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Categories and Nominees

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Judges

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Sponsors

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Organisers


4 WELCOME

Strong banks mean a strong Africa Omar Ben Yedder Publisher, African Banker magazine

Over the last two years, our group has worked ever more closely with a number of multilateral and development institutions which have been at the forefront of interventions to try and cushion the impact of a series of crises that have hit Africa. These last two years have deepened my conviction of the danger of relying on others. This is why I look back in admiration at the important decisions made two decades ago to strengthen our banks. It was prescient and provided them with the strength to withstand crises and the wherewithal to support growth in the face of these challenges. African Banker magazine and the African Banker Awards were launched to recognise the rapid transformation of financial services in Africa and the modernisation of the sector, on the back of the reforms undertaken by Prof Chukwuma Soludo, then Central Bank Governor of Nigeria. Today, banks are at the forefront of innovation in the continent and are playing a lead role when it comes to regional integration as well as channelling investments to strategic and critical sectors which can unlock sustained double-digit growth. The Ukraine and Russia situation has also shown us the importance of sovereignty when it comes to our finances. The slew of sanctions and the wholesale freezing of accounts has delivered the broad message that “your money is only safe if you toe our line”. Today, this message underlines what many have been asking for a long while: domestic resource

mobilisation. We do have reserves, so let’s start putting them to good use by strengthening the capital bases of our banks and development institutions. They need to have the ammunition to support our growth and have shown they are equipped to do so. We do not need to depend on others At a recent investment summit hosted by the Africa Finance Corporation, I was encouraged to hear that the financing needs of the Dangote Group, Africa’s biggest conglomerate, were provided for to the tune of 70% by African commercial and development banks. The message is loud and clear: we should not depend on others for our development. Nor do we need to. On that note I would like to thank our sponsors, who are all doing their bit in making us more self-reliant and crowding in partners to accelerate our growth trajectory. We are grateful and do not take your support for granted. So thank you to the African Development Bank, the African Guarantee Fund, the Bank of Industry, all longstanding supporters, and last but by no means least new sponsors this year, the Trade and Development Bank and Access Bank. All these institutions continue to show us the way to grow bank balance sheets prudently; how to crowd in domestic and international resources; and how to make interventions that are game changing for the continent, whilst providing the framework and conditions for African talent to thrive.


5 FOREWORD

Click and Brick Banking: The Hybrid Future of Banking in Africa Christian C. Udechukwu Founder, African Banker Awards and Chairman, BusinessinAfrica E – Partners

Akwaaba! Welcome to the 16th Anniversary of the African Bankers Awards. We are delighted to be back live after COVID-19 forced our program online and induced changes to our annual Premier event. It feels good to be home in Kwame Nkruma’s country. At 16 years, the African Banker Awards is coming of age. In the period when we started during the consolidation of banking in Nigeria, to the rise of panAfrican banking and the surge of confidence that came with the phenomenon of Africa rising created a new generation of global bankers in Africa. The temporal but very significant shocks of the global financial crisis in 2007/8 originating from America with high impact international waves, followed by another rare, powerfully disruptive global pandemic health crisis which, in turn, created a consequent global economic crisis of post COVID-19 recovery have helped bank customers to migrate to online banking. These unanticipated global events trend have boosted migration to online banking and the rapid rise of global financial technology companies doing online “Click Banking” fiercely competing with traditional “brick” banking institutions which now operate as hybrids of their fintech rivals. Traditional brick banks will continue to be around for a very long time into the future because they have huge assets of public trust equity, brand power, unrivalled human relations and strong reputations of reliability, dependability and sustainability are priceless for customers. This is something fintech companies are struggling to replicate as they shrink

market shares for brick banks and the barrier to market entry in click banking continues to fall lower with little or no regulation online in cyber space. Click banking is now being offered by mobile phone companies, technology companies, online communities, social media companies and more. Today’s brick banks are being challenged by click banks with many Unicorns being born in Africa. In 2023, we shall introduce a new category of Awards for Fintechs to celebrate their excellence and define their brand identities. Indeed, we shall also be introducing new Award categories for Infrastructure Solutions financiers and Strategic Project performance deliveries which move Africa progressively towards fulfilment of the Africa Free Trade Area ambitions. We shall also have a new category of Awards for innovative Mortgage Banking and Affordable Housing developments to encourage the continent-wide policy of a home for all in Africa. Finally, congratulations to all entries and attendees of today’s African Banker 16th anniversary event. All who participate are worthy winners and champions in many respects. Once again, congratulations!


6 HIGH PATRON

THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK GROUP IN ACCRA, GHANA

LE GROUPE DE LA BANQUE AFRICAINE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT À ACCRA, AU GHANA

The African Development Bank Group’s 2022 Annual Meetings are being held in Accra, Ghana from 23-27 May at the Accra International Conference Centre. The theme for the 2022 meetings is Achieving Climate Resilience and a Just Energy Transition for Africa. Africa, despite its low contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, remains the most vulnerable continent to climate change. The meetings will offer Bank governors a forum to share the climate change and energy transition challenges that their countries face. They also present an opportunity to showcase policy responses to tackle these challenges. The discussions will focus on how to boost funding for climate adaptation and related matters. Climate adaptation finance currently accounts for only 10% of global climate finance. Overall, only about 19% of total international adaptation finance is programmed in Africa, with the continent receiving only 3% of global climate finance flows. This year’s theme aligns with preparations for the United Nations’ global climate summit (COP27), scheduled for Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt in November 2022. It will highlight Africa’s need for increased investment and other forms of financing to accelerate climate adaptation efforts. The 2022 African Development Bank Group Annual Meetings will be the 57th Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the African Development Bank and the 48th Annual Meeting of the African Development Fund, the concessional arm of the Bank Group.

