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MAGAZINE

welcome

I

t may feel like the world is fraught with political turmoil, but that aside there is plenty to celebrate! For starters there is always a feel good factor when there is a royal wedding as well as another royal baby on the horizon. At Cliveden, with Windsor on the doorstep, we remain proud of our centuries of royal associations. Cliveden also boasts more than its fair share of literary links, and on the back of a monumentally successful inaugural Cliveden Literary Festival last autumn, an impressive collection of A-list authors has already been curated for the second Literary Festival to be held in late September. If festivals are ‘your thing’, we are well positioned to cover the sublime to the ridiculous with seriously highbrow events on our doorsteps, such as the internationally renowned Chelsea Flower Show in May, just around the corner from 11 Cadogan Gardens, or the Broadway Arts Festival in June, in and around The Lygon Arms. Meanwhile, Chewton Glen’s ‘super-exclusive’ mini-Glastonbury sees Chris Evans once again bringing the ‘Dine & Disco’ back in aid of BBC Children in Need with headliners Take That and

street food courtesy of Tom Kerridge, José Pizzaro and Atul Kochhar. Olly Smith is firmly in charge of liquid refreshments throughout this amazing event which raised a whopping £1.7 million for the charity last year. He has also penned a few enticing words on the resurgence of gin (a firm favourite in The Stembridge household). The phenomenal success of the British luxury sector prompted us to feature a conversation with several successful business women who are currently influencing this £32 billion industry. Prominent women were also the inspiration for our new bespoke Spa range at Cliveden, with two unique fragrances named after Nancy Astor and Anna Maria, Countess of Shrewsbury. With a new Ultra-Treehouse at Chewton Glen, a new Spa at Cliveden and a top-to-toe facelift for The Lygon Arms completed, the Iconic estate is in good order. Without even drawing breath, we are already hard at work at 11 Cadogan Gardens, creating an exciting new neighbourhood restaurant opening onto Pavilion Road in the heart of Chelsea.

Andrew Stembridge Executive Director, Iconic Luxury Hotels

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ALL INDIVIDUAL ALL ICONIC

CLIVEDEN

CHEWTON GLEN

Ideal for: an escape from the city.

Ideal for: a perfect staycation.

Contact reservations to make a booking. T: 01628 607107 reservations@clivedenhouse.co.uk www.clivedenhouse.co.uk

Contact reservations to make a booking. T: 01425 282212 reservations@chewtonglen.com www.chewtonglen.com

Cliveden is unique; this historic National Trust country house, just 40 minutes from London and 20 minutes from Heathrow, is set in 376 acres of Grade I listed formal gardens and woodland and enjoys panoramic views over the River Thames. It has a rich heritage as a venue for entertaining royalty and prime ministers, with tales of parties, privilege and power. Today Cliveden is as glamorous and decadent as it has ever been. An ambitious and sympathetic five-year restoration project has recently been completed, its crowning glory being the Cliveden Spa, which features the ‘Profumo Affair’ pool. Guests can enjoy a delicious choice of dining experiences including the award-winning André Garrett Restaurant in the sumptuous dining room and The Astor Grill in the old stables. Cliveden has recently been recognised as ‘Top Hotel in the UK’ in Condé Nast Traveller Readers’ Travel Awards.

Chewton Glen is an original; this 5-star Relais & Chateaux luxury hotel and spa is one of the finest in the country and sets the standards by which others are judged. Located within 130 acres of gardens on the edge of the New Forest and a few minutes’ walk from the coast, Chewton Glen is renowned for continually innovating and evolving. Recent additions include fabulous Treehouse suites and The Kitchen, an exciting meet, eat, cook venue overseen by TV Chef James Martin. Various activities available within the grounds include 9-hole golf course, indoor and outdoor tennis courts, and a croquet lawn. Every year Chewton Glen garners a host of top awards, these include The Good Hotel Guide 2018 Editor’s Choice Award for both Country House Hotel and Family Friendly Hotel, and third ‘Top Hotel in the UK’ in Condé Nast Traveller Readers’ Travel Awards.

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ICONIC LUXURY HOTELS IS A SMALL COLLECTION OF EXCEPTIONAL HOTELS. EACH ONE HAS ITS OWN CHARACTER, BUT THEY ALL DELIVER OUTSTANDING EXPERIENCES.

THE LYGON ARMS

11 CADOGAN GARDENS

Ideal for: a country retreat.

Ideal for: the smartest shopping experience.

Contact reservations to make a booking. T: 01386 852255 reservations@lygonarmshotel.co.uk www.lygonarmshotel.co.uk

Contact reservations to make a booking. T: 0207 730 7000 reservations@11cadogangardens.com www.11cadogangardens.com

The Lygon Arms is a Cotswolds institution; this stunning 600-year-old coaching inn of honeyed stone is located in picturesque Broadway – which is often referred to as the ‘Jewel of the Cotswolds’. The inn has been a destination for centuries, attracting guests as varied as King Charles I, Oliver Cromwell, Elizabeth Taylor and Clint Eastwood. Recently The Lygon Arms underwent a major refurbishment programme that has delivered luxurious comfort and chic style while retaining the inn’s distinctive heritage, character and Cotswolds charm. Features include: The Lygon Bar & Grill for relaxed dining in the magnificent Great Hall, inviting new wine bar, relaxing cocktail bar, luxurious spa for indulgent pampering, and secret gardens approaching three acres.

11 Cadogan Gardens is exceptional; appreciated by the cognoscenti, this delightful, exclusive boutique hotel is situated in an elegant townhouse in the heart of Chelsea, one of the smartest and most fashionable areas of London. Individual and distinguished, yet subtly discreet, 11 Cadogan Gardens provides the ultimate city escape with plush, luxurious suites, theatrical cocktail bar and, coming soon, a new addition: a restaurant opening onto Pavilion Road – which is considered the very latest in-vogue destination for foodies. Situated between Sloane Square and Knightsbridge, an area acclaimed worldwide for the very best in luxury and style, the hotel is perfectly located for travellers and fashionistas. Condé Nast Traveller has just announced that 11 Cadogan Gardens was named third in ‘The Best Hotels in London’ in the Readers’ Travel Awards.

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MAGAZINE

50

contents iconic travel

GLITTERING PRIZES

UP & AWAY

22

TOWN & COUNTRY

26

PRINCELY PARADISE

70

FOR VERY PETICULAR TRAVELLERS

86

The ultimate escape among the treetops In praise of the Maserati Levante Highgrove: monument to the English garden

iconic luxury WOMEN IN LUXURY

Unsung heroes of the luxury market offer insights and encouragement

A LIFE IN LUXURY 

Julia Carrick OBE gives the long view for the luxury industry

Dog-friendly adventures

15

Are staycations the new exotic?

19

34

THE NEW LOVE AFFAIR

58

Susan d’Arcy discovers her inner and outer goddess

THE GENERATION GAME  What is the single biggest threat to a family-owned business?

98

HOW TO SHOP: VILLAGE CHELSEA

39

JUST DANDY

44

DEFINING THE DRESS

46

The revival of peacockery Wedding gown secrets revealed

GLITTERING PRIZES

50

TIME IS PRECIOUS

52

Statement jewellery to dazzle What does your watch say about you?

VINTAGE GLAMOUR

Country chic at The Lygon Arms

74

iconic culture BETWEEN THE COVERS AT CLIVEDEN

24

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

28

WHO IS THAT GIRL?

32

Britain’s best new literary festival courts controversy

Jeremy Houghton captures movement, space and time on canvas Margaret Clunie on bringing costume drama to the screen

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HIGH SPIRITS

55

PROOF OF THE PUDDING

78

ENTENTE CORDIALE

82

TASTE OF THE COTSWOLDS 

88

ARE YOU BEING SERVED?

95

What is cooking in Chewton Glen’s The Kitchen? There is a fizz to the English wine scene

iconic style Where tradition and fashion, high style and edge all collide

iconic taste Olly Smith on the perfect G&T

SCENTS & SENSITIVITY

Bespoke perfumes and fragrant trends

BEWARE FAMILY ON HOLIDAY  96

The old swagger is back at The Lygon Arms

Front of house is moving centre stage

iconic society EXTREMELY SPORTING

62

THE SEASON

66

FESTIVAL FEVER

97

Invitation to play polo

Essential diary dates for 2018 Fizz, feasting, falconry, flash mobs and Paloma Faith

Cover image: ADAM LYNK www.adamlynk.com

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D EFI N I N G M O M E NT S

R O B E R T D E N I R O a n d B E N J A M I N M I L L E P I E D, N Y, 7p m Robert Old & Co, 20-21 Westover Road, Bournemouth, Dorset BH1 2BY

|

|

01202 555151 07595905464 www.robertold.co.uk

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contributors

JANE

SIMON

SUSAN

ANDERSON

CARTER

D’ARCY

Travel writer and photographer Jane Anderson is Editor of Family Traveller magazine and Travel Editor at Prima magazine and occasional contributor to The Times and The Telegraph. What does luxury mean to you? Spending time with my family in an inspiring setting.

As founder of an online fine dining guide aimed at informing like-minded enthusiasts interested in the top end of the hospitality sector, Simon has become a leading independent industry observer. What does luxury mean to you? To be made to feel special, happy and content!

Luxury travel and spa writer for The Sunday Times, in the name of journalism Susan has been scrubbed with diamond dust, soaked in wet hay and injected with her own blood for a vampire facial. What does luxury mean to you? Access to exceptional experiences that make you appreciate how wonderful the world is... without having to queue.

ALISON

JENNIFER

SHARP

OLLY

SMITH

Alison Porter is a recovering spin doctor turned feature writer whose work has featured in fashion bible W Magazine among many others. Her first book will be published in September. She lives in Henley-on-Thames and adores Cliveden. What does luxury mean to you? It is something you feel: beauty, quality, spaciousness.

Jennifer Sharp was restaurant critic of Harpers Bazaar for 12 years before branching into magazines from California to China. What does luxury mean to you? As a food critic, people expect me to love fancy ingredients. In fact, there is nothing better than really good bread with handmade butter and Maldon salt.

Olly Smith is the wine columnist for The Mail on Sunday, regular on BBC1’s Saturday Kitchen, host of drinks podcast ‘A Glass With’, and the author of four books and creator of a successful wine app. What does luxury mean to you? Time off with a large glass of glory: in colder months, a madeira or armagnac from my birth year; in summer it is hard to beat a cool glass of English sparking wine.

PORTER

I c o n i c M a g a z i n e Te a m Executive Director: Andrew Stembridge Magazine Project Director: Angela Day Publisher/ Editor: Emma Caulton Advertising Sales: Arabella Boardman Art Direction: Kerry Brown Design

Iconic Magazine © 2018 is published once a year and is in the portfolio of Iconic Luxury Hotels: Chewton Glen; Cliveden; 11 Cadogan Gardens and The Lygon Arms.

While every attempt has been made to ensure that the content in this magazine is accurate, Iconic Magazine or Iconic Luxury Hotels cannot accept and hereby disclaim any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine can be reproduced without prior written permission of Iconic Magazine. Information is correct at time of going to press.

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FARRARI

HANDMADE IN ENGLAND E T T I N G E R .CO.U K +44 (0)20 8877 1616

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LUXURY

WOMEN IN

LUXURY

FROM FOUNDERS OF BRANDS OF TOMORROW TO DIRECTORS STEERING BRANDS OF TODAY, WOMEN ARE INFLUENCING THE LUXURY MARKET; HERE THEY OFFER INSIGHTS, ADVICE AND ENCOURAGEMENT

W

omen are very often the unsung heroes of luxury – sometimes not so unsung – I am thinking of the extraordinary achievements of Rose Marie Bravo and Angela Ahrendts at Burberry, of Alice Temperley, of the Bentley Girls, of Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen and many more – all beacons of the exceptional, dynamic, entrepreneurial spirit of women in luxury, driving their businesses forward, nurturing new talent, fostering creativity and pushing change. HELEN This was part of the speech given by Helen Brocklebank, CEO of Walpole, at the fourth Women in Luxury luncheon. She continued: Walpole may have been named for a man, but all of its achievements are down to its women: for most of its 25 years, it has been led by three women. Julia Carrick, who joined in 2000, built the programmes on which its reputation rests – Brands of Tomorrow, for example, and ECCIA, our spearhead into Europe; Michelle Emmerson; and I now hope to carry the baton forward into the next 25 years.

Brocklebank

So, what does luxury mean to Helen?

Luxury is all about emotion and experience. It is how you feel, the memories you create, the special details that turn the ordinary into the extraordinary. It is finding the secret path that leads down through the woods to the beach at Chewton Glen, feeling the sand between your toes and salt-spray on your face before racing back to afternoon tea to discover there is not only a surprise birthday cake with your name on it, but a special children’s tea. Thoughtful and unforgettable.

Why is luxury important?

Luxury is a treat, and we all need treats. It is also about beautiful things: think of some of the luxury brands in the

V&A – designed by extraordinarily inventive creatives and made by incredibly skilled artisans at the top of their game. Luxury is also a business. The sector contributes £32.2 billion to the UK economy and is forecast to employ 160,000 people by 2019; British luxury has a unique sensibility – its products and experiences make the country famous throughout the world for creativity, craftsmanship, inventiveness, quality, heritage and the ability to conjure stories from a magical past and make them new, exciting and relevant.

What do women bring to luxury?

There is a creativity, a vision and an ability to set an agenda that is always noteworthy in the women who have brought something new to the luxury scene – think of how Chanel changed the way women dressed forever a hundred years ago by taking cues from menswear and using relaxed fabrics like jersey, or how Sarah Burton took on the legacy of Alexander McQueen and made it her own. I am also deeply impressed by Natalie Livingstone’s vision – her literary festival at Cliveden was immensely chic and perfectly curated; a Glyndebourne for books.

What advice would you give other women in luxury?

Never listen to the little voice in your head that tells you you are not good enough. You are.

What advice would you give someone entering the luxury industry?

Be relentlessly curious – the best ideas do not come from looking at what other brands are doing, but from looking outside the business, particularly to art and culture; what is past is always the prologue.

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LUXURY

POLLY

McMaster

FOUNDER, THE FOLD

What was the inspiration?

I was working in a corporate environment and continually disappointed by the choice of clothes for work. I believed there should be a brand that was relevant and inspirational to working women – so the idea for The Fold was born. We pride ourselves on creating beautifully designed, feminine and contemporary pieces you can treasure. Our customers are our inspiration: a diverse group of incredible women – from the multi-tasking working mother to the highest ranks of government office, and it is a privilege to see them wearing The Fold.

What does luxury mean to you?

Anything that is luxury is not throw away, it is to be treasured, kept and enjoyed over time. It is the opposite of fast fashion – clothes that you can invest in and enjoy for many years to come.

JESSICA

McCormack

FOUNDER, JESSICA MCCORMACK

What was the inspiration?

My business partners (Michael Rosenfeld and Rachel Slack) and I share an affinity for low-key high-end luxury  of days gone by, a time when a lifelong relationship would be built between jeweller and jewellery collector. We wanted to try and recreate that old-world magic and romance and create an exceptional, highly personal experience for clients.

What does luxury mean to you?

The definition of luxury  is constantly changing but, for us, it is about being able to create pieces that are infused with traditional handcrafted techniques and contemporary design. Personally, for me luxury has always meant having time – time to spend designing and lingering in a gallery or museum discovering new inspirations.

Why is luxury important?

Luxury represents incredible standards of craftsmanship, which should be celebrated. Luxury products become a showcase of incredible skill and attention to detail. What is important about this is that it keeps these crafts and skills alive and valued for generations to come.

What advice would you give other women in luxury?

Have absolute conviction and passion for what you are doing, and surround yourself with talented, committed and supportive people with whom you can work as a team. One of our customers recently said, “you will not remember what someone said, but you will remember how they made you feel” – this is so true, so never forget to treat every product, customer and employee with due love and care.

What is the best advice you have been given?

Not advice, but self-belief. My business partner Michael Rosenfeld discovered me while I was in the jewellery department at Sotheby’s. He was the first person to advise and encourage me to design with diamonds. His belief in me and his exceptional knowledge of diamonds continues to be a huge inspiration.

What advice would you give other women in luxury?

Take risks, trust your instincts, and know your clients.

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LUXURY

LIZ

Hotchin GLOBAL BRAND DIRECTOR, CLIVE CHRISTIAN

What do women bring to luxury?

Obviously, not to take anything away from the men, as I am very much a woman who wants to be an equal to my peers in business, but I do think that women hold a level of emotional intelligence and empathy toward how something really makes you feel that allows us to consider those little details that can turn the expected into the extraordinary.

What does luxury mean to you?

For me luxury is simply about a true standard of quality and innovation and more so than ever it is about experience and service. There is an elegance about modern day luxury – it should be less about inaccessibility and expense and more about uniqueness, creativity and true attention to detail.

