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ICNA NEWS Spring - Summer 2013

International Child Neurology Association Founded 1973

JICNA Launching the Journal of International Child Neurology Association (JICNA)

ICNC Awards

ICNC 2014 Submit your abstracts


ICNANEWS

ICNANEWS

Promoting Education & Research in Child Neurology Worldwide Editor Jo Wilmshurst Co-Editor Biju Hameed Publisher ICNApedia Comments, suggestions? Get in touch Jo Wilmshurst Red Cross Children’s Hospital University Cape Town Tel: 021 658 5434 Fax: 021 689 1287 jo.wilmshurst@uct.ac.za http://www.icnapedia.org http://icnapedia.uservoice.com To subscribe E newsletters@icnapedia.org The content of this publication is copyright ICNA. The views and opinions expressed by the contributors do not necessarily reflect those of ICNA or the Editor. ICNA News is copyright ICNA and is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK. The ICNA is an organisation registered in Belgium. The registered office is at 29 rue de Wynants, 1000 Brussels, Belgium.

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ICNC 2014 May Iguazu Falls, Brazil

REPORTS 4 Editor’s Report 5 President’s Report 5 Treasurer’s Report 6 Secretary’s Report 8 Finance report 9 The International Review of Child Neurology (IRCN) series 9 ICNA Bylaws and Constitution

CONTENTS

MEETING REPORTS 10 11 12 13 16 20

ICNC2014 AWARDS

Child Neurology at the Top of the World 1st Myanmar Child Neurology Symposium Symposium On Child And Adolescent Neurology For Practicing Neurologists ICNA/ACNA Cerebral Palsy Workshop IV Baltic Congress on Child Neurology The Jubilee XXth Russian National Medical Congress “Man and Medicine”

27 28 29

The Impact Of Brain Maturation On Eeg Development In Childhood And Some ElectroClinical Syndromes Brain Injury In The Newborn: The Importance Of The Everyday Establishing A Program For Neuro-Developmental Disorders In Resource Constrained Settings: Opportunities And Challenges

TRAINING

ICNC 22 ICNC 2014 May - Igacu Falls, Brazil 25 ICNA Council of Delegates To Meet In Brazil 2014 26 ICNC2014 - REGISTRATIONS NOW OPEN 32 ICNC2016 34 Bids for ICNC 35 Launching the Journal of International Child Neurology Association (JICNA)

36 Neurometabolic Diseases: Diagnostic Approach and Management

OBITUARIES 38 Shunsuke Ohtahara 39 Roger Alan Brumback

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REPORTS

Editor’s Report Keeping up with technology

ICNA Executive Board 2010-2014 Harry Chugani (USA, President) Ingrid Tein (Canada, President-elect) Robert Ouvrier (Australia, Past President) Jo Wilmshurst (South Africa, Secretary) Orvar Eeg-Olofsson (Sweden, Treasurer)

Jo Wilmshurst

O

ver the last few years it has been such a pleasure to watch how the ICNA newsletter has blossomed into a vibrant and visual display of ICNA activities. In addition how it fits into the template set by ICNApedia, allowing the two resources to complement each other. This report will be my last Newsletter as editor. For future issues I will be delighted to leave the editorship in the joint hands of Biju Hammed (ICNApedia web-master) and Linda De Meirlier (key ICNA board member). This issue is packed with updates on the numerous educational meetings, the latest on the forthcoming ICNCs (2014 and 2016), early warning of a forthcoming call for nominations to the become part of the ICNA board, and for bids for the 2018 ICNC. On a sad note we have included obituaries for Prof Roger Brumback and Prof Otahara. Both are great losses to the world of child neurology. ■

Guillermo Agosta (Argentina)

ICNA OFFICE BEARERS

Banu Anlar (Turkey)

President Harry Chugani Children’s Hospital of Michigan Pediatric Neurology 3901 Beaubien Blvd Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA Tel: 1-313-993-2605 Fax: 1-313-745-0955 Email: hchugani@pet.wayne.edu

Hugo Arroyo (Argentina) Paolo Curatolo (Italy) Ahmed Raouf Ibrahim (Egypt) Kenneth Mack (USA) Linda De Meirleir (Belgium) Vijeya Ganesan (United Kingdom) Yong-Seung Hwang (Korea) Andrew Kornberg (Australia) Lieven Lagae (Belgium)

Treasurer Orvar Eeg-Olofsson University Children’s Hospital 751 85 Uppsala Sweden Tel: +46 18 611 5899 Fax: +46 18 611 5853 E-mail: orvar.eeg-olofsson@kbh.uu.se

Secretary Jo Wilmshurst Department of Paediatric Neurology Red Cross Children’s Hospital Rondebosch Cape Town South Africa 7700 Tel: +27 21 658 5111 Fax: + 27 21 689 1287 E-mail: jo.wilmshurst@uct.ac.za

Newsletter Editor Jo Wilmshurst Red Cross Children’s Hospital Rondebosch Cape Town South Africa 7700 Tel: +27 21 658 5111 Fax: + 27 21 689 1287

Charles Newton (Kenya)

ICNA COMMITTEES

Raili Riikonen (Finland)

Committee

Chair

Contact details

Robert Rust (USA)

Research

Ingrid Tein

ingtein@sympatico.ca

Education

Kenneth Mack

mack.kenneth@mayo.edu

Masaya Segawa (Japan)

Information / technology (ICNApedia)

Vijeya Ganesan Charles Newton

v.ganesan@ich.ucl.ac.uk cnewton@kilifi.kemri-wellcome.org

Michael Shevell (Canada)

Finance

Andre Venter

Gnpdav.MD@ufs.ac.za

Archives

Robert Rust

rsr6f@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu

Pratibha Singhi (India)

Bylaws

Hugo Arroyo

hugoarroyo@arnet.com.ar

Takao Takahasi (Japan)

IRCN

Charles Newton

cnewton@kilifi.kemri-wellcome.org

Andre Venter (South Africa)

Newsletter

Jo Wilmshurst Gail Scher Biju Hameed

Jo.wilmshurst@uct.ac.za gail.scher@wits.ac.za biju.hameed@gmail.com

Nominating committee

Robert Ouvrier

Roberto@chw.edu.au

Virginia Wong (Hong Kong) 4 | Summer 2013

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REPORTS

ICNANEWS

President’s Report Harry Chugani

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CNA continues to evolve at a fast pace. At the time of the most recent Executive board meeting in Kaunas, Lithuania, in May, the membership went from 993 to over 1000 members and was still growing. This is a record number and has occurred since the membership fees became free. A strong membership will increase the number of hits to ICNApedia which should not only provide an educational forum but also attract advertisers. All members of the ICNA should take advantage and participate in both goals. Whereas the educational goal is already well into swing, we as a group and individually must solicit pharmaceutical companies and other organizations to post their advertisements on ICNApedia. The board members should consider themselves volunteers, give time to ICNA and not sit silently. The strength of an organization is in the board! With the next term new board members need to be enthusiastic. We have to rethink obligations of the board members and enforce these new rules (see the secretarial report). We have to discuss how each board member has to contribute to the overall mission of ICNA.

Thanks to a number of the board members, there have been a record number of educational meetings with most of the funding coming from external sources so not tapping into the ICNA budget. Major board undertakings include the African initiatives, collaborations with the WFN and other organisations, and the development of JICNA (which the editors are ensuring will be accessible on pubmed and will be open access). Meetings have been held in many countries and several are planned for 2014. The outstanding profits from the Brisbane 2012 ICNC should be regarded as the “new norm”. These assets allow ICNA to hold more educational programs. I would like at least 10 per year in various parts of the world. There are enough of us that we can do this easily. Each educational program requires only 4 to 5 speakers, should be organized by a board member, but the other speakers do not need to be board members, only ICNA members. We can all look forward to a bright future for ICNA! ■

Treasurer’s Report

A

s you have been aware of, the ICNA dues were waived from June 2012. This move increased the ICNA membership to over 1000. Those who paid their membership 2011 (n=278) and 2012 (n=145) will get the IRCN book for respective years for free. The 2011 book on CNS infections edited by Singhi, Griffins, and Newton will be published towards the end of 2013. The 2012 book on Epilepsy Surgery edited by Cross and Duchowny will be published in 2014. Other members can buy these and former books at a reduced price from Mac Keith Press (see separate announcement in this Newsletter). As always it has been important to spread knowledge about child neurology all over the world and especially in developing countries. I urge members to inform about ICNA in their institutions and countries. The best way to be a member is to apply via www.ICNApedia.org,

Orvar Eeg-Olofsson

where you also can find all information about ICNA. For ICNA it is important to work for training and education, and donations for these purposes are appreciated. Information about how to donate is also found on www.ICNApedia.org. A fantastic contribution to ICNA this year was USD 136705 as a result of the very well organized ICNC in Brisbane in 2012. A few donations of USD 10 up to 1000 have also been received. The main expense in 2013 is expected to be about USD 30000 to Mac Keith Press for the 2011 book (see above). The bank deposit 22 May 2013 is USD 309000. Education with conferences is the main target for part of this balance. ■

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REPORTS

Secretary’s Report The ICNA offering what is needed to improve child neurology care

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he last 6 months have been busy for the ICNA with various activities central to the mission and vision of the association occurring.

Since becoming free, the membership has expanded to over 1000 members from diverse parts of the world! This is superb and has provided a wonderful registry to enable specialists to be contacted and communicated with on a global scale. Following each Educational meeting there follows a run of applications from the region. The key driving points that make ICNA novel and are part of the branding of the association are • ICNApedia • ICNA • Educational meetings Over 2012-2013 there will have been a record number of 11 educational meetings occurring. These will be summarised in the Newsletter reports, on ICNApedia and in the educational report. The nature of meetings through the ICNA fall under 3 main headings • ICNCs – major meetings with a fixed infrastructure, a PCO 6 | Summer 2013

and significant work from the ICNA EB as well. Progress in the 2014 Brazil ICNC and the 2016 Amsterdam ICNC meeting will be updated in this report. Educational meetings – usually based on a key board member being contacted by a local centre who take on the local infrastructure organization. The board member identifies other invited speakers, they access their own travel funds and ensure the other invited speakers are covered to travel to the meeting. Innovations in this type of educational support have included encouraging ICNA members in general to be part of these programs, not just board members. The education committee now has an extensive portfolio www.icnapedia.org

of potential Jo Wilmshurst speakers available to be part of such meetings. The regular board meetings attended by all available members of the ICNA board fall under the “educational meeting” heading. At these meetings the board meets to discuss policy and their strategic goals. The hosting local centre provides internal costs and can recruit members of the board to present at their national or regional meetings. The board attended such a meeting in Kaunas, Lithuania in May 2013 and took part in the Baltic Child Neurology Association meeting. This was an extremely well organised meeting with an excellent attendance of several hundred delegates. The ICNA board were impressed by the vibrant and the enthusiastic approach


REPORTS

Minimal activities for board members • Attend all EB meetings (unless exceptional circumstances preclude this) • Be part of Educational meetings (organise one during their term) • Contribute to JICNA at least one article • Be an active part of 2 sub-committees within the ICNA • Be prepared to selffund themselves to meetings unless local resources preclude this. • Be prepared to fundraise for ICNA • For the future elections – nominees should be asked to confirm their intentions with respect to the above points and accept that if they cannot fullfill these they will be asked to step down as a member. They should acknowledge this in their nomination statement. The nomination statement should • Address the above points (even as a tick chart – with comments if they foresee problems) • A statement of their child neurology activities in their own countries • Any prior ICNA or other child neurology international / regional activities or affiliations • What sub-committee they would like to be part of and why • A brief summary of who and what and from where they are!

of the BCNA and wish to especially extend their thanks to Dr Milda Endziniene. • Workshops: These are larger meetings which are organized by board members. They require identification and applications for funding support, recruitment of selected attendees, invitations to other speakers, and coordination of the program. The costs for the delegates are covered by the ICNA and the international speakers cover their own costs. The Cerebral Palsy and Epilepsy workshop, which was held in Cape Town in February 2013 was one such workshop. Representatives from 22 African countries attended. These meetings are extremely useful to network, build contacts and to develop better understandings of practice in parts of the world. Also to collate data which is developed into reports to the peer reviewed literature, and for lobbying for better services. Continued and positive collaborations with the WFN are occurring with the World Brain Alliance group remaining active. At the forthcoming World Congress of Neurology in Vienna in September, the ICNA has been invited to run several symposiums on child neurology topics. The development of an on-line open access journal the JICNA, is an exciting new project which is already receiving a steady flow of manuscript submissions for peer reviewed screening http://jicna.org/index. php/journal/author/submit/1. All this is accessible via the ICNApedia which really should be the internet front page of all child neurologists who wish to remain current (www.icnapedia.org)! The Educational templates are still an ongoing project – championed by Banu Anlar. These are hoped to be another useful www.icnapedia.org

ICNANEWS

educational resource for health care workers with limited resources to empower them with an approach to various clinical neurological challenges. As the association evolves certain activities will be automatically incorporated into the expectation of any specialist who undertakes to be elected to be a board member. ■

The 2018 ICNA EB will be announced at the 2014 ICNC Iguacu Falls meeting – call for nominations and elections will be occurring over the next few months so watch your inboxes and be active. Some brief guidelines are in this issue. By February 2014 the committee will select which centres will be invited to make bid presentations at the 2014 ICNC in May, so that the 2018 congress can be announced at the 2014 meeting.

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REPORTS

Finance report

Andre Venter

Motion 1 We propose that a banner to advertise on ICNApedia and the Newsletter, that the association will charge $500 a month or $5000 a year. Passed n=17 (all who were present).