Les assemblées annuelles 2022 du Groupe de la Banque africaine de développement se tiennent à Accra, au Ghana, du 23 au 27 mai au Centre international de conférences d’Accra. Le thème des assemblées de 2022 est « Favoriser la résilience climatique et une transition énergétique juste pour l’Afrique ». L’Afrique, malgré sa faible contribution aux émissions de gaz à effet de serre, demeure le continent le plus vulnérable au changement climatique. Les assemblées offriront aux gouverneurs de la Banque un forum pour échanger sur les défis liés au changement climatique et à la transition énergétique auxquels leurs pays respectifs sont confrontés. Elles sont également l’occasion de présenter les réponses politiques apportées pour relever ces défis. Les discussions porteront sur la manière de stimuler le financement de l’adaptation au climat et des questions connexes. Le financement de l’adaptation au climat ne représente actuellement que 10 % du financement mondial du climat. Dans l’ensemble, seuls 19 % environ du financement international total de l’adaptation sont programmés en Afrique, le continent ne recevant que 3 % des flux financiers mondiaux liés au climat. Le thème des assemblées annuelles de cette année s’inscrit en droite ligne des préparatifs du sommet mondial des Nations unies sur le climat (COP27), prévu à Sharm El Sheikh, en Égypte, en novembre 2022. Il soulignera la nécessité pour l’Afrique d’accroître les investissements et d’autres formes de financement pour accélérer les efforts d’adaptation au climat. Les assemblées annuelles du Groupe de la Banque africaine de développement en 2022 seront la 57e assemblée annuelle du Conseil des gouverneurs de la Banque africaine de développement et la 48e assemblée annuelle du Fonds africain de développement, le guichet concessionnel du Groupe de la Banque.

https://am.afdb.org/ Join the discussion #AfDBAM2022

https://am.afdb.org/ Participez à la discussion : #AfDBAM2022


7 ABOUT THE AWARDS

Compete. Celebrate. Connect

The African Banker Awards were originally designed to recognise the reforms, rapid modernisation and expansion of banking and finance in Africa. Today they continue to identify and reward those who have been instrumental in maintaining excellence and best practices in the African financial services sector. They reward the outstanding achievements of companies and individuals that have changed the perception of Africa’s potential in domestic and international markets. The winners have created new financial opportunities for citizens and communities all over the continent and have inspired new generations of bankers who are shaping Africa’s future. Every year we see the quantity and quality of entries increase, testifying to the readiness of African banks and financial institutions to showcase to the world the good work they have been doing. A selection committee made up of our editorial board in consultation with institutional partners involved in Africa and our broader network of experts throughout the continent shortlisted nominees for the eligible categories. A distinguished and independent judging panel, known and respected for their banking and financial expertise on the African region, subsequently selected the winners.


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THE AFRICAN BANKER AWA R D S – A FA S C I N AT I N G JOURNEY It was 15 years ago when we instituted the African Banker Awards – the first of their kind for Africa. It has been a fascinating journey for us and the African financial community. As we prepare for the 16th Awards, scheduled for May this year, African Banker Editor, Anver Versi, looks back at 15 exciting years.


Momentous developments often have a fairly prosaic beginning. In 2007, following a series of explosive events in the banking sector in Nigeria and on advice from some of our most astute advisors, including Nigeria’s central bank governor at the time, Chukwuma Soludo, we launched the African Banker magazine as a quarterly. This was new territory for us, although of course we covered and commented on banking and finance in our flagship economics publication, African Business. After a total editorial and design makeover a few years earlier which involved placing the A frican entrepreneur and their concerns at the front, centre and back of all our endeavours, the publication just took off like never before. Hitherto, business coverage had been limited to national boundaries and when any news broke on the international stage, its focus was mainly on the negative. Very occasionally, an African success story would peep from behind other ‘more important’ items and that too with plenty of caveats by the reporters. The only genuinely pan-African coverage was provided by us through African Business for Anglophone Africa, and by the Jeune Afrique stable for Francophone Africa. Even then, the focus was very much on the activities of the multinational organisations such as the Bretton Woods institutions (the World

Bank and the IMF) in Africa, and on the views of mostly Western international companies operating in Africa. That was the model, inherited from the colonial attitudes in which most of the active force came from outside the continent while its own response was passive and often confined to statements by ministers of finance or central bank governors. But the relaunch of African Business, which in terms of the quality and depth of writing and design was just as good – if not better – than the best available on the market including top Western publications, caused a huge stir, not only in Africa but far afield. Now the stars of the show, taking centre stage, were African entrepreneurs and the coverage focused on African economic activities as the central issue rather than as a sideline to others. The success of African Business did two very important things: one, it broke the national silos that had limited and constrained the vision and ambition of entrepreneurs and two, African business successes and skills could no longer be ignored. Profile after profile, interview after interview showed the maturity, the originality, the sophistication and the a mbition of A frican entrepreneurs and business leaders. Views were echoed, discussed, amplified and modified across Africa. African enterprise had found a common voice and it spoke loudly

and clearly – and the world listened. Many of the earlier, idealistic aspirations such as pan-Africanism with teeth, greater cross-border trading, greater excha nge of ideas, greater collaboration and the emergence of truly African multinational companies now seemed possible. There was a realistic road-map, not an airy-fairy wish list. Today, of course, much of that has been achieved and the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) is probably the crowning pinnacle of that aspiration. Something significant Back in 2007, we were still deeply engrossed in the African Business project, which a lso involved ‘retraining’ our correspondents to think differently and working with some of the companies to adjust their advertising from a local retail focus to selling their brands internationally, when the call came to launch a publication specifically for the banking and finance sector. This sector, which was composed of a few large international Western banks and a multitude of smaller, u nderc apit a lised a nd poorly managed local banks, had failed to keep pace with the progress made by other commercial entities. Banks were locked in tight national silos with little or no information about what else was happening on the continent. Only Ecobank, with its clear pan-African mandate, was looking at the bigger picture.

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Bank failures were frequent and regulatory authorities were weak, often undercapitalised and understaffed. For the majority, even in urban centres, trust in the system was almost non-existent. Most of commercial life was carried out on a cash basis. The cream of Africa’s talent was often trained and employed by Western multinational banks such as Citi Bank, J.P. Morgan and so on. W hile local banks around Africa were trying to find a place for themselves to serve the interests of the new loca l commercia l classes and national governments, the situation in Nigeria had become dire. Trust in the system was virtually gone as scandal followed scandal and bank failures multiplied. Something had to be done. In 2004, the central bank governor, Chukwuma Soludo unleashed the ‘Consolidation big bang’. He raised the capital threshold more than 10fold from N2bn to N25bn ($190m at the time).