CARMEL

Allen

CREATIVE DIRECTOR, LINLEY

What does luxury mean to you?

For me it is all linked up in timing. Not just the time it takes to create something luxurious (although we often talk about the craft hours involved in a piece at LINLEY), but also the time that the piece is given or commissioned. I am always conscious that most luxury pieces are given at significant moments – they are a celebration, marking a special moment in time, such as an anniversary. I love the emotional link with luxury. Every item has a story, not just in the product, but in the giving and buying and that makes it even more precious.

Why is luxury important?

Organic customer growth will be in the luxury goods market, and as new emerging customer segments appear and the purchasing power of the millennial consumer who is not spending on homes and traditional big-ticket items increases, luxury products and services are going to drive growth in existing markets and channels.

What is the best advice you have been given?

I have been told by two very inspiring women at different stages in my career that sometimes it is OK to fail and not to put so much pressure on yourself. The high standards I used to set myself to deliver perfection were at times stifling and clouded me being able to make the right decisions. Sometimes 80% is OK!

Why is luxury important? Because it makes you feel special.

What is the best advice you have been given?

Put the customer at the centre of everything you do. In addition I always remember a CEO I worked with who had “KISS” on the wall beside him: “Keep It Simple, Stupid”. It always made me smile. When things get over complicated it is good to step back and repeat that mantra.

What advice would you give others in the luxury sector?

Enjoy it! It is a privilege and a joy to be part of making beautiful things for special moments.

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OPINION

A life in

LU X U RY Julia Carrick OBE has long been a prominent voice for the British luxury industry, innovating and lobbying on its behalf. Here, she gives the long view on the luxury landscape in an uncertain world.

I

have spent my working life surrounded by luxury and admire and enjoy every  aspect of the innovation, outstanding service, craftsmanship, talent  and entrepreneurialism of countless international luxury brands and their ability to adapt, inspire and create. I am passionate about this vibrant industry, which is crucial for our economy and job creation, and I have been privileged to work closely with highly skilled cultural and creative entrepreneurs.

The British luxury sector has gone from a relatively unrecognised sector to one of the most flourishing. It is an industry that is valued at over £32 billion to the UK economy with global British brands like Burberry and Jimmy Choo leading the way. In the months following the Brexit vote, luxury prices rose to adjust to sterling devaluation. However, UK luxury companies are continually reassessing their business models - notably in sourcing, supply chain and talent. Wealthy tourists from the Middle East, China, the US and Russia drive a significant proportion of demand in the UK luxury goods market. This exposes the market to the risk of economic and political developments in these countries; that said, inbound tourist numbers, and consequently luxury goods spending, has been even stronger than usual as the UK has become the most affordable luxury market in the world. With technology as a driver towards making things faster and more convenient, we are expecting to see a rise in service as a key differentiator, especially in luxury goods where delivering experience and customer understanding have always been hallmarks. The need for transparency in luxury is growing as more consumers demand clarity in sourcing, supply chain and corporate behaviour. Compared to other sectors, such as beauty and food, luxury has been slower to adapt to this need, but a British take on thoughtfulness, honesty and a connection to local heritage will help define a new narrative for more conscious luxury brands. Britain was once the ‘workshop of the world’ and those values could make it so again, especially as there is a growing rejection of needless consumerism. People are looking for

more meaning from their products and more purpose from the brands they give their custom to. People are looking for products and services that last and can be enjoyed for years and years, not consumed and disposed. This long view is very British. Today’s discerning shoppers want brands that tell a story, are rooted in heritage and are of such genuine quality that they can be passed down to the next generation. They want to know that workers are well-treated and that brands are committed to doing all they can to protect the environment and give back to local communities.

JULIA

CARRICK OBE Julia Carrick has innovated, led and lobbied for the British

luxury

throughout

her

industry career.

This included establishing and driving the FT’s global luxury goods proposition to become one of the largest industry platforms for global luxury brands. In particular she founded the multi-award-winning supplement How to Spend It which became a global market leader. She also gained recognition for the British Luxury sector through her role as Chief Executive of Walpole from 2000 to 2013, building it into one of the most respected organisations of its kind across Europe and establishing a prominent voice for the British luxury industry. In addition, she co-founded the UK Chinese Visa Alliance, making it easier for Chinese visitors to travel to the UK, and represented the interests of the British luxury industry on EU consultations on competitiveness, innovation

and

e-commerce.

Her

achievements

culminated in her being awarded an OBE in 2014.

Julia runs Julia Carrick Luxury Consultancy as well as being Publisher of Country and Town House.

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U p & Aw a y HIGH AMONG THE CANOPY OF LEAVES IN A HIDDEN WOODED VALLEY IS A DREAM OF A TREEHOUSE COME TRUE

I

f you go down to the woods at Chewton Glen today you will find a very pleasant surprise – a new Treehouse: The Yews. Combining a childhood fantasy of a treetop hideaway with luxury and comfort, Chewton Glen’s Treehouses provide the ultimate escape for grown-ups. The very latest one is the most secluded yet – set apart not only from the hotel, but from the other existing Treehouses – which are hidden down a footpath winding through a wooded hillside in the grounds of this award-winning country house hotel in the New Forest. The Yews is also the largest of the Treehouses, sleeping up to eight adults, plus four children, making it ideal for a get-together for families and friends. Full of surprises and indulgences, this is a Treehouse for extreme cosseting. The central living area, with deep sofas

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INDULGENCE

and woodburning stove, has picture windows opening onto a completely private, wrap-around decked terrace suspended 35 feet above the ground among the treetops and enjoying tranquil forest views. With day beds, dining table and chairs and two hot tubs among the leafy canopy, it is the perfect place to eat and drink, unwind and day dream. The interior complements the setting; warm greys and rich greens and teals, comforting throws and organic pod-style lamp bases reinforce the sense of tranquillity and wellbeing. The Treehouse is both sumptuous and spacious. There are two double bedrooms, two loft bedrooms, each with twin beds, and three marbled bathrooms, with underfloor heating, walkin showers and freestanding tubs in front of spectacular forest views. A kitchen allows guests to have their own personal chef. In addition, therapists and personal trainers from Chewton

Glen’s award-winning spa can provide treatments, meditation, yoga, and one-to-one personal training sessions, all within the privacy of the Treehouse. Breakfast arrives via hamper into a concealed hatch ensuring guests are not disturbed. All this, plus sophisticated entertainment systems, mood lighting and, of course, all the amenities of Chewton Glen are just a woodland stroll away. “To feel like time has stopped, that is the kind of reverse luxury we all crave in our furiously hectic, ever connected lives,” says Andrew Stembridge, Executive Director Iconic Luxury Hotels. “That is what we set out to achieve when we designed our first Treehouse in 2012. The phenomenal success of that project has lead us to create our new Treehouse which provides an even greater opportunity to reconnect with family and friends in a magical setting.”

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Between the covers

AT C L I V E D E N

COMBINING HIGH ART AND POPULAR CULTURE AND COURTING CONTROVERSY: WELCOME TO BRITAIN’S NEWEST LITERARY FESTIVAL

T

he “Byzantium” Hay Literary Festival (Howard Jacobson’s description) is remembered by the author as evolving gradually over the years from discussions about narrative technique in pub gardens. In contrast, he has written that the inaugural Cliveden Literary Festival (which he attended as a speaker) was “remarkable, all consideration of architecture and landscape apart, for having arrived in the world fully formed”. This is down to Natalie Livingstone, author of The Mistresses of Cliveden and Chair of this new two-day boutique festival, who explains: “In the course of researching my book, The Mistresses of Cliveden, I had expected to find key figures from British history, from Queen Victoria to Winston Churchill, what I had not expected to find was that Cliveden had such a rich literary tradition. Alexander Pope wrote about the house, Jonathan Swift was a very good friend of Elisabeth Villiers who was the second mistress of Cliveden, Tennyson was a frequent guest of Harriet, Duchess of Sutherland, and Nancy Astor hosted every single literary luminary of her day from JM Barry to George Bernard Shaw and Rudyard Kipling. Creating the Cliveden Literary Festival was very much born out of my desire to revive this literary tradition. Natalie’s efforts culminated in the first Cliveden Literary Festival, held last autumn, with over 40 speakers, more than 1000 tickets sold over the weekend and a sold-out opening day. The line-up of speakers was a who’s who of the most influential writers, thinkers and commentators of our time: not only Howard Jacobson, but Anne Applebaum, Sebastian Faulks, Lady Antonia Fraser, Robert Harris, Ian McEwan, Dambisa Moyo, Ruth Rogers, Simon Schama, and Simon Sebag Montefiore among many others. “The Festival’s themes reflect Cliveden’s own story as a political-literary salon, and include high politics and low scandal. It harks back to Cliveden being at the epicentre of political intrigue and literary discussion and, reflecting Cliveden’s past as the crucible of female power brokers, this Festival also celebrates female trailblazers and pioneers.”

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CULTURE

WHAT I HAD NOT EXPECTED TO FIND WAS THAT CLIVEDEN HAD SUCH A RICH LITERARY TRADITION…

Appropriately, for a venue renowned for intrigue and, in particular, the Profumo Affair, the sex and spies scandal which brought down a government, controversy and contentious issues were courted and aired. Tina Brown, the editor who saved Vanity Fair, spoke about her own experiences of working with Harvey Weinstein in a packed-out ‘Women in Power’ panel event. James Harding appeared in conversation with Michael Gove to discuss politics, the media and trust, including Trump and divisions in the cabinet, while Sara Vine chaired a heated discussion about Brexit with Michael Gove, Kwasi Kwarteng, Anne McElvoy, Stephen Pollard and Benjamin Wegg-Prosser. Natalie Livingstone talked to fellow historians Amanda Foreman and Daisy Goodwin about bringing history to the screen. And The Serpentine Gallery’s Yana Peel, National Gallery’s  Hannah Rothschild  and National Portrait Gallery’s Nicholas Cullinan discussed how the treasures of the past and present shape our future; which was apt, considering Cliveden is itself a treasure that has shaped our political and social scene. Natalie commented, “I hope that we have reignited an old flame in a new way; in the process, reacquainting this wonderful place with its history and its raison d’etre.”

CLIVEDEN LITERARY FESTIVAL 29-30 SEPTEMBER 2018

CHELTENHAM TO CLIVEDEN: THE RISE & RISE OF THE LITERARY FESTIVAL It all started with the Cheltenham Literary Festival, established in 1949 and one of the oldest literary events in the world. This was followed some considerable time later by Ilkley in 1973 and Edinburgh a decade after that. Since then they have multiplied, including Hay-on-Wye (1988). The growth of the literary festival has been attributed in part to the transformation of the Man Booker Prize into something of a literary Oscar night, along with an increasing number of literary awards and a tranche of exciting new writers. The growth of the internet and the demise of bookshops and libraries has not dinted our enthusiasm for the written word. Quite the reverse. Meet the author events are increasingly popular. Last year there were around 350 book festivals of various kinds throughout the UK and Ireland. The literary festival is a celebration, an experience and an opportunity, allowing authors and readers to connect, inspire and be inspired.

www.clivedenliteraryfestival.org

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MOTORING

TOWN & COUNTRY Looking for a car to take you from city roads to country tracks? The answer is an SUV – but the Maserati Levante is not just any SUV says Steve Moody

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hen you want to look slick in the city and at home in the country, there are plenty of SUVs which do the job. However, very few do it with such panache as the new Maserati Levante. To begin with, the Levante wears that Trident badge which is synonymous with elegant, understated style: a Maserati is instantly recognisable but does not demand attention. This makes it the ideal SUV in the city because, rightly or wrongly, they can attract a certain amount of opprobrium, dragging with them the image of tractors bashing their way through Chelsea. Or Knightsbridge. Or Kensington. Vast slab-sided monsters driven with scant regard for other road users. The Levante just does not fit into this notion. For a start it is more lithe and less monolithic than the average SUV. With its low, sporty, sharky nose and classic Maserati grille, sculpted

flanks and coupĂŠ-like rear, it looks more like a practical sportscar than a big tank, a shooting brake rather than a load lugger. This helps in the city because from behind the steering wheel you have a clear appreciation of where you are and more accuracy about where you want to go. Instead of just barreling through traffic with a rough approximation of the environment around you, cocooned in what amounts to a bank vault on wheels, its more sporting nature allows you to place the Levante more precisely and to be aware of your surroundings. That is not to say that you forgo the feeling of solidity, luxury and high seating position of most SUVs. Being a Maserati you can have all the usual quality, and being Italian it is done with a measure of delicacy and fine detailing that you do not usually get from the more corporate German brands and thickly upholstered British ones.

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MOTORING

Customers can choose one of two distinct trims: the GranLusso and GranSport. With the Levante GranLusso the focus is on luxury with metallic-finish front skid plates and roof rails, GranLusso badges on the front wings, body-colour side skirts, black-painted brake calipers and 19-inch Zefiro alloy wheels. The cabin combines Ermenegildo Zegna silk or premium Italian leather upholstery with a Radica fine wood trim and steering wheel with wood inserts. This luxurious trim also includes 12-way power comfort seats, Harman Kardon sound system, power-adjustable steering wheel, illuminated door sills, parking sensors, navigation system and new soft close doors. The Levante GranSport meets the demands of customers seeking a sportier expression of a high-end SUV. The exterior design and interior features reflect the legendary racing heritage of the Maserati brand. Externally the GranSport is recognisable by its Piano Black front grille, skid plates and roof rails, GranSport badges on the front wings, body-colour side skirts, blue inserts on all Trident and Saetta logos, red brake calipers and 20-inch Nereo wheels. The cabin includes 12-way power leather sport seats and power-adjustable steering wheel with gear shift paddles as well as Inox sport pedals. In the country, the Maserati Levante manages to pull off the trick of being a useful 4x4 and not too prissy about getting muddy. It is a genuinely practical SUV; although you would not want dirty gundogs leaping on the buttery soft leather seats, it is hardy enough to qualify for its fair share of mud plugging. But it is in between the two extremes of rat runs of West London and the green lanes of the Cotswolds where the Levante excels. For a genuine SUV, it is a fabulous drive. Based on the evolution of the Ghibli/Quattroporte platform, the

Levante chassis has been developed to offer unique on-road driving dynamics, boasting an ideal 50:50 weight distribution and the segment’s lowest centre of gravity, delivering a very agile car for its size. The aluminium double-wishbone, five-link suspension layout comprises standard air springs and electronically controlled Skyhook shock absorbers. In conjunction with the Q4 intelligent All-Wheel-Drive system and the torque vectoring technology, the chassis delivers GT on-road dynamics and surprising off-road capabilities. The Levante was engineered to deliver luxurious comfort on rough roads and great handling on low-grip surfaces, and it really shows, feeling nimble without being fidgety and with very little roll for a car of this bulk. Then, of course, there are the engines that can exploit such a chassis. The Levante comes with the latest evolution of the Maserati 3.0-litre V6 twin-turbo petrol and a more economical turbodiesel. The V6 S petrol engine, built in conjunction with sister company Ferrari, comes with a maximum power output of 430bhp, and reaches 62mph in 5.2 seconds. Of course, being a Maserati, those six cylinders make a remarkable noise, barking through the gears as the Levante leaps forward. For those who want a little more economy with their luxury, the Levante is also available with a common-rail, direct-injection V6 turbodiesel. While it does not possess the verve of the petrol, it is no chugging tractor, thanks to 275bhp and 0-62mph in 6.9 seconds. Ultimately, whatever the figures, the Levante is an SUV with a huge amount of character and soul — a pretty car, capable and practical, and perfectly at home on tarmac or mud, in the glitz and glamour of the town and the charm and comfort of the country.

FLITTING BETWEEN LONDON, COTSWOLDS AND NEW FOREST? These SUVs are also ideal:

“IT IS IN BETWEEN THE TWO EXTREMES OF RAT RUNS OF WEST LONDON AND THE GREEN LANES OF THE COTSWOLDS WHERE THE LEVANTE EXCELS”

Range Rover’s elegant new Velar is smaller than a Sport and sleeker, too, with a fabulously minimalist interior. Being a Range Rover, it is of course near unbeatable off-road.

Porsche Macan is the best handling SUV you can buy. It is not big, but it is incredibly nimble with brilliant engines. Not cheap – but what would you expect of a Porsche?