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he search for sponsors, both for educational grants and advertisers for the ICNApedia website has continued. Up to now 27 companies have been approached. Criteria to approach a company have been: 1. The company must be in the child neurology “business” 2. Should be multi-national, if possible 3. A contact person’s name must be known 4. There must be a personal e-mail address The policy of free membership fees has worked well for the association and should generate more advertising interest as a larger audience can be targeted – as such continuing the requests to pharmaceutical companies will continue.

So far individuals of 27 companies have been approached. None of the requests have been rejected officially. In 6 cases I am having a dialogue regarding sponsorship, and in two cases the company’s e-mail addresses were not deliverable. Half of the companies have had a second appeal so far. This is a tedious and arduous process, but it is one of the ways to inform the industry regarding our Association and to sensitize them regarding the work we would like to do. We have had two relative successes. One company made $2500US available for the epilepsy workshop in Cape Town in February, and another company is negotiating to be the first advertisers on our website. The board voted on the following rates for advertising on ICNApedia and the Newsletter, that the association will charge $500 a month or $5000 a year.■

Thank you for your support!

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he ICNA would like to thank the following members for their generous donations. Your contributions will certainly play a valuable role in advancing the field of child neurology and improving patient care through out the world.

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Hrisanthi Ikonomidou Donald Gilbert Katherine Mathews Radha Giridharan Marcio A Sotero de Menezes Taeun Chang Donna Ferriero Janet Soul Soe Mar Harry T. Chugani Isabelle R. Oaklander

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Robert Cerciello Marc Patterson Mark Mintz Nina Schor Jonathan Mink Carolyn Green Dioraci Paula de Castilho Anne Connolly Milivoj Velickovic Perat Robert Ouvrier Adam Kirton


REPORTS

ICNANEWS

The International Review of Child Neurology (IRCN) series Charles RJC Newton

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he IRCN series is undergoing a stage of transition, which instead of being the main benefit for the paid membership, this series will focus on producing high quality books in collaboration with MacKeith Press, which will by necessity appear less frequently. This is to accommodate the decrease demand in books and membership being free. The CNS Infections edited by Pratibha Singhi, Diane Griffin and Charles Newton is nearing completion and will be distributed to the paid members in 2011. The next book will be Epilepsy Surgery edited by Helen Cross and Michael Duchowny, and will be the first of joint preparation with MacKeith Press. Other titles such as Neon1atal Seizures, have the support of the MacKeith Press and will be put forward as publication in the IRCN series. The consensus is that the IRCN series should continue, but it should be published jointly with

MacKeith Press. This would allow to MacKeith Press to continue copy editing the books and market the books through Wiley-Blackwell Press. Although MacKeith Press does not aim to make a profit, it cannot afford to make a loss on books, and thus would not support books that are commercially viable. We are still in negotiation with MacKeith Press about the process and also the royalties to be paid to ICNA, for the IRCN series. This year Michael Shevell’s book on Acquired Brain Injury in the Fetus & Newborn was published (book for 2010) and the Other books on Neonatal seizures, Neuroimmunology and Tropical Neurology will be discussed with MacKeith Press. ■

ICNA Bylaws and Constitution Hugo A. Arroyo

“The Executive Board Meeting held in Kaunas (May 2013) has proposed to include the following items to the agenda of the next GM that will be held in May 2014 in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil: 1) Suspend the membership dues for an additional term of [tba] 2) In case item 1 is approved, include a provisional article in the Constitution and Bylaws in order to reflect the suspension of the membership dues. The proposed amendment reads as follows: Constitution: “Article 14: Provisional Article. As of July 2012, membership dues will be temporary suspended for a [tba] year term. As a result, Articles 5.1, 5.2.b, 5.3, 6.2,

7.2, 7.3 and 10.6.d, as applicable, shall not be valid and into force for such term.” Bylaws “Article 55: Provisional Article. As of July 2012, membership dues will be temporary suspended for a two year term. As a result, Articles 7.d, 8.c, 10.a, 10.c, 10.d, 21, 39, 43, 46, 47, 48, as applicable, shall not be valid and into force for such term.” 3) Amend the bylaws including a new article by virtue of which it will be expressly stated that all references to the Newsletter automatically will equate to ICNApedia as well. The proposed amendment reads as follows: “Article 56: Newsletter In these bylaws any reference to the Newsletter automatically equates to ICNApedia as well.”

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MEETING REPORTS

Child Neurology at the Top of the World Paolo Curatolo

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n May 2010 I met by chance in Rome Dr. Galo Pesantez Cuesta, a pediatric neurologist from Quito, who was, like me, on his way to Cairo to attend the International Child Neurology Congress. This wasn’t the first time I had met him, as I already had the chance to appreciate his work during earlier congresses of the Ibero-American Academy of Pediatric Neurology. At the time I served as Chairperson of the Galo Pesantez Cuesta (left) and Paolo Curatolo (right) with child neurologists from Ecuador at the National Epilepsy Center in Quito ICNA Educational and cerebral palsy. To improve the situation I offered to & Training send over as much information as possible that would Committee, and therefore had a profound interest in help improve the quality of care for children affected promoting education in child neurology around the by neurological disorders, and offered to organize the world. During the Cairo congress I had the opportunity publication of booklets in Spanish dedicated to the main to discuss with my friend Galo how to improve the level neurological problems found in the community. The of pediatric neurology in Ecuador. We made plans for Italian Embassy in Quito provided the initial financial me to visit Ecuador and organize together the first Child support required to publish the first two booklets Neurology meeting within the National Epilepsy Center dedicated to epilepsy and autism. directed by Dr. Pesantez in Quito. In 2011 Dr. Galo Pesantez completed his Masters In addition, I suggested to Galo to spend a training degree in Rome with a thesis on epilepsy and period in Rome and sign up to the Master program neurodevelopmental disabilities. In November 2012 he in Child Neurology at the Tor Vergata University founded the Ecuador chapter of the International Bureau Hospital. In January 2011 I visited the Epilepsy Center for Epilepsy. During the 7th Latin American Congress in Quito located 3000 meters above sea level, and the of Epilepsy in Quito he organized a Satellite Symposium bottom of the Pinchincha volcano, in very picturesque dedicated to the management of children with epilepsy surroundings. It is probably the highest center in the and its comorbidities. Roberto Caraballo (Buenos Aires, world dedicated to the cure of children affected by Argentina), Lilia Nunez Orozco (Mexico City, Mexico) epilepsy and developmental disabilities. In that same and Paolo Curatolo (Rome, Italy) were among the invited location Dr. Galo Pesantez Cuesta and Dr. Monica Rios speakers of this meeting, which was attended by more Rodriguez organized a school for the rehabilitation of than 200 participants. I’m proud of the fact that the Italian children affected by neuropsychomotor disabilities. Embassy in Quito has pledged to support financially During my visit I noticed that very little information the publications of the National Epilepsy Center and was available in the local language about the strengthen the scientific ties between Italy and Ecuador progresses of the pediatric neurosciences, particularly for the benefit of children affected by neurological the management of neurodevelopmental disabilities, diseases. ■ including epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, ADHD 10 | Summer 2013

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MEETING REPORTS

ICNANEWS

1st Myanmar Child Neurology Symposium Yangon Children Hospital, Yangon, February 2013

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John BP Stephenson the Myanmar Neurological Society (president Tin Htar Nwe). These documents allowed us quick entry to the country and a sigh of relief. The first day of the Symposium – 17th February 2013 - was held in the Conference Room of the Yangon Children Hospital, by courtesy of the Minister of Health, paediatrician Dr Pe Thet Khin, who gave the opening address. In summary, the speakers’ presentations were as follows: Prof Diane Chugani (Children’s Hospital of Mitchigan, USA): Overview of autistic spectrum disorders; Prof Wendy Mitchell (Children’s Hospital, Los Angeles, USA): Autoimmune encephalopathies and Neurocutaneous disorders; Prof Harry Chugani (Children’s Hospital of Mitchigan, USA): Neuroimaging in developmental disorders and Infantile spasms; myself: Benign movement disorders easily mistaken for epilepsy and Syncopes in newborns, infants and children; and Dr Derrick Chan (KK Women and Children Hospital, Singapore): Seizures – Clinical approach (video) and Management of childhood epilepsy. Despite minor technical hitches (red appeared as black when projected onto the screen) the Symposium was a great success and was complemented by many astute and thoughtful questions from the audience. On the second day of the Child Neurology Symposium Dr Diane Chugani gave an impressive hourlong presentation on Assessment and treatments of autistic spectrum disorders that was followed again by keen questioning from the attending participants. Both before and after Dr Chugani’s talk there were twohour Clinical Sessions in the Yangon Children Hospital at which child patients were presented to individual Speakers by junior medical staff ►

t was a great pleasure and honour to be invited to this excellent two-day event organised in collaboration with the International Child Neurology Association (ICNA). The prime mover of this first ever Child Neurology Symposium in Myanmar was Dr Kyaw Linn the only Child Neurologist in this country of 60 million. Dr Kyaw Linn (Kyaw is pronounced roughly as Chorr) had the idea of such a meeting and approached Dr Harry Chugani – President if ICNA – at the ICNAorganised Congress in Brisbane in May 2012 where Dr Kyaw Linn was an invited speaker (on “Experience of a child neurologist during disasters in a developing country”). With the support of ICNA Executive Board (in particular Dr Harry Chugani, Dr Jo Wilmshurst and Dr Ken Mack), Dr Kyaw Linn – with his own small team (Dr Thant Thant Aung, Assistant Pediatrician, Dr Cho Thair, Research Fellow, and Dr Phyo Nay Linn, Research Fellow) – went on to organise this ambitious Symposium. In collaboration, it was decided to invite speakers from USA: Dr Harry Chugani, his wife Dr Diane Chugani (both from Detroit), and Dr Wendy Mitchell (from Los Angeles), and from Asia: Dr Derrick Chan (from Singapore). For some reason (maybe because I knew Dr Kyaw Linn from Child Neuro, was his proposer for the Bernard de Souza award of the Child Neurology Society in 2012 and had met him in Brisbane) they also invited me. A letter of introduction and recommendation was produced by Dr Jo Wilmshurst, Secretary of ICNA, and special efforts were made by Dr Kyaw Linn to obtain from the Ministry of Health of Myanmar the document recommending “On Arrival Visa” for us speakers, supplemented by letters of invitation from the organising committee of the Child Neurology Symposium, the Myanmar Pediatric Society (president Prof Saw Win) and www.icnapedia.org

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MEETING REPORTS

and by medical students. This was a most rewarding experience and your correspondent was glad to be able to continue this contribution over the following week, thanks to Dr Kyaw Linn. The next day saw the First biennial Myanmar neurological conference in Traders hotel, Yangon. While neurologist Professor Ernest Somerville from Sydney was speaking on Differential diagnosis and Projects to reduce the treatment gap, we Child Neurology speakers

were taken to the Shwe Dagon pagoda, a golden and truly wondrous experience. Later in the afternoon, three of us concluded the proceedings of the Neurological conference with presentations on Syncopes and other nonepileptic paroxysmal events in children and adults (myself), Functional neuroimaging (Dr Harry Chugani) and Headache and migraine (Dr Wendy Mitchell). All in all this enterprise was something that Dr Kyaw Linn (now FRCPCH) and ICNA can be very proud of! â– 

Symposium On Child And Adolescent Neurology For Practicing Neurologists Under auspices of ICNA and SNP

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his course was organized in Pune, India, on 19-20 January 2013 to an audience of 150 participants, mostly paediatricians, paediatric neurologists and neurologists. ICNA speakers Harry Chugani, Linda deMeirleir, Pratibha Singhi and Banu Anlar contributed with conferences and monitored case discussions.

The course was very well received and feedback was excellent. In particular, the interesting cases presented by younger colleagues elicited very instructive discussions. All parties agreed on repeating similar seminars in the future.