This sent many of the banks into panic mode. They could only raise this amount of money through mergers, acquisitions or by raising fresh capital. Other requirements in Soludo’s 13-point reform agenda included the adoption of a rulebased regulatory framework that was more risk-focused, ensuring greater compliance and transparency and vastly improved corporate governance. No other reforms in Nigeria’s financial history had gone so far nor bitten so deep. A scramble for M&A and fundraising ensued, as did head hunting for skilled and qualified executives. This brought in a fresh batch of gifted CEOs and managers, many of whom had held important positions at international banks. They saw vast opportunities in the new landscape – in which only 25 banks remained standing after the dust had settled – and were hungry for success. A bright new chapter had opened in the Nigerian banking story and the rest of Africa wanted to hear all about it.

Opposite Left: John Legend in Marrakesh Opposite Right: Akon, special guest at the awards in 2013


We at IC Publications felt the vibes and became convinced that something very significant was under way and that this was not a temporary turning but a permanent new road. This was our cue to launch African Banker – and I had the privilege to be its first editor. Our great ally in this venture was Christian Udechukwu – a handsome, barrel-chested Nigerian with a big laugh and boundless energ y who wa s a vita l lin k between the Nigerian government, the central bank, the commercial banks and interested parties in the

as to what sort of stories would interest a pan-African or rather an international audience (as there was keen interest in the magazine in financial quarters worldwide) or, if they were reporting for the big Western agencies or media, they found it difficult to look at stories from the African perspective rather than from the perspective of their home countries. But where there is a demand, the supply will come and we gradually built up an excellent team of correspondents and commentators. We decided we would apply the African Business model to African

AT THE INCEPTION STAGE, NO - ONE KNEW THAT STAGING THE AWARDS WOULD BECOME SUCH AN ADVENTURE AND THROW UP SO MANY CHALLENGES. UK. Through his BusinessinAfrica Events organisation, he brought diverse people together and set into motion very many valuable connections. But A f r ic a n Ba n ker, a s I mentioned earlier, was new territory for us. We set out to look for the best finance writers we could find but the going was tough – most were reporters working on national dailies and had no clue

Banker and made the bankers and regulators the stars through profiles and interviews. We ran robust analysis and didn’t pull our punches when we felt criticism was due. As it has done in all our publications, the pan-African theme ran like a river through the magazine. African Banker was an instant hit, wit h dema nd for copies increasing by the day. Many of our stories and interviews were lifted

and reproduced in newspapers and finance magazines all over the continent. With the new platform now established, important people in the banking and finance world reached out to us and made strong connections. We were a natural fit for people like Arnold Ekpe, the now legendary former CEO of Ecobank, or Jean-Louis Ekra, the former president of Afreximbank, or Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, the former CEO of Access Bank, among many others. These early connections have remained firmly in place to this day. Dona ld K aberuka, the former president of the African Development Bank and a man very well aware of the power of the media to get things done, invited us to the organisation’s HQ in Tunis at the time and gave us carte blanche to interview whoever we liked. This was in sharp contrast to the earlier policy of secrecy that had surrounded the bank and the publication of the feature changed the image of the bank almost overnight. Again we made very strong connections and friendships, for example with Tim Turner, then head of the bank’s private sector arm. Other stalwart friends of the magazine who gave us invaluable insights included Ngozi Okonjo-

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ABK AWARDS: BANK AND BANKER OF THE YEAR Category

Winner

Year

African Bank of the Year

Ecobank

2009

African Bank of the Year

Attijariwafa Bank

2010

African Bank of the Year

Standard Bank Group

2011

African Bank of the Year

Ecobank

2012

African Bank of the Year

Attijariwafa Bank

2013

African Bank of the Year

GTBank

2014

African Bank of the Year

Banque Populaire

2015

African Bank of the Year

Attijariwafa Bank

2016

African Bank of the Year

GT Bank Group

2017

African Bank of the Year

Equity Group

2018

African Bank of the Year

AfreximBank

2019

African Bank of the Year

Trade and Development Bank (TDB)

2020

African Bank of the Year

Standard Bank Group

2021

African Banker Icon

Adebayo Ogunlesi, CEO, Global Infra. Partners

2011

African Banker Icon

Eleni Gabre-Madhin, Ethiopia Com. Exchange

2012

African Banker Icon

Michael Joseph, Founder, mPesa

2013

African Banker Icon

Andrew Alli, CEO, Africa Finance Corporation

2014

African Banker Icon

Tidjane Thiam, CEO, Prudential

2015

African Banker Icon

Daniel Matjila, CEO, PIC

2016

African Banker Icon

Citi Group

2017

African Banker Icon

Stephen Koseff, co-founder, Investec

2018

African Banker Icon

Mitchell Elegbe, Founder, Interswitch

2019

African Banker Icon

Vivien Shobo, Former CEO Agusto & Co.

2020

African Banker Icon

Charlie Robertson, Renaissance Capital

2021

African Banker of the Year

Tayo Aderinokun, CEO GTB

2009

African Banker of the Year

Dr. James Mwangi, CEO, Equity Bank

2010

African Banker of the Year

Dr. James Mwangi, CEO, Equity Bank

2011

African Banker of the Year

Segun Agbaje, CEO, Guaranty Trust Bank

2012

African Banker of the Year

Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, CEO, Access Bank

2013

African Banker of the Year

Vivienne Yeda, MD, East African Dev. Bank

2014

African Banker of the Year

Albert Essien, CEO, Ecobank Transnational

2015

African Banker of the Year

Segun Agbaje, CEO, GTBank

2016

African Banker of the Year

Dr Benedict Okey Oramah, Pres. Afreximbank

2017

African Banker of the Year

Dr. James Mwangi, CEO, Equity Group

2018

African Banker of the Year

A. Tadesse, Pres. Trade and Development Bank

2019

African Banker of the Year

Herbert Wigwe, CEO, Access Bank

2020

African Banker of the Year

Herbert Wigwe, CEO, Access Bank

2021


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ABK AWARDS VENUES Year

Venue

2007

Grand Hyatt, Washington DC, US

2008

Willard Intercontinental Hotel, Washington DC

2009

Four Seasons Hotel at the Bosphorus, Istanbul

2010

Willard InterContinental Hotel, Washington DC

2011

Willard InterContinental Hotel, Washington DC

2012

Frangipani Gardens, Arusha, Tanzania

2013

Taj Palace, Marrakech, Morocco

2014

Serena Hotel, Kigali, Rwanda

2015

The Sofitel Ivoire, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire

2016

Intercontinental Hotel, Lusaka, Zambia

2017

Hyatt Regency, Ahmedabad, India

2018

Paradise Hotel, Busan, Korea

2019

La Gaviota, Malabo, Equatorial Guinea

2020

Virtual

2021

Virtual

2022

Kempinski Hotel, Accra, Ghana

Iweala, now Director General of the WTO, Razia Khan, Chief Economist at Standard Chartered, Obiageli ‘Oby’ Ezekwesili, VicePresident, World Bank and a host of other people who have helped fill in the gaps and become part of the African Banker family.

