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SPRING 2013

Steel Center Area Vocational Technical School

Thomas Jefferson High School

The Many Faces of West Jefferson Hills

Pleasant Hills Middle School

Gill Hall Elementary

Jefferson Elementary

Steel Center Area Vocational Technical School

Plus! Jefferson Hills Borough Newsletter

McClellan Elementary


From the Publisher   Welcome to the spring issue of IN West Jefferson Hills magazine! I hope that you are as anxious as I am to get the cold and snow behind us and get busy planning projects around the house. This issue is dedicated to home-improvement projects great and small. Some projects will give you curb appeal, some will increase your home’s value, and others are for the sheer enjoyment or luxury of it. Regardless of your aims with your home, whether gutting the walls, or just planting the perfect tree in the yard, our homes are a source of pride for us, and not in a status sense. They are where we raise our families, where we feel safe, and where we invite our friends and loved ones for parties and fellowship. Our homes are where our children play, and where oftentimes, we tend to sick loved ones. They are where we try hardest in life, and where the challenges of life hit us the most. Our homes bear witness to our triumphs as well as our sorrows, and they are as much a part of our personalities as what we choose to wear or adorn ourselves with. So with so much importance placed on the walls that contain us, we hope that you can find at least one project within these pages to be fodder for your next project around the home. Have a wonderful spring!

Wayne Dollard, Publisher

Summer content deadline: 5/31/13

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INSIDE

SPRING

2013

IN West Jefferson Hills is a non-partisan community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the West Jefferson Hills area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Area Steel Center Technical Vocational School

Thomas Jefferso High School

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any The M Faces of West n Jefferso Hills

Hills Pleasant Middle School

Gill Hall Elementary

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Jefferson Elementary

onal Area Vocati Steel Center cal School Techni

Plus! Hills Jefferson letter Borough News

McClellan Elementary

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Industry Insights

Cusumano Insurance Agency, Inc. Insuring Your Home - The Importance of Replacement Cost vs. Market Value ......... | 28 on the cover

There’s never any shortage of things going on in the West Jefferson Hills School District.

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UPMC TODAY

NovaCare® Rehabilitation Taking the Pain Out of Spring Cleaning ..... | 49 Business Spotlight

Health and Wellness News You Can Use | Spring 2013

Bill Few Associates .......................... | 24

What’s Inside 2 3 4

When It’s More than Just Heartburn Hope and Healing A Healing Touch Food in a Glass

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Clinical Trials Can Change Lives

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Depression and Older Adults Comprehensive Care for Today’s Urology Patients

© 2013 UPMC

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Features

Scott Lautner, Putting Community First .............................. | 4 Taking Care of the Neighbors ................................................. | 26 Home Improvements in West Jefferson Hills .................... | 50 Planting is Believing for New WJH Family ......................... | 58 Being Called to Serve ............................................................... | 60 community interests

West Jefferson Hills School District ................................... | 7 Tomosynthesis Offers Women Greater Detection of Breast Abnormalities ................................................................. | 25 UPMC Today | Health and Wellness News ...................................... | 29 Jefferson Hills Borough............................................................. | 40 New Advanced Treatment for Skin Cancer .......................... | 64


Scott Lautner,

Putting Community First

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f you’ve never heard of Scott Lautner, you haven’t been paying attention. Born and raised in Pleasant Hills, and now living with his wife, Kimberly, and his two boys, Dylan and Tyler, in Jefferson Hills, Lautner is proud to call the West Jefferson Hills School District home.

With a mother who teaches at Jefferson Hills Elementary School, brother and sister who reside in Pleasant Hills, and as a member of the Pleasant Hills Lions Club and Pleasant Hills Presbyterian Church, he has been enmeshed in the community his entire life. Starting early in athletics, he made a name for himself locally on the football team, and then regionally at Washington and Jefferson College, where he was a two-time academic All-American football player. In fact, the only time in his life he’s been away from home, was to attend law school in Michigan,