ICNA speakers (from left to right): Banu Anlar, Harry Chugani, Linda deMeirleir, Pratibha Singhi

ICNA President & Course Director: Harry Chugani (USA) Coordinator: Nitin Chouthai ( USA)

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MEETING REPORTS

ICNANEWS

ICNA/ACNA Cerebral Palsy Workshop Cape Town: 10-13 February 2013 Speakers: n= 20; Representing n=14 countries in total, of whom n=8 from Africa. Acknowledgements: Prof Michael Japanese Society of Child Shevell (Canada); Prof Neurology Annette Majnemer Sanofi-Aventis groupe (Canada); Prof Darcy NeuroDevNet Fehlings (Canada); International Child Neurology Prof Pratibha Singhi Association (India); Prof Hans Allergan Forssberg (Sweden); Novartis Dr Pam Follett (USA); Aspen Prof Kazuhiro Haginoya (Japan); Dr David Bearden (USA/Botswana); Dr Angelina Kakooza (Uganda), Dr Pauline Samia (Kenya), Dr Haydar Babakir (Sudan), Prof Robinson Wamanda (Nigeria); Prof Chanez Triki (Tunisia); Dr Kirsty Donald (South Africa); Dr Reneva Petersen (South Africa), Dr Nelleke Langerak (South Africa/Netherlands); Prof Graham Fieggen (South Africa); Dr Mac Mallewa (Malawi); Shona MacDonald (South Africa); Dr Chris Tinley (South Africa) Delegates: n= 22 countries, n=25 delegates Dr Angelina Kakooza (Uganda), Dr Pauline Samia (Kenya), Prof Haydar Babakir (Sudan), Prof Robinson Wamanda (Nigeria); Prof Chanez Triki (Tunisia); Dr Kirsty Donald (South Africa); Dr Reneva Petersen (South Africa); Dr Mac Mallewa (Malawi); Dr Judy Orikiiriza (Rwanda); Dr Eben Badoe (Ghana); Dr Kindu Woldemichael (Ethiopia/Botswana); Dr Tinsae

Jo Wilmshurst

Alemayehu (Ethiopia); Dr Stella Langa (Mozambique); Dr Alao Jules (Benin); Dr Celestin Caputu (DRC); Dr Amadou Toure (Mali); Dr Nuri Shembesh (Libya); Dr Ngozi Ojiinaka (Nigeria); Dr Sami Lemine (Mauritania); Dr Evans Mpabalwani (Zambia), Dr Marieke Dekker (Netherlands/Tanzania); Kirsty Donald Dr Dalila Sulemane (Mozambique); Dr Alusine Jalloh (Sierra Leone); Dr Edward Kija (Tanzania); Dr Wadzanai Zvavamwe (Zimbabwe); Dr Muhamed Salisu (Nigeria) In addition some 20 local (SA) paediatric neurologists (or paediatricians working with neurological conditions in children) and paediatric neurology trainees attended the conference and took part in the discussions. There were representatives from 22 different countries. Sponsorship was offered to one delegate from each country, but a number of countries chose to pay for additional delegates to attend. A total of 60 people attended the 2 days (including the local delegates). There was a strong representation from the Francophone countries in Africa. This was a significant strength of the meeting and Professor Shevell made an additional contribution of skillfully integrating the post-lecture discussions across English and French representatives. As such languages were not a barrier. ►

Speakers: David Bearden – Botswana and States; Chahnez Triki –Tunisia; Kazuhiro Haginoya – Japan; Robinson Wammanda – Nigeria; Macphersen Mallewa – Malawi; Angelina Kakooza – Uganda; Ben Badoe – Ghana; Haydir Babikir – Sudan; Hans Forssberg – Sweden

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MEETING REPORTS

Programme summary The scientific programme consisted of a range of topics spanning advances in the understanding of the neurobiology underlying the cerebral palsies, clinical and functional classification systems, theories around the relationship between different factors in the causal cascade of this group of conditions, thoughts on the different spectrum of causes in resource-poor countries, management priorities and cost-effective management strategies as well as addressing specific topics such as vision, seating, interventions in Cerebral Palsy (CP) (with associated discussion on guidelines Lectures from this and appropriateness of workshop are available to different strategies in the view online at African context). A range of delegates representing www.icnapedia.org/ different geographical e-learning/lectures areas across the continent were invited to give brief presentations on a situational analysis/specific challenges for their country/region. Workshop summary On the second afternoon a series of facilitated group discussions were held around 4 key focus areas: 1. Definitions (facilitator: Prof L Jacklin, RSA Dr K Donald, RSA; Prof Majnemer, Canada) 2. Aetiology/epidemiology (facilitator: Dr P Follet, USA, Prof R Wammanda, Nigeria) 3. Services/Capacity (facilitators: Prof Singhi, India, Dr A Kakooza, Uganda) 4. Education and research (facilitators: Prof Wilmshurst, RSA, Dr D Beardon, Botswana/USA) Take home points from group discussions: CP is a term often used in African contexts to describe all motor disability syndromes. Delegates reported that in many countries CP is considered synonymous with birth asphyxia. Internationally accepted consensus definitions are relevant in resource-poor countries but the lack of diagnostic facilities makes excluding some of the “non-CP” conditions/mimics more difficult. Also the “ceiling” age at which one can call a post-natal insult CP may be more important in this group? Some groups include children who acquired brain injury up to the age of 5 years. After the discussion it was felt that using the international consensus definition age of 2 years is probably the most useful way to achieve consistency in the discussion of the topic. The spectrum of aetiologies is different to the well described European and North American cohorts. There seems to be a greater proportion of post-natal aetiologies (Infections/post-infectious/Traumatic brain injury), based largely on anecdotal evidence. There is very little published data either on prevalence or aetiology in African countries. Published reported to date are largely discreet cohorts often drawn from hospital clinics and therefore not population based studies.

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Delegates reported seeing a larger proportion of Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) IV and V children in their services compared to European and North American cohorts. This was postulated to be due to a combination of selection bias (hospital cohorts vs community); lack of access to medical services (resulting in only the most severe children who really need medical input to survive being brought to medical attention) and powerful stigma against disabled children (resulting in children being “hidden” when medical attention not considered essential). Delegates felt that there may be overall a greater proportion of children with more severe disability in resource poor countries because of delayed presentation of a range of disorders as well as the lack of early intervention services. However, this hypothesis needs to be tested across population based epidemiological studies. This was identified as a key research priority going forward. There was a robust discussion on whether certain acquired conditions should be included in the CP group. The consensus was that congenital infections such as cytomegalovirus and rubella should be included, as well as traumatic brain injury and neurological sequelae of meningitis(<2 years of age), providing they also met the other inclusion criteria for the diagnosis (especially motor disability). Conditions which are included by some centres such as HIV encephalopathy (progressive) and Spinal muscular atrophy (i.e. lower motor neurone disorders) should be excluded. A discussion about the inclusion of these conditions in “motor disability” rather than “CP” clinics for service purposes was discussed. This was the rationale for including a talk on HIV Encephalopathy in the programme. It is clear that there is inadequate training at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels in paediatric neurology in most Medical schools across the African continent. Even for particularly prevalent conditions such as epilepsy and cerebral palsy, which constitute a significant burden of disease amongst the paediatric population, there is very little formal training in many centres. Outcomes: The way forward This meeting gave an excellent body of both academic and practical content around the topic of Cerebral Palsy in the African context. Discussion was far ranging and enthusiastic across the full range of topics and revisited in the facilitated discussion groups. All the lectures were recorded and will be available as podcasts (and pdf’s) on the ICNApaedia website shortly. Links will be individually sent to delegates and will also be widely and freely available as a resource for people to refer to. Discussions following the didactic lectures will be included in the material available. Longer term training programmes which foster both clinical training and research collaborations is a key priority. Existing networks already exist to a limited extent The African Paediatric Fellowship Program based in the Department of Paediatrics, University of Cape Town, has formally trained medical and nursing practitioners from across Africa since 2008. Collaborations are formed

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with other tertiary institutes who identify key health care challenges where developing a skilled work force will influence child health outcomes. This program is training doctors in all disciplines including paediatric neurology and neurodevelopment. www.scah.uct.ac.za/apfp Research priorities must include some multicenter collaborative studies looking at the prevalence, spectrum of CP and main aetiologies in the African context. This is vital in order to motivate not only for services for children with existing disabilities, but also in order

to effectively target the main aetiologies to develop preventative strategies for the continent. The value of this meeting included getting a group of individually, often isolated professionals (as they they may be the only such specialist in the country), driving the care of children with CP in their region/country together to address challenges which in many respects are similar across the continent. This is a forum which can be grown and expanded in order to focus the needs of children with neurodisability in Africa.

Epilepsy workshop On the final day of the workshop the delegates attended a session relating to Updates on Epilepsy in Children. Speakers at this workshop were Prof Helen Cross (The Prince of Wales’s Chair of Childhood Epilepsy, and recently elected Secretary of the International league Against Epilepsy), Associate Prof Jo Wilmshurst (HOD Paediatric Neurology, Red Cross Children’s Hospital) and Prof Pratibha Singhi (Chief Pediatric Neurology and Neurodevelopment, Chandigarh, India and President of the Child Neurology Society of India). Prof Cross presented the basic concepts of epilepsy through to to the relevance of molecular genetic testing – especially the implications to therapies. Further presentations on co-morbidities and medically intractable epilepsy syndromes generated much discussion. Prof Singhi presented the lastest approaches to status epilepticus with relevance to capacity to follow guidelines in RPC and safe practical approaches relevant to the African context based on her extensive experience in India. Associate Prof Wilmshurst showed a collection

of video clips of paroxysmal events which the audience were asked to differentiate from seizures and commit to the underlying aetiologies. The meeting closed with a summary of the updated information on services and capacity to treat seizures across Africa from a total of 34 African countries. This data has recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Child Neurology. Access to this article will be made open for health care workers from low income countries. This interactive workshop was attended by 129 delegates both from the ACNA group but also South African paediatricians who were attending as part of a Paediatric Refresher course which occurred over the subsequent days. This was a valuable opportunity for practitioners from diverse situations to interact and forge collaborations. A number of the ACNA group elected to remain on for the remainder of the refresher course program. The next focus area identified by the ACNA delegates for this ICNA educational outreach programme is Autism. This will be held in Ghana in 2014. ■

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IV Baltic Congress on Child Neurology Saint Petersburg, Russia, June 3-4, 2013

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he IV Baltic Congress on Child Neurology was dedicated to the 80th anniversary of the first European Department of Child neurology and was held in Saint Petersburg, Russia from June 3rd to 4th, 2013. This congress was organized under the supervision of Prof. Valentina Guzeva, Chief of Nervous Diseases and Chair at the Saint Petersburg State Pediatric Medical University and Chief Pediatric Neurologist of the Russian Ministry of Health, and Professor Eugeniy Gusev, Chief of Neurology and Neurosurgery and Chair of the Medical Faculty at the Russian State Medical University, and Chairman of the All-Russian Society of Neurologists, and Prof. Nikolay Zavadenko, Chief of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Genetics Chair of the Pediatric

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Faculty at the Russian State Ingrid Tein Medical University with the participation of the International Child Neurology Association. The organizing institutions included the Ministry of Heath of the Russian Federation, the International Child Neurology Association (ICNA), the Saint Petersburg State Pediatric Medical University, the North-Western State Medical University, the Scientific Research Institute of Pediatric Infections, the Military Medical Academy, the Scientific Research Neuropsychiatric Institute, the Russian Scientific Research Neurosurgical Institute, and the Saint Petersburg Association of Neurologists. â&#x2013;ş

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The congress hosted a total of 838 participants primarily from Russia including the following regions: St. Petersburg and Leningrad region, Moscow and Moscow region; Abakan, Abinsk, Azov, Arkhangelsk, Astrakhan, Ashkhabad, Barnaul, Belgorod and Belgorod Region, Blagoveshchensk, Pine forest, Century. Novgorod, Velsk, Vladivostok, Vladikavkaz, Vladimir, Volgograd, Vologda, Voronezh, Grozny, Egoryevsk, Yekaterinburg, Zelenodolsk, Ivanovo, Izhevsk, Irkutsk, Kazan, Kaliningrad, Kaluga, Karaganda, Karakol, Kemerovo, Kirov, Kostroma, the Krasnogorsk, Krasnodar, Krasnoyarsk, Kuznetsk, Kurgan, Kursk, Leninsk - Kuznetsk, Lipetsk, Lomonosov, Makhachkala, Minsk, Zhukovsky, Queens, the Krasnogorsk, Electrostal, Murmansk, Mytischi, Nizhnevartovsk, Nizhny Novgorod, Novokuznetsk, Novosibirsk, Odessa, Odintsovo, Omsk, the Eagle, Orenburg, Aspen forests, Penza, Pervouralsk, Peresvet, Perm, PetropavlovskKamchatsky, Petrozavodsk, Pskov, Pushkin, Pyatigorsk, Rostov-on-Don, Ryazan, Samara, Saratov, Severodvinsk,

The opening of the congress was highlighted by a historical overview of the first European Dept. of Child Neurology. The ICNA faculty (Linda DeMeirleir, Orvar Eeg-Olofsson, Andrew Kornberg, Robert Ouvrier, Raili Riikonen, Robert Rust, Pratibha Singhi, Ingrid Tein, and Andre Venter) provided talks on the classification of seizures, evidence-based guidelines for infantile spasms, infectious causes of epilepsy, vitamin- and cofactor-responsive encephalopathies and seizures, seizures in fluid and electrolyte imbalances, autoimmune encephalopathies, metabolic etiologies of developmental delay, the challenges of ADHD in the preschool child,

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Smolensk, Stavropol, Sterlitamak, Syktyvkar, Tver, Tolyatti, Tomsk, Tula, Tyumen, Ufa, Khabarovsk, Chelyabinsk, Cherepovets, Engels, Yakutsk, Yaroslavl. Participants also came from nearby countries such as Belarus, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, and Estonia. Invited lecturers came from Sweden, Canada, Belgium, Australia, Finland, India, USA, and South Africa.

and childhood hereditary neuropathies. Other key congress topics including focus groups included neonatal neurology and early child development and the impact of rehabilitation, brain injury, hydrocephalus, CNS infections, non-epileptic seizures, cognitive and behavioural neurology, demyelinating disorders, orthopedics and trauma, vascular disorders of the brain and spinal cord, psychiatry, neurophysiology, neurogenetics, pharmacology, cerebral palsy and tuberous sclerosis. The congress published 98 reports and 298 theses and stimulated many interactive discussions.

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The conference gala dinner of classic Russian delicacies was highlighted by poignant Russian melodies and dance. Our gracious hosts provided us with a tour of the Hermitage museum featuring interiors of the former imperial residence and a vast collection of artistic treasures including many impressionist masterpieces, a ‘White Nights’ city tour on the Neva river which runs through the heart of this UNESCO World Heritage site,

as well as a trip to the ornate Petergof Grand Palace built by Peter the Great and its luscious gardens and cascading fountains on the banks of the Gulf of Finland. We left with beautiful memories of this elegant city which is home to so many of the arts including the Saint Petersburg Philharmonia and the Mariinsky theatre of the Kirov Ballet and its legendary dancers Rudolf Nureyev, Natalia Makarova and Mikhail Baryshnikov.