Time ripe for awards

Soon after African Banker had come into existence, with the first edition dedicated to the launch of the Africa Finance Corporation (another brainchild of Professor Soludo), Christian Udechukwu, who was a regular and very welcome presence at our offices, suggested the time was ripe to set up the African Banker Awards. It was actually Udechukwu who was the brains behind both African Banker and the awards, which he co-founded alongside our group, and he was instrumental in their growth and success. After the shocks of the early 2000s, African banks were in a much more comfortable place a nd ma ny were expa nding – both domestica lly a s well a s multinationally – at a rapid pace. This allowed many to survive the financial crisis of 2008 and proved that they could be resilient to global shocks and contribute to their nations’ developments.

The parameters and indices were also changing with issues like governance, CSR, inclusivity, ef f icienc y, tra nspa renc y a nd adaptation to new technology and methods coming more to the fore. “It’s time to find out the best of the best in each category a nd b enc h m a rk it ,” a r g ue d Udechukwu. “And the choices need to be watertight so that no one can question the credibility of the awards.” Afif Ben Yedder, who was the publisher at the time, Omar Ben Yedder, then the associate publisher and founder of our events division, and myself agreed. We decided to shadow the a nnua l World Ba nk Genera l Meetings in Washington. Most of the top African bankers, central bank governors, ministers of finance and so on would be attending the meetings. It was also the time to showcase excellence on the global stage. Our awards ceremony would provide not only welcome relief from the round of dry talks and discussions but bring together the continent’s banking community to break bread, get to know each other and enjoy an evening. We also knew that competition for the awards would be fierce and that judging would have to be scrupulous.

Omar was already breathing life into an IC Events department that had lain dormant for years. The ‘ABK Awards’ as we shortened them, would be his baby. He was under no illusion. He knew the task would stretch his organisation and leadership capacity and that of his teams to the breaking point, as it would involve staging the event far from home, in Washington and the logistics were daunting. Would he take it on? He said he would but added: “Africa deserves the best – we don’t compromise. Every event would have to be a showpiece.” It was but at that point, no one knew that staging the annual awards would become such an adventure and throw up so many challenges. We decided that we would give awards for several categories of activities, with the big gongs going to the Bank of the Year and the Banker of the Year, although the Central Banker of the Year and the Finance Minister of the Year awards were also high in prestige value. We would also give outstanding bankers a Lifetime Award. Once the call for entries had gone out, the team had to sift through every document that arrived and make a longlist before a smaller team would cut it down to a shortlist. Then judges had to


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could enjoy a refreshing beer in the dry heat. But whatever the challenges, by the grace of providence and an astonishing degree of composure under fire on the part of Omar and his team, everything turned out right on the night.

Above: GTB CEO Segun Agbaje, winning the 2012 African Banker of the Year award Opposite: President Paul Kagame making an impassioned speech in 2014

be appointed and briefed and handed the shortlist for their final selection. The announcement of the winners would be made during a gala night which would also include some entertainment. Easier said than done. The gods of disruption sometimes seemed to take a delight in making our plans go awry. With the world then obsessed with terrorism, logistics could be nightmarish. Even when the team was safely at the venue, everything that could go wrong usually did. We found ourselves being bumped off the venues we had booked at the last minute; in Malabo, we had only 90 minutes to change an unscheduled, but highpowered lunch setting into our stage; someone decided to cut away the feeder cables in Lusaka “because they got under my feet” while the tables had gaping holes; in Busan we had to swallow hard when we discovered that the flowers we had ordered for tables would cost around $400 a bunch, and getting over the cultural divide was an achievement in itself. However, the gods of wine were on our side in Ahmedabad, a city where the serving of alcohol is strictly prohibited. Through wily negotiations and a connected event planner we managed to get alcohol in time, the only event that week where guests

Mending and making do The first awards ceremony took place at the Grand Hyatt in Washington. The second was upgraded to the Willard Intercontinental, a hotel steeped in history. With the World Bank meetings taking place outside of Washington every third year, in 2009 the awards left Washington to move to the Four Seasons Hotel on the Bosphorus, Istanbul, Turkey. It was a very enjoyable affair with the Turkish hosts providing great hospitality. The awards were now truly global. The next t wo events were held back at the Willard I nt e r C ont i n e nt a l Ho t e l i n Washington DC but then there was a strong lobbying that instead of shadowing the World Bank, our awards should be held during the African Development Bank’s annual meetings. We readily agreed as it made great deal of sense. It was time to come home. We were in Arusha, Tanzania for the first of these awards in Africa, in 2012. I remember that due to some misunderstanding, the venue we had booked was no longer available. To make it worse, there was no other venue that could cater for around 400 people. We were at our wits’ end when someone suggested setting up a big marquee on a field. But with the recent rains, the ground would be soft and muddy, we felt. No fear, a small group of Indians contractors turned up and said they would cover the ground with wooden platforms and set up the tents. “Can you do it in time?” Omar asked. “It is not a problem,” the leader answered. He gave the same answer to every question we put to him – which was a problem. But sure enough, on a clear moon l it n ig ht, w it h Mou nt Kilimanjaro’s bulk in the distance, the venue was up and ready, festooned with torches and lights. For the catering, we persuaded the lady who ran a small boutique hotel we were staying at to go for the big time and provide meals for 400 instead of a dozen. She took it on, trained a few young people to wait


WINNING THE AWARD HA S BEEN A GREAT BOOST TO US MOR ALLY AND HA S GIVEN OUR STAFF, AND EVEN OUR CUSTOMERS, A FEELING OF GREAT PRIDE.