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after which, he quickly returned to his beloved community to set up a law practice. That was 15 years ago. Today, with thousands of cases under his belt, he’s been admitted to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, allowing him to practice law anywhere in the Commonwealth. He’s also a certified to practice federally in the U.S. District Court and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. “My passion is helping people, whether for family situations, civil cases, personal injury, estates or criminal defense,” he said. Anyone who has ever been cross-examined by Scott Lautner knows that it is not a pleasant experience. “The funny thing about that is that I have gained numerous clients as a result of my zealous advocacy.” Lautner is a passionate attorney who stands up for the rights of his clients. Scott’s reputation for candid honesty and as a “bulldog” in the courtroom has earned him the respect of police officers across Southwestern Pennsylvania, many of whom after being crossexamined find themselves seeking his representation for their own personal interests. “I was fortunate to have learned my trade from two very experienced lawyers, Bob Garshak and Ray Radakovich, both of whom gave me the opportunity to develop my skills.” Lautner doesn’t just believe in obtaining clients from pillars of the community, he also believes in giving support back where he can. “I still continue to coach my children’s activities, and I’ve been a coach while attending college and immediately after returning from law school,” he said. “And I’ve been blessed that I can financially support local high school teams, as well as TJ’s music and theater arts departments. I’m really fortunate in a lot of regards, but particularly in that my family is close; I live in the community I grew up in and I’m able to sustain a business here and give back to the community. I am hoping to do just that for many years to come.” To find out more information about Scott, or his law practice, go to www.lautnerlaw.com or call 412.650.8820 today.

West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 5


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WEST JEFFERSON HILLS

WEST ELIZABETH JEFFERSON HILLS PLEASANT HILLS

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Inside West Jefferson Hills School District Message from the S uperintendent Dear Residents of the West Jefferson Hills School District, As the vernal equinox ushers in the last nine weeks of the school year there is cause to pause and celebrate all that is happening in our schools. The district-wide Olweus Program was launched in all the schools in January with scintillating performances by our staff and students. There were also parent meetings that were held in the schools to introduce the program. Hope all of you had the opportunity to visit the district website to catch a glimpse of the super hero at McClellan Elementary, a flash mob at PHMS, the TJHS Choir and Percussion ensemble, the creative songs and moves of students at Jefferson Elementary and the nifty feet of dancers at Gill Hall Elementary. Students have embraced the basic tenets of this program that helps foster and maintain positive learning environments in our schools. The Ides of March are synonymous with the start of the next assessment cycle in school districts. Students take the PSSA Reading, Math, Writing and Science tests in the elementary and middle schools, with Keystone Exams, ACTs, SATs and AP for high school students, along with other exams. In the midst of all this testing our students continue to learn and thrive in the classrooms and compete and participate in extra-curricular activities that showcase their phenomenal talents. The current focus on reforming public education continues with: - much needed pension reforms to sustain future retirements in the system, - a teacher evaluation tool that is slated to roll out next school year, but for which the concrete parameters that will be used in the evaluation are yet to be determined, - the transition of curriculum to PA Common Core standards, and - a School Performance Profile for each school that will have a score based on variables that are still being debated. Change for the sake of change is not a path that should be traversed when it involves the future of our children. Legislators tout school

choice as the solution. The federal mandate of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has the target of all students being 100% proficient by 2014. Pennsylvania has at last joined the list of states to apply for a waiver from this unrealistic expectation to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) this year. Meanwhile, charter schools, cyber charters and private schools remain unscathed relative to the expectations that are placed on public schools, be it on the performance and expectations of students to meet AYP, or that schools be staffed with highly qualified teachers, or the basis for how allocations and funding are determined. The playing field is not level when publicly funded school districts have a higher burden placed on them than that on publicly funded cyber and cyber charter institutions. However, the West Jefferson Hills School District marches on, carving a road map that charts the future course of our district with the support of our stake holders. Community members, parents, staff and students have been an integral part of initiatives that have been launched this past year. These have included numerous community meetings to determine the district’s current state of facilities, with a focus on the needs of our High School, meetings related to the selection process of a new Superintendent, and surveys to initiate the Strategic Planning process for the district. I would like to acknowledge the time spent on these initiatives by parents, community members, staff and students. On behalf of the administrative team and the board of school directors I sincerely thank you for your feedback and comments. They have been and will continue to be reviewed and addressed appropriately. As we continue, our students, their personal success and academic achievement remain our priority focus. It is a privilege to work in our school district and my administrative team and staff are very grateful for your unwavering support. Sincerely, Hamsini Rajgopal Acting Assistant Superintendent West Jefferson Hills School District