PARTICIPANTS OF THE CONGRESS REPRESENTED PROFILE ESTABLISHMENTS FROM THE FOLLOWING CITIES OF RUSSIA: St. Petersburg and Leningrad region, Moscow and Moscow region; Abakan, Abinsk, Azov, Arkhangelsk, Astrakhan, Ashkhabad, Barnaul, Belgorod and Belgorod Region, Blagoveshchensk, Pine forest, Century. Novgorod, Velsk, Vladivostok, Vladikavkaz, Vladimir, Volgograd, Vologda, Voronezh, Grozny, Egoryevsk, Yekaterinburg, Zelenodolsk, Ivanovo, Izhevsk, Irkutsk, Kazan, Kaliningrad, Kaluga, Karaganda, Karakol, Kemerovo, Kirov, Kostroma, the Krasnogorsk, Krasnodar,

Krasnoyarsk, Kuznetsk, Kurgan, Kursk, Leninsk Kuznetsk, Lipetsk, Lomonosov, Makhachkala, Minsk, Zhukovsky, Queens, the Krasnogorsk, Electrostal, Murmansk, Mytischi, Nizhnevartovsk, Nizhny Novgorod, Novokuznetsk, Novosibirsk, Odessa, Odintsovo, Omsk, the Eagle, Orenburg, Aspen forests, Penza, Pervouralsk, Peresvet, Perm, PetropavlovskKamchatsky, Petrozavodsk, Pskov, Pushkin, Pyatigorsk, Rostov-on-Don, Ryazan, Samara, Saratov, Severodvinsk, Smolensk, Stavropol, Sterlitamak, Syktyvkar, Tver, Tolyatti, Tomsk, Tula, Tyumen, Ufa, Khabarovsk, Chelyabinsk, Cherepovets, Engels, Yakutsk, Yaroslavl. ■

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The Jubilee XXth Russian National Medical Congress “Man and Medicine” Moscow. April 15-16, 2013 and a night at the Bolshoi Ingrid Tein

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he Jubilee XXth Russian National Medical Congress was held in the Moscow City Hospital No. 12, Moscow from April 15th to 16th, 2013. The number of registered participants was 1910 including 1577 from the Russian Federation and 356 from other countries as follows: Kazakhstan – 126, Uzbekistan – 60, Belarus – 53, Ukraine – 33, Azerbaijan – 14, Kyrgyzstan -7, Moldova – 7, Latvia – 4, Tajikistan – 3, Armenia – 1, Turkmenistan – 1, plus 46 (primarily speakers) from the USA, UK, Germany, Austria, Greece, Sweden, Canada, Spain, Luxemburg, Italy, Serbia, Denmark, Vietnam, China, and Israel. The total number of actual participants including interested physicians without registration was in the order of 6,000-7,000. The neurological section of the congress was focused on epilepsy and its medical and social aspects for both children and adults. Invited international speakers included members of the International Child Neurology Association namely Ingrid 20 | Summer 2013

Tein, Presidentelect of ICNA and Director of the Neurometabolic Clinic and Research Laboratory, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto (Canada) and Helen Cross, Prince of Wales’ Chair of Childhood Epilepsy and Head of the Neuroscience Unit, University College of London Institute of Child Health (UK) as well as members of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) including Solomon L. Moshe – Past President of ILAE (USA), Emilio Perucca, President of ILAE (Italy), Helen Cross - current Secretary General of ILAE, Co-Chair of the subcommittee for ILAE Task Force for Global Outreach and Chair of the Task Force for Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery for the ILAE Commission for European Affairs (UK), Simon Shorvon, President ILAE British Chapter (UK), Eugen Trinka (Austria), Torbjorn Tomson (Sweden), Alan Hauser (USA), Meir Bialer, Commission on European Affairs (Israel), and Athanasios Covanis (IBE President and President of the Greek League and Greek Bureau for Epilepsy and IBE/ILAE Ambassador for epilepsy (Greece). The themes of the plenary sessions on the first day included (1) Epileptology: from bench to bedside including the diagnosis and treatment of non-convulsive status epilepticus (2) Difficult to treat epilepsies (3) Video-EEG session on seizure semiology and differential diagnosis of epilepsy in adults. The plenary sessions on the second day included (1) Challenges of epilepsy treatment across ages highlighted by talks on brain maturation and epilepsy (S. Moshe), anticonvulsant pharmacology in the fetus, newborn and mothers (T. Tomson), and predictors of prognosis in individuals with seizures and epilepsy (A. Hauser). (2) Pediatric neurology and epileptology and rare disesases in neurology including talks on the management of severe epilepsies with onset under 2 years of age (H. Cross),

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vitamin/cofactor responsive encephalopathies and seizures (I. Tein), epileptic seizures in rare progressive brain disorders (A. Covanis), and AEDs tolerability and compliance (Valentina I. Guzeva) (3) Video-EEG session on seizure semiology and differential diagnosis of epilepsy in children. The cultural program provided by our gracious hosts was highlighted by tours of the Kremlin and St. Basil’s cathedral culminating in an enchanted evening at the opening premier of the dramatic ‘Ivan the Terrible’ ballet choreographed to the music of Sergei Prokofiev which was performed at the recently renovated and elegant Bolshoi theatre. The culinary program was highlighted by borscht soup with sour cream, smoked salmon and pirogues, which were enjoyed by all and promoted lively discussions and a collegial collaborative environment. We would like to express our sincerest gratitude to Professor Eugeniy I. Gusev (Chief of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Chair of Medical Faculty at the Russian State Medical University and Chairman of the ALLRussian Society of Neurologists, academician RAMS, and to Dr. Alla B. Guekht, Professor of Neurology, Russian State Medical University and Ambassador of ILAE for organizing this congress and providing us with the opportunity to interact with child neurologists from throughout Russia for the global promotiron of clinical care and research collaborations in Child Neurology. European Central Asia Neurology Conference (Tashkent, Uzbekistan, April 18-19, 2013) and a Journey to Samarkand on the Silk Road Directly following the Russian National Congress in Moscow, our group of international speakers (outlined above) traveled to Tashkent, Uzbekistan to give a series of invited talks at the European Central Asia Neurology Conference. This conference was attended by participants from throughout Uzbekistan as well as from the surrounding countries (Kazahkstan, Kyrgyzstan, Azerbaijan, etc.). The plenary sessions over two days

ICNANEWS

included talks on (1) the global burden and challenges of epilepsy in different regions including Europe (S. Moshe), Uzbekistan (E. N. Madjidova), and Russia and other Eastern European countries (A. Guekht), (2) the management and treatment of epilepsy including mortality of patients with epilepsy (S. Shorvon) (3) Video-EEG session on seizure semiology and differential diagnosis in adults (4) Epilepsy in mothers and children including a review of the quality of life in children with epilepsy (V. I. Guzeva, Russia), therapeutic strategies in pediatric epileptology (H. Cross, UK), vitamin/cofactor responsive seizures and encephalopathies and mitochondrial disorders and epilepsy (I. Tein, Canada) and absence seizures in various epileptic syndromes (A. Covanis, Greece). This was followed by a visit to a local hospital in Tashkent to review presented histories and pediatric patients with different epilepsy syndromes at a clinical round which was attended by Helen Cross, Ingrid Tein and Athanasios Covannis for the purposes of providing diagnostic, management and treatment recommendations. The cultural program organized by our gracious hosts was highlighted by an archeological tour of the ancient city and World Heritage site of Samarkand (“Stone fort”) noted for its central position on the Silk Road traveled by Marco Polo between China and the West and for being an Islamic centre for scholarly study. This “very large and splendid city..” as described in the Travels of Marco Polo was built up by artists, craftsmen and architects during the 14th century, commissioned by the ruler Timur, and is adorned by monumental and ornate Islamic mosques of floral and vegetal symbols of turquoise, lapis and gold in the midst of numerous gardens of paradise. Between 1424 and 1429, the great astronomer Ulugh Beg built the Samarkand Observatory which housed the world’s largest sextant of its time. The country’s rich agricultural land is the source of many culinary delights of tender lamb, aromatic palov rice with meat, grated carrots, chickpeas, raisins, barberries and onions and halvah. We would like to express our sincerest gratitude to Professor Eugeniy I. Gusev (Chief of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Chair of Medical Faculty at the Russian State Medical University and Chairman of the ALLRussian Society of Neurologists, academician RAMS, to Dr. Alla B. Guekht, Professor of Neurology, Russian State Medical University and Ambassador of ILAE and to Dr. E.N. Madjidova, Dept. of Neurology, Tashkent, Uzbekistan for providing us with the opportunity to interact with child neurologists in Russia, Uzbekistan and in other European Central Asian countries for the global promotion of clinical care and educational and research collaborations in Child Neurology. ■

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ICNC

ICNC 2014 May - Igacu Falls, Brazil Report from the Scientific Program Committee

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Michael Shevell

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he SPC for ICNC2014 has exclusively focused on providing the scientific content of the meeting by addressing the selection of this content ensuring its quality, topic representativeness and geographic diversity. The goal is a meeting at the highest international standards for the presentation of clinical and scientific information relevant to the practice of child neurology and its challenges.

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ICNC

The SPC has established the following;

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With the support of the ICNApedia webmaster, Biju Hameed, and local organiser, Sergio Rosemberg, a dynamic website for ICNC2014 that provides information pertaining to the meetingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scientific content.

Following the open call for symposia proposals, sixty-one proposals were received and anonymously ranked by each SPC member. With sixteen available symposia slots (4 concurrent over 4 mornings) those finally accepted were based on rank order with a symposia organizer limited to one accepted proposal and two highly ranked proposals with overlapping content consolidated with the consent of the organizers into a single proposal. In the end the final 16 was drawn from the top 19 ranked proposals. The list of accepted symposias is below:

1. Ingrid Schaeffer (Australia); Focal EpilepsiesThe New Genetics Changes the Clinic 2. Kim Heung Dong (South Korea); Genetics in Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy 3. Hila Ben-Pazi (Israel); The Clinical Context of Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders 4. Deborah Renaud (USA); Inherited Leukoencephalopathies 5. Evangeline Wassmer (UK); Pediatric Demyelinating Disorders and MS 6. Pratibha Singhi (India); Cerebral Palsy 7. Laura Silveira Moriyama (UK): Genetic Movement Disorders 8. Ingrid Tein (Canada); Neurometabolic Disorders;Treatment Update

9. Helen Cross (UK)/Lieven Lagae (Belgium); Improving Outcomes in Childhood Epilepsy 10. Adam Kirton (Canada); Brain Stimulation in Children; Neurophysiology and Therapeutics 11. Rand Askalan (Canada) ; Frontiers in Neuroprotection of the Neonatal Brain 12. Silvia Tennebaum (Argentina); Acute Leukoencephalopathies in Children 13. Leonardo de Azevado (Brazil); Neuroinflammation 14. Kenneth Mack (USA); Childhood Headaches; Current Treatment & Research 15. Harry Chugani (USA); Update on Neuroimaging 16. Rosalin Quinlivan (UK); Update on Neuromuscular Diseases

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An Abstract submission format has been established and a formal call for Abstracts was commenced on May 1st and will close on October 1st. From these abstracts platforms and posters will be selected.

The format for the Congress calls for 3 full days (Monday, Tuesday and Thursday) and a half day (Wednesday). There will be a standard day schedule template. The posters and concurrent platforms will run only on the full Congress days. There is room for 200 posters on each day thus we can accommodate from the Abstract submissions up to 600 posters and 144 platform presentations of 15 minutes each. Wednesday afternoon is set aside by the Congress organizers for a social outing.

Plenary/Awards 8:00-10:00 Break 10-10:30

Concurrent Symposia (4) 10:30-12:30 Lunch/Poster Viewing 12:30-14:00 Concurrent Platforms (4) 14:00-17:00

Business meetings and SIG will be scheduled at 5 PM or prior to 8. Pharma sponsored lunches will be set up each day pending identified sponsors. The following awards have been made and the awardees will form part of the plenaries The Prichard award to Steven Miller. The Ford award to Orvar Eeg-Oloffsson. The Wallace award to Sheffali Gulati . In closing the SPC would like to explicitly acknowledge the tremendous support of Biju Hameed in facilitating the efficient electronic management of information and communication.

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Five plenary speakers have been selected and invited. The five plenary talks topics were first decided upon. They were selected to complement the content of the symposias. The topics were chosen based on being cross-cutting, not disease/disorder specific and an area of dynamic change and flux currently in child neurology. The plenary speakers were selected to ensure world leadership, geographic diversity and ‘freshness’ to the Congress audience. The list of plenary speakers and their assigned topics is below.

Dealing with the Coming Tsunami of Whole Genome Sequencing

Respectfully submitted Michael Shevell Chair-SPC SPC Members: Guillermo Agosta Hugo Arroyo Russell Dale Marilisa Guerreiro Lieven Lagae Charles Newton Sergio Rosemberg

The New Technologies of Neurorehabilitation

Patrice (Tamar) Weiss (University of Haifa, Israel)

Fetal Neurology; An Emerging Subspecialty?

Arnold Munnich (INSERM, France)

Lessening the Burden of Neurological Disorders in Low Resource Settings; A Ground Level Perspective Naila Khan (Bangladesh Institute of Child Health)

Adre DuPlessis (Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC-originally from South Africa)

What Can We Reasonably Expect from Stem Cell Therapy-Beyond the Hype and the Hope Alan Mackay-Sim (Griffith University, Queensland, Australia)

ICNA Council of Delegates To Meet In Brazil 2014

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he newly formed Council of Delegates (COD) is a committee composed of a delegate from each national or regional child neurology society. The purpose of this COD is to increase communication and foster collaboration among the regional societies and the ICNA. The delegates to the COD are determined by each local society. The COD will meet for the third time during the International Child Neurology Congress in Brazil in 2014. The Council will be used to obtain feedback on

Kenneth Mack

the changes in membership fees for the ICNA, as well as discuss future goals for our organization. The COD is a very exciting development for ICNA, and we encourage each national or regional society to participate. We believe that this will help to foster International communication and collaboration. ■

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ICNC

ICNC2014 REGISTRATIONS NOW OPEN

Category

Early Bird Registration (USD) Ends NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Standard Registration (USD)

On-Site Registration (USD)

HIGH INCOME COUNTRIES ICNA Non-Member

720

790

870

ICNA Member

625

700

750

Resident

360

400

440

ICNA Non-Member

650

720

790

ICNA Member

575

630

700

Resident

315

350

390

ICNA Non-Member

590

690

720

ICNA Member

475

530

590

Resident

270

300

330

Accompanying Person

300

300

300

Gala Dinner

100

100

100

MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES

LOW INCOME COUNTRIES

EXTRAS

Hurry visit the congress website at http://icnc2014.com for more details, submit your abstract, and register for the congress.