perfectly and the meal and awards ceremony were a huge success. Two years later in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, the ice-rink at the Sofitel hotel had to be converted to a gala dinner and awards venue in doublequick time. The Senegalese pop idol Baba Maal headlined the evening’s entertainment. In Lusaka, Zambia in 2016 we had to build a tent in the gardens of the InterContinental Hotel – but again, things went swimmingly. The 2014 event in Kigali was later defined as the ‘heavyweights night’, according to Udechukwu. Among the VIP guests were Presidents Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Festus Mogae of Botswana, Dona ld Kaberuka, Mo Ibrahim, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Arunma Oteh and others. All said they had enjoyed the event and been impressed. In some way, those meetings and our awards had established Kigali as a major centre for large international events. A year later their wonderful conference centre officially opened and it’s today a truly global leader in events and conferences. But by genera l accla im, the 2013 event held at the Taj Palace, Marrakesh, Morocco was the best. This event was staged in collaboration with famous designer Ozwald Boateng and his Made-in Africa Foundation. The setting in the ancient city of Marrakesh, surrounded by an oasis of palm trees, added an extra esoteric dimension and the entertainment provided by musical stars such as John Legend, Akon and Youssou N’ dou r, plu s t he wonder f u l Moroccan cuisine, made it a night never to be forgotten. The awards took us to many places around the world (see box), including Busan in Korea and Ahmedabad in India. We often worked with local contractors to give the event colour and grounding and for the bankers and other attendees, the opportunity to meet with and discuss issues of mutual interest was invaluable. The awards have done two major services – one they broke down the silos, or even echo-chambers of most of the national banking sectors as those who threw their hats in the ring had to take into account what other banks in different jurisdictions were doing. So there was a lot of cross-fertilisation and exchange of ideas and processes.

“What the competition forced us to do,” one banker told me, “was to take a fresh look at our systems and models and ask ourselves if this was the best we could do. So even if you didn’t win, the fact that you had entered and presented your case... it has been a great ongoing exercise for improving our performance and trying to match up to the continental benchmark.” For the winners of course, the awards have been greatly cherished trophies. They say these are not only the best locally, but continentwide. “Winning the award has been a great boost to us morally and has given our staff, and even our customers, a feeling of great pride. In addition of course, we have used the award to its full extent in our advertising and PR – and the results have been great. We shall continue to strive to win other awards in the future,” said another banker, this time a major winner. It goes without saying that we could not have staged any of the awards without the unstinting support of our sponsors. These are organisations with a wider and longer-term view of African banking and its place in the continent’s economic development. The list is too long to reproduce here but Ecobank, Afreximbank, the African Development Bank and the Nigerian Bank of Industry have been our stalwart supporters over the years. The last few years has seen also the African Guarantee Fund come in as our Platinum Sponsor. Working alongside our sponsors throughout the year and understanding their work and trying to do our bit to make their work resonate has been as rewarding as the event itself. The success of the awards is also very much their success. The last two events have been held v i r t u a l ly a nd a lt hou g h nothing can compensate for the loss of the real live person-toperson events, they have been very well attended and, pandemic or not, the competition to get and hold one of the African Banker trophies has been as fierce as ever – which is wonderful news for the health of Africa’s vibrant banking sector. Normal service resumes in Accra, Ghana in May 2022 when the African Banker family will once again come together to celebrate the best of the best in African financial services. See you there! n

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Programme 18.00 –19.15 Cocktail Reception Dinner and Awards Ceremony 19.30 – 22:30 20.00

1st Set of Awards Sustainable Bank of the Year Deal of the Year - Infrastructure Deal of the Year - Equity Deal of the Year - Debt Yaw Kuffour Award for Trade Finance 2nd Set of Awards Award for Financial Inclusion FinTech of the Year African Banker Icon Minister of Finance of the Year

20.30

Dinner & Entertainment

21.15

3rd Set of Awards Deal of the Year - Energy Deal of the Year - Agriculture SME Bank of the Year Best Regional Banks DFI of the Year

21.35

4th Set of Awards Central Bank Governor of the Year Lifetime achievement Award African Bank of the Year African Banker of the Year Vote of Thanks and Group Photo

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Night cap



18 CATEGORIES AND NOMINEES 1. S U STA I N A B L E B A N K O F T H E Y E A R

3. D E A L O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D – EQ U I T Y

The panel of judges will be seeking concrete examples of projects and initiatives within the institutions that have had a sustainable impact on the communities they are geared towards. The award is aimed at companies that go beyond the philanthropic use of funds to use their overall knowledge, resources and reputation to improve the lives of the less advantaged in society.

The winning deal will have highlighted new opportunities and raised sector or regional investment profiles. The judges will consider the size, complexity and impact in terms of changing perceptions of Africa as a place to do business.

S H O RT L I ST :

Commercial International Bank (CIB) Nedbank

S H O RT L I ST :

Mutandis – Attijariwafa Bank Momentum Metropolitan – Bank of America Prosus’ c. $15bn Accelerated Equity Offering in Tencent – Citi

Standard Chartered

Divestment by Sasol of a 30% interest in the Republic of Mozambique Pipeline Investments Company (ROMPCO) – Nedbank

Trade and Development Bank

MTN Nigeria IPO – Renaissance Capital

2. D E A L O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D – I N F R A ST RU C T U R E

4. D E A L O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D – D E BT

Rand Merchant Bank

This will be awarded for the deal which has had the most significant impact. The committee will take into consideration the complexity of the deal, its size, its structure and the groundbreaking role it may have played (ie ‘replicability’). The deal may provide a template for such future transactions and will have highlighted new possibilities and new solutions within the sector or industry it relates to. S H O RT L I ST :

The Luanda Bita Water Supply Project – African Trade Insurance Agency

This winning deal may provide a template for such future transactions and will have highlighted new opportunities and raised country, sector or regional investment profiles, or some other innovation in debt deal financing within Africa. S H O RT L I ST :

Bidvest $800m 5NC2 Senior Unsecured bond – Bank of America Bank of Industry €750m Debut Senior Note Participation Notes due 2027 – Bank of Industry Bank One Currency Swap – Bank One Limited

Tanger Alliance – Attijariwafa Bank

€500m Benin SDG Bond – Citi

Lagos Free Zone Company Funding SPV – Infrastructure Credit Guarantee Company

Access Bank $634.5m Syndicated Facility – Mashreq Bank UAE

Gharably Integrated Engineering Company (GIECO) term loan – National Bank of Egypt Kenya Roads Annuity Programme, Lots 15 and 18 – Standard Bank


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5. Y AW K U F F O U R AWA R D F O R T R A D E F I N A N C E* Yaw Kuffour was a trailblazer and with hindsight a visionary. The Yaw Kuffour Trade Finance Award has been launched to recognise the ethos of this Ghanaian banker, who passed away in 2020. Yaw was instrumental in creating the AfDB's Trade Finance division. What started off as an idea, became a project, evolved to a programme and is today a fully-fledged division within the Bank. The winner of the award, a person or a bank, will have demonstrated the qualities that Yaw also sought out: innovation, problem solving and progress. Yaw engendered a spirit of high ambition, high standards and continuous improvement. This is what we are trying to recognise with this award.