West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 7


WEST ELIZABETH JEFFERSON HILLS PLEASANT HILLS

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Letter from the Board

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OLWEUS Bullying

Dear Friends of the West Jefferson Hills School District Community, As the long winter season comes to an end, we look forward to a spring that not only brings new growth in nature, but also brings tremendous growth for the West Jefferson Hills School District and our children. For the past several months, our District has been very busy planning for our future. We are currently coming to the end of our District-Wide Facilities Master Plan Study which began last September. This plan has been a collaborative effort of our community, administrators, faculty, staff, and school board. As a community, we are setting a course and developing a plan to maintain our existing facilities, to plan for future growth in the District, and to address the need to modernize our high school. Our high school is over fifty years old. Although our staff has done a tremendous job of maintaining the facility, there comes a time when a facility comes to the end of its useful life, both physically and educationally. The current high school has reached that crossroad. It is time for all of us to come together and help craft a community vision of what the high school will look like for the next fifty years. At the beginning of this school year, we began the search for our next superintendent of schools. Like our facilities study, this process has also involved the entire community. Applicants for this position have been interviewed not only by the board, but also by “Role Alike” groups of administrators, teachers, support staff, PTA members, booster parents, and community members. The Board extends its sincere thanks to all who have volunteered to play a role in the selection of our District’s next CEO. Last but certainly not least, our District has embarked on a Strategic Planning & Visioning process this past month. The purpose of this process is to create a roadmap for the future of our District. Again, your assistance is essential in creating a community vision for the future of the West Jefferson Hills School District. We ask you to participate by serving on a Steering Committee or an Action Team as we set the educational course for the District’s and our children’s future. Just as Mother Nature has sewn seeds for new growth over the past winter, the West Jefferson Hills School District, with these three on-going initiatives, will be setting the stage that will allow for successful growth of our District for years to come. We would like to thank all of you who have participated in these initiatives. Please know that having children attending the schools is not a requirement for participation. We value and need the wisdom and experience of all our community members. A strong and vibrant school system is vitally important to all community members regardless of your stage in life. Please get involved: The West Jefferson Hills School District Needs You! Thank you for your continued support and for the very important role you play as we work as a community toward raising the bar of educational excellence in West Jefferson Hills. Our students’ success depends on all of us. Very truly yours, Anthony Angotti, President Carolyn Bourgeois, Vice President Shauna D’Alessandro, Vice President Alan Caponi Dr. David Graham Anna Lilley Marianne Neel Debbie Pozycki Darlene Schreiber

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What a whirlwind of events and activities have recently taken place in the West Jefferson Hills School District. A courageous “Super Hero” was spotted at McClellan Elementary. Students dancing and singing while holding posters bearing a poignant message was “caught on tape” at Jefferson Elementary. A perfectly synchronized, choreographed whole- school dance was performed at Gill Hall Elementary. A “flash mob” was spotted in the halls at Pleasant Hills Middle School and the TJ Concert Choir and Percussion Ensemble “rocked the stage” with “Some Nights.” Mr. “MoJo Up” addressed our middle and high school students and encouraged them to “ Step In, Step Up, Stand For” The unique events signaled the official kick- off of the District wide OLWEUS Bullying Prevention Program. (OBPP) Throughout the summer, a core team of administrators, teachers, support staff and parents attended training sessions conducted by an OLWEUS certified trainer. During the October District In Service, OBPP training sessions were held for the entire District faculty and staff in preparation of the upcoming District wide kick off in January. The OLWEUS Bullying Prevention Program focuses on: • Reducing bullying problems among students • Preventing the development of new bullying problems • Achieving better peer relations at school • Defines bullying as someone who repeatedly, on purpose says or does something mean or hurtful to another • Identifies three key components of Bullying Behavior; aggressive behavior, a repeated pattern of behavior, an imbalance of power or strength • OBPP endorses a community wide effort in preventing bullying The District has partnered with parents, administrators and faculty to expand, endorse and encourage this worthwhile Bully Prevention Program. During a visit to our schools you may notice the colorful posters displayed throughout the halls. Each distinctive poster represents their students, some personalized, some bearing Paw Prints, but all bear the same OBPP Message: We will not bully others We will help others who are being bullied We will include others who are being left out If we know someone is being bullied, we will tell an adult