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Portrait of the artist THE LYGON ARMS’ ARTIST IN RESIDENCE, JEREMY HOUGHTON, EXPLAINS TO EMMA CAULTON HOW HE PAINTS MOVEMENT THROUGH SPACE AND TIME

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ave you ever seen movement captured so well by an artist? Here are tennis players mid-stroke; a flock of birds startled into flight; the Household Cavalry on parade – sunlight flashing on their uniforms. The loft area above the barn where Jeremy Houghton paints serves as gallery, showcasing an extraordinary body of work: a portrait of HM The Queen in contemplative pose; Ben Ainslie and his BAR team trying their damndest to win back the America’s Cup in Bermuda; sheep being gently corralled down a country lane. The subject range is broad, but the treatment is broadly the same: a moment caught in time, painted using a limited palette, creating the effect of an old back and white photograph or negative.

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ART

Left: Bond In The Highlands

Jeremy’s work captures a dynamic moment, movement and energy. It is a fascinating approach. “I paint movement and to paint movement, I paint negative space (I am fascinated by space). I focus on form and shape, nothing else, eliminating detail — which often makes the image quite abstract.” There are reasons for this unusual, distinctive approach. As an artist, Jeremy tends to move from residency to residency, enabling him to create a body of work that does not simply describe, but chronicles country life, sporting events, society and pageant. It all started with Rorke’s Drift and a series of studies in biro that he had undertaken, at the invitation of David Rattray, an expert on the Anglo-Zulu war of 1879, when he was Head of Art at a school in Cape Town (having read law at university, prior to studying at the Slade School of Fine Art and then the University of Provence).

Right: Mile High Club Below: Stable Mates

These evocative works were a turning point: partly because they introduced him to working with a limited palette, partly because they focused on a narrative, and partly because they were Jeremy’s first military pictures. “The pictures told the story. That is what happens when you are an artist in residence – you get under the skin of a place. Telling the stories of the Zulus was fantastic. Coming back to the UK, I wanted to continue that role and keep with the military theme, as I enjoyed its pageantry and ceremony.” Initially he approached the cavalry regiments, who said, yes. The result was a body of work entitled ‘All The Queen’s Horses’. This led to Jeremy being asked by the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, Her Majesty’s Body Guard at ceremonial occasions, to follow them during their Quincentenary Year – including working in St Paul’s Cathedral, Buckingham Palace and St James’ Palace. From there he was asked to do something similar at Highgrove; using Prince of Wales’ vision as his inspiration, he went beyond the

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ART

Woolly Bottoms

garden fence and into the farm. Next was Official Artist for the London 2012 Olympics. Then Artist in Residence at Windsor Castle. Then Goodwood for Lord Marsh. Then Ben Ainslie and the America’s Cup challenge. When we met, his last project was Wimbledon. His next is a residency at The Lygon Arms in Broadway. This is appropriate for two reasons. First, Broadway was a hugely significant artists’ colony in the late 19th century. The Lygon Arms’ guest list includes the likes of American illustrator and painter Francis Millet, John Singer Sargent (who painted the enchanting ‘Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose’ in the orchard of Broadway’s Russell House), William Morris, Henry James, and Edwin Austin Abbey, who used details of The Lygon Arms in the background of his illustrations to Goldsmith’s play ‘She Stoops to Conquer’. Second, this is where Jeremy himself was born and grew up and where he continues to live and paint. “I have grown up walking past that hotel every day of my life, and as a boy walking along the top of the wall (it is probably why they positioned the flower tubs there). I feel very connected to the space and its renaissance is wonderful.” It is possible that Jeremy’s style of working was also influenced by his grandfather’s extraordinary documentation of Broadway. “My grandfather was the village doctor [for 50 years until the mid-1980s], and I live in his house, the house where I was born. I have inherited a few of his things, including 12 volumes on the history of Broadway which he collated. He was passionate about Broadway, and these have been a source of inspiration as well.

“Throughout my studies, and residencies, working with a limited palette and using negative space makes my paintings look like old transparencies and sepia photographs from another era. There is a nostalgia and timelessness about them that ties in with the lovely old photographs my grandfather collected; so, my work references him.” Jeremy indicates a picture of Broadway’s High Street: “The viewer cannot necessarily identify whether this was painted yesterday or a hundred years ago. This enables me to integrate the passage of time into a painting; that is another representation of movement, through time.” Pondering his residency at The Lygon Arms, Jeremy wonders: “How do you tell the story of an old building in 20 or 30 paintings? You have to find an angle to focus on. You have to tell what is untold. You have to be quite journalistic...” There is much to inspire Jeremy, just as his grandfather was inspired, and the writer Henry James before him, who said of Broadway, “There is very portraiture in the air”.

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE Jeremy Houghton’s residency work will be available to view on a studio wall space within The Lygon Arms. He will also be holding talks at The Lygon Arms, with topics covering Broadway’s art history, the story of the Lygon family and the American colony in Broadway, as well as taking tours of the village and occasionally opening his studio to guests. www.jeremyhoughton.co.uk

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2B

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FILM

2A

506-8 FILM NATURA BISSÉ

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DIAMOND EXTREME NIGHT DUAL TREATMENT

Sleep your skin beautiful Find out more about Natura Bissé at the Chewton Glen Spa www.naturabisse.com

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PERSONALITY

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W HO I S T H AT GIR L? IN THE POPULAR ITV DRAMA SERIES ‘VICTORIA’, MARGARET CLUNIE BURST ONTO OUR SCREENS AS CLIVEDEN’S OWN HARRIET, DUCHESS OF SUTHERLAND

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ollowing roles in theatre, film and television, including ‘Upstart Crow’, ‘Endeavour’ and ‘Johnny English’, Margaret Clunie’s big break came playing Cliveden’s very own Harriet, Duchess of Sutherland, in the ITV drama series, ‘Victoria’. With her long brown locks and soulful eyes, she bears a striking resemblance to the portrait of Harriet that hangs at Cliveden. Margaret recalls, “I had not heard of Harriet before, but after researching her history and reading Natalie Livingstone’s work, The Mistresses of Cliveden, I realised what an amazing woman she was. Not only did she have 11 children, she was politically engaged in a way in which most women were not at that time. She was an all-round strong woman, which for the 19th century is pretty exciting.” Series creator Daisy Goodwin, speaking at the Cliveden Literary Festival, commented: “Harriet, Duchess of Sutherland, was a key character in Victoria’s Court. She was Victoria’s best friend in real life. Her relationship with Victoria was very close and Victoria would often come here to Cliveden to have tea. “In my series I am afraid I have taken huge dramatic liberties as Harriet has a slightly tragic love affair with Albert’s brother, Prince Ernest. The real Duchess of Sutherland was a very pious woman who was extremely faithful to her husband George until his death. So, apologies to the Sutherland family and for disturbing Harriet’s shade.” Margaret adds: “As she is not a hugely famous figure, I think there has been less pressure to be true to history. Not as much is known about her in the way there is about Victoria, and the storyline moved away from the truth. It is unlikely Harriet and Ernest would have known each other, and I think Harriet was about 20 years older

than him in real life. Also, Harriet and her husband had a successful and loving marriage, so I do not think she would have been paying much attention to other men at court.” Margaret recently stayed at Cliveden: “Seeing the house where she was mistress was fascinating – and thank you to whoever put us in the Sutherland Suite. Just imagining her taking tea looking out onto that garden and walking through the grounds really helped me feel the part a little more. I knew Harriet was a particularly grand lady, she grew up in beautiful Castle Howard in Yorkshire, however Cliveden is on another level of elegance and style which I think is entirely suitable for her.”

Her character is appropriately resplendent in lavish costumes and elaborate hairstyles. “We have a running joke on the makeup truck that when I am getting my hair done as the Duchess of Sutherland, I should have the most outrageous hairstyle with hundreds of jewels in my ‘do. “As beautiful as the dresses are, they are pretty restrictive and having to put a corset on daily is challenging. I can understand why women fainted - it can be quite difficult to breathe! Having said that, dressing up is one of my favourite parts of the job and the costumes are beautiful. There was one gold dress I wore in the first series that was unbelievable - the embroidery was gorgeous. “We filmed on location at quite a few stately homes in Yorkshire including Castle Howard, and Harewood House is used a lot - the grounds there are where the ice skating scene in the Christmas episode was filmed, although it was August so there was a lot of fake snow. We also went to Blair Atholl in Scotland, Wentworth Woodhouse and Beverley Minster… It is such a perk of the job to work in these places and we are always given the opportunity to sneak off to look round them and explore. “Memories I will take away from ‘Victoria’ will be filming the ice skating scene; the set was insanely beautiful. I only fell over once. I had massive bruises on my knees for ages afterwards, but the scene looks lovely on screen. “A behind-the-scenes secret is that there were scenes where it was quite cold so I had a hot water bottle between my legs under my dress! But what I enjoyed most about filming ‘Victoria’ was making a whole new gang of friends – it was like being at school hanging out in the common room in-between scenes!” Would the real Duchess of Sutherland have approved?

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PERFUME

&

Scents

SENSITI V IT Y ALISON PORTER IS ON THE SCENT OF BESPOKE PERFUMES AND FRAGRANT TRENDS

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Azzi Glasser The Perfumer’s Story

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erfume is experiencing a renaissance with a new generation of artisan perfumers, many of them British, ushering in a fresh era of opulence and creativity in fragrance. The traditional signature scent has been updated with the concept of a fragrance wardrobe. Today’s perfume lover enjoys experimenting, matching a mood or selecting different scents for each season. And a love of fragrance is more than cosmetic – it taps into the deepest parts of our brain, directly associated with memory. As Master Perfumer Roja Dove says, “Our responses to scent are learned, each one locked away with a memory of association with whatever was happening to us at the time. When we discover a scent we truly love, it will have large numbers of ingredients within it that have positive, feel-good associations. The scent itself then becomes an odour which also has positive associations and makes us feel safe, secure, happy and well.” To honour the role of scent in our lives, the Fragrance Foundation, now celebrating 25 years in the UK, has developed its #ScentMemories project, including curating the favourite memories of celebrities and fragrance lovers. Linda Key Jackson, Fragrance Foundation CEO, sees not only the independent perfumers but the larger houses all working to bring the magic back. “Customers are so savvy, they want to know more about their scents and to have that touch of luxury. Trend-wise we are seeing genderless fragrances being developed, and the big flowers are coming back, too. Perfume is like fashion: it has its cycles. It all comes back again. What we wear as scent is deeply connected with what is happening in the world. In a period of uncertainty, you go back to the familiar – the things that hold a fond place in your heart.” As the #ScentMemories project evolves, it has scent aficionados looking at the perfume playlist of their lives, recalling their first fragrance and all those that followed, marking milestones in their memories. As Linda says, “You have a playlist for music, so why not one for perfume?”

The real luxury in perfume is an experience like no other – the creation of a bespoke fragrance. Award-winning perfumer Azzi Glasser offers a range of 12 different fragrance characters and styles in her brand, The Perfumer’s Story, allowing customers to find a scent that matches their personality. Yet, for some only bespoke will do. “My bespoke clients have been mainly actors and artists, as they are more aware of how they want to style themselves in fragrance. They particularly love the way I reflect their personality, character and image through their DNA print in perfume. I compose an exclusive perfume using handpicked rare ingredients from around the world, and each fragrance is presented in a giant crystal bottle engraved with the name and formula number of the unique perfume, encased in a luxurious handmade box with 20 personalised travel-sized bottles of their fragrance.” Her clients include Jude Law, Bella Freud, Helena Bonham-Carter and Johnny Depp, who said of his consultation, “Azzi possesses a certain sorcery, in that she is capable of capturing the essence of a character in scent.” Lovers of the unashamedly luxurious Ormonde Jayne perfumes can also discover their favourite scent through the fragrance families of citrus, floral, floral oriental, woody and

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PERFUME

‘four corners’, an exotic exploration of the four corners of the earth. Founder Linda Pilkington set out to personify grace through her perfumes, saying, “In creating Ormonde Jayne, my goal was to combine elements which I consider define true elegance: the quality of English craftsmanship, the art of French perfumery, and the sensuality and natural harmony of the Orient.” Her perfume library is built around a simple principle – extraordinarily beautiful scents using speciality oils not widely used in the industry today – and her fragrances are worn by European royalty, musicians and actors, including Bryan Ferry, Goldie Hawn and Will Smith. Linda’s bespoke clients step into a rarefied world of extravagant ingredients that allow her to create a fragrance that not only encapsulates who they are, but boasts elements as unique as the clients. Presentation of the personalised fragrance can be customised with engraved Lalique or Baccarat crystal bottles and embossed boxes in calf leather or your preferred finish. She has also created unique scented candles for Chanel, Burberry and Anouska Hempel. Semi-bespoke is another high-end option, giving you exclusive access to limited edition perfumes. The Roja Dove Haute Parfumerie within the Salon de Parfum at Harrods offers a private fragrance consultation with their Maître de Consultation to unlock your perfume personality through odour profiling techniques and discover your ideal signature fragrance. Within the selection of deluxe brands on offer at the parfumerie are Roja’s own opulent perfumes and semibespoke scents, made from ingredients of the highest quality and produced in limited editions. Identified only by a number, and limited to just 50 people, these exceptional fragrances are offered in a plain perfumer’s flask for you to decant and name as you choose.

“CAPTURING THE ESSENCE OF A CHARACTER IN SCENT.”

Linda Pilkington Ormande Jayne

For Roja, these are his meisterwerks. “My perfumes are for those searching for a scent that triggers an emotion within them, and that discreetly delivers quality, luxury and sophistication – a fragrance that will become part of them forever.” A private consultation with Roja himself is a rare opportunity and priced accordingly, but a session with his Maître de Consultation is an affordable £150 redeemable against the purchase of your perfume, making it ideal for a spot of self-indulgence or a thoughtful gift. Jo Loves, founded by perfumer Jo Malone, offers a different semi-bespoke experience: the creation of your own handmade candle. Her menu of fragrances features an explosion of memories and moments, including the Shot Candle™ concept, an innovation in fragrance with a bespoke scented candle in two parts – a base and a shot fragrance of your choice. Such an explosion of creativity in the fragrance industry means perfumers are constantly innovating how we experience scent. Jo has also invented the Fragrance Tapas session – allowing you to indulge in a flight of scent at a Fragrance Brasserie Bar. Bath cologne is warmed within a tagine and released via a cloud of scented steam, then cleanser is shaken over ice and strained into a glass, and finally lotion is whipped and foamed before being swept gently onto your skin with a paintbrush. However you choose to experience it, fragrance is a touchstone in your life – there to recall a memory or symbolise a fresh start. It is the essence of you. As Christian Dior said, “A woman’s perfume tells you more about her than her handwriting”.

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“YOU HAVE A PLAYLIST FOR MUSIC, SO WHY NOT ONE FOR PERFUME?” THE SCENT OF MEMORIES “The scent of a gardenia flower is the most powerful fragrance I have ever come across, and instantly catapults me back to Swaziland where I grew up. Nostalgic, overwhelmingly erotic and potent.”  Richard E Grant, Actor “I love the way perfumes act as recollections of the world, where notes fill the air with the opportunity to revisit past dreams and expectations. Golden elixirs of magical ingredients… transporting us away to precious memories. Because memories are the most important treasure of all.”  Roja Dove, Master Perfumer “My father – a globe-trotting journalist who liked to assuage any guilt at ‘abandoning’ his family by bringing home generous gifts from Duty Free – propelled me further down the path of being a perfumista via gifts of Calèche, Calandre, Miss Dior, Dior Eau Fraîche and Chanel No 19. Ridiculously sophisticated for a 13-year-old, but the beginning of a fragrance wardrobe I am still building today. I smell one of those even now, and I can see my dad smiling as he hands over his airport swag. And really, who needs a time machine when you have scent in your life?” Jo Fairley, Co-Founder, The Perfume Society “It was the scent of jasmine in the street where we lived in Saigon that first inspired me to create fragrances. It was unlike anything I had smelt before – rich and all-encompassing, yet beautifully fresh. It is called Champa Jasmine, a flower indigenous to Southern Vietnam, and is the key note of the first fragrance I created for Cochine: White Jasmine & Gardenia. Each time I smell this fragrance, I am instantly transported back to our garden in Saigon, where the scent of jasmine filled the air.” Kate Crofton-Atkins, Cochine

Linda Pilkington Ormonde Jayne New Bond Street www.ormondejayne.com Azzi Glasser The Perfumer’s Story www.theperfumersstory.com

Or book via Harvey Nichols’ Concierge Service Roja Dove Roja Dove Haute Parfumerie Salon de Parfum, Harrods, Knightsbridge www.rojadovehauteparfumerie.com

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The LINLEY Circus Jewellery Box “Bespoke items connect you to the hand and soul of the maker – I like to think there is a little part of the maker’s soul in each piece” David Linley

W W W. DAV I D L I N L EY.CO M P R I VAT E C O M M IS S I O N S K I TCH EN S & C A B IN E T RY IN T ER I O R D ES I G N F U R N I T U R E & H O M E AC CES S O R IES

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LINLEY BELGRAVIA FLAGSHIP SHOWROOM 60 PIMLICO ROAD LONDON SW1W 8LP +44 (0) 20 7824 7223

LINLEY BURLINGTON ARCADE NO. 4 BURLINGTON ARCADE 51 PICCADILLY LONDON W1J 0QJ +44 (0) 20 7499 8678

LINLEY AT HARRODS LUXURY HOME 2, 2 ND FLOOR 87-135 BROMPTON ROAD LONDON SW1X 7XL +44 (0) 20 3036 6156

11/12/2017 22:42


CHELSEA

HOW TO SHOP:

V i l l a ge C h e l s e a WHERE TRADITION AND FASHION, HIGH STYLE AND EDGE ALL COLLIDE IN A GLORIOUS OUTBURST OF ORIGINALITY AND CREATIVITY. EMMA CAULTON TAKES A TOUR OF CHELSEA

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helsea is different. Over the centuries it developed from a Thameside village into a creative hotspot – home to artists and writers, among them Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and John Singer Sargent. More often than not it is at the forefront of cultural movements. The area turned into a fashion hub after Mary Quant opened London’s very first boutique, Bazaar, on the King’s Road. In the seventies it became the epicentre for the counter-culture punk movement and in the following decade it was identified as prime ‘Sloane Ranger’ territory - particularly the eastern side, bordering Belgravia. Which goes to show that Chelsea has always encompassed a breadth of style and taste and can be many things to most people. In this respect, this bustling area with its juxtaposition of grand buildings and quirky character is unchanged. It is still favoured by creatives, the avant garde and the wealthy perhaps epitomised in the Saatchi Gallery which provides a forum for contemporary art and a springboard for launching young artists.