Judging criteria The award will go to the person or bank that has been able to demonstrate true innovation in the trade finance space through the wide-use of, for example, technology-led solutions, innovative finance mechanisms to provide adapted solutions for clients to ensure wider coverage and greater trade. The award winner (either a person or an institution) would have led the charge in reducing trade barriers in Africa, improving efficiency and accessibility of trade finance products, thus contributing to greater trade. Most notably, the award winner would also be recognised by the strong contribution to the development of cross border trade, support the formalisation of informal regional trade and thus helping champion the implementation and benefits of the AfCFTA.

6. AWA R D F O R F I N A N C I A L I N C LU S I O N This category has been widened to include more than just microfinance. The winner will have best succeeded in delivering financial products and services to wider parts of society, particularly to the most disadvantaged and low income segments, ultimately contributing to financial inclusion, development and growth. S H O RT L I ST :

British Arab Commercial Bank (BACB) Commercial International Bank (CIB), Egypt Centenary Rural Development Bank, Uganda Trade and Development Bank Tugende, Uganda

7. F I N T EC H O F T H E Y E A R This award goes to the FinTech hat has brought most innovative practices to the financial services industry. The winner will have demonstrated original and efficient use of technology and/or innovative practices to provide: new, evolving business models; high quality and affordable products and services; faster and more inclusive access to financial services for customers; improved security and reliability of transaction services. S H O RT L I ST :

Capricorn Digital Limited Crowdyvest Interswitch JUMO OPay

*The winners of these categories will be chosen through consultations by the African Banker Awards committee


20 CATEGORIES AND NOMINEES 8. A F R I C A N B A N K E R I CO N* The ‘Icon’ category is awarded to an individual or institution for their outstanding contribution in the field of business, banking and finance. They are chosen by the awards committee, who will have noted excellence in their area of expertise and for their work in helping to change the perception of Africa as well as contributing to the establishment of best global practice in the continent. This award in the past has been given to outstanding individuals such as Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, who needs no introduction, Adebayo Ogunlesi, one of Wall Street’s most eminent financiers, and Eleni Gabre-Madhin, founder of the Ethiopian Commodities Exchange.

9. M I N I ST E R O F F I N A N C E O F T H E Y E A R*

11. D E A L O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D – AG R I C U LT U R E This will be awarded for the deal which has had the most significant impact. The committee will take into consideration the complexity of the deal, its size, its structure and the groundbreaking role it may have played. The deal may provide a template for such future transactions and will have highlighted new possibilities and new solutions within the sector/industry it relates to. S H O RT L I ST :

Expansion of Atlantic Shrimpers Limited (ASL) – Access Bank $200m corporate facility to BUA Industries Limited – AFC

This award goes to the African minister of finance who has carried through prudent macro economic policies and, through reforms and his or her actions, has shown skill and dexterity to create the conditions of an appealing investment climate.

Multicurrency Facilities Agreement in favour of Canal Sugar Company – Afreximbank / National Bank of Egypt

10. D E A L O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D – E N E RG Y

12. S M E B A N K O F T H E Y E A R

This will be awarded for the project which has had the most significant impact. The committee will take into consideration the complexity of the project, its size, its structure and the groundbreaking role it may have played. The deal may provide a template for such future transactions and will have highlighted new possibilities and new solutions within the sector/industry it relates to. S H O RT L I ST :

Temane Thermal Power Station – Absa Mozambique and IFC Abia State Geometric Power IPP Power Project – Afreximbank

Ghana Cocoa Board – Nedbank

This award goes to the bank in Africa which has significantly contributed to the development of the SME sector, thus helping contribute to building the economic backbone of the continent. It will have considerably catalysed funding into the private sector in Africa and promoted enterprise development by facilitating credit and access to finance for SEMs. They will have done so by expanding SME-focused lines of credit, providing technical assistance to SME development institutions and built SMEs’ capacity via linkage programmes with private sector investment. S H O RT L I ST :

ABSA, Ghana Commercial International Bank (CIB), Egypt

Aftissat Wind Farm – Attijariwafa Bank

Ecobank

The Kinguele Aval Hydropower Project – IFC

Fidelity Bank, Ghana

Syndicated Facility to El Sewedy Group – National Bank of Egypt

The Standard Bank Group


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13. B EST R E G I O N A L B A N K*

17. A F R I C A N B A N K O F T H E Y E A R

This award goes to a bank operating either across a specific region or in one country within a region (North, East, South, West or Central Africa). The winner will have excelled in the banking industry in its region by reaching out to new customers, offering new services, adopting inclusiveness by bringing the unbanked into the banking space, making use of new technologies and contributing to a stronger financial sector.

This award goes to the bank in Africa that has demonstrated a high performance across various metrics. It will have considerably changed the banking landscape by reaching out to new customers, offering new services, adopting inclusiveness by bringing the unbanked into the banking space, making use of new technologies, and helping to drive growth through a stronger financial sector. S H O RT L I ST :

14. D F I O F T H E Y E A R This award goes to the Development Financial Institution which has demonstrated a high performance across various metrics, both qualitative and quantitative. It will have supported clients, projects and delivered high impact during these unprecedented times. It will also have considerably changed the development finance landscape by investing in impact-led projects and contributed to the sustainable economic development of the continent. S H O RT L I ST :

AECF Afreximbank BADEA International Finance Corporation (IFC) Trade and Development Bank

Access Bank Attijariwafa Bank Bank of Africa Bank of Industry Ecobank Guaranty Trust Bank The Standard Bank Group

18. A F R I C A N B A N K E R O F T H E Y E A R Through their leadership and vision, the winner will have overseen strong financial performance within their organisation and will have successfully guided their institution to new heights in the industry. S H O RT L I ST :

15. C E N T R A L B A N K G OV E R N O R O F T H E Y E A R*

Ade Ayeyemi – Ecobank Transnational Incorporated

This award goes to the central bank governor who has successfully reformed and transformed the financial sector, through proper regulation and policies, as well as created a stable and predictable environment for investment and growth.