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Prevention Program The following details each school’s “Bully Prevention Theme,” and a brief description of OBPP related activities:

Thomas Jefferson High School

Theme: “What Do I Stand For” Follow-up activities: Discussion on bullying during home room A viewing of the video “ What Would You Do” A presentation to students by our local police officers

Pleasant Hills Middle School

Theme Song: “Gotta Keep Your Head Up” Follow-up activities will focus on students learning how to support and respect each other and bully prevention. Reinforcing the message of Mr. MoJo, “ leaders take a stand and make a difference.”

Jefferson Elementary

Theme: “Bully Busters” Follow up activities will focus on recognizing positive student contributions. The Jefferson Elementary PTA recently sponsored a Sadecky Puppet Assembly which focused on friends and bullying.

Gill Hall Elementary

Theme:“ Gill Hall is Paws-itevely Bully Free” Theme Song; “Firework” Follow up class meetings and activities will take place each week, of which, students and staff are encouraged to wear their “Paws-itevely Bully Free” shirts.

McClellan Elementary

Theme:“ Be a Hero-Not A Bully” Follow up activities will include class meetings, “ME Super Hero” shirts, and a book mark bearing the McClellan Elementary Anti Bullying Rules distributed at the PTA sponsored “Family Fun Book Fair” event.

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“Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss!” Throughout the week in early March, peculiar creatures were sited at Gill Hall Elementary, Jefferson Elementary and McClellan Elementary. Many of the large furry creatures resembled the familiar character in Dr. Seuss’s renowned children’s book, “The Cat in the Hat.” Our elementary students were also decked out in oversized red and white stripped paper hats, which they crafted to celebrate both this wonderful week of reading the birthday of “The Cat in the Hat’s” celebrated author, Dr. Seuss. In recognition of this beloved national celebration of reading and books, the McClellan Elementary faculty and Principal “Hat Cat” Justin Liberatore volunteered at the Pleasant Hills Public Library Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss Celebration. The elementary teachers manned the numerous craft tables, which included Go Fish, Fortune Cookies and face painting. The highlight of the Birthday Celebration was the “Reading Theater.” During this public reading of Dr. Seuss favorites, the teachers and Library staff acted out the various, often favorite, Dr. Seuss characters.

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Steel Center Technical Talents The following Thomas Jefferson High School students have been selected to receive the Top of The Shop Award for their accomplishments at Steel Center Area Vocational Technical School. The recipients of the Top of The Shop Award were nominated by their instructors, and have been selected as the top student in overall performance. This award is presented each semester to students who demonstrate proficiency in their course work, consistent attendance, professionalism, and commendable behavior.

Congratulations to: Junior Gregory Hough -Area of Technical Study- Computer Information Systems Senior Joshua Lehotsky - Area of Technical Study- Retail Food Merchandising & Production Senior Joshua Anderson -Area of Technical Study- Protective Services Junior Mitchell Martino- Area of Technical Study- Building Trades

The following Thomas Jefferson High School Students were selected to receive the Extra Effort Award for their accomplishments at Steel Center Area Vocational Technical School. The recipients of the Extra Effort Award are chosen by their instructors and recognized for their demonstrating outstanding attitude, work ethic, dependability, accurate theory and consistent attendance.