There is much to discover, both along the main thoroughfares and down inviting side streets of elegant Georgian townhouses and pretty rows of terraces painted ice cream colours. And those looking for trend-led fashion, inspiration for their homes or an item that is just that little bit different, are more than likely to find it here. Let us start in Knightsbridge, the northern edge of Chelsea, with those stalwarts of the retail scene: Harrods and Harvey Nichols. The former, on Brompton Road in an area known as Hans Town (after Sir Hans Sloane), covers four and a half acres and is world renowned for lavish style and fabulous food halls. The latter, a luxury emporium to beauty, fashion and lifestyle across eight floors, heads up Sloane Street. Ah, yes, Sloane Street, with its roll call of exclusive international designers and glamorous names: Anya Hindmarch, Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Dior, Dolce & Gabbana, Graff, Hackett, Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Prada, Tiffany & Co, Versace and Yves St Laurent, to name but an exquisite few. It is a catwalk parade down to leafy Sloane Square - dominated on

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CHELSEA

© Saatchi Gallery © Steve White 2016 Anya Hindmarch

one side by Hugo Boss, on another by the Royal Court Theatre and on a third by Peter Jones ( John Lewis’ flagship store). Where Sloane Square meets King’s Road is a contemporary courtyard of quality names. This is Duke of York Square, home to aforementioned Saatchi Gallery as well as Partridges, a food store that rivals Fortnum & Mason and hosts a food market every Saturday. No wonder the area has respectable foodie credentials. This is an opportune moment to flag up Pavilion Road, running parallel to Sloane Street and home to a selection of artisan food and drink shops including butcher, baker and cheesemonger. Watch this space as 11 Cadogan Gardens plans to open its own restaurant in this discreet enclave. Then there is King’s Road itself, a long road which changes personality every 100 metres or so. The stretch immediately off Sloane Square feels fresh, young and lively, dominated by fitnesswear (like Lululemon for the coolest gym kit), childrenswear (such as Trotters, from newborn up), skincare (for example Space NK) and funky boutiques (take a look at Bimba y Lola ). Past fashion forward labels such as Sandro and Toast, and lifestyle store Anthropologie, behind a frontage of coloured tiles and stained glass, King’s Road morphs into an arty area. Here is old-fashioned-looking Green & Stone, one of the biggest retailers of fine art materials in Europe and one of the longest established shops on the King’s Road. This is followed by interiors showrooms including Designer’s Guild, with its vivid colours and bold patterns, and Osborne & Little, with fabrics and papers inspired by English country gardens and sunbleached Mediterranean pots. There is also a good sprinkling of contemporary art galleries – among them Proud, Signet, Box, Silian and Tanya Baxter. Beyond World’s End, with its fey nursery, an enchanting Alice in Wonderland garden in the shade of a weeping willow, King’s Road undergoes a further character shift. This time it transforms into a parade of antique dealers, furniture designers and lighting specialists. Here is Julia Boston for French antiques and decoration, Matthew Upham with fine

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You no longer have to choose between an SUV and a Maserati

Levante GranSport. Yours. From £62,490 Meridien Modena Maserati 77 High Street, Lyndhurst, Hampshire SO43 7PB 02380 283 404 meridien.co.uk/maserati

Official fuel consumption figures for the New Maserati Levante range in mpg (l/100km): Urban 18.8 (15.0) - 34.4 (8.2), Extra Urban 33.2 (8.5) - 42.8 (6.6), Combined 25.9 (10.9) - 39.2 (7.2). CO2 emissions 253 – 189g/km. Fuel consumption and CO2 figures are based on standard EU tests for comparative purposes and may not reflect real driving results. Model shown is a Maserati Levante S GranSport MY18 at £85,110 On The Road including

optional metallescent paint at £680, 21” Anteo alloy wheels at £1,760, Brake callipers painted yellow at £445, Bi-xenon headlamps with AFS and headlamp washers at £680, Full premium leather interior with headrest Trident stitching at £3,050, Steering wheel with carbon fibre insert at £550 and Surround view camera at £950.

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CHELSEA

Lotts Road Auctions

Lots Road Auctions

“A BOOKAHOLIC’S FANTASY WITH EVERY SHELF AND SURFACE CRAMMED AND PILED WITH BOOKS” antique chandeliers, lanterns and wall lights, Decorum Est for crafted luxury surfaces including inlay, overlay, carving and enamelling, and I & JL Brown for bespoke country-inspired pieces, plus many, many more. Do not forget Chelsea’s network of side streets, revealing yet more treasures. Off Sloane Street, Ellis Street is home to beguiling Basia Azrzycka - a grotto of jewelled and beaded ornaments and evening bags inspired by folklore and fairyland. There are finds to be had on Symons Street, between Sloane Square and Cadogan Gardens, where Kiki McDonough, jeweller, displays drop earrings in candy colours of lemon, lime and lavender. Off the top of King’s Road on Blacklands Terrace is a curiosity of a bookshop, John Sandoe Books. Sponsors of Cliveden Literary Festival, this is one of London’s best-loved independent bookshops and a bookaholic’s fantasy with every shelf and surface crammed and piled with books: 30,000 of them. Others include Jubilee Place, home to Michael Hoppen photographic gallery, Langton Street with a row of delightful interior-related stores including Goodfellow for sumptuous interior design and Toad for decorative statement pieces. There is Lots Road, best known for Lots Road Auction Rooms, but with a mix from Crucial Trading (flooring) to Ventique (fine art), before a bridge crosses over to Chelsea Harbour Design Village. And it is all change again, there are floor lamps with lampshades instead of street lights and smart showrooms in glass constructs. Chelsea just gets curiouser and curiouser.

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SLUG STYLE

Just

Dandy Status, style and self-expression, gent-about-town Edward Piper visits Mayfair and St James to reflect on the revival of peacockery

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STYLE

T

he catwalk parade of women’s fashion tends to dominate our high streets; yet for centuries gentlemen were peacocks resplendent in ceremonial and military uniform, and dashing in everything from black tie to country tweeds. Status and style were synonymous. Recently there has been a renewed interest in menswear design – ranging from classic English sartorial elegance to an exuberant explosion of self-expression. Jermyn Street in St James has long been recognised as a bastion of British style. Here are the likes of Church’s handcrafted shoes, from brogues to Chelsea boots, and Turnbull & Asser, established in 1885 and considered one of the best shirtmakers in the world. Here, too, is New & Lingwood - something of a secret for those in the know: outfitter for Eton College’s pupils, with a specialism in dressing gentlemen for the sporting and social calendar, and accomplished at supplying both flair and whimsy. Individuality and tradition can also be combined with bespoke tailoring. Savile Row, at the heart of Mayfair, arguably London’s menswear mecca, has been the home of bespoke tailoring since the 18th century. Gieves & Hawkes at No1 Savile Row has one of the oldest workrooms in the world. However, this is also one of the most forward-thinking tailors in London, responding to clients’ lifestyle needs by creating tailoring for the modern wardrobe, including innovative yachting blazers, functional driving jackets and barrel pea coats. This is also one of those destination menswear shops that blurs the line when it comes to the shopping experience, delivering part shop, part tailor and part gentlemen’s club. Dunhill’s prestigious Bourdon House on Davies Street takes this concept further. This 18th century Georgian townhouse was once home to the Duke of Westminster and today is an emporium with bespoke tailoring, private cinema room, barbershop, spa, cellar bar and courtyard restaurant. History, character and culture combine with leather Chesterfields,

grand staircases, walls papered in vintage maps and a selection to appeal to today’s discerning gentleman, from ready-to-wear to boys’ toys. Others include Daks, a British heritage brand with a flagship store on Old Bond Street and a Simpson Menswear Club that encompasses Tricker’s shoes, Lock & Co hats and Henry Poole tailoring. At the other end of the design spectrum there is Paul Smith with a trendsetting boutique on Albemarle Street that reinforces the designer’s vibrant creativity and includes a venue for exhibitions and events.

“DESTINATION MENSWEAR SHOPS ARE PART SHOP, PART TAILOR AND PART GENTLEMEN’S CLUB” Relative youngsters include Orlebar Brown on Sackville Street, which celebrated its tenth anniversary last year. It all started with tailored shorts, but has evolved to offer a full resort collection influenced by 1960s poolside and Riviera style. Meanwhile William & Son, Bruton Street, is a young fogey, established just 20 years ago by William Asprey and celebrating town and country, creating and curating collections of leather goods, silver and glassware, plus handcrafted shotguns. And Italian élan struts down New Bond Street with Ermenegildo Zegna’s reinvented and expanded ‘Global Store’ encompassing new Su Misura (made-to-measure) area, contemporary continental style, plus vintage 1950s bar and a display of modernist pieces. City or country; continental or classic English, traditional or individual, the choice is very much down to today’s dapper man about town.

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WEDDINGS

Defining

THE DR ESS

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Amanda Wakeley Wedding Dresses photographed at Cliveden

THE ENGAGEMENT IS ANNOUNCED; PLANNING THE DAY IS UNDERWAY; NOW WHAT ABOUT THE DRESS? SOPHIE MUSKETT OF LES TROIS SOEURS BRIDAL REVEALS WEDDING GOWN STYLE SECRETS

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hances are you have been dreaming of the perfect bridal dress since you were a small child. But cast those childhood dreams aside because a wedding dress is like a piece of fine art that should be lovingly curated, carefully perfected and shown off like a priceless masterpiece. The search is on for the ultimate dress.

HOW TO SHOP

Shopping for bridal is not the same as updating your seasonal wardrobe. For a start, it takes a long time to perfect, usually a minimum of six months. So, leave plenty of time. The shapes and styles you usually gravitate towards may not translate into bridal style, so try on as many different styles, silhouettes, lengths, colours and designs as you can endure. Who knows, that textured silk tulle fish tail may sweep you off your feet after all. Find an expert whose opinion you can trust. At the forefront of the luxury bridal scene, Les Trois Soeurs act as both stylist and confidant, with all the honesty of your trusted best friend. Our trained experts provide professional and honest advice on what works best for you, helping every individual bride navigate each style, cut and silhouette. Leading bridal designer Amanda Wakeley, close friend of Les Trois Soeurs Bridal, comments, “The sisters have a very good eye for style and a fresh approach to bridal, attracting glamorous and sophisticated brides.” Your objective? To feel every bit the goddess you are. As distinguished designer Caroline Castigliano perfectly articulates, “What inspires me is creating a dress that makes a woman feel as she has never felt before”. So, if it is not making your heart leap, it is not the dress for you.

WHAT TO CONSIDER

Three things: Style; Season; Selfishness.

If your heart is set on a beachside ceremony, focus on a less structured style. If you want to look like you have walked straight off the fashion pages of Vogue and down the aisle, an on-trend two-piece will scream catwalk couture. Or do you want to shock the congregation with a deep plunging neckline, thigh-high split or seductively sheer contouring for outright wedding day lust. Remember practicalities. While barely-there and backless will certainly stand out, goosebumps will get you noticed for all the wrong reasons. So, if your wedding is set in a winter wonderland, add a fur bridal jacket for warmth as well as added glamour. And take along lavishly luxurious lingerie to your fittings – preferably the exact ones you plan to wear on your wedding day, to ensure everything works together. Above all, choose a dress you cannot live without. Pick the dress that gets your and your other half’s heart racing. This is your day and your decision. As Alice Temperley says, “Our brides always wear the dress rather than being worn by it. They can dance all night, look beautiful and also feel themselves, which is something that should never be forgotten on their wedding day”.

TRENDS FOR 2018

The two-piece is set to gather momentum in 2018 with sheer designs, delicate lace detailing and bell sleeves proving popular, as seen at Daalarna. Expect more unconventional, unexpected materials, textures and shapes as Israeli designer to the stars Alon Livné so effortlessly masters. For possibly the prettiest bridal style update, we are in love with the pearl-beaded appliqué that stole the show in the 2018 Temperley collection.

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WEDDINGS

THE TRUNK SHOW

If you want to discover the freshest trends, exclusive designs and the possibility of meeting the designers, then you are advised to attend a trunk show. You will be among the first to try on your favourites from the brand-new collection as it lands in store, hot from the runway, giving you access to never-seen-before styles. Style envy guaranteed. At Les Trois Soeurs Bridal, designers usually send over approximately 20 new dresses for the trunk show, most of which have never been presented in the UK before. It is a real must for anyone with a particular interest in a designer that we stock.

THE FINAL DETAILS

To wow on your wedding day, complete the look by accessorising with care. First, the shoes. You need a pair that make you feel unstoppable, confident and powerful, so you own the aisle with style and grace. They may be embroidered, bejewelled or metallic and as eye-catching as a glass slipper. Headwear can be traditional or alternative. There is a treasure trove of headpieces and hair accessories to explore including veils embellished with crystals and ribbons and edged with net or beads. For the bohemian bride there are enchanting leaf vines of charms, crystals, pearls and handmade flowers. Most importantly, be authentic to yourself. Glamorous or fairytale, ethereal or showstopper, this is your day.

ICONIC WEDDINGS CLIVEDEN: This grand stately home makes a spectacular and glamorous venue with glorious settings in The Great Hall and French Dining Room and stunning garden views.

THE LYGON ARMS: This picturesque 16th century coaching inn of honeyed Cotswold stone is perfect for a romantic, country wedding. Secret gardens provide an enchanting setting.

CHEWTON GLEN: This renowned country house hotel delivers the unexpected with charming orchard, walled kitchen garden, luxurious Treehouses and woodland walk to the beach.

11 CADOGAN GARDENS: Chic townhouse hotel in the heart of Chelsea; ideal for an intimate wedding and the opportunity to use landmarks, such as the Royal Albert Hall, as backdrops to photographs.

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A Lifetime of Love Individually hand selected diamonds, set in exquisite designs, perfect for the one you love.

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8 6 S TAT I O N R D , N E W M I LT O N , H A M P S H I R E B H 2 5 6 L Q C H A R L E S N O B E L .C O M

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2. 1.

8.

GLI T T ER ING PR IZES

4.

Every woman should own at least one piece of statement jewellery – a spirited piece that redefines an outfit, showcases

7.

individuality, creates drama and dazzles… This season, jewellery collections include bold, crafted pieces influenced by Renaissance courts, asymmetrical rings, bracelets and pendants inspired by delicate blossoms and exotic blooms, and necklaces that capture storm bursts or the warmth of evening light in a cascade of precious stones reflecting fire, ice and sunset brights

6.

5.

1. DAVID MORRIS Illusion Necklace and Earrings, www.davidmorris.com 2. DE BEERS Blooming Lotus Necklace, www.debeers.com 3. GRAFF White Diamond Fringe Necklace and Earrings, www.graffdiamonds.com 4. FRANSES Waterdrop Earrings and Eclipse Earrings, www.franses.co.uk 5. BOODLES The Knot Link Necklace, Circus Earrings, www.boodles.com 6. HARRY WINSTON Secret Combination Bracelet, www.harrywinston.com 7. CARTIER Résonances de Cartier Tutti Frutti Necklace, www.cartier.com 8. ASPREY Emerald Diamond Zigzag Necklace, www.asprey.com

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3.