Adesola Adeduntan – First Bank Nigeria

16. L I F E T I M E AC H I E V E M E N T AWA R D* This award goes to an African banker who throughout his or her career has worked tirelessly to strengthen and promote banking as well as the role of the financial services sector on the African continent.

Mukwandi Chibesakunda – Zambia National Commercial Bank Benedict Oramah – Afreximbank Admassu Tadesse – Trade and Development Bank Herbert Wigwe – Access Bank Vivienne Yeda – East African Development Bank

*The winners of these categories will be chosen through consultations by the African Banker Awards committee


22 JUDGES

R E B ECC A ENONCHONG Founder, Chief Executive Officer of AppsTech Rebecca Enonchong is founder and CEO of AppsTech, a leading global provider of enterprise application solutions. With offices on three continents, AppsTech counts clients in the private and public sector across the globe. A native of Cameroon, she has devoted much of her life to promoting African interests. She is cofounder and Chair of ActivSpaces, a tech incubator in Cameroon. She also cofounded ABAN (African Business Angels Network) and CAN (Cameroon Angels Network). She is an advisor to VC4Africa, the largest online community dedicated to entrepreneurs and investors building companies in Africa. Enonchong is a long-time board member of the awardwinning social enterprise Salesforce.org. She is the patron and advisor of African IT Women, a community of young women involved in ICTs. She served on the UNIFEM (UN Women) Global Advisory Committee on the Digital Divide and the UN ICT Task Force.

C H R I STO P H E R H A RT L A N D - P E E L

Principal Hartland-Peel Africa Equity Research

Christopher Hartland-Peel has worked exclusively on sub-Saharan Africa since 1990 and has maintained a database of African companies and stock markets that is one of the most comprehensive in the world. He has worked extensively in emerging markets – with the IFC in Washington DC, the AfDB and USAID, and Standard Bank and Exotix in London. In the 1990s he was based in Nairobi, working on privatisation and financial market development, where he realised there was little or no effective research done on sub-Saharan stock markets. He has written a book, African Equities: A Guide to Markets and Companies, published by Euromoney.

ALAIN LE NOIR Founder and Special Advisor to the President of the Club of the Directors of Banks and Credit Institutions in Africa Alain Le Noir graduated in banking and finance. After working in a French bank for 13 years, he joined the Training Centre of the Banking Industry in France before relocating to Africa. In his capacity as General Delegate, he directed training courses for 25 countries in Africa and the Indian Ocean. For 20 years, he was the Executive Secretary of the Club of the Directors of Banks and Credit Institutions in Africa, which he founded in 1989. He is today the special advisor to the president of the club. Independent administrator of several banks in the franc zone, he writes regularly in the French edition of African Banker. He is co-author of the book Banks and Finance in Africa.


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TOM MINNEY

ZEMEDENEH N EG AT U

TOY I N F. SANNI

VIVIEN SHOBO

Editor African Capital Markets News

Global Chairman of Fairfax Africa Fund, LLC (US)

Group Chief Executive Officer, Emerging Africa Capital Group

Chief Executive Officer of FVS Advisory Partners

Tom Minney has run capital markets and businesses for over 19 years in Africa and specialises in finance, business strategy and communications. His experience includes being general manager of the Namibian Stock Exchange (in a period of fast growth); a founding member of the SADC Committee of Stock Exchanges; investment banking and private equity; helping set up an innovative investment firm in Ethiopia; and working with Fairtrade and other companies on strategy and capital raising. He advises on capital markets strategy and is a writer, analyst, journalist and speaker. He edits the African Capital Markets News blog and writes for a range of magazines.

An American of Ethiopian origin, Negatu is a globally-recognised business leader. He has advised Wall Street investment banks, governments, sovereign wealth funds, and multinationals in sectors including financial services, airlines and consumer products. His clients have included Diageo, BAT and Ethiopian Airlines. He was the founder of Ernst & Young Ethiopia and served as its Managing Partner for 18 years. In 2017 he became Global Chairman of the American investment firm Fairfax Africa Fund, LLC. He is also Chairman of the African subsidiary of one of the largest European multinational fashion design and manufacturing companies. He has a business degree from Howard University, Washington DC, completed the LSE programme at the Harvard Business School, Boston, and is a US CPA.

Toyin F. Sanni is Group CEO of Emerging Africa Capital, which she founded after retiring as Group CEO of United Capital Plc. In 2017, she was declared the Business Woman of the Year at the All Africa Business Leaders Awards (AABLA) and CEO of the Year 2017 at the Nigerian Pearl Awards. Sanni has served on the boards of several companies and on investment committees of private equity and specialised funds. She is a past president of the Association of Investment Advisers and Portfolio Managers of Nigeria and currently the President of the Association of Corporate and Individual Investment Advisers, the official trade group recognised by the Securities and Exchange Commission for all registered Investment Advisers in Nigeria.

Vivien Shobo is the Chief Executive Officer of FVS Advisory Partners. Before this, she was the Chief Executive Officer of Agusto & Co, Nigeria’s foremost Credit Rating Agency, a position she held for over a decade, until December 2019. Vivien has extensive experience and macro and industry knowledge. Agusto & Co successfully rated a diverse range of transactions under her leadership, including most of Nigeria’s leading domestic and international banks, notable corporates, subnational governments, and significant debt capital issues. As part of her contribution to the Nigerian financial market development, Vivien previously served on several Securities and Exchange Commission’s Financial Literacy Master Plan Committee (a blueprint for the development of the Nigerian Capital Market), the Fixed Income Sub-Committee, and the Investor Confidence SubCommittee.