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ICNC AWARDS

ICNANEWS

The Impact Of Brain Maturation On Eeg Development In Childhood And Some Electro-Clinical Syndromes Frank Ford Award Lecture 2014

• 1971: Associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Göteborg, Sweden • 1974: Associate professor and head of child neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Linköping, Sweden • Specialist competence in pediatrics, clinical neurophysiology and pediatric neurology • 1985 Professor, especially pediatric neurology, University of Kuwait • 1988 and chief physician, National Center for Epilepsy, Oslo, Norway • 1990 and head of pediatric neurology, University Children's Hospital, Uppsala • 1999 and consultant in pediatric neurology, Uppsala and northeastern region of Sweden • 2006 - 2009 Twice a year consultant for 2 weeks at the National Center for Epilepsy, Oslo, Norway • Visiting professor Montreal Neurological Institute 1982 - 1983 and periodically 1984 - 1985

Prof. Orvar EegOlofsson Uppsala University

• Publications: 252 references and book chapters including 34 abstracts concerning epilepsy, general pediatric neurology, clinical neurophysiology, genetics, headache, neurometabolic disorders, neuromuscular disorders, diabetes. (120 original articles ref. in PubMed) • Chairman Swedish Child Neurology Association 1994 - 1996. • Board member of European Paediatric Neurology Society (EPNS) 1997 - 2005. • Board member of ICNA since 1998 (Treassurer 2002 - 2010 and reelected 2010 - 2014). • Member of the ILAE task force group on classification 2000 - 2005

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ICNC AWARDS

Brain Injury In The Newborn: The Importance Of The Everyday John Stobo Prichard Award Lecture 2014 Steven Paul Miller, MDCM FRCPC • Head, Division of Neurology and the Centre for Brain & Behaviour, The Hospital for Sick Children • Bloorview Children’s Hospital Chair in Paediatric Neuroscience • Senior Scientist, Neuroscience & Mental Health • Professor, Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto

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r Miller will be delivering the John Stobo Prichard Award Lecture at the ICNC2014.Dr. Miller is Head of the Division of Neurology and Centre for Brain & Behaviour at the Hospital for Sick Children, Bloorview Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair in Paediatric Neuroscience, Professor Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, and Senior Scientist in Neuroscience & Mental health at the SickKids Research Institute. Collaborating with a multidisciplinary team, his research program focuses on better understanding brain injury and development in the newborn. He and his team use advanced brain imaging and detailed longterm followup to help children who were born early or with conditions that put them at risk of neurological and developmental deficits. He has contributed to our understanding of brain abnormalities caused directly by premature birth, perinatal asphyxia or indirectly by congenital heart disease.

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ICNC AWARDS

ICNANEWS

Establishing A Program For Neuro-Developmental Disorders In Resource Constrained Settings: Opportunities And Challenges Sheila Wallace Award Lecture 2014

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r Sheffali Gulati is an Associate Professor in Paediatric eurology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. She will be delivering the Sheila Wallace Award Lecture at the ICNC2014 in Brazil. Academic Qualifications: MBBS (AIIMS) December, 1992; MD Pediatrics (AIIMS) December, 1996 Publications: Her major research publications in Indian and International journals have been in the field of Child Neurology. She has written chapters in books in the same field and has assisted Professor Veena Kalra in authoring and editing a book on Practical Pediatric Neurology Membership of Scientific Bodies: Elected as Member of National Academy of Medical Sciences, India, December, 2005. Executive Board member (2004) Delhi branch, IAP; Life member, Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP); Life member, Neurological Society of India; Life member, International Child Neurology Association; Executive member & Life member, Association of Child Neurology; Life member, Asian & Oceanian Child Neurology Association; Life member, Indian Epilepsy Society; Life Associate Member, of Indian Academy of Neurology; Life member, Genetics Chapter of Indian Academy of Pediatrics; Life member, Child Neurology Chapter of Indian Academy of Pediatrics, Founder Member, Indian Society for Inborn

Errors of Metabolism Editorial board member / Reviewer of Articles for International & National Journals: Editorial Board Member of Indian Pediatrics & Indian Journal of Pediatrics; Reviewer for Acta Pediatrica, Medical Science Monitor, Indian Journal of Pediatrics, Indian Pediatrics, Neurology India, Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, Pediatric Clinics of India, The National Medical Journal of India; Coeditor of the News letter of Association of Child Neurology. Areas of Interest: Has helped in establishing the electrophysiology services in the Department. Her special interests are neurometabolic disorders, neurogenetics, neurocysticercosis, febrile convulsions, epilepsy, neuromuscular disorders, electrophysiology and developmental disabilities.

Sheffali Gulati Associate Professor, Child Neurology Division Department of Pediatrics All India Institute of Medical Sciences Ansari Nagar, New Delhi1 10029 Phone: +911126588500, 26588700 extn 4679 Fax: 91 11 26588663

ICNC2014 Travel Grants & Bursaries

T

he ICNA is happy to announce that they are able to offer 6 travel grants at up to USD 2500 each to participants from explicitly resource-poor countries in order to facilitate participation at the 13th International Child Neurology Congress in Brazil. In order to receive a grant the condition is that applicant should be from a resource limited country and must have their abstract(s) accepted for either poster or platform presentation. The grant will be paid after the congress. All applications are to be made online via http://icnapedia.org. The deadline for receiving applications is on March 1, 2014. â&#x2013; 

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SAVE THE DATE

EPNS 2013 9th International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementias

10Th European Paediatric Neurology Society Congress 2013 25 - 28 september 2013

Oct 23-25, 2014

Square - Brussels Meeting Centre

The Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre Hotel Vancouver, Canada www.FTDVancouver2014.com

Brussels, Belgium

WHO WE ARE

Vancouver was recently selected to host the 9th International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementias (ICFTD), which will take place at the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre, from October 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25, 2014. Drs. Ian Mackenzie and Howard Feldman will co-organize the meeting with assistance from the University of British Columbia, Division of Continuing Professional Development (UBC CPD). The ICFTD is held every two years and is the only regularly scheduled international conference devoted to frontotemporal dementia (FTD), making it an important opportunity for FTD clinicians, researchers, trainees and caregivers from around the world to share knowledge with the goal of improving care for patients with this devastating neurodegenerative disease. This is a particularly exciting time in FTD research as significant recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of FTD now provide us with the foundation for the rational development of targeted therapies. It is anticipated that the 2014 conference will attract more than 600 international delegates.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

The ICFTD attracts a diverse audience that includes clinicians (neurologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians, neuroradiologists), neuroscientists (molecular geneticists, neuropathologists, neurobiologists, pharmacologists) and their trainees, as well as representatives from biomedical and pharmaceutical industries, government agencies, patient advocacy groups, patients, their families, caregivers and interested laypersons. FOR REGULAR UPDATES & MORE INFORMATION: contact us at ftd.vancouver2014@ubc.ca to be added to our E-mail list or check the conference web site www.FTDVancouver2014.com

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ICNC

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ICNC

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he Dutch Society of Pediatric Neurology is proud to host the 14th International Child Neurology Congress 2016 in Amsterdam. Amsterdam will be the first European destination since 1998, when the ICNA congress was held in Llubljana, Slovenia. The general theme of the 2016 ICNC will be: “Bridging Worlds: Child Neurology from a Global Perspective” reflecting the goal of the congress to unite child neurologists and neuroscientists from all over the world. We will offer a program that is of global relevance and has a significant educational impact. The Dutch society has a strong history in child neurology. Together with ICNA we promise to organize a congress with a highly innovative format and content, that will be held in the modern and spacious Amsterdam RAI Convention Center. The venue is close to the historical city center and only 7 minutes by train from Schiphol Amsterdam International Airport, which offers over 400 non-stop (inter)continental connections. More than 2500 hotel rooms are in the vicinity of the conference center, ranging from budget hostels to five-star accommodations. We designed a highly educational program with free teaching courses, master classes and meet-the-expert sessions. The scientific content will be original, covering both conventional and new child neurology topics of global importance. Attendance of many delegates from low-income countries, young talented trainees, and allied health care workers is encouraged by the significantly reduced registration fees and travel grants. Please mark your calendar! We look forward to welcoming you all in the beautiful city of Amsterdam for the 14th ICNC from May 1 – 6th 2016. On behalf of the Dutch Society of Pediatric Neurology and the local organizing committee, Kees P.J. Braun (chair), Michèl A. Willemsen, Lilian T. Sie, and Coriene E. Catsman-Berrevoets.

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ICNC

Bids for ICNC

Invitation to submit a bid for the next ICNC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2018

Y

ou are invited to submit a letter of intent to enter the bidding for the next ICNC in 2018. We request a short letter from the key local medical organiser (not the conference management team). The letter should be sent to the secretary of the ICNA (jo.wilmshurst@uct.ac.za) Selection of who will be invited to make a formal bid is initially based on attempts to encourage equity in allocation of ICNA Congresses to each of the six geographical regions and your capacity to hold a meeting for up to 1500 delegates. You will be informed in February 2014 whether you are invited to put a complete bid together. Final bid selection for the 2018 ICNC will be made at the Brazil ICNC in May 2014. Pending ICNC YEAR

LOCATION

REGION

2016

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Europe

2014

Iguaçu Falls, Brazil

South America

YEAR

LOCATION

REGION

2012

Brisbane, Australia

Oceania

2010

Cairo, Egypt

Africa

2006

Montreal, Canada

North America

2002

Bejing, China

East Asia / Oceania

1996

Lljubjana, Slovenia

Europe

1994

San Francisco, USA

North America

1992

Buenos Aires, Argentina

South America

1990

Tokyo, Japan

East Asia / Oceania

1986

Jerusalem, Israel

West Asia

1982

Copenhagen, Denmark

Europe

1979

Sydney, Australia

East Asia / Oceania

1975

Toronto, Canada

North America

Previous ICNC

n T witter Follow us o /icnapedia twitter.com

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JICNA

ICNANEWS

®

Journal of the International Child Neurology Association

A peer reviewed open access e-journal in Child Neurology

Launching the Journal of International Child Neurology Association (JICNA) Charles RJC Newton

T

he International Child Neurology Association has started a peer-reviewed child neurology journal, the Journal of International Child Neurology Association (JICNA). The web site for the journal is up and running, and journal has already been reviewing submissions. We would like to thank the brave authors who have submitted their initial papers to JICNA. The papers will be deposited on the web, and initially in the databases such as PubMed Central. All manuscripts submitted to JICNA will undergo full peer review and fast publication. Currently there are no charges for publication and all published articles will be freely accessible from the JICNA website. In addition the paper will also be integrated into ICNApedia, allowing readers to access the interesting and useful material on this website. Our aim is to have the journal registered with the Directory of Open Access Journals, and cited by PubMed and other scholarly search engines within one year of publication. But to achieve these goals, the journal needs to be in existence

for more than a year and published at least twenty peer-reviewed papers. JICNA will only flourish if it receives papers to publish, and is read and referenced by child neurologists all over the world. We have started and now we look to the ICNA membership to contribute to Biju Hameed this journal, and be involved in a new and exciting publication in child neurology helping to disseminate current research as widely as possible. Please start submitting your papers to JICNA via the website: http:// jicna.org/index.php/journal/about/ submissions#onlineSubmissions You will need to register as an author, and follow the author guidelines for submission. If you having any difficulties please contact either of us directly. We look forward to receiving your manuscripts. ■

Chronic Motor Disorders in Children and Adolescents (Trastornos Motores Crónicos en Niños y Adolescentes)

T

Natalio Fejerman and Hugo A. Arroyo Editorial Médica Panamericana, Buenos Aires, Argentina 2013 49 chapters, 445 pages.

his book describes chronic motor disorders in children and adolescents, ranging from the milder ones, such as motor coordination disorder, to the more severe, as cerebral palsy. All levels of central and peripherical nervous system, including muscular pathologies are covered. Etiologies are analyzed and clinical manifestations and diagnostic methods are described. Comorbidities are also dealt in special chapters. With a deep approach to therapeutic methods and different rehabilitation techniques, this work is the result of the experience of various professionals who work with these patients, both in the area of health, education, recreation and social integration. Chapters that describe the architectural barriers and the legal aspects related to the best patient care are also included. Since the literature in Spanish regarding these subjects is scarce, this book is aimed to become a good tool to study and permanent consultation for pediatricians, neuropaediatricians, psychiatrists, orthopedists and specialists in rehabilitation, as well as physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, psychologists, teachers of physical education and specialized teachers. ■

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TRAINING

Commissioned Training for Centre of Excellence in Pediatrics 2013

Neurometabolic Diseases: Diagnostic Approach and Management Hong Kong, March 1-4, 2013 Virginia Wong

A

Commissioned Training Course in “Neurometabolic Diseases: Diagnostic Approach and Management” was held from March 1st to 4th , 2013 in preparation for the establishment of the Centre of Excellence in Paediatrics in Hong Kong, aiming to raise the awareness and interest among the medical professionals and the local community in managing children with neurometabolic diseases. The course faculty included Dr. Ingrid Tein, President-elect of the International Child Neurology Association and Director of the Neurometabolic Clinic and Research Laboratory at the Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto and Dr Angeles Garcia-Cazorla, Head of Neurometabolic Disorders at the Hospital Sant Joan de Deu in Barcelona, both of whom

are paediatric neurologists specializing in neurometabolic diseases. Prof Eva Morava is a metabolic physician and geneticist at the Hayward Genetics Center at Tulane University in New Orleans. Prof Ron Wevers is a clinical biochemist and Head of the Laboratory of Genetic Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands and Prof Tamas Kozicz is a neuroscientist, in the Dept. of Anatomy at Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. Approximately 100 participants, including paediatric neurologists, metabolic physicians, clinical geneticists, obstetricians and chemical pathologists, attended this 4-day course which provided a comprehensive diagnostic approach to neurometabolic diseases from clinical to laboratory aspects including the following. ■

Top left 2nd row standing, Prof. Eva Morava, 5th from left – Dr. Cheukwing Fung, 6th – Dr. Eric Yau Seated first row: 2nd from left, Dr. Angeles Garcia-Cazorla, 3rd – Dr. Ingrid Tein, 4th – Prof. Virginia Wong, 5th: Prof. Ronald Wevers

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Cheukwing Fung


1

TRAINING

ICNANEWS

Twelve lectures were given illustrating the clinical approach to various neurological presentations within the context of inborn errors of metabolism including epilepsy, malformations of cortical development, neuromuscular presentations, dysmorphism, mental retardation including regression, movement disorders, extraneurological presentations, and eye manifestations, as well as autism spectrum disorder and depression in mitochondrial diseases. The laboratory approach covered the basic biochemical investigations in inborn errors of metabolism and congenital disorders of glycosylation.