Congratulations to: Junior Wyatt Swick -Area of Technical Study- Computer Information Systems Sophomore David McConeghyArea of Technical Study Food Service

And Then There Was One

The “last one standing,” representing the entire West Jefferson Hills School District administration, faculty and staff was none other than Thomas Jefferson High School Science teacher Heidi Karcher. Her moves were methodical as she “ducked, threw and dodged” gallantly facing her opponents, Team TJ Seniors. At stake was victory, the esteemed Golden Trophy and the Dodgeball Championship Title. Each Team represented by fellow students, faculty, staff and administrators “strutted their bad self” onto the court dressed in true team spirit fashion. The high school’s look preppy, the middle school’s fearless, Jefferson Elementary, denim camo McClellan “Style Super Hero” and Gill Hall intimidating. The First Annual District-Wide Dodgeball Tournament sponsored by the Thomas Jefferson High School Prom Committee “packed the house” as District families arrived to cheer on their school’s team. Seated in their self designated cheering section, our students held up their crafted posters and cheered wildly as each team was slowly eliminated throughout the Tournament.

The excitement mounted as the last four teams were competing for the Championship Title. The Title Match was between Team Thomas Jefferson High School and Team TJ Seniors, who went on to win the coveted Golden Trophy in the best out of three. Congratulations to all of our West Jefferson Hills School District Dodgeball Teams for their valiant effort in this First Annual Dodgeball Tournament and our heartfelt thanks for their remarkable dedication to our District and awe-inspiring commitment to our students. Team Jefferson Elementary Team Gill Hall Elementary Team McClellan Elementary Team Pleasant Hills Middle School Team Thomas Jefferson High School Team TJ Seniors-The First Annual Dodgeball Tournament Champions Team TJ Juniors Team Prom Committee

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Dancing With the Athletes The Thomas Jefferson High School Student Council sponsored the Fourth Annual Dancing with the Athletes. The selected dance routines the students performed highlighted the grace of our trained young dancers and the agility and talent of our young athletes. The audience had the opportunity to “Vote for Their Favorite Dancing Couple” with monetary donations, which were collected to benefit each of the couple’s chosen Charity. Kudos to the following Thomas Jefferson High School Dancing Couples who thrilled us with their talent, Dancers~ Quinton Gardner and Sam Etzi entertained us with their creativity and touched our Dance Routine~ Contemporary~ “I Was Here” hearts with their generosity: Charity~ Make- A- Wish Foundation Dancers~ Leah Rowan and Brendan Ward Dance Routine~ Broadway ~ “King of New York” Charity~ Animal Friends Dancers~ Lexi Stoicovy and Colton Booher Dance Routine~ Tap ~”Are You Gonna Be My Girl” Charity~ Down Syndrome Association of Pittsburgh Dancers~ Abbey Fickley and Jake Prosser Dance Routine~ Contemporary Hip Hop~ “Bounce” Charity~ The Cami and Alissa Fund Dancers~ Jesse Hinkle and Jordan Campano Dance Routine~ Disco~ “I’m Your Boogie Man” Charity~ Children’s Free Care Fund

Dancers~ Alex Miller and Joe Carroll Dance Routine~ Cha-Cha ~“ We Run the Night” Charity~ The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Western Pennsylvania Dancers~ Becky Stem and Pat Hall Dance Routine~ Swing~ “Sing, Sing, Sing” Charity~ Four Diamonds Fund Dancers~ Taylor Childers and Bryce Churilla Dance Routine~ Mambo ~ “Para Los Rumberos” Charity~ Trucks for Maddox Dancers~ Erin Gramm and Severin Scott Dance Routine~ Baton ~ “Save A Horse, Ride A Cowboy” Charity~ American Heart Association of Pittsburgh Dancers~ Sydney Stromberg and Asher Williams Dance Routine~ Hip Hop ~ “Move If You Wanna” Charity~ Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Congratulations to Disco Performers Jesse Hinkle and Jordan Campano selected by the Panel of Judges, to be the Dancing Couple awarded the “Golden Character Shoes.” More than $2,000 was donated to their selected Charity, the Children’s Free Care Fund. Congratulations are also extended to Taylor Childers and Bryce Churilla for winning the “Fan Favorite.” More than $1,300 was collected for their selected Charity, Trucks for Maddox.