AUDEMARS PIQUET MILLENARY HAND-WOUND www.audemarspiguet.com

JAEGER­-LECOULTRE REVERSO ONE www.jaeger-lecoultre.com

ROLEX LADY DATEJUST www.rolex.com

R A ZZLE

DA Z Z L E

Women’s watches combine artistry and skill with snow-set diamonds, off-centre dials, oval cases and straps in kaleidoscope colours

1.

2. 3.

1. HARRY WINSTON Lotus Cluster Ring, www.harrywinston.com 3. ELIZABETH GAGE Diamond and Pearl Agincourt Ring, www.elizabeth-gage.com

PATEK PHILIPPE GRANT COMPLICATIONS www.patek.com

BACKES & STRAUSSE REGENT TWO ROWS www.backesandstrauss.com

4. 2. BOUCHERON Serpent Bohème Mother of Pearl Ring, www.boucheron.com

HARRY WINSTON MIDNIGHT DIAMOND DROPS www.harrywinston.com

4. VAN CLEEF & ARPELS Goutte de Spinelle Ring, www.vancleefandarpels.com

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TIME IS

PR ECIOUS Like the car you drive, the luxury timepiece is so much more than simply functional. It has evolved into a desirable accessory and can reveal more than you may realise about your personality and lifestyle – who you are, what you do and where your dreams take you. City or country? Explorer, diver, pilot or sailor? Traditionalist or creative? And remember, unlike your car, you can take your watch everywhere. What does yours say about you? And who is wrist watching?

ROLEX

YACHT MASTER II www.rolex.com

OMEGA

SPEEDMASTER www.omegawatches.com

BREITLING

SUPEROCEAN HERITAGE II www.breitling.com

PATEK PHILIPPE CALATRAVA, www.patek.com

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MENS WATCHES

PANERAI

LUMINOR DUE www.panerai.com

IWC SCHAFFHAUSEN PORTOFINO www.iwc.com

JAEGER-LECOULTRE REVERSO www.jaeger-lecoultre.com

BREGUET

MARINE EQUATION PLATINUM www.breguet.com

RICHARD MILLE RM50 www.richardmille.com

AUDEMARS PIQUET

ROYAL OAK CHRONOGRAPH www.audemarspiguet.com

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TASTE

High

SPIR I TS

OLLY SMITH ON THE CURRENT GOLDEN AGE OF GIN AND HOW TO MAKE THE PERFECT G&T

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TASTE

G

in, on the face of it, could not be more British. Despite its Dutch roots, it was the English who finessed gin on the filthy back streets of London in the 17th century into a pristine drink with quenching clarity like no other. But it was not always the drink of sophistication and creativity that is enjoying such a renaissance today. In fact, gin’s origins are downright scurrilous. “Liquid madness sold at tenpence the quartem,” is how Thomas Carlyle described gin back in 1839. Sounds like he could have done with a calming G&T. But he had a point. Thanks to one of our regular feuds with the French, taxes on cognac had soared, paving the way for a flood of gin to drench Britain; back in those days, you could start distilling ten days after pinning up a notice of intent. The trouble was the quality was, to put it politely, variable, which led to all sorts of crises in public health. Coupled with its ready availability and low prices, the splendidly named Tippling Act of 1751 brought in a degree of overdue quality control. But that does not quite account for the journey of gin, which continues to this day on a quest for balancing purity with complexity. The roots of good gin come, in part, from the natural springs such as Clerkenwell and Goswell that bubbled merrily into old London. Lord Byron himself declared, “Gin and water is the source of all my inspiration”. Which brings me neatly to the first of my serving suggestions. Really great gin, I would argue, is best enjoyed naked. Not you, the gin; unadorned save perhaps for a splash of water or even a naughty rock or two of ice. The flavours have been carefully crafted and intensified so, before squirting it into the heart of a cheeky cocktail, it is always a great idea to familiarize yourself with the distinctive character of each unique gin.

“… THE LATE SIR ROGER MOORE’S RECIPE FOR A GIN MARTINI WHICH HE SHARED WITH ME OVER A SPLENDIDLY MEMORABLE LUNCH IN MONACO…”

Gin is a fusion of ingredients, method and judgment. Broadly you could describe the process as infusing botanicals in a neutral spirit ensuring a headline juniper note. But before you rush out and pick any old gin, a few considerations need to be addressed. The first is where does the base spirit come from and what is it made of? Chase Distillery in the UK make a superb gin and are one of the rare few who actually create their own base spirit themselves, in this instance from fresh apples. Their gin, as a result, works brilliantly with a garnish of a fresh slice of apple. Then there is the method. I recently visited Silent Pool distillery in Surrey and warmly recommend you do the same: lovely bunch of people handcrafting a splendid gin which draws on the water from the nearby Silent Pool. The story is one thing, but their distillery makes the method spring to life – intensifying flavours and carefully assembling the final blend with headline floral note thanks to chamomile, lavender and rose along with zesty kaffir lime leaves and orange. Their signature serve for a G&T is with a slice of twisted orange peel to release the aromas and accentuate the bright citrus notes in their rather glorious gin. And finally, there is judgment. The best distillers will judge when to select the heart of any distillation, discarding what are termed the ‘heads’ and ‘tails’, which have rather undesirable aromas and flavours. Once all these factors are in play, the ingredients, the method and judgment unite in the best examples to create a massively diverse range of flavours and textures. So how to deploy them? Personally, I always take the steer of the distillery before branching out. Gin Mare is one of my favourite gins for a G&T. It is imbued with the most glorious Mediterranean herbs thanks to its botanicals which include olives, basil, thyme and rosemary. But serve that same G&T with a garnish of fresh mango and a grind of black pepper (who knew?) and be amazed. It was discovered by drinks scientist Stuart Bale who found that, “mango has high levels of pinene, a flavour compound found in both juniper berries and Mediterranean herbs, so you can see why it works with this brand”. This brings me to tonic water. Why spend money on a gorgeously flavoured gin and then always stick the same tonic water into it? Fever Tree are making a wonderful range of tonic waters that are well worth experimenting with and I would select them over own label brands and big names every time. But look further into tonic waters and revel in their character which increasingly reflects the varieties of gin, with good producers including Indi, Thomas Henry, BTW, Peter Spanton and 1724. As for cocktails, the sky is the limit from the traditional Negroni to the late Sir Roger Moore’s recipe for a gin martini which he shared with me over a splendidly memorable lunch in Monaco. The Moore Martini is as follows: add a teaspoon of vermouth to a jug, discard. Pour in a bottle of gin then decant into individual glasses placed in the freezer with a lemon twist. It has to be said, they do taste very Moore-ish. Vermouth is another area of huge range. If I had to single one out for your attention it would be the excellent selection from Regal Rogue which vary from light and dry to rosé and red, all equally ace. Finally, when it comes to serving your gin, tumblers and long glasses are all very well, but for really revelling in those flavours, I recommend a large wine glass, especially for a G&T, which is perfect to unleash the aromas to maximum effect, and when packed with ice allows you to hold by the stem and keep that drink cool. And try my tonic ice cube trick – fill your ice tray with your favourite tonic to use in G&Ts. As they melt they reinforce the flavour of the drink and stop it from becoming diluted. Cheers!

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OLLY’S TOP TEN GINS St. George Botanivore Gin, www.masterofmalt.com Huge flavours abound in this craft USA gin that is the secret favourite of two British distillers I know who make their own successful gin. Excellent. Silent Pool, silentpooldistillers.com Tremendous in a G&T with a slice of orange. Expect bright notes of kaffir lime and citrus in this complex, quenching gin. Warner Edwards Harrington Gin, www.warneredwards.com Highly aromatic and brilliantly scented gin that I cannot get enough of. Spicy and splendid in every way. Adnams Copper House Gin, cellarandkitchen.adnams.co.uk Creamy and powerful; perfection on the rocks or try with a sprig of mint. Gin Mare, www.masterofmalt.com Deploy this unique Mediterranean gin in your G&T. Perfumed and delicious. Hibernation Gin, www.thewhiskyexchange.com Foraged Welsh botanicals create a superb aromatic profile that makes a marvellous Negroni. Gilpin’s Extra Dry Westmoreland 2014, wwww.thewhiskyexchange.com Martini time! Intense purity; darn close to perfection in terms of sheer refreshment. Xoriguer Gin, www.thewhiskyexchange.com Insanely aromatic awesomeness from Menorca with botanical bounce close to minty flavours. Supreme value.

CREATE YOUR OWN Perfect your own bespoke blend of gin on the ‘It’s a Gin Thing’ course at Chewton Glen’s The Kitchen. Martin Jennings, co-founder and craft distiller of awardwinning Pothecary Gin, will guide and inspire. The day will include an explanation of the different production methods, a blind tasting to discover your preferred gin style, gin-themed lunch, and an opportunity to create delicious gin cocktails. Everyone leaves with their own blended 500ml bottle of gin and each recipe will be archived so that they can be recreated to order by Martin. www.chewtonglen.com/the-kitchen

Ki No Bi Kyoto Dry Gin, www.thewhiskyexchange.com Meaning ’the beauty of the seasons’, this zesty unusual Japanese gin deploys botanicals such as yuzu, sansho pepper, bamboo leaf and gyokuro tea from Uji. Sacred Gin, sacredspiritscompany.com Distilled under a vacuum with Frankincense as a key botanical, this is a gin of immense clarity, purity and elegance.

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The new love

A F FA I R

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HEALTH & BEAUTY

SUSAN D’ARCY OF THE SUNDAY TIMES DISCOVERS HER INNER AND OUTER GODDESS AT CLIVEDEN’S NEW SPA

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liveden’s most formidable mistress Nancy Astor famously declared: “I married beneath me, all women do.” I found this quote hilarious, my husband did not, so we moved swiftly on to another assertion on which we could both agree. Nancy was absolutely wrong when she remarked: “Take a close-up of a woman past 60! You might as well use a picture of a relief map of Ireland.” Unfortunately for the feisty Viscountess, she did not live long enough to experience Cliveden’s fabulous new no-expense-spared spa. Fortunately for me, I have and can testify she would only utter the word relief in relation to total relief from pains, strains, stresses and, joyously, wrinkles. Yes, really. The spa is working with two of the UK’s best anti-ageing brands whose lotions and potions are so effective they may well end up putting Photoshop out of business. But this spa is not simply the ultimate selfie solution, it is a stay-all-day pampering palace worthy of a stately home where royalty and rock stars have partied hard for centuries. 

It is also the only spa in the country that could legitimately be the subject of a pub-quiz question. Tucked away behind the mellow bashed bricks of Cliveden’s dreamy walled garden is the outdoor pool where war minister John Profumo first met Christine Keeler, an encounter which led to an affair that plunged the Conservative government of the time into crisis. As a result, the pool gained notoriety and a Grade I-listing, and it is thrilling to swim a lap somewhere that has played such a significant role in history.  It remains untouched. Everywhere else, wellnesswise, has been re-imagined with a nod to the estate’s elegant Italianate architecture and an eye on 21stcentury sensibilities (touches such as the GHD hair straighteners in the changing room get a big tick). The interiors are now a Chanel poster come to life, bathed in the sort of sympathetic backlight for which Hollywood divas would give their agents’ eye teeth. There is a decadent indoor pool, an infused steam room and an on-trend infrared sauna. Unlike the traditional version, which raises the mercury to

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“SARAH CHAPMAN IS A GLOBAL BEAUTY INFLUENCER, WITH FANS SUCH AS THE BECKHAMS, SO IT IS QUITE A COUP FOR CLIVEDEN TO BE THE FIRST HOTEL WORLDWIDE TO OFFER HER AWARD-WINNING TREATMENTS” unbearable Saharan levels, the infrared light warms the body from within and is, therefore, effective at much lower temperatures, so I emerged after 20 minutes, energised but minus the usual flaming–red cheeks — never a good look. The infrared had also upped my heart rate to the equivalent of a jog, meaning I had burned 400 calories while feet up, chatting. I know, if only all exercise could be like this. I idled in the light-filled conservatory relaxation area and on the lavender-lined terrace. From both, there are Instagrammable views of the Profumo pool and the could-only-be-Cliveden gold-faced clock tower beyond. I was almost disappointed when my therapist appeared. Almost. Any regrets evaporated the second I realised the massage bed was fitted with a water mattress. It was like floating on a cloud. I was probably

snoring five minutes into my Rose Garden Experience but my therapist was far too polite to confirm this. Oskia, the cool bio-nutritional skincare range, has formulated the spa’s bespoke range of body products with fragrances using Cliveden’s colourful leading ladies as inspiration. Nancy’s perfume has notes of jasmine, fruit blossoms and lily to reflect her va-vavoom. Alternatively, there are seductive cedarwood, citrus and spicy layers to Anna Maria, the scent named after the mistress for whom Cliveden was built. I remember choosing Nancy as my olfactory backdrop, I also remember the foot bath with salts drenched in her addictively energetic aroma.  After that it is a bit of a blur. Apparently, the next 90 minutes combined ancient Indian massage techniques and craniosacral therapy to balance my nervous system and induce deep meditative relaxation. All I know is I left with super-soft skin and a bounce in my step. I certainly did not nod off during my facial. Sarah Chapman is a global beauty influencer, with fans such as the Beckhams and Naomi Watts, and a waiting list of three months at her London HQ, so it is quite a coup for Cliveden to be the first hotel worldwide to offer her award-winning treatments. Her secret weapon is her “gymnastics” massage. No leotards involved, just plenty of pinching, flicking and rolling to encourage absorption of her results-driven cosmeceutical creams. It genuinely took years off. Listening up there, Nancy? Outer temple tended, I addressed my inner goddess with a trip to The Spa Kitchen, which was like walking into one of Marylebone’s trendy clean-eating cafes. I was tempted by the wholesome soups and superfood salads but could not resist The Tummy Flattening Power Potato. Who knew feta cheese, tomatoes and olives were the sworn enemy of jelly belly? My instinct was to order two and hope the magic might work its way round to my derriére.  After lunch, the sun went in but I went out - for a dip in one of the two new al fresco hot tubs. In keeping with a trip to the world’s most scandalous swimming pool, you have to get into hot water at some point.

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Extremely Sporting Is any sport more glamorous than polo? Here is an exclusive invitation to play; beginners beware – you may get hooked Photography by Marcos Cerdeira

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omance and royals, passion and pizazz, polo is a heady combination. Think Thomas Crowne Affair cool and thank Jilly Cooper’s raunchy novels for widening polo’s appeal and putting the dash into the country set. Now even those without any riding experience can enjoy polo’s exhilarating thrills. “Yes, you have to be wealthy to play, and the game is quite exclusive – the expense of keeping polo ponies ensures that – but it is not elitist,” insists Michael Holton of Emsworth Polo Grounds, a privately owned polo facility based in the Berkshire countryside that is welcoming guests from Cliveden. “Our aim is to give people an opportunity to come and really see what this wonderful sport, and those who play it, are all about. Polo delivers huge excitement and thrills, but it also a very sociable activity… An invitation to Emsworth is not unlike an invitation to hang out with friends.” Polo is thought to be the oldest ball sport and possibly the oldest team sport in the world, with a tournament recorded back in 600BC. It has been played in the UK since the mid19th century, quickly becoming established as a favoured pastime of the rich and sport of princes, if not kings, with the Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales both exhibiting great prowess. Today, Berkshire is considered the heart of British polo. Cliveden’s own association with the sport is long-standing, going back to Waldorf Astor, who excelled at the game and counted Devereux Milburn, one of the Big Four champion American polo players, among his closest friends. So it seems fitting that Cliveden and Emsworth Polo Grounds have established an exclusive partnership, with guests at Cliveden invited to visit the grounds as spectators and also as participants on special ‘Learn to Play’ experiences. Set in 72 acres of beautiful countryside, Emsworth is just 20 minutes from Cliveden and 40 minutes from central London. As the home of Four Quarters Polo, its outstanding facilities provide an authentic introduction to the sport and an opportunity to see behind the scenes of a successful polo organisation, while the unique ‘Learn to Play’ experience is suitable for team building as well as individuals and is available year-round.