3

2

Six case illustration sessions were conducted by local colleagues providing an in-depth case demonstration of an individual inborn error of metabolism with different neurological presentations.

Three clinical workshops were given with a focus on a particular presentation in neurometabolic diseases, during which our overseas faculty conducted interactive discussions on topics including the approaches to acute encephalopathy, stroke and acute psychosis.

4

Five laboratory workshops were conducted by overseas and local experts, covering methodologies and data interpretation of different tests needed to diagnose specific inborn errors of metabolism, ranging from basic to complex. These included analysis of plasma amino acids, serum acylcarnitines, peroxisomal markers, sterols, and congenital disorders of glycosylation; urine organic acids and oligosaccharides; and cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters analysis.

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OBITUARIES

Shunsuke Ohtahara 1930-2013 Professor Shunsuke Ohtahara passed away early in the morning of March 16, 2013, at the age of 83. He was suffering from a neuromuscular disease, and had been hospitalized for nearly a year. Although he had had a hard time walking for several years due to muscle weakness and severe leg-pain, he continued to give lectures and saw many patients with epilepsy until his hospitalization. In addition, he was always an encouraging and great mentor, even while in his sickbed. He gave his all to every endeavor and his wife was devoted to him. Despite his deteriorating health, he was able to enjoy talking with his family and friends until a few weeks before his death. He was an inspiring presence for his pupils and his death fills us with deep sadness. Professor Ohtahara is well known in the academic world for the disease that he first described and which was named after him: Ohtahara syndrome. This epileptic syndrome is the earliest type of age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy proposed by him, that is consisting of Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome and LennoxGastaut syndrome. The concept and categorization of age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy was based on the recognition of the developmental changes that occur in each epileptic syndrome, which were observed in long-term follow-up studies. The concept of agedependent epileptic encephalopathy was truly novel and led to an understanding of the significance of brain development in the occurrence of childhood epilepsy. Dr. Ohtahara investigated the developmental changes seen in electrophysiological examinations such as EEGs and evoked potentials in many normal children. He found that these electrophysiological parameters showed specific age-related changes that were not necessarily lineal but occurred in critical stages. Based on these findings, he happened upon the idea that developmental aspects of childhood epilepsy such as age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy were closely related with these developmental changes in brain functions. Dr. Ohtahara was born in Okayama in 1930, and was raised there. He graduated Okayama University, and started his career as a pediatrician at the Department of Pediatrics in Okayama University Medical School. In 1979 he became a professor, and founded Department of Child Neurology in Okayama University, at a time when such specialized departments were very few in Japan. He was one of the founding members of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Although all his research and practice were performed in Okayama and he never left the area for more than months, his work has had great influence in the international child neurology and epilepsy communities. In his academic career he visited many foreign countries to give lectures and closely communicated with many foreign researchers. He was respected for his excellent scientific achievements and his deep insight into child neurology. His kind and warm personality always drew people to him. He received 38 | Summer 2013

Yoko Ohtsuka

many international awards such as the Frank Ford Memorial Award from the International Child Neurology Association (ICNA), the Ambassador for Epilepsy from the International League Against Epilepsy and International Bureau for Epilepsy, the Hans Berger Award from the Hans Berger Foundation and the Fritz Dreifuss Award from the Epilepsy Foundation of America. He was one of the members of the Board of Trustees of the ICNA since 1990. In his free time, he was a great lover of photography and had an excellent collection of cameras including antique ones. He was knowledgeable about architectural history and he took many beautiful photos every time he visited foreign countries. He was also a big fan of professional baseball. He loved dogs all his life and he used to take his dog for walks even when it was difficult for him to walk. He leaves behind two daughters, a son and five grandchildren. The youngest grandchild was born just two month before his death. He is one of the pioneers in child neurology field in Japan. When he started his research of child neurology, especially childhood-onset epilepsy, there was only one humble EEG machine at the surgical department in Okayama University. Furthermore. he had to overcome a lot of difficulties in doing his research without predecessors. He was a man of great determination and perseverance. Moreover, he was a great teacher and trained younger doctors from the earliest days of his career. Many doctors from all over Japan and foreign countries such as China studied child neurology and epileptology here at the Department of Child Neurology of Okayama University. Until the very last day of his life he worked to raise awareness of the importance of studying child neurology and he stressed the need for specialized departments of child neurology in universities in order to promote research and improve the lives of neurologically handicapped children. We, his pupils, are determined to carry on his devotion to research and the care of patients. â&#x2013; 

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OBITUARIES

ICNANEWS

Roger Alan Brumback 1948-2013

Summarizing someone’s life work and achievements can be relatively straightforward, even for an individual as prolific as Roger Brumback. Placing their accomplishments into perspective and highlighting what is most meaningful among a lifetime of notable achievements are much more challenging tasks. Making sense of the terrible tragedy of 2 productive lives cut short, on the other hand, is impossible, particularly while sorting through one’s own grief. Yet in a few paragraphs we must attempt to do all of these things for our friend and colleague Roger Alan Brumback, who, along with his beloved wife Mary, was tragically killed in Omaha, Nebraska. Roger Brumback (Figure 1) grew up in Monroeville, a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.1 Immediately after graduation from Monroeville’s Gateway High School in 1965, he enrolled in Pennsylvania State University. Through a combination of advance placement credits, a heavy course load, and year-round attendance, Roger earned a Bachelor of Science degree in premedical studies

E. Steve Roach

in only 2 years. It was at Penn State that Roger met Mary, his future wife. The University’s 1967 yearbook depicts John B. Bodensteiner a barely recognizable beardless young man with scalp hair, an appearance that was not destined to persist very long. In 1967, Roger entered the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania. His was the very first class of the newly opened medical school, and at age 19, Roger was by far the youngest member of this inaugural class. He initially intended to become a family physician, but a required medical school research project redirected his interests.1 Following medical school graduation in 1971, Dr Brumback began a 2-year stint as a pediatric resident at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. After completing general pediatrics in 1973, Roger and Mary moved to St Louis in order for him to begin training in pediatric neurology. While training in St Louis, Roger Brumback met several people who were influential in his professional development, including Philip R. Dodge, WilliamLandau,Marvin Fishman,WarrenWeinberg, and Joseph Volpe. Between 1975 and 1977, Dr Brumback served as a clinical associate in clinical and experimental neurology, neuropathology, and clinical neurophysiology with the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Maryland. After brief work stopovers in Pittsburgh and Fargo, North Dakota, the Brumback family in 1982 moved to Rochester, New York, in order for Roger to begin pathology training at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. After completing his pathology residency and neuropathology fellowship in 1986, Brumback was recruited to the University of Oklahoma by his longtime friend and mentor Richard Leach. In 1997, he was named a David Ross Boyd Professor in honor of his teaching excellence. In Oklahoma, Roger established a clinical and research program in Alzheimer disease, and the Oklahoma Alzheimer’s Association created the Brumback Award to recognize individuals who made outstanding contributions to Alzheimer disease research. In 2001, Brumback was appointed Professor and Chair of the ►

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OBITUARIES

Department of Pathology at Creighton University School of Medicine, a post he held until 2010. He had recently announced his plans to retire from Creighton University in preparation for his and Mary’s move to West Virginia. A scholar of the first order, Dr Brumback loved books— reading them, writing them, and collecting them. He once commented that he loved even the feel and sight of a book, and that a well-crafted book signified for him an author’s mastery of a topic in a way that shorter reviews could not. Counting multiple editions, Brumback himself wrote, edited, or coauthored at least 19 books on an amazingly wide range of topics. His first book was Practical Neurology for the Primary Care Physician in 1981. Color Atlas of Muscle Histochemistry and The Neuromuscular Junction both appeared in 1984 during his pathology training, and The Cerebrospinal Fluid was published in 1989. Another pathology text, Neuropathology and Basic Neuroscience, appeared in 1995. Despite having veered into neuropathology, Dr Brumback continued to write clinical neurology texts, including Hydrocephalus: Current Clinical Concepts (1991), 2 editions of Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience (1993 and 1996), and 3 editions of Handbook of Symptom-Oriented Neurology (1989, 1994, and 2002), and Advanced Therapy in Epilepsy (2009).Most remarkable of all, for a neuropathologist, was a series of books and articles on psychiatry and developmental cognitive disorders, including Textbook of Pediatric Neuropsychiatry (1998), Pediatric Neuropsychiatry (2006), and Attention, Behavior, and Learning Problems in Children: Protocols for Diagnosis and Treatment (2001). And 2 books about Alzheimer disease by a neuropathologist may not seem unusual at first glance, until one notices that both books are written as guides for families and caregivers. People have marveled that a neuropathologist could make substantial contributions to our understanding of behavioral neurology and childhood learning disabilities. This longstanding interest was largely stimulated by the collaboration with Warren Weinberg that began in St Louis and continued until Dr Weinberg’s death in 2002. Together they published numerous papers on childhood depression, mania, learning disabilities, and vigilance. Dr Brumback also contributed many other articles, book chapters, and editorials on a wide range of topics. Roger Brumback founded the Journal of Child Neurology in 1986 and remained its editor-in-chief until his death. Remarkably, discussions about developing the new journal began in 1982, the same year that Brumback began his first year as a pathology resident. As a fulltime resident, his planning for the new journal occurred primarily during the evening hours and weekends, often with the help of Mary Brumback.2 To fill the new quarterly Journal of Child Neurology, Dr Brumback initially solicited manuscripts from friends and invited colleagues and mentors to join the new editorial board. The journal was immediately hit with controversy. Unbeknown to Dr Brumback, Pediatric Neurology was being planned at the time, and several senior members 40 | Summer 2013

of the profession testily suggested that he abandon his carefully laid plans to edit a journal.2 Nevertheless, Journal of Child Neurology grew steadily and eventually became a highly regarded monthly journal.3 Many individuals have served on the editorial board or as associate editors of Journal of Child Neurology over the years, including both of the authors. DrBrumback became the editor of Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (JEBCAM, formerly Complementary Health Practice Review) in 2010. This is an interdisciplinary, peerreviewed, medical journal featuring hypothesis-driven and evidence-based articles pertaining to complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine.4 Brumback told one of the authors that the journal had not been successful and that the publisher asked him to salvage it. Editing a journal on complementary and alternative medicine seems like a radical departure for one so steeped in pathology and neurology, but he took on this new task with characteristic energy and enthusiasm. Dr Brumback was an ardent supporter of other physicians and scientists and particularly the younger generation in our profession. The outpouring of anecdotes describing his kindness and encouragement of others on the Child Neurology Society List Serve is only a small indication of this aspect of his career. Dr Brumback, using his position as the editor of Journal of Child Neurology, agreed to publish the abstracts of the meetings of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society and established the Journal of Child Neurology Excellence Prize given each year at the annual meeting of the organization to the best paper by a resident, student, or fellow. He also recently developed a resident and fellow section of the editorial board of the Journal of Child Neurology to encourage junior physician scientists to participate in the academic process, thereby learning at an earlier age to become thought leaders in pediatric neurology. When Dr Brumback first mentioned that someone had named a species of owl monkey after him, it seemed like the start to one of his sly jokes. But, sure enough, he had studied the chromosomal structure of the owl monkey as a thesis project in medical school, determining via chromosomal analysis that there are several owl monkey species and proposing a reclassification.5,6 After Roger learned that one of the new owl monkey species had been named Aotus brumbacki, he declared himself a ‘‘bornagain conservationist.’’ A life of high achievement is usually peppered with accolades. Among other honors, Dr Brumback was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society and the Creighton University chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society. He received the 2011 Warren Weinberg Award for Outstanding Contribution in the Field of Learning Disabilities from the Learning Disabilities Association of Texas. Dr Brumback was elected president of both the Society for Experimental Neuropathology and the Behavioral Neurology Society. Brumback was named the 2001 Alumni Fellow of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, the