24 PLATINUM SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSOR

A guarantee for African growth

…transforming Nigeria’s industrial sector

The African Guarantee Fund (AGF) is a pan-African financial institution whose mandate is to facilitate access to finance for Small and Medium Enterprises, with the aim of fostering a sustainable and inclusive economic growth in Africa. AGF provides partial credit guarantees and capacity development assistance, designed to jointly mitigate SMEs’ perceived risk. AGF has also launched an innovative guarantee product to build resilience within the SME sector as the continent recovers from the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Steadfast on its commitment to increase access to finance for women entrepreneurs, AGF implements the Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa (AFAWA), through its Guarantee for Growth program, which aims to avail up to $3 billion in financing for women entrepreneurs in Africa. With a presence in 40 African countries, African Guarantee Fund has unlocked $3 billion in financing for SMEs, enabling beneficiary SMEs to generate nearly $5 billion dollars in incremental income.

The Bank of Industry (BOI) is Nigeria’s oldest and most successful Development Finance Institution (DFI). The Bank was incorporated in 1959 as ICON Limited and reconstructed into the Nigerian Industrial Development Bank (NIDB) in 1964 and further restructured into BOI in 2001. Due to its sustained impressive performance over the past 60 years, the Bank of Industry with its AA+ rating by Fitch Ratings is today, the best internationally rated wholly-owned Nigerian bank. It was also rated Aa3 by Moody’s Investor Services and AA+ by Agusto & Co of Nigeria. As Nigeria’s premier DFI, BOI has consistently, efficiently and effectively intervened in sectors of the Nigerian economy that market-based financial institutions would shy away from. Over the last couple of years, the Bank’s risk assets have grown significantly while it has still maintained a quality portfolio. The Bank is gender-friendly and has a dedicated team that helps build the capacity of its customers to access finance. BOI’s focus is to promote the industrialisation of the Nigerian economy by supporting enterprises (micro, small, medium and large) whose major inputs and raw materials are locally sourced. The enterprises BOI works with cut across the entire economy – agriculture, entertainment, energy, oil and gas, power, mining, information technology, etc. Also, because many of the assisted projects are import substitution and export based, BOI’s esteemed customers have contributed significantly to driving for self-reliance through backward integration and economic diversification, all of which positively impact the contribution of the industrial sector to the nation’s Gross National Product and overall development.

www.africanguaranteefund.com

www.boi.ng


25 ASSOCIATE SPONSORS

Reliable leaders in innovative financing solutions Established in 1985, the Eastern and Southern African Trade and Development Bank (TDB) is a multilateral, treaty-based, investment-grade development finance institution, with 41 sovereign and institutional shareholders and assets of USD 8bn. TDB serves 22 economies in its region, with the mandate to finance and foster trade, regional economic integration, and sustainable development, through trade finance, project & infrastructure finance, and asset management. TDB is part of the TDB Group, which also comprises TDF (the Trade and Development Fund), ESATF (the Eastern and Southern African Trade Fund), TCI (TDB Captive Insurance) and the TDB Academy.

www.tdbgroup.org

Delivering sustainable economic growth Access Bank is a leading full-service commercial Bank. Having operated in the Sub-Region for over four decades, the Bank prides in its achievements and legacy as a truly dependable African Bank penetrating the global market. Access Bank currently has presence in 10 African countries with branches in the UEA, UK and three representative offices in China, India and Lebanon. Operating in Commercial, Corporate, Business and Retail space, Access Bank commands the largest customer base among African banks with over 40million customers. Access Bank has recorded remarkable growth in its financial performance over the years. In 2021, the Bank recorded close to 600 billion Naira, a profit before tax of over 110 billion Naira. Another area that has received exponential growth is the usage of its digital platforms. With over 2900 ATMs across Africa and over 9million USSD and Mobile App users respectively, customers have experienced our digital transformation. Banking has been made easy and accessible with the wide network base with over 600 branches and service outlets across Africa and our ever evolving digital technology employed branches and service outlets across Africa and our ever evolving digital technology employed. Our diligence in proffering solutions to our cherished customers have been acknowledged and awarded. In the past few years, Access Bank has been honoured by distinguished global and domestic awards which includes: 2021 Karlsruhe Sustainable Finance Award “Outstanding Business Sustainability Achievement”, 2021 Euromoney Award “Best Digital Bank in Africa”, 2021 Global Brands Award “Best Bank in Investor Relations”, amongst others. www.accessbankplc.com


26 ORGANISERS

African Banker is a quarterly magazine dedicated to banking and finance in Africa. It covers news from the banking, finance, insurance and currency sectors, and the latest analysis of the stock markets and capital markets. With demand for reliable and

up-to-date information on Africa’s banking and financial sectors at an all-time high, African Banker aims to provide the necessary support to companies and individuals participating in an industry that is shaping the future of the continent’s economy.

BusinessinAfrica Events (BiAE) is a leading UK-based business communication company specialising in live events, public relations, media relations and reputation management for corporate clients, regulatory agencies and governments with a focus on Africa. BiAE provides an interface between Africa and the rest of the world. It offers precise

planning, strict budgetary control, excellent logistical preparation, attention to detail, unrivalled regional networks of contacts and a top quality database, extensive industry experience, good information flow and the best on-site management. BiAE has experience of organising and hosting live events in the US, the UK and various African countries.

IC Events has established itself as a leading organiser of African business and economic events. From small workshops and roundtables to large business conferences and awards ceremonies, our events are

recognised as some of the premier fixtures on the international calendar. Our annual banking awards are an opportunity to reward companies and individuals who have made a positive contribution to the continent.

IC Publications has over 50 years’ experience in publishing magazines, newsletters, country supplements, industry reports and market intelligence on Africa. With over 2.6 million readers in more than 100 countries, our publications are the region’s undisputed market leaders. Our distribution network and reach are unrivalled in terms of scope, numbers and quality. Our readers

and clients represent the elite from business, political and academic circles. These are people who have influence over the direction of their countries and companies. With its vast experience in the field of communications, public relations and contract publishing services, IC Publications offers a one-stopshop solution to serve all its clients’ needs.


RELIABLE LEADERS IN INNOVATIVE FINANCING SOLUTIONS FOR AFRICA’S SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THE TRADE & DEVELOPMENT BANK HAS BEEN CATALYZING BILLIONS IN TRADE AND TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS IN EASTERN & SOUTHERN AFRICA AND BEYOND FOR OVER 35 YEARS.

INTEGRATING & ADVANCING THE REGION WWW.TDBGROUP.ORG