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POLO

“NOW EVEN THOSE WITHOUT ANY RIDING EXPERIENCE CAN ENJOY POLO’S EXHILARATING THRILLS”

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Michael explains: “This is a hugely enjoyable introduction to the sport. A real hands-on experience. Our fully accredited instructors provide the skills and confidence to enable you to compete in a polo match, schooling you in the three fundamentals: riding, hitting and rules. “Whether you are looking for a once in a lifetime experience or interested in taking the sport further, this is the perfect introduction to the game. The team consists of professionals who have played at the highest levels, bringing not only a wealth of knowledge, but also some interesting tales to boot. “It is a common misconception that to enjoy polo one must be an experienced rider. Our team of fully qualified instructors is expert at managing players with a range of abilities, from the complete novice to those who are accomplished riders. Clients are always surprised and delighted at what they can achieve in a day.” Emsworth will also be telephoning the concierge at Cliveden every weekend to invite guests over to watch some of the games, so that polo becomes part of the Cliveden experience – very much like enjoying a weekend in the country relaxing with friends. “While there are many amazing clubs throughout the UK offering spectacular polo events, we differ from the norm in that we are a privately owned, private hire venue. Ultimately this is a special, personal invitation to come hang out, enjoy our wonderful location and, most importantly, get to grips with this exhilarating game, meeting those who play and have a passion for polo.” Michael himself shares a passion for both polo and Cliveden, having fallen in love with the house when he was a child. There is certainly a synergy between the two, as Michael suggests. They both share the wow of spectacle and an element of glamour. Now they also share an exclusive invitation to play polo and party.

TAKE TWO

THE ULTIMATE: CARTIER QUEEN’S CUP, GUARDS POLO CLUB, WINDSOR GREAT PARK One of the world’s leading polo tournaments. Historically HM The Queen attends on finals day to present the silver cup. KING POWER GOLD CUP COWDRAY PARK, WEST SUSSEX A not-to-miss on the polo sporting calendar with its high octane final. THE FUN: CHESTERTONS POLO IN THE PARK, HURLINGHAM PARK, FULHAM Family-friendly polo experience with shopping village and ‘grazing paddock’. BRITISH BEACH POLO CHAMPIONSHIPS, SANDBANKS, POOLE As much about the partying; includes pro beach volleyball and polo pony charity race.

‘Learn to play’ polo experiences at Emsworth include all transfers from Cliveden, riding experience, equipment, lunch, refreshments and bespoke player’s shirt. Additional lessons, riding clinics and an extended polo programme are available on request. No previous riding experience is necessary.

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TA I T T I N G E R TIME

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DIARY

THE SEASON Essential Guide to the Season 2018

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2018 DIARY

he Season conjures up dazzling images of a glamorous and elegant world; a British spectacular rooted in a bygone era. It was originally the period when the wealthy, landed classes came up to town from their country estates to attend social events and marry off their daughters. These occasions included the Royal Horticultural Society Great Spring Show, which has now morphed into the more familiar Chelsea Flower Show, Henley Royal Regatta, and the major race meetings, such as Royal Ascot and Goodwood, before they returned to the country for the Glorious Twelfth and shooting season.

Over the decades the Season has evolved, shifting from private celebrations to public events, and combining business, rather than marriage, with social occasion. Yet it still conjures up a vision of lawns and lace, strawberries and fizz; the dream of a British summer as Edwardian garden party, with a focus on correct dress and good manners. Classics, such as Royal Ascot and Henley Royal Regatta, are still key. However new events have been adopted into the Season’s calendar, creating an exciting diary that harks back to the best of the past while reflecting today’s expectations.

MARCH

MAY

CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL Cheltenham Racecourse, Gloucestershire 13-16 March Not strictly part of the traditional Season, however Cheltenham Festival is a highlight of the winter racing season and the ultimate fixture of the jump racing season.

BADMINTON HORSE TRIALS Badminton Estate, Gloucestershire 2-6 May Premier three-day event with Dressage, Cross Country and Showjumping.

THE BOAT RACE River Thames, London 24 March Annual competition between rowing crews from Oxford and Cambridge Universities on the Thames.

ROYAL WINDSOR HORSE SHOW Windsor Castle, Windsor 9-13 May Hosting international competitions in Showjumping, Dressage, Driving and Endurance.

GLYNDEBOURNE

GLYNDEBOURNE East Sussex 19 May -26 August This great opera house is charmingly eccentric with audiences in evening dress traditionally enjoying picnics with fizz.

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DIARY

THE SEASON GARSINGTON OPERA Wormsley Estate, Chiltern Hills, Buckinghamshire 31 May-22 July Founded in 1989, Garsington Opera moved to Wormsley Estate in 2011 with performances held in the spectacular Opera Pavilion.

RHS CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW Royal Hospital, Chelsea, London 21-26 May Now regarded as the world’s most prestigious flower show and featuring inspirational garden designs.

JUNE INVESTEC DERBY FESTIVAL Epsom Downs Racecourse, Surrey 1-2 June Described as the greatest flat race in the world. CHESTERTONS POLO IN THE PARK The Hurlingham Club, London 8-10 June ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS SUMMER EXHIBITION Royal Academy of Arts, London 12 June-19 August Grayson Perry RA coordinates the 250th anniversary of the world’s longest running and largest opensubmission show. CARTIER QUEEN’S CUP FINAL Guards Polo Club, Windsor 17 June One of the top five polo tournaments in the world.

RHS CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW GLOUCESTERSHIRE FESTIVAL OF POLO Beaufort Polo Club, Westonbirt, Gloucestershire to be confirmed Two day spectacle held at the Beaufort Polo Club. ROYAL ASCOT Ascot Racecourse, Berkshire 19-23 June The Queen’s parade opens what is the world’s most famous race meeting.

QUEEN’S CLUB AEGON CHAMPIONSHIPS Queen’s Club, London 13-19 June This prestigious tournament known as the warm-up to Wimbledon.

CARTIER QUEEN’S CUP FINAL

MASTERPIECE Royal Hospital, Chelsea, London 28 June-4 July Leading international event for viewing and buying works of art from antiquity to the present day; established in 2010. JERUDONG PARK ROYAL CHARITY POLO EVENT Cirencester Park Polo Club, Bathurst Estate, Gloucestershire to be confirmed Historically HRH Prince William and Prince Harry have played, raising funds for their charities.

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DIARY

THE SEASON GOODWOOD REVIVAL

2018 DIARY

BOODLES TENNIS Stoke Park, Buckinghamshire 26-30 June Tennis tournament showcasing some of the best sporting talent on court.

JULY WIMBLEDON The All England Tennis Club, Wimbledon, London 2-15 July One of the top tennis tournaments in the world with strawberries and cream as a Wimbledon tradition. HENLEY ROYAL REGATTA River Thames, Henley 4-8 July Best known rowing regatta in the world and a highlight of the summer sporting calendar. KING POWER GOLD CUP Cowdray Park, West Sussex 18 and 22 July The premier polo tournament in the world at ‘High Goal’ level.

HENLEY ROYAL REGATTA

GOODWOOD FESTIVAL OF SPEED Goodwood Estate, West Sussex 12-15 July Motorsport’s ultimate summer garden party. THE GAME FAIR Ragley Hall, Warwickshire 27-29 July Europe’s largest festival of the countryside, celebrating British field sports and country life; this year marking its 60th anniversary. QATAR GOODWOOD FESTIVAL Goodwood, West Sussex 31 July-4 August Known as Glorious Goodwood and one of the best racing meets of the Season.

AUGUST COWES WEEK Cowes, Isle of Wight 4-11 August One of longest running regattas in the world. SALON PRIVÉ Blenheim Palace, 30 August-1 September Exclusive automotive garden party with rare and valuable classic cars and motorcycles.

CONCOURS OF ELEGANCE Hampton Court Palace, Richmond-upon-Thames 31 August- 2 September A selection of the world’s rarest cars.

SEPTEMBER GOODWOOD REVIVAL Goodwood Estate, West Sussex 7-9 September Extravaganza of historic racing and period clothing. LAPADA ART & ANTIQUES FAIR Berkeley Square, London 14-19 September One of the foremost showcases for art and antiques with authenticity approved by specialist committee .

OCTOBER FRIEZE Regent’s Park, London 3-7 October Popular with the fashion crowd, Frieze brings together leading art galleries from around the world, showcasing both newly discovered artists and respected names in contemporary art.

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0800 917 3000 | www.barbour.com

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GARDENS

PR INCELY

PA R A D I S E

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SEEKING INSPIRATION FOR YOUR PLOT? THE COTSWOLDS IS RENOWNED FOR ITS DESTINATION GARDENS, INCLUDING HIGHGROVE – AN EXCEPTIONAL MONUMENT TO THE ENGLISH GARDEN; CAROL WRIGHT VISITS

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notice at the visitor entrance to Highgrove gardens near Tetbury in Gloucestershire reads, “Beware. You are entering an old-fashioned establishment”. It is perhaps a fitting greeting to a series of themed, separately designed gardens girdling the Georgian neo-classical house, creating magical mixtures of plants, ornaments and buildings that “work with nature not against it”. These are the words of the Prince of Wales, who bought the property in 1980 when the land consisted of parkland, sheep pasture and a neglected kitchen garden. As the Prince says, “The garden was very much a blank canvas”. Working with experts such as Rosemary Verey, Lady Salisbury, Miriam Rothschild and a team of 11 gardeners, the Prince has put his ideas into glorious reality. However, the 15 acres remain a personal garden reflecting the Prince’s interests and exuding tranquillity and enchantment. The house, liberally coated with wisteria and Magnolia grandiflora, acts as a spindle for the encircling gardens. Among them, the Terrace Garden is an intimate yew and stone walled area with two pepper pot pavilions designed by the Prince, and four 150-year-old Spanish olive trees. The Cottage Garden is divided between traditional shrubs, herbaceous plants and bulbs, and a vibrant scheme of blue, yellow and pink echoing Tibetan silks. The Sundial Garden, in soft blues, pinks and purples, has spiky delphiniums as its focal point amid box edging. The surrounding yew has niches cut in it, a characteristic Highgrove feature, and wrought iron gates rescued from a reclamation yard. Recycling and organic sustainability are garden keynotes. Rainwater is conserved for irrigation, waste recycled, solar panels employed, wood chips fuel heating and mulch plants, harvested seed and cuttings renew plantings.

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The small garden buildings reflect this philosophy: dead trees from the estate and redundant stone, particularly from churches, are utilised. A 200-year-old cedar tree alongside the house had to be felled in 2007 and on its site an open spire topped oak pavilion has been created. There is a fey Hansel and Gretel feel to some structures. A treehouse originally designed for Princes William and Harry has been recreated for Prince George. In the Cottage Garden there is both a summer house, designed by the Prince and architect Mark Hoare that uses dead oak from the estate, and the Shand Gate, made from stone and oak and featuring reclaimed 18th century Indian doors from Jodhpur. The Prince’s own contemplative bolt hole, the Sanctuary in the Arboretum, has cob earth walls, Bath Stone footings and pillars, Cotswold stone roof, open fire and stained-glass window. Meanwhile the Egyptian Gate to the Azalea Walk bears hieroglyphics, meaning “the flowers in the garden are a reflection of the stars in the sky”, which were carved by students from the Prince’s Foundation for Building Community, where Mark Hoare, much involved with the gardens, studied. The most impressive tree recycling is the Stumpery, redefining a Victorian conceit of displaying ferns with old tree stumps. The Stumpery centres round two classical temples designed by Julian and Isabel Bannerman in green oak cut to resemble stone. A pile of redundant stone mixed with limestone in the centre of a small lake is topped with umbrella-like gunnera leaves. The Stumpery also contains a National Collection of large and broadleaved hostas - 150 types on which no slug pellets are used. Embellishments blend with plantings. Geometric-shaped yews line a walk of 25 kinds of thyme flanked by a stilt hornbeam hedge. At the end of the Thyme Walk, the Lily Pool Garden has two massive amphora. Shipped to ‘The Prince of Wales, Tetbury’, they were first delivered to Tetbury’s  Prince of Wales pub!   Near the oak pavilion, an acid bed contains azaleas, rhododendrons and specimen magnolias from Edmund de Rothschild’s Exbury Gardens in Hampshire. More magnolias appear in the Arboretum, on which the curator of nearby Westonbirt advised, while the adjacent Winterbourne Garden is lushly green with tree ferns, hydrangeas, cornus and mahonia cut through by a stream edged with gunnera and Asiatic primula. The one-acre Walled Garden’s potagers form eight square and eight triangular shapes edged with box to represent the flags of St George and St Andrew. There is a tunnel of 20 apple varieties and a row of crab apples shaped like coronets.  In 1982, Miriam Rothschild blended 32 wildflower species seeds sown in a four-acre Wildflower Meadow including five orchid species and yellow rattle to suppress grass growth. Best seen late May and early June, it is cut by scythe once a year and used to graze sheep in the autumn. After this idyllic Englishness, the Carpet Garden, reached through a door off the heritage apple orchard, is a surprise. This Arabian Nights’ fantasy was inspired by a Turkish carpet design in Highgrove, edged with cypress pillars, scented roses, olives, cork oaks and vines around a tiled oriental fountain. These are gardens of wonder and delight, yet they are also a calm and relaxing space; perhaps as the gardens are the Prince’s own retreat. This makes the fact that he is prepared to share his gardens with visitors even more special. Tours run from April to mid-October with all profits going to the Prince of Wales’ Charitable Foundation.

GORGEOUS GARDENS BARNSLEY HOUSE, NEAR CIRENCESTER Redesigned in the 1950s by Rosemary Verey, a Highgrove adviser. Herbaceous plants are arrayed in four acres with knot garden, laburnum and pleached lime walks, ornamental fruit and vegetable garden. Best late spring or early summer. www.barnsleyhouse.com

BATSFORD PARK ARBORETUM, NEAR MORETON IN MARSH Created by the first Lord Redesdale in the 1890s, this is the UK’s largest private collection of tree and shrub species, and reflects his passion for the Orient with bamboos, Japanese maples and bronze statues. Best in spring for 50 magnolia species in flower or autumn for fiery colours. www.batasarb.co.uk

HIDCOTE MANOR, NEAR CHIPPING CAMPDEN Hill top arts and crafts garden created by American plant collector Major Lawrence Johnston. It is renowned for its series of themed, hedged, outdoor ‘rooms’. Best in summer. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hidcote

KIFTSGATE COURT, NEAR CHIPPING CAMPDEN Banked gardens developed by three generations of women: Heather Muir in the 1920s and 1930s, Diany Binny in the 1950s and Anne Chambers today. A series of colour ‘pictures’ are presented in the white sunk, water, yellow and rose border gardens. Highlight is the vigorous Kiftsgate rose. Go in summer for rose scents. www.kiftsgate.co.uk

SEZINCOTE, NEAR MORETON IN MARSH Extraordinary 1810 Indian styled house and Moghul Paradise garden. Neglected during the Second World War, the gardens were restored in the 1960s by Sir Cyril and Lady Kleinwort with advice from Graham Stuart Thomas, and feature a series of spring fed pools banked by hostas, rodgersias and skunk cabbage. Go for summer cool provided by grottoes, waterfalls and canals. www.sezincote.co.uk

www.highgrovegardens.com

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INTERIORS

V I N TAG E GL AMOUR

THE NEW STYLE MIXES OLD TRADITION WITH RECYCLED AND REPURPOSED PIECES AND CONTEMPORARY COMFORTS – INTERIOR DESIGNER ANITA ROSATO MAKES IT LOOK EFFORTLESS Written by Emma Caulton

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he Lygon Arms takes centre stage in Broadway, a honeyed afternoon tea of a Cotswold village, and so it should. This prettily wisteria-clad historic coaching inn with gabled wings and stone mullion windows is thought to date back to the 16th century and has attracted actors, artists and writers through the centuries. Beyond its entrance, flanked by pilasters, are decorative friezes, dark beams and flagstones worn smooth over the centuries. No surface is straight or even. Doorways lean at odd angles, floors pitch and swell. It is wonderful, rich with character and heritage; the sort of place that makes you go “Wow”! Well, it does now that interior designer Anita Rosato has, in her own words, “Taken it back to where it belongs.” I first visited when Anita was in the

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throes of agreeing final decisions and details, including hanging artwork in sight and judgment of the locals who had wandered in to watch (The Lygon Arms is a Cotswold institution and as such is viewed as belonging to the wider community). Regrouping and rehanging The Lygon Arm’s extensive collection of artwork was just one of several design challenges. The most obvious was meeting the expectations for a luxury hotel while respecting the inn’s heritage. King Charles I and his supporters met here in what is now the King Charles I Suite and Oliver Cromwell stayed here before the Battle of Worcester in what is now The Cromwell Room - an ornate room with a magnificent fireplace where you can inhale the centuries. More problematic were the discordant architectural periods. Anita explains: “The

Lygon Arms comprises historic structures that span the centuries, from the Tudor period through to the 20th century. “Gordon Russell, the pioneering designer and furniture maker, had a workshop out the back, after his father Sydney Bolton Russell bought The Lygon Arms, where he produced many pieces for the hotel. Today, the Russell legacy is as much a part of the history of The Lygon Arms as King Charles I and Cromwell.” Anita recalls: “The main building was a rabbit warren of small, dark, challenging spaces, and there was a lack of coherence between these and the more recent additions, including one wing influenced by the Arts & Craft Movement and another that was built in the mid-century. “The different periods were jarring and we had to resolve how we were going to

meld together the styles and periods to look as though they belonged to each other; that was both the greatest challenge and the most exciting element.” One solution was commissioning bespoke carpets running throughout these different areas and complementing the varied architecture. The designs were an acanthus leaf pattern with four different background colourways to work with each of the bedroom schemes, and a development of this pattern into an elegant Fleur de Lys design to run through the public areas. Next was the use of colour. Anita continues: “I used a palette of deep, dark and moody colours; this helped me work with difficult spaces. If you have a small, dark space, I am not afraid of making it darker. Painting colour on the ceilings and

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walls creates a neutral backdrop without visible ceiling lines, enhances the features and makes rooms more intriguing by keeping the focus at eye level.” Bold, rich and warm tones have created an effect that is cosy and inviting, snug yet sumptuous. Anita kept the colour palette deliberately restrained so not to detract from the architecture. Schemes used in the bedrooms include: taupe and mauve; deep turquoise and earth; citrus and olive; red and grey. An example is the King Charles I Suite with its impressive four-poster hung in a bold red and grey check and a heap of cushions in grey, white and red pattern, tartan and tweed, and a wing armchair, rehomed from another part of the hotel, reupholstered in crimson. Anita continues: “The Lygon Arms has always had a collection of fantastic antiques and original pieces of furniture. We have refreshed and reupholstered items, moved them around into different areas, and sourced new antique pieces, mixing them in, so that they look as though they have always belonged here.” A similar approach was taken with the inn’s collection of paintings, photographs and prints: “We stripped the hotel of its existing artwork and regrouped them into themes, such as landscapes, lithoprints, flora and fauna and horses, and rehung them; really flipping it on its head. It has been a mammoth task!”