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OBITUARIES

ICNANEWS

It is difficult to adequately describe an individual whose accomplishments were so numerous and so varied. Roger Brumback leaves a record of diverse contributions to neurology and pathology that few will equal. Roger himself would probably list the founding of the Journal of Child Neurology as his single proudest professional achievement. Others would mention his work on Alzheimer disease, his early studies on the owl monkey, and his work on childhood cognitive disorders. But what ultimately made Roger Brumback so special was not his many professional accomplishments but his unique personal qualities. He was brilliant and loved to learn new things. Roger’s enthusiasm for medicine and for publishing was boundless, no doubt contributing to his legendary productivity. But his close friends treasured his kindness and generosity toward others, his sense of humor, his modesty, his loyalty to friends, and his love of family. No one is likely to match Roger Brumback’s combination of intelligence, enthusiasm, work ethic, and personal warmth. We have lost a giant, and the void is cavernous. ■ Roger and Mary Brumback in 2002.

highest honor given by the Pennsylvania State University Alumni Association.1 No portrayal of Roger Brumback would be complete without a substantial comment about his beloved wife Mary (Figure 2). Born in 1947, Mary Helen Skinner met Roger Brumback at Pennsylvania State University. They married in 1969. Mary Brumback was an exceptionally bright, accomplished individual. She trained in pharmacy (University of Pittsburgh 1970). She later completed law school (University of Oklahoma 1991) and practiced family law until the family moved to Omaha. After retiring from her law practice in 2001, Mary dedicated herself to volunteer work at Creighton University Hospital and with the Philanthropic Educational Organization (PEO). She was esteemed by her PEO sisters for her uncommon wisdom, love of justice, humility, and her compassion and generosity toward individuals in sickness or in need. Mary Brumback was instrumental in the successful launch of the Journal of Child Neurology2 and many other projects. In 1989, Mary collaborated with Roger on the book The Dietary Fiber Weight Control Handbook. Their most successful collaboration, however, was in raising 3 well-adjusted and successful children, Darryl, Owen, and Audrey, a child neurologist. Mary Brumback often accompanied Roger to professional meetings, where she developed her own circle of friends, often organizing excursions to museums, historic sites, or other local attractions. She and Roger shared an interest in genealogy, and they were seasoned travelers who roamed the world together. Roger dedicated the second edition of Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience to Mary with the following poignant comment: ‘‘I dedicate this text to my wife Mary Helen Brumback, whose assistance has been vital in finalizing the volumes. This is another example of her unselfish devotion and support that has sustained me throughout my career.’’

References 1. Brumback MH. Roger Alan Brumback, MD, selected as 2001 Alumni Fellow of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. J Child Neurol. 2001;16:940-941. 2. Brumback RA. The silver jubilee: Journal of Child Neurology turns 25. J Child Neurol. 2010;25:4-31. 3. Brumback RA. The journal of child neurology: 28 years and still improving. J Child Neurol. 2013;28:289-291. 4. Brumback RA. JEBCAM: rebirth brings new life to an old journal and scientific scrutiny to the field. J Evidence-Based Complement Altern Med. 2011;16:4-11. 5. Brumback RA. Two distinctive types of owl monkeys (Aotus). J Med Primatol. 1973;2:284-289. 6. Brumback RA. A third species of the owl monkey (Aotus). J Hered. 1974;65:321-323. Note: The Brumback family has designated 3 organizations for anyone wishing to make a memorial contribution: 1. PEO, Mary Brumback’s service organization that supports women’s education: – peointernational. org – checks to ‘‘Cottey College’’ in memory of Mary Brumback; Institutional Advancement, Cottey College, 1000 West Austin, Nevada, MO 64772 2. Child Neurology Society – childneurologysociety. org/support-cns – checks to ‘‘Child Neurology Society,’’ 1000 W. County Road E #290, St. Paul, MN 55126 3. Penn State Hershey College of Medicine – giveto. pennstatehershey.org – (717) 531-8497. Please designate the Dr. Roger and Mary Brumback Alzheimer’s Disease Memorial Scholarship Reproduced with permission from J Child Neurol June 2013 vol. 28 no. 6 703-705

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ICNANEWS

SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS // 2013-2016 2013 August 18-23, 2013. 7th Baltic Sea Summer School for Epilepsy (BSSSE7), Estonia. http://www.epilepsiestiftung-wolf.de/ August 22-24, 2013. IASSID (International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities) AsiaPacific 3rd Regional conference. Tokyo, Japan. https://www.iassid.org/ August 24-27, 2013. Australian College of Children and Young Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nurses (ACCYPN) Conference 2013. Melbourne, Australia. http://www.accypnconf.com.au/index.php August 24-29, 2013. 27th Congress of the International Pediatric Association. Melbourne, Australia. http://www2.kenes.com/IPA/Pages/home.aspx August 31-September 4, 2013. 25th European Congress of Pathology. Lisbon, Portugal. http://www.esp-congress.org/ecp-2013.html September 6-9, 2013. 45th meeting of the European Brain and Behaviour Society. Munich, Germany. http://www.ebbs2013.com/ September 8-13, 2013. 15th WFNS (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies) World Congress of Neurosurgery. Seoul, Korea. E-mail: hwnjung@snu.ac.kr http://www.wfns2013.org/ September 14-18, 2013. 12th Asian Oceanian Congress of Child Neurology (AOCCN 2013). Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. http://aoccn2013.com/ September 16-20, 2013. 1st International Neuropathology Summer School for Epilepsy Surgery (INES). Erlangen, Germany. http://community.ilae-epilepsy.org/CEA/ EVENTSMEETINGS/ September 19-22, 2013. 9th Joint Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. Milan, Italy. http://www.jointmeeting2013.org/ September 22-24, 2013. American College of Clinical Phamacology (ACCP) Annual Meeting. Bethesda, MD, USA. http://www.accp1.org/meetings_future.shtml September 21-26, 2013. 21st World Congress of Neurology. Vienna, Austria. http://www2.kenes.com/wcn/pages/home.aspx 42 | Summer 2013

September 22-24, 2013. American College of Clinical Phamacology (ACCP) Annual Meeting. Bethesda, MD, USA. http://www.accp1.org/meetings_future.shtml September 21-26, 2013. 21st World Congress of Neurology. Vienna, Austria. http://www.wcn-neurology.com/ September 25-28, 2013. 10th EPNS(European Pediatric Neurology Society) Congress. Brussels, Belgium. http://www.epns2013.be/ September 25-29, 2013. American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) 47th Annual Meeting. Milwaukee, WI, USA. http://www.ashnr.org/futmtgs.html September 26-28, 2013. 4th European Conference on Schizophrenia Research. Berlin, Germany. http://www.schizophrenianet.eu/ September 29-October 3, 2013. 41th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery(ISPN). Mainz, Germany. http://www.ispneurosurgery.org/assets/248/ Invitation_ISPN_Mainz_2013.pdf September 30-October 6, 2013. 5th Eilat International Educational Course on the Pharmacological Treatment of Epilepsy (5thEilat Education). Jerusalem, Israel. http://www.eilat-aeds.com/eilatedu5/ October 1-4, 2013. World Parkinson Congress. Montreal, QC, Canada. http://www.worldpdcongress.org/ October 5-9, 2013. 26th ECNP(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Congress. Barcelona, Spain. http://www.ecnp-congress.eu/sitecore/content/ Congress2013/ECNP%20Congress.aspx?sc_lang=en October 13-15,2013. 138th Annual Meeting of American Neurological Association. New Orleans, LA, USA. http://www.aneuroa.org/ October 16-19, 2013. AANEM (American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine) Annual Meeting. San Antonio,TX,USA. http://www.aanem.org/Meeting/Future-Meetings.aspx October 17-20, 2013. 8th International Congress on Vascular Dementia & The First Cognitive Impairment European Meeting. Athens, Greece. http://www2.kenes.com/vascular/Pages/home.aspx October 17-19, 2013. 19th International Congress of Child Neurologists of Mediterranean. Budva, Montenegro.

www.icnapedia.org


ICNANEWS

http://www.cnmbudva2013.eu/child-neurologists-ofmediterranean/ October 27-30, 2013. World Psychiatric Association International Congress. Vienna, Austria. http://www.wpaic2013.org/ October 30-November 2, 2013. 42nd Annual Meeting of the Child Neurology Society. Austin, TX, USA. http://www.childneurologysociety.org/resources/ meetings November 3-9, 2013. 7th Migrating Course on Epilepsy.

2014 February 12-15, 2014. 42nd Annual Meeting of International Neuropsychological Society(INS). Seattle,WA, USA. http://www.the-ins.org/future-meeting-of-ins March 1-4, 2014. EPA 2014. 22nd European Congress of Psychiatry. Munich, Germany http://www.epa-congress.org/ March 18-22, 2014. 115th The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT) Annual Meeting. Atlanta, GA ,USA. http://www.ascpt.org/ March 22-27, 2014. SIR(Society of Interventional Radiology) Annual Scientific Meeting. San Diego, CA, USA. http://www.sirmeeting.org/

Nicosia, Cyprus. http://community.ilae-epilepsy.org/CEA/ EVENTSMEETINGS/ November 8-12, 2013. 61st Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Cytopathology. Orlando, FL,USA. http://cytopathologymeeting.org/2012/future-meetingdates-2/ November 9-13, 2013. Neuroscience 2013. San Diego, CA, USA.

March 26-29, 2014. 13th International Geneve/Springfield Symposium on Advances in Alzheimer Therapy. Geneva, Switzerland. http://www.siumed.edu/cme/alzheimer/ April 5-9, 2014. 82nd American Association of Neurological Surgeons(AANS) Annual Meeting. San Francisco,CA, USA. http://www.aans.org/ April 26-May 3, 2014. 66th AAN(American Academy of Neurology) Annual Meeting. Philadelphia, PA, USA. http://www.aan.com/

http://www.sfn.org/ November 19-22, 2013. 8th World Congress on Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Cape Town, South Africa. http://www2.kenes.com/wspid/pages/home.aspx December 1-6, 2013. RSNA(Radiological Society of North America) Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL, USA.

April 27-29, 2014. 35th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES). Boston,MA, USA. http://www.endocrinesurgery.org/meeting/meeting. html May 2-6, 2014. AAI(the American Association of immunologists) Annual Meeting. Pittsburgh, PA, USA. http://www.aai.org/Meetings/Future_Meeting.html

http://www.rsna.org/Past_Meetings.aspx December 6-10, 2013. 67th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. Washington, DC, USA. http://www.aesnet.org/ December 8-12, 2013. 52nd Annual Meeting of The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP). Hollywood, FL, USA. http://www.acnp.org/annualmeeting/dates.aspx

May 3-6,2014. PAS(Pediatrics Academic Societies) Annual Meeting. Vancouver, Canada. http://www.pas-meeting.org/2013DC/future_meetings. asp May 3-7, 2014. 16th European Congress of Endocrinology(ECE). Wroclaw, Poland http://www.ese-hormones.org/meetings/ May 3-7, 2014. 167th Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association(APA). New York,NY, USA.

www.icnapedia.org

Summer 2013 | 43


ICNANEWS

http://www.psychiatry.org/learn/meetings/futureannual-and-institute-meetings May 3-7, 2014. 69th Annual Meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry (SOBP). New York,NY, USA. https://www.sobp.org/ May 4-9, 2014. 13th ICNC (International Child Neurology Congress ). Iguazu Falls, Brazil. http://www.icnapedia.org/icnc2014-symposia-proposals May 8-10,2014. 69th Annual Meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry (SOBP). New York, NY, USA. https://www.sobp.org/ May 13-17, 2014. SPR(Society for Pediatric Radiology) Annual Meeting. Washington, DC, USA. http://www.pedrad.org/displaycommon. cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=470#SPR_2013 May 14-18, 2014. American association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 23rd Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress. Las Vegas, NV, USA. https://www.aace.com/ May 17-22, 2014. 52nd American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR) Annual Meeting. Montréal, QC, Canada. http://www.asnr.org/2013/future/ May 21-24, 2014. American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy (ASGCT) 17th Annual Meeting. Washington, DC, USA. http://www.asgct.org/ May 31-June 3, 2014. Joint Congress of European Neurology. Istanbul, Turkey. http://www.jointcongressofeuropeanneurology.org/ June 2-6,2014. 51st Annual Meeting and 37th post Graduate Course of the European Society of Paediatric Radiology. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. http://www.espr.org/index.php?option=com_ content&view=article&id=232&Itemid=211 June 8-12, 2014. 18th International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders. Stockholm, Sweden. http://www.movementdisorders.org/congress/past_ and_future.php June 15-19, 2014. 20th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. Berlin, Germany. http://www.humanbrainmapping.org/ July 28-August 2, 2014. International Congress of Neuroethology. Sapporo, Japan. http://icn2014.wordpress.com/

44 | Summer 2013

August 30-September 3, 2014. 27th ECNP(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Congress. Helsinki, Finland. http://www.ecnp.eu/en/meetings/agenda.aspx August 31-September 3, 2014. 12th Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (Eilat VII). Madrid, Spain. http://www.eilat-aeds.com/ September 7 - 12, 2014. XX Symposium Neuroradiologicum. Istanbul, Turkey. http://www.wfnrs.org/ September 10-14, 2014. American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) 48th Annual Meeting. Seattle, WA, USA. http://www.ashnr.org/futmtgs.html September 14-16, 2014. American College of Clinical Phamacology (ACCP) Annual Meeting. Atlanta, GA, USA. http://www.accp1.org/meetings_future.shtml September 14-18, 2014. XVIIIth International Congress of Neuropathology. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. http://www.intsocneuropathol.com/ September 18 -21, 2014. 53rd ESPE(European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology) Meeting.Dublin, Ireland. http://www.eurospe.org/meetings/ October 9-12, 2014. 11th Meeting of the European Association of Neuro-Oncology. Turin, Italy. http://www.eano.eu/content.aspx?id=Congress/ upcoming October 12-14,2014. 139th Annual Meeting of American Neurological Association. Baltimore, MD, USA. http://www.aneuroa.org/ October 29-November 1, 2014. AANEM (American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine) Annual Meeting. Savannah, GA,USA. http://www.aanem.org/Meeting/Future-Meetings.aspx November 14-18, 2014. 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Cytopathology. Dallas, TX,USA. http://cytopathologymeeting.org/2012/future-meetingdates-2/ November 30-December 5, 2014. RSNA(Radiological Society of North America) Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL, USA. http://www.rsna.org/Past_Meetings.aspx December 5-9, 2014. 68th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. Seattle, WA, USA. http://www.aesnet.org/

www.icnapedia.org


ICNANEWS

December 7-11, 2014. 53rd Annual Meeting of The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP). Phoenix, AZ, USA. http://www.acnp.org/annualmeeting/dates.aspx