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A Tribute to Remarkable Talent Bravo! to Sandy Barker, Julie Lucci, Jim Mirabella, Michele Stoicovy, Dottie Kutscher, Jenna Freund, Ron Gmys and the Student Directors, Cast, Technical Crew, Orchestra, Stage Managers, Set Designers, Costume Stylists and Make-Up Artists of Thomas Jefferson High School for dedicating their time and talents in orchestrating the virtuoso performance of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. The talent of TJ’s aspiring actors, who showcased their incredible acting ability and musical expertise, brought this time -honored, Oscar nominated (1959) stage play, once again, to life. The “cast’ was comprised of more than 160 students whose diverse talents each “played a major role” in the performance’s phenomenal success. Those involved in the production of Thomas Jefferson High School’s Annual Spring Musical, also promote a corresponding Community Service Project. To benefit this year’s selection, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, a collection of monetary donations was held during each performance.

The Cou rage of “ONE” Thomas Jefferson High School students involved in The Interact Club, Honors 10 English and the high school Gifted Program made quite an impression on our elementary students during their recent visit to Jefferson Elementary and McClellan Elementary. The incredible interdisciplinary endeavor coordinated by high school teachers Naomi Beres and Colleen Triffanoff, coincided with the District wide OLWEUS Bully Prevention Program. The more than 40 high school student volunteers read the book ONE by Kathryn Otoshi to each elementary classroom. The premise of ONE focuses on Red bullying Blue and Yellow. Green, Purple and Orange witness the bullying by Red but do not stand up for Yellow and Blue. Then along comes 1, who courageously stands up to the bully encouraging the colorful bystanders to follow 1’s lead in doing what is right and learning to extend their friendship to bully Red. The elementary students who enthusiastically greeted the high school guests, listened intently as the story was read. During

the follow up discussion of ONE’s story line, the elementary students impressively discovered that 1 person can make a difference, that we should always treat each other with respect and that even “Colors” can be extraordinary. To many of our young scholars the high school students’ visit was incredible. They were in awe of their celebrity guests and grateful “that so many of those big kids would spend the morning with them.” As the morning came to a close and the high school students were preparing to leave, they bestowed upon their new young friends a memorable morning, a poignant message, and remarkable insight into the courage and power of “1.” A heartfelt thank you is extended to the McClellan Elementary PTA for purchasing the numerous copies of the book “ONE,” which were used for this inter-district reading activity and to commemorate the official kick-off of the “Annual Read Across America; Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss” National Program. West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 13


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Interest Groups On Wednesday afternoons, the corridors at Pleasant Hills Middle School are vivacious with activity long after the dismissal bell has rung. The middle school students in grades six, seven, and eight, who participate in the after-school Interest Groups, were presented an array of activities and interests from which they could choose. The following contains a brief description of the 2012-2013 Pleasant Hills Middle School Interest Groups as well as the faculty sponsor: • Scrapbooking - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Clark is ideal for students who enjoy developing their personal Scrapbook. The students’ Scrapbooks depict their memories with personal messages and colorful photographs. • “Open Book” Club - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Watson, is ideal for students wishing to read new books and make new friends. Six selected books will be read and discussed including “The Boy in the Stripped Pajamas.” All of the six books the students are to read, will be included in their twenty-five book challenge. • Show Choir - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Lucci the students in grades 6, 7 and 8 who auditioned for were selected to participate in the Show Choir will collaborate with students in the Dance Workshop to perform in a year end, middle school production. • Dance Workshop - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs.Kolenda the students in grades 7 and 8 who have a passion to dance will be involved in choreographing dances for large and small groups, alternating weeks between Show Choir and Dance Workshop. The collaborating students will perform in a year end, middle school production. • Percussion Ensemble - Faculty Sponsor - Mr. Hrvatin, is ideal for all student musicians who want to play music using only percussion instruments and to learn skills which can be applied in many musical situations. Students in the Percussion Ensemble will also be performing at various middle school activities. • History Through Movies - Faculty Sponsor - Mr. Zunic, is ideal for students who want to examine various historical accuracy of films. After viewing the films, a detailed analysis of the films historical event will be provided. • Board Games - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Prah, is ideal for students who wish to draw conclusions, evaluate information, cooperate in groups and strategically think, while playing popular board games such as Monopoly, Scatterogries and Jenga. • Extreme Intramurals - Faculty Sponsor - Mr. Shosky, is ideal for students who want to participate in healthy activities and extreme sports such as Flag Football, Basketball, Ultimate Frisbee, and Kick-Ball. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in skill challenges, which will showcase their talents in specific sports. • Strategic Games - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Curry is ideal for students who wish to compete in a variety of strategic games such as Chess, and Checkers. • Pinterest Crafting - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Vetter is ideal for students who enjoy crafting. Students will have the opportunity to create various crafts found on the Pinterest Website from repurposed materials. • Around the World in 30 Wednesdays - Sponsor- Mrs. McCauley is ideal for the students interested in International Cuisine. Various cultures will be explored and recipes made to reflect the culture and customs. • Fruit Fun - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Zanetti, is ideal for students who love a crossword challenge. Using letter tiles to create words in a crossword fashion, the winner of each hand is required to use all of the letter tiles to “split, peel, and go Bananas or Apples to Apples, connecting nouns and adjectives.” • Jazz Band - Faculty Sponsor - Mr. Stewart, is for students who are members of the Jazz Band, to prepare for concerts and upcoming auditions. • The Prowler - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Dugan is ideal for students interested in writing, artistry, and interviewing classmates and teachers for the Prowler, the new middle school newsletter. The Prowler will feature school news, interviews and special interest articles. Students will also be involved in the layout, graphic design and content of the Prowler. • Aftermath - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Mitko, is ideal for students interested in math peer tutoring. Open to students in grades 6,7, and 8, students who excel at math are partnered with their fellow classmates seeking after school math tutoring. • Basic Weight Training - Faculty Sponsor - Mrs. Startari for students in grades 6, 7 and 8 who are interested in weight training and physical fitness.