Public areas have been given a scheme of tan saddle leather contrasted with blue, green and steely grey, and accessorised with elements inspired by country life, such as antler chandeliers and hare sculptures. The feel is traditional, yet young, cosmopolitan and quirky. A new bar area with dark bottle green walls and tan leather banquettes draws visitors in, while the Great Hall with panelling, minstrels’ gallery and barrel-vaulted ceiling has been warmed up. Anita is delighted. “It previously lacked atmosphere; the restaurant was too austere, so we roughed it up, removing the carpet so you can hear heels on the floor, and added marble-topped bistro tables that reflect light, with beautiful petit LED lamps on each, and painted it a dusty old blue.” Country chic for a charming old building.

ANITA ROSATO’S TIPS TO ACHIEVE THE LYGON LOOK •

Ornate heavy furniture can be stripped down and transformed with a coat of paint.

Refresh schemes by relocating and rehoming pieces, including artwork, which can be taken down, regrouped and rehung, giving it a new life.

Reinvent how a piece is used – such as old trunks as coffee tables and sideboards, which we have put into the bedrooms, repurposed as TV cabinets.

SINK INTO SLEEP Anita advises: “You have to get the sleeping experience perfect and these mattresses are divine.” “These” mattresses are Naturalmat, handmade in Devon using natural materials from sustainable British sources. Founders Mark Tremlett and Peter Tindall, recall: “The Lygon Arms was an interesting project; the real challenge was

dragging the 17th century antique bedsteads into the comfort of the 21st century. We had to re-engineer these beds with new bespoke bases made with organic coir and lambswool and inset these into the antique structures. Then bespoke mattresses had to be crafted to fit on the bases around the existing woodwork and corner posts.”

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FOOD & DRINK

T H E P RO O F

OF THE

PUDDING WHAT’S COOKING AT CHEWTON GLEN’S THE KITCHEN? EMMA CAULTON DONS PINNY AND FINDS OUT…

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here is fresh coffee, a heap of flaky, buttery pastries and a table of beaming, friendly faces. This is my welcome to The Kitchen, Chewton Glen’s new “Eat, Meet, Create” venue. I am here for the “Create” element (aka the cookery school), and these are my fellow students for the day. The design and development of The Kitchen was overseen by Chewton Glen alumni and TV Chef James Martin. And I have signed up for James Martin’s Perfect Puddings – not taken by the man himself, although he does take regular classes at The Kitchen, but by Chef Tutor Rob Cottam who previously worked with James as Head of James’ The Cookery Club on board the cruise ship Britannia. So here we are, a group of foodie enthusiasts of varied confidence and competence. Some have travelled from London, others live just round the corner. I am from somewhere in-between. The Kitchen is a light-filled, barn-style space, inspired by both the farmyard and Scandi chic with rustic oak beams and warm copper lighting. We gather in the restaurant, divided from the cookery school by a wall of glass, and I wonder briefly about whether I will feel on display to diners. In reality, however, when the course is underway, you become engrossed, completely involved, oblivious to anything happening beyond. We are in safe hands. Rob has an encouraging and engaging manner. Even

the assistants are trained chefs and able to guide and advise each of us individually as required, and classes are small to guarantee this level of personal attention. Introductions made, Rob assures us that he can help everyone and anyone: “Even if you think you can burn a pan of water!” As for those who are more capable and have made these classic puds before, Rob will help to refine them, taking them to the next level. He prepares each dish first, and we watch, all sitting comfortably around the demonstration area with clear views of what to do when, how and why. He makes it look simple. Then we all set to work at individual, shiny new workstations, each with our own efficient induction hob. There is a professional pace to the day. We have four puddings to prepare, however, ingredients have been weighed and prepped beforehand. So, for example, sultanas are already soused in a rather delicious whisky for indulgent ‘White Chocolate and Whisky Croissant Butter Pudding’ (a great excuse to use up stale croissants). Rob continually shares techniques and tips, from how to use vanilla pods to flavour the custard to the best blow torches for caramelising the top, dredged in icing sugar, without burning. One showcase pudding created, and we are onto the next. This time making choux pastry for chocolate éclairs. We laugh over our misshapen efforts, however they have a homemade, handcrafted appearance. But who would have thought that piping fresh cream into the centre of each one would

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FOOD & DRINK

“THE BEST-TASTING CHOCOLATE ÉCLAIRS EVER – EVEN IF I SAY SO MYSELF.” be so physically demanding? It is a workout for the upper body. (I probably needed to snip a wider opening into the piping bag; a lesson learned.) We are shown how to melt chocolate correctly before spreading it swiftly and thickly on to the top of each pastry. The result is quite possibly the best-tasting chocolate éclairs ever – even if I say so myself. We break for lunch: a selection of superfood salads and wood-fired pizzas from The Kitchen restaurant served with a glass of crisp white wine. On other courses, students eat what they have been cooking during the morning, but we can hardly tuck into rich bread and butter pudding for lunch. Then we turn our attention to concocting

the lightest sticky toffee puddings served with gooey toffee sauce. The finale is an apple tarte tatin turned into food of the gods with the addition of thyme. It is a surprisingly easy pudding that will be perfect for astonishing dinner guests. There is no clearing away or washing up. That is all done for us. We are here to relax and enjoy ourselves. Come 4pm, we are simultaneously elated and exhausted, staggering home loaded up with our irresistible, instagrammable efforts, plus complimentary The Kitchen apron, and feeling rather pleased with ourselves. These courses can certainly teach beginners and old foodies new tricks.

ON COURSE The Kitchen’s cookery school encompasses a wide range of courses for all interests, ages and abilities. These include various ‘Junior Chef’ (for eight to 12-year-olds) and ‘Teen Chef’ (for 13-17-year-olds) classes which have a fun, creative approach. Rob remarks: “Kids classes are great fun, but, boy, do they get busy!” There are inspiring and imaginative courses for grown-ups with menus for entertaining, from baking and bread-making (not your standard loaf, think Chewton Glen Kitchen Garden Clay Pot Loaf and Goat’s Cheese, Fig and Honey Bread), to seasonal eating and seafood (the likes of James Martin’s smoked haddock Welsh rarebit with tomatoes and chive oil, and

Pan-fried Seabass with Mussels Braised in Laverstoke Park Cider, inspired by Luke Matthew’s Saturday Kitchen dish). And there is so much more: home-cooking, delicious nutritional recipes, and courses that roam a world of flavours, from South American Street Food to Scandinavian Cuisine, and journey through Asia, Middle East and Sri Lanka. Finally, there are celebrity chef classes, given by James Martin and his friends, guiding participants through menus reflecting specialisms and seasonality. If cooking is not your thing, you can enjoy dinner with James - comprising drinks, demonstration and dinner with matching wines and entertaining anecdotes. Perfect.

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ENTENTE

COR DIALE INSIDE STORY: THERE IS A FIZZ TO THE ENGLISH WINE SCENE, AND NOW THE FRENCH ARE COMING. LYNNE MURRAY TOASTS A FIRST

B

ut they are all speaking French! Was probably Charles de Saint-Evremond’s astonished cry as he broached the bawdy fleshpots of London. King Louis XIV of France had kicked him out, however King Charles II of England welcomed him with open arms. The English aristocracy spoke French, bolstered by a King who had spent nine years in exile in France and the Netherlands. Saint-Evremond brought with him not only his razor-sharp wit and great bonhomie, but a fiercely protective love for the sparkling wines of Champagne. Therefore, when Champagne Taittinger announced its purchase of 69 hectares of vineyard land in Kent, Pierre-Emmanuel Taittinger, President of Champagne Taittinger and avid historian, decided the new vineyard should take its name from Charles de Saint-Evremond (1614-1703), the first true ambassador for champagne in the UK. Poet and literary critic as well as epicurean, Saint-Evremond is buried in Poets’ Corner in Westminster Abbey. So it was also appropriate that the launch of Domaine Evremond, in December 2015, was announced at Westminster Abbey.

There was a sharp intake of breath when Taittinger told guests of the first-ever plantings by a Grande Marque Champagne House on British soil. He commented: “Our family has strong connections to Kent through my father, Jean Taittinger, who twinned Canterbury with Reims over 45 years ago when he was Mayor of Reims; I am looking forward to being able to strengthen these links. “We have dreamt for a number of years of working with our dear friends here to create a special Franco/British project. Built on the values of friendship, this venture will show our appreciation of the UK’s love of champagne – it is Champagne Taittinger’s number one export market. We are very excited that this dream is becoming a reality,  drawing on our 80 years of winemaking expertise, to produce a highquality English sparkling wine. Our aim is to make something of real excellence in the UK’s increasingly temperate climate, and not to compare it with champagne or any other sparkling wine.” The land, a former apple farm, is near Chilham in Kent, close to Canterbury. The plots planted are a maximum of 80 metres above sea level, with chalk soil and southfacing slopes, creating an ideal terroir (soil, microclimate and topography) to grow high quality Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier vines; weather permitting, of course. Ultimately the ambition is to produce fine Chardonnay-rich wines, the grape which dominates the Taittinger Champagne range. Planted in the first week of May 2017, following 18 months of intense land preparation, Domaine Evremond plans to bottle its first wines from the 2020 harvest, with the first bottles chilling on tables around 2023 - depending on what hand Mother Nature plays.

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WINE

“THIS VENTURE WILL SHOW OUR APPRECIATION OF THE UK’S LOVE OF CHAMPAGNE – IT IS CHAMPAGNE TAITTINGER’S NUMBER ONE EXPORT MARKET”

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What is paramount is that it will only be released when the quality is considered to be good enough. This project is very much an entente cordial, a joint venture between Champagne Taittinger, its independently owned UK agency Hatch Mansfield and friends. Taittinger is the only Grande Marque Champagne House to be run by its eponymous family and now it is the first Grande Marque Champagne House to establish a vineyard in the UK in this way. Patrick McGrath MW and Managing Director of Hatch Mansfield adds: “Ultimately we will be aiming to produce 300,000 bottles per year of premium English sparkling wine, although this will not be for six years or more as the vines will take time to reach the stage where they are producing the quantity of

quality fruit required. It will be a gradual process and is a very exciting journey for all of us.” As the second largest vineyard owner in the Champagne region, with 288 hectares supplying over half of their needs, the family has sound pedigree when it comes to growing grapes and making wine. Their viticulture team has been working closely with Stephen Skelton MW, one of the UK’s leading viticulture consultants, in selecting and preparing the land. This rich knowledge base, combined with their USA experience in establishing their successful venture Domaine Carneros, which makes highly regarded sparkling wine and Pinot Noir wines, provides a sound base for Domaine Evremond’s future. And Saint-Evremond, as champagne’s first ambassador, would have raised a glass or two.

GROWTH SECTOR: VINES & WINES Wine producers in the UK planted a record one million vines in 2017 Wine production is one of the fastest growing agricultural sectors in the UK Over the past ten years the acreage planted with grapevines has grown by 13% There are now more than 500 vineyards in England and Wales An average of five million bottles is currently produced; two-thirds of which is sparkling wine Production is projected to double in the next five years www.domaineevremond.com

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Best Design-Led Architectural Practice, Dorset as awarded in the South West Enterprise Awards 2017

davidjames architects

& partners ltd

Voted Best Design-Led Architectural Practice, Dorset

design

planning

technical design

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TRAVEL

FOR VERY PETICULAR TRAVELLERS HAVE POOCH WILL TRAVEL; DENISE ELPHICK EXPLAINS WHY DOGS MAKE THE BEST TRAVEL COMPANIONS

I

truly believe that travelling with your pet is a life enhancing experience. It is just so much more fun! Imagine travelling with a companion who does not spend hours checking their phone, never complains and is always cheerful. Nothing beats the look on Rufus and Heidi’s faces when I tell them that we are off on one of our jaunts. The bright eyes, the wagging tails… They are bursting with excitement and that sets the tone for the trip and ensures everyone has a good time. I first started travelling with Rufus and Heidi, my two feisty Norfolk terriers, as part of their role as the Pet Inspectors, assessing places for their pet-friendliness for PetsPyjamas, an online pet company which my business partner Karen Hanton and I set up five years ago. It was Karen’s idea to start a pet website: we were both mad about animals and, having had previous experience setting up Toptable online, we could see the potential of a super stylish pet lifestyle site. We began by offering stylish accessories and services, but quickly moved on to booking dog-friendly travel.  Our pet concierge service was an instant hit, booking fabulous pet getaways to properties that could demonstrate they were truly dog-friendly. First we had to sign up the most luxurious and prestigious hotels in the UK. Top of our list was Cliveden. Happily, Cliveden agreed to partner us right away, along with sister hotels Chewton Glen in the New Forest and The Lygon Arms in the Cotswolds. All three have something extra special to offer our canine friends. Cliveden has the marvellously dogfriendly Great Hall where you can enjoy afternoon tea with your pet, oodles of space in the luxurious rooms and 250 acres of fabulous grounds for woodland walkies. On their Pet Inspection to Cliveden, Rufus and Heidi became ever so slightly grand. They loved the vast turning staircase up to our room, accompanying us to tea in the Great Hall, and they were happy to snooze

contentedly in the comfy doggie beds after a long walk in the gorgeous National Trust grounds. Chewton Glen is equally magical for you and your pooch with pets welcome to stay in the stunning Treehouse Suites set among a wooded valley in the grounds. At The Lygon Arms, what we call ‘The Bow-wow Factor’ includes pet guests provided with a bed, bowl and dog biscuit, three acres of gardens for strolls, the Cotswolds’ countryside to explore and then a chance for owner and dog to relax in front of a roaring log fire. These hotels understand dogs are part of the family and that owners want to bring them along, too! Since we began, our selection of dogfriendly recommendations has grown, and now includes hotels across England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, and chateaux in France and mountain chalets in Switzerland. It is not just hotels that are welcoming dogs. In London there is a trend towards more and more cafes and restaurants luring in your best friend with biscuits and cuddles. A favourite of mine, Hally’s, is a Californianstyle cafe in Parsons Green which is full of dogs in the morning, with one Labrador regularly receiving a carrot when he visits. Megan’s on the King’s Road is another favourite spot for Rufus and Heidi, as well as The Courtyard at Bluebird.

“ON THEIR PET INSPECTION TO CLIVEDEN, RUFUS AND HEIDI BECAME EVER SO SLIGHTLY GRAND”

Lulu Guinness with Daphne

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As Pet Passport holders, Rufus and Heidi have travelled the globe, including a road trip across Western Europe, through France, Italy, Germany and Switzerland, with visits to Pompeii, the Leaning Tower of Pisa and the Berlin Wall - where both dogs seemed sad, having picked up on the more sombre atmosphere. Last September we took them on another road trip; this time to Eastern Europe visiting Bruges, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland, retuning via Venice and Paris. On both journeys we travelled via Eurotunnel - super fast and super dog-friendly with play areas for pooches provided at both terminals. As seasoned travellers, Rufus and Heidi’s must-have accessories for all these trips include a collapsible water bowl, bottled water, pet bed, blankets, their normal food, treats and toys including a tennis ball and frisbee. I also strongly recommend taking cool coats in the summer as well as high viz jackets and LED lights for winter getaways.  I have just treated Rufus and Heidi to personalised roll-up travel blankets. And I have treated myself to the new Lulu Guinness dog-shaped Daphne bag which has loads of bow-wow appeal and is named after Lulu’s own equally glamorous white Westie. Lulu Guinness has herself stayed at Cliveden with Daphne, and they both loved their visit, too.   So next time you are thinking of a weekend getaway or a get together with friends, include your four-legged friend, and ensure everyone has the best time.