2015 March 4-7, 2015. 116th The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT) Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA,USA. http://www.ascpt.org/ March 14-19, 2015. SIR(Society of Interventional Radiology) Annual Scientific Meeting. Atlanta, GA, USA. http://www.sirmeeting.org/ March 28-31, 2015. EPA 2015: 23rd European Congress of Psychiatry. Vienna, Austria. http://www.epa-congress.org/ April 18-25, 2015. 67th AAN(American Academy of Neurology) Annual Meeting. Washington, DC,USA. http://www.aan.com/ April 25 - 28, 2015. PAS(Pediatrics Academic Societies) Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA,USA. http://www.pas-meeting.org/2013DC/future_meetings. asp April 25-30, 2015. 53rd American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR) Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL, USA. http://www.asnr.org/2013/future/ April 27-May 1, 2015. SPR(Society for Pediatric Radiology) Annual Meeting.Seattle,WA, USA. http://www.pedrad.org/displaycommon. cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=470#SPR_2013

May 14-16, 2015. 70th Annual Meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry (SOBP). Toronto, Canada. https://www.sobp.org/ May 16-20, 2015. 17th European Congress of Endocrinology(ECE). Dublin, Ireland. http://www.ese-hormones.org/meetings/ May 16-20, 2015. 168th Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association(APA). Tronto,Canada. http://www.psychiatry.org/learn/meetings/futureannual-and-institute-meetings May 17-19, 2015. 36th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES). Nashville, TN, USA. http://www.endocrinesurgery.org/meeting/meeting. html June 6-11, 2015. 8th World Congress of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. Berlin, Germany. E-mail: isprm@conventus.de http://www.isprm2015.org/ June14-18, 2015. Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. Honolulu, HI, USA. http://www.humanbrainmapping.org/ June 14-18, 2015. 19th International Congress of Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease and Movement Disorders. San Diego, CA, USA. http://www.movementdisorders.org/congress/past_ and_future.php August 29-September 2, 2015. 28th ECNP(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Congress. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. http://www.ecnp.eu/en/meetings/agenda.aspx September 9 -12, 2015. 54th ESPE(European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology) Meeting. Barcelona, Spain. http://www.eurospe.org/meetings/

May 2-6, 2015. 83rd American Association of Neurological Surgeons(AANS) Annual Meeting. Washington, DC, USA. http://www.aans.org/ May 8-12, 2015. 102nd AAI(the American Association of immunologists) Annual Meeting.New Orleans, LA,USA. http://aai.org/Meetings/Future_Meeting.html May 13-16, 2015. American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy (ASGCT) 18th Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA,USA. http://www.asgct.org/ May 13-17, 2015. American association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 24th Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress. Nashville, TN, USA. https://www.aace.com/

September 27-29,2015. 140th Annual Meeting of American Neurological Association. Chicago, IL, USA. http://www.aneuroa.org/ October 28-31, 2015. AANEM (American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine) Annual Meeting. Honolulu, HI, USA. http://www.aanem.org/ December 4-8, 2015. 69th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. Philadelphia, PA, USA. http://www.aesnet.org/ December 6-10, 2015. 54th Annual Meeting of The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP). Hollywood,FL, USA. http://www.acnp.org/annualmeeting/dates.aspx

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Summer 2013 | 45


ICNANEWS

2016 March 9-12, 2016. 117th The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT) Annual Meeting. San Diego, California,USA. http://www.ascpt.org/ March 12-15, 2016. EPA 2016: 24th European Congress of Psychiatry. Madrid, Spain. http://www.epa-congress.org/

December 2-6, 2016. 70th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society. Houston, TX, USA. http://www.aesnet.org/ December 4-8, 2016. 55th Annual Meeting of The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP). Hollywood,FL, USA. http://www.acnp.org/annualmeeting/dates.aspx

April 30 - May 3, 2016 . PAS(Pediatrics Academic Societies) Annual Meeting. Baltimore, MD, USA. http://www.pas-meeting.org/2013DC/future_meetings. asp May 7-11, 2016. 18th European Congress of Endocrinology(ECE). Munich, Germany. http://www.euro-endo.org/meetings/meetings_ conferences.htm May 12-14, 2016. 71st Annual Meeting of the Society of Biological Psychiatry (SOBP). Atlanta, GA, USA. https://www.sobp.org/ May 14-18, 2016. 169th Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association(APA). Atlanta, GA, USA. http://www.psychiatry.org/learn/meetings/futureannual-and-institute-meetings May 21-26, 2016. 54th American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR) Annual Meeting. Washington,DC, USA. http://www.asnr.org/2013/future/ May 27-1 June, 2016.18th European Congress of Endocrinology. Munich, Germany. http://www.ese-hormones.org/meetings/ August 24-28, 2016. 16th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Developmental Neuroscience. Banff, Canada. http://www.developmental-neuroscience.org/meetings. html September 10-13, 2016. 55th ESPE(European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology) Meeting.Paris, France. http://www.eurospe.org/meetings/ September 14-17, 2016. AANEM (American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine) Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA,USA http://www.aanem.org/ September 17-21, 2016. 29th ECNP(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Congress.Vienna, Austria. http://www.ecnp.eu/en/meetings/agenda.aspx October 16-18, 2016. 141th Annual Meeting of American Neurological Association. Baltimore, MD, USA. http://www.aneuroa.org/ 46 | Summer 2013

www.icnapedia.org


ICNANEWS

ICNA ICNA is a respected international group of child neurologists who wish to advance the care of children with neurological problems throughout the world. Officers are: Dr Harry Chugani, Detroit, USA, President, Dr Jo Wilmshurst, Cape Town, South Africa, Secretary, Dr Orvar Eeg-Olofsson, Uppsala, Sweden, Treasurer. We invite all child neurologists to join the association. See www.icnapedia.org.

Provide the following information and we will send you the application form with rules for membership (please, print clearly): Name_________________________________________ Address________________________________________

The benefits of membership include: • Membership dues waived for 2 years starting June 2012 • Being part of an international network of child neurologist • Half-yearly electronic Newsletter • The International Review of Child Neurology (IRCN) book series. • The following books have been published in 2006 and 2007: Autism: A Neurological Disorder of Early Brain Development (eds.: R.F. Tuchman, I Rapin), Paediatric Clinical Neurophysiology (ed.: K. Edebol Eeg-Olofsson), and Head Injuries in Childhood (ed.: D. MacGregor).The 2007 book Clinical & Scientific Aspects of Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (ed: M Shevell) was published July 2009. The book on Stroke (Eds: F Kirkham and V Ganesan), the 2008 book, was published in May 2011. Then also the 2009 book on Leucodytrophies (Eds: GV Raymond, F Eichler, A Fatemi, S Naidu) was published. The 2010 book on Acquired brain injury in the fetus and newborn (Ed. M Shewell) will be published late 2012. The 2011 book on CNS infections will be published 2013, and the 2012 book on Neonatal seizures will be published 2013. Members not having paid the dues earlier years can purchase the books directly from the publisher (Mac Keith Press) to some discount. See also www.amazone. com for non-members. • Directory of members. • Reduced fees for ICNA meetings. The next will be in Brazil, Iguazu Falls, May 4-9, 2014. • Participation in ICNA projects • ICNA information and web-based learning program (www.ICNApedia.org)

______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ E-mail_________________________________________

Send to: Orvar Eeg-Olofsson ICNA Treasurer University Children’s Hospital, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden E-mail: orvar.eeg-olofsson@kbh.uu.se; Fax +46 18 6115853 Uppsala, Sweden, April 2012 Orvar Eeg-Olofsson PLEASE COPY AND DISTRIBUTE THIS INVITATION AS WIDELY AS POSSIBLE

Categories of membership • Active – fully trained child neurologists who have attained the certificate and credential that is recognized in their venue. • Associate – professionals in child neurology training, or training in related disciplines such as neuroscience research, neurosurgery, rehabilitation etc. Your membership and active participation is critical in further advancing child neurology around the world, especially in developing countries, which will ultimately benefit from possibilities of diagnoses, treatment alternatives, and general care of the patients, as well as from education and training. www.icnapedia.org

Summer 2013 | 47


4th Course on Epilepsy Surgery (EPODES) Advanced Course II Brno, Czech Republic

13-17 January 2014 CONTINENTAL Hotel Kounicova 6, Brno, Czech Republic www.continentalbrno.cz The course is organized as part of the European Project of Development of Epilepsy Surgery Programs (EPODES) under the aegis and with funding from the Commission of European Affairs of the International League Against Epilepsy Deadline for applications: 1st November 2013;

Organizing Committee Chair Prof. Dr. Çigdem Özkara Cerrahpasa Medical School, Department of Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey, tel-fax: 90 212 6330176 e-mail: cigdemoz@istanbul.edu.tr

Chair of the Programme Committee Prof. Dr. Kristina Malmgren Local Organizer Prof. Dr. Ivan Rektor Masaryk University, St. Anne's Hospital Brno, Czech Republic e-mail: irektor@med.muni.cz

TA-SERVICE s.r.o. (congress agency) Hlinky 48, 603 00 Brno, Czech Republic contact person: Ivana Tarabová tel./fax: 00 420 543 211 134 e-mail: tarabova@ta-service.cz


20

New titles from Mac Keith Press

6 Market Road, London N7 9PW, UK T +44 (0)20 7619 7172 F +44 (0)20 7619 7207 E admin@mackeith.co.uk W www.mackeith.co.uk

Measures for children with developmental disabilities: an ICF-CY approach EDITED BY ANNETTE MAJNEMER 2012 § 552PP § HARDBACK § 978-1-908316-45-5 § £150 ICNA member price: £120

%

discount for I C N A members

Cerebellar Disorders in Children

EDITED BY EUGEN BOLTSHAUSER AND JEREMY SCHMAHMANN 2012 § 456PP § HARDBACK § 978-1-907655-01-2 § £125.00

ICNA member price: £100

The first definitive reference on the topic. An in valuable resource.

Comprehensive review of outcome measures.

Cerebral Palsy: From Diagnosis to Adult Life

PETER L. ROSENBAUM AND LEWIS ROSENBLOOM 2012 § 224PP § PAPERBACK § 978-1-908316-50-9 § £29.95

ICNA member price: £24

Essential reading for parents and carers of those with cerebral palsy, clinicians, paediatricians, neurologists, occupational therapists and physiotherapists.

Principles and Practice of Child Neurology in Infancy EDITED BY COLIN KENNEDY 2012 § 384PP § PAPERBACK §978-1-908316-35-6 § £29.95

ICNA member price: £24

Distillation by experts of best practice applicable in any setting where neurological disorders in infancy are managed.

AUTHOR AND BRIEF TITLE

ICNA MEMBER PRICE £ £

Dispatch: UK: £3.00 for first book plus £1.00 for each additional book; rest of Europe: £6.00 for first book plus £1.50 for each additional book; rest of world: £9.00 for first book plus £2.00 for each additional book (books sent by air to addresses outside UK).

DISPATCH (SEE LEFT) £ TOTAL £

Payment methods: Cheque made out to Mac Keith Press Ltd or credit card. Send your order to the address above.

NAME

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EMAIL / TELEPHONE IN CASE OF QUERY: ICNA November 2012


I C

N A

International Review of Child Neurology

ICNA members receive the annual volume in this series as a membership benefit. Members may purchase books for years in which they have not paid dues at a discount from the publisher. Please mail your order to Mac Keith Press, 6 Market Road, London N7 9PW, UK, fax to +44 20 7619 7207, or email to admin@mackeith.co.uk.

Author/Editor

Title

List price ICNA price

Quantity

Amount

Baxter

Vitamin responsive conditions in paediatric neurology

£50.00

£23.00

£

Tuchman

Autism: a neurological disorder of early brain development

£65.00

£28.00

£

Eeg-Olofsson

Pediatric clinical neurophysiology

£65.00

£25.00

£

MacGregor

Head injury in children and adolescents

£60.00

£25.00

£

Shevell

Neurodevelopmental disabilities: clinical and scientific foundations

£75.00

£38.00

£

Raymond

Leukodystrophies

£80.00

£24.00

£

Shevell & Miller

Acquired Brain Injury in the Fetus and Newborn

£125.00

£63.00

£

Other titles from Mac Keith Press can be bought at 20% discount – see www.mackeith.co.uk/books.html £ £ £ Dispatch: UK: £3.00 for 1st book plus £1.00 for each additional book; rest of Europe: £6.00 for 1st book plus £1.50 for each additional book; rest of world: £9.00 for 1st book plus £2.00 for each additional book (books sent by air to addresses outside UK).

Plus dispatch (see left) £ Total £

Cheques made out to Mac Keith Press Ltd or credit card.

NAME

CARD NUMBER (VISA/MASTERCARD)

CREDIT CARD BILLING ADDRESS

EXPIRY DATE SECURITY CODE

ADDRESS WHERE BOOKS SHOULD BE SENT (IF DIFFERENT)

SIGNATURE

EMAIL / TELEPHONE IN CASE OF QUERY: ICNA November 2012



Icna Newsletter Spring-Summer 2013