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An International Flair Flags from France, Italy and the United States of America were among the decorative display as you entered Pleasant Hills Middle School. The middle school was abuzz with activity this Friday evening as District families came to gather, dine on International cuisine and actively participate in the cultured celebration. Those in attendance had the opportunity to win one of the dazzling themed baskets exhibited throughout the main lobby, which were contributed by each middle school home room. Thomas Jefferson High School student artists were diligently painting faces and drawing life- like characteristic Caricatures. As you entered the gymnasium, there were numerous booths manned by the middle school faculty and students, with each featuring a distinct activity. The enormous inflatable Basketball Pulley and Maze, bowling, Go Fish, and the Photo Booth with assorted costume accessories were a huge success, however the highlight of the Festival was the Pie - a -Teacher and the rocking, live band, featuring middle school teacher guitarist Michael Medved. The cafeteria was transformed into an International Café including among the delicacies, crepes,’ lasagna, and Indian pastry. Kudos to Principal Dan Como and the entire Pleasant Hills Middle School administration, faculty, staff , Middle School PTO, International Festival Chair Sharyn Reagan, parents and students for coordinating and sponsoring this wondrous , family focused, International Festival, which will benefit the upcoming, whole -school trip to Washington, D.C. ********************************************************* The administration, faculty, staff, and Middle School PTO, would like to acknowledge and thank the following local businesses for their generous donations to the Pleasant Hills Middle School International Festival: Costco Duffy’s Pop & Beer Get Go Giant Eagle Hot Metal Harley Davidson IGA Old Country Buffet Sam’s Club Vocelli Pizza Weiss Brothers Inc. Meats

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A Soaring Message

The Gill Hall Elementary PTA once again sponsored the BMX Dialed Action Sports Team “soaring” anti -drug, anti- alcohol, anti-bullying Program. With platforms assembled, ramps constructed, and musical accompaniment, the BMX pros soared through the gymnasium, flipping airborne and flying up and down the platforms with expert precision. Principal, Tina Mayer bravely volunteered to climb to the top of the ramp. She tentatively sat in the chair, as one of the BMX performers came racing up the ramp, and literally jumped over her. The focused message of the Assembly, “the three R’s; Recognize: know what bullying is, Refuse: stand up confidently, React: do something about it.” Their “do not do drugs or drink alcohol message” was reaffirmed by the performing athletes, Brian Cunningham, Lonnie Parton and Keith Schmidt. They shared with the students the level of commitment and the countless hours involved