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FOOD & REVIEW DRINK

TA S T E O F T H E

COTSWOLDS THE LYGON ARMS: A STORY OF TWO RESTAURANTS TOLD BY JENNIFER SHARP

W

hen you are 600 years old, it is hard to keep up with the times, especially the fast-moving world of restaurants and food trends, but the much-loved Lygon Arms has achieved it effortlessly. Two new dining options for both hotel guests and locals, along with sumptuous breakfasts and afternoon teas, are consolidating the hotel’s reputation as the jewel of this beautiful Cotswold village. I have happy romantic memories of The Lygon despite the recent ‘dark ages’, a decade of neglect by careless owners. But with inspirational new management and top-notch staff, including a very talented Head Chef, the old swagger is back and this historic coaching inn is well and truly on the map again. The ground floor is an enchanting maze of snug public rooms perfect for reading or meeting friends. The dominant space is The Lygon Bar & Grill, a fresh interpretation of the main dining room which keeps its huge barrel ceiling and minstrels’ gallery but with a more relaxed mood. Instead of heavy white linen and stodgy service, there are modern marbletopped tables, comfortable blue leather chairs, tan leather banquettes and enthusiastic serving staff in frisky blue jeans.

During the day, light from the leaded windows streams across polished wooden floors and dramatic flower arrangements to a huge open fireplace, grand enough for a Tudor monarch. At night, there is a warm seductive ambience. The menu cleverly appeals both to adventurous diners and those happier with classics such as chicken and mushroom pie or lamb cutlets, but even the most familiar dishes have a touch of magic. Head Chef Ales Maurer is passionate about the best local produce and has an impressive network of local suppliers: farm shops on the outskirts of Evesham for fruit and vegetables, Waghornes artisan butchers in Prestbury for the best meat perfectly hung to the Chef’s standards, Billy’s Eggs near Stow on the Wold, honey from local beekeepers and versatile Cotswold Gold rapeseed oil, highly prized by the best chefs across the country. Smoked salmon comes from award-winning Coln Valley traditional smokery and, a little further away, Welsh wizard Wendy Brendon, who makes pickles and preserves, uses hand-picked sloes along with apple and brandy to create a rich liquor for The Lygon Arms that gives a subtle dash of daring to a dish.

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Although he has little time for the gimmicks of much fashionable cooking, Ales Maurer is a brave chef who enjoys pushing boundaries. And the customers like it - his octopus dish is a surprising best-seller. In a marinade of red wine, lemon, orange, thyme, juniper, coriander and star anise, the octopus is vacuum-packed, steamed for three hours and then chilled overnight. The tentacles keep their shape but remain tender. When ordered, they are grilled and served with fennel and a sharp citrus dressing. Delicious. The same care goes into the beef burger using prime quality steak and served with beef tomatoes, Cheddar, baby gem lettuce, sliced pickle, streaky bacon and spiced tomato relish. So far so traditional perhaps, but every single item is precisely chosen and the meat is cut, mixed and pressed by hand so it is not compacted and heavy. Try a rich cheese soufflé with artichokes and chestnut cream. Or, if you are dieting, maybe the beef tartare with a light ciabatta crisp instead of fries. Seasonal fish can include lemon sole or sea bass with butter beans and the salty tang of cockles. There is local venison with roasted root vegetables and some of that magical sloe jus. There are imaginative side dishes like warm kale and almonds or creamed leeks and bacon. Vegetarians and vegans will be very well looked after, and there is also a very good menu for children – proper food for budding gourmets. The Chef’s wife, Jo, is the Pastry Chef; a star turn in her own right. Her bitter chocolate tart uses light gram flour for the pastry, 70% dark chocolate and ice cream revved up with

“THE OLD SWAGGER IS BACK AND THIS HISTORIC COACHING INN IS WELL AND TRULY ON THE MAP AGAIN” Cotswold ale. There is fruit crumble with clotted cream, fresh ices and sorbets, and English cheese. Jo has also devised luxurious pastries and savouries for the afternoon tea menu in partnership with drinks by the Herefordshire distillery Chase. An alternative to the Grill is the new Lygon Wine Bar, a very different space that feels like modern Milan in chic monochrome colours with Italian dishes from Ales Maurer’s right-hand man in the kitchen, the young chef Michele Figus. His menu of antipasti and sharing plates includes rich burrata with chicory and hazelnuts, beef carpaccio and crab linguine. There are porcini mushrooms with hand-rolled strozzapreti pasta and a dish of lentils, tomato and parsley supplemented with flakes of salt cod. The Grill and the Wine Bar share a thoughtfully compiled wine list with a good selection by the glass, plus 500ml carafes. There are more than 20 bottles each of red and white wine from across the world (including Britain), plus prestige champagne, rosé and dessert wines. Do not forget to try the cocktail bar adjacent to the Grill. Their take on a classic negroni whooshed up with lavender will start you off nicely. Cheers!

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OPINION

A r e Yo u B e i n g

S E RV E D ? FRONT OF HOUSE IS MOVING CENTRE STAGE; SIMON CARTER OF THE FINE DINING GUIDE PONDERS THE ART OF SERVICE AND THE FINE LINE BETWEEN FORMALITY AND FRIENDLINESS

T

oday hospitality is the art of how do you make someone feel. But can it be learned or is it the magic dust within character? Some dislike being fussed over, others expect pampering. Subtle skills are required so service appears intuitive. Service was once the bastion of the great London hotels. Until relatively recently at The Savoy you would see waiters gliding around the floor wearing long white gloves matched by longer tail jackets, carrying silver domes and representing the superior element of the room. The stiffness and stuffiness of that era has gone. Now the accent is on warmth of welcome coupled with a relaxed and accessible generosity of spirit. The accumulated knowledge of specialist service may still involve the when, where and how of cutlery, crockery and glassware presentation, but all of this is now conducted with a far more informal grace – perhaps involving a twinkle in the eye, a memory of a conversation, an anecdotal story and the warmth of a genuine smile. Then there is ‘Management By Walking About’ (MBWA), a technique employed by the ‘host of the house’, allowing them to see what the customer sees; spotting the required details of excellence. The leader becomes conductor, delivering a performance, orchestrating the service and charming the guests. The result is the ambience of a club where the customer feels they belong. This is the ideal.

“YOU GET A BILL FOR WHAT WE CALL THE LUNCH OR THE DINNER – THE FOOD AND THE WINE – BUT WHAT YOU RECEIVE IS MOMENTS OF HAPPINESS!” It was Silvano Giraldin, legendary maître d’ of Le Gavroche, who developed the front of house blueprint for service and hospitality, founding the Academy of Culinary Arts’ Les Arts de la Table in 1985 (along with Michel Bourdin and Richard Edmonds). He was also responsible for setting up the Academy’s first Master of Culinary Arts for Service (with Jean-Pierre Durantet) and more recently has been a significant player in the Gold Service Scholarship. Along with the Acorn Awards (last year’s winners participated in an Acorn Awards weekend at Cliveden), these represent the rise of service as a recognised

profession. In addition, the hotel side of the ‘Ten out of Ten’ hospitality management programme saw trainees seconded in rotation across a select tranche of luxury hotels, covering departments from HR to housekeeping. All of these programmes are supported by Iconic Luxury Hotels, and there is acknowledgement of a clear link between training and recognition with staff retention and morale, standards and customer satisfaction. The customer has developed increasing power in their expectations. We live in a social media world where the customer may review instantaneously their experience via Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, or perhaps sometime later on TripAdvisor or a blog, and hotels and restaurants have to be smart in reading their customers to ensure that it is a positive buzz that does the rounds. Anticipatory service is a key element of this, being aware of what the customer is about to want: taking a coat, moving back a chair, pouring more wine, fetching the bill or simply starting a friendly conversation. Service with neither servility nor severity, friendliness without being too informal… Hospitality is a fine balancing act. However, if it appears effortless, gentle and subtle, then they have probably got it right. The power of front of house done well is best summed up by one industry legend who said of hospitality: “You get a bill for what we call the lunch or the dinner – the food and the wine - but what you receive is moments of happiness!”

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OPINION

Beware f a m i l y o n h o l i d ay JANE ANDERSON, EDITOR OF FAMILY TRAVELLER MAGAZINE, CONSIDERS WHETHER STAYCATIONS ARE THE NEW EXOTIC

F

amily holidays are not the low-key affair they used to be. My daughter Scarlett, 13, and her brother Fin, 10, attend state schools in South London, yet at the school gate it is not unusual to hear parent chat of six-week summer holidays in Indonesia, a fortnight exploring California’s Highway 1, or a week testing out the latest theme parks in Dubai. When I was a child in the ‘70s, I never so much as stepped onto a plane. Growing up in Edinburgh and the north of England, a trip down south to Cornwall was my abroad, its high hedgerows, clotted cream teas and quaint harbour towns remaining lodged in my memory. Fast forward four decades and experiential holidays and immersion in local cultures are major trends in family travel with parents anxious to open their children’s eyes to a wider world in the precious school holidays. A recent Eurotunnel Le Shuttle survey of 1,500 travelling parents discovered that 79% of them wanted to be more adventurous on holiday. Yet dig a little deeper into the family holiday psyche, and the wider we roam and the more adventurous we become with our offspring, the more it seems we cherish the great British family holiday as an annual staple, not to mention multiple weekend getaways throughout the year.

“BOOK THOSE FAMILY HOLIDAYS TO THE STREETS OF MANHATTAN AND THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA, BUT DO NOT FORGET THE TREASURES ON YOUR DOORSTEP” And is it just me, or does the UK seems to have become a far more exotic place than when I was eight? When we travelled to Cornwall it was all about messing about on beaches and eating pasties. Now you cannot move for rad surf schools, SUP safaris, bushcraft sessions and field to fork restaurants. Camping has morphed into glamping and incredible attractions like the

Eden Project have been part of a revolution in UK tourism. There has also been a willingness for five-star hotels to embrace the family market; in the UK that often means returning to simple pleasures. At Chewton Glen, for example, there is everything from children’s cookery courses in The Kitchen to duck herding experiences. I do not feel l was deprived as a child, but, boy, do kids get to do some exciting things while holidaying at home these days. My two have danced their socks off at Camp Bestival in Dorset, snorkeled with seals on the Isles of Scilly, learnt to surf in Watergate Bay, witnessed puffin colonies on the Farne Islands of Northumberland, and come up close to Hope the Blue Whale at a Dino Snore sleepover at the Natural History Museum. With the increase in hassle at airports and a sense that there is more than enough cultural immersion to be had in the diverse corners of the British Isles, a staycation is the preferred option for many families. Plus, parents know that children get a big kick out of returning to the same place year after year, while mum and dad can relax in advance, knowing what to expect and what to pack. Even though my children have travelled the world to far flung atolls in the Maldives, campervanned their way around Quebec and swum with wild dolphins in the Azores, their favourite repeat holiday is to a goat farm in Leicestershire where they know the farmer by name and the lay of the land; an empowering experience for a child and one that boosts independence. As our lives get more frenetic and digital, the trend for embracing the simple things in life grows. There is a welldocumented parental yearning to get children off their digital devices and out enjoying the real world as they did when growing up. But does a bucket and spade on the beach and a family game of Monopoly still cut it in today’s world? Well, from my experience, yes, it does. Collecting eggs to make breakfast, swinging off a rope from a treehouse or crabbing off the end of a pier are all things my children adore, even when the weather is a tad squally. And no one can underestimate the excitement of a fully blown family picnic with homemade goodies. I can practically taste the lashings of ginger beer, or would that now be organic elderflower water? So, book those family holidays to the streets of Manhattan and the Great Wall of China, but do not forget the treasures on your doorstep. Your children will thank you for it.

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EVENT

F E S T I VA L F E V E R What do fizz, feasting, falconry, flash mobs and Paloma Faith have in common?

F

estivals are fashionable and now of

encompass themes,

a

variety

including

art,

gin, wine and walking. Meanwhile popular music festivals have grown to the size of a large village. In reaction to this, the exclusive boutique festival has become the ultimate experience. And Chewton Glen,

with

picturesque

heritage

orchard reached via the Walled Kitchen Garden, is the perfect venue for such a memorable occasion. Step forward Chris Evans, BBC Radio 2 broadcaster and long-term friend of Chewton Glen, who was the driving force behind a boutique festival held at Chewton Glen as a fundraiser for BBC’s Children in Need appeal. It was the tenth year

that

Chewton

Glen

has

supported Chris Evans’ fundraising efforts for this deserving cause, and the resulting ‘Festival in a Day’ was

an

appropriate

anniversary

celebration. Festival highlights featured duck herding

and

ferret

racing

competitions and falconry display, much enjoyed by Chris himself, followed by cocktail making and an afternoon picnic. An al fresco banquet was created in the Walled Kitchen Garden by a team of some of the UK’s very finest chefs, including Tom Kerridge, Atul Kochhar and José Pizarro, and accompanied by a surprise flash mob dance by the waiting staff! Finally, a pathway illuminated by flaming torches was revealed to the festival village of teepees with a

special

and

entertainment legendary

intimate provided

Jeff

musical by

Lynne’s

the ELO,

Sharleen Spiterie with her band Texas, a surprise guest appearance from Paloma Faith and, of course, Chris Evans’ lively DJ set. Altogether more than £1.7 million was raised for the appeal.

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FINANCE

THE GENER ATION GAME WHAT IS THE SINGLE BIGGEST THREAT TO A FAMILY OWNED BUSINESS? RECESSION? TAX? DIVORCE? BREXIT? NOT NECESSARILY, SAYS RICHARD LANE, HEAD OF FAMILY BUSINESS, AND ALEXANDRA HOLLINGSHEAD, SENIOR ASSOCIATE, FARRER & CO

W

e have advised families and their businesses through countless changes of government, punishing tax regimes, wars, divorces and feuds. But there is one threat which family business leaders around the world often overlook, risking disaster: succession. Every family business leader will have to pass the baton on to the next generation. However, emotions can run high when home and business life collide. This effect is amplified when control of the business is at stake, and a badly planned succession can deliver a fatal blow to a family business. In 2000, two cousins locked horns on inheriting joint control of Al-Futtaim Group, a major Dubai-based conglomerate, resulting in the dividing up of the empire. Their feud led to a dramatic royal intervention from Sheikh Mohammed, who reportedly locked the cousins in a room and refused to let them out until they had come to an agreement. Effective and timely planning can mean the difference between a successful transition and a family business sinking beneath the waves. This is how family dynasties like the Rothschilds, the Waltons (Walmart) and the Fords have defied the odds and flourished for centuries. Have you considered what would happen if the leader of your family business had to step down unexpectedly tomorrow? Who would take the reins? Is that person ready? Would that person be supported? What would that person need? What business experience would you wish they had had? Use these thoughts to form the basis of a practical strategy for succession. Countless family business leaders assume that they will have the chance to choose and train their heir, to explain their vision

for the business, its culture, its idiosyncrasies. But no one can make this assumption. If the next generation are to be effective in the business when their time comes they need to feel heard and fulfilled. This means allowing them to express themselves and listening to what they say. Their contribution will be essential, particularly given the pace of technological and cultural change. In our experience, problems arise when the next generation has been kept in the dark for decades and are suddenly expected to step up and take part in the business. Hold informal gatherings to chat openly about the business. Invite discussion. Circulate information. Talk to the rest of the family about what sort of communications work best for them. Expect some conflict: trying to eliminate it is unrealistic. If communications are difficult: get help. There are many ways to help unblock a communications breakdown. Investing properly in effective and positive communications will reap dividends for years to come. Do not forget the essentials. Make sure you and other family members have an up-to-date Will in place which clearly deals with your business interests and dovetails with any Wills you have in other jurisdictions. Without a Will in place, chaos can ensue. Also consider getting a Family Constitution in place to describe your family’s vision and outline ground rules and expectations for the business. We all need independent advice. Make sure your advisers understand your business needs and your family’s needs in both the short and the long term – the more they understand about you and the business, the better they will be. And the more likely any succession risk will be averted.

“PROBLEMS ARISE WHEN THE NEXT GENERATION HAS BEEN KEPT IN THE DARK FOR DECADES AND ARE SUDDENLY EXPECTED TO STEP UP AND TAKE PART IN THE BUSINESS”

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Profile for Iconic Luxury Hotels

Iconic Magazine 2018  

Iconic Magazine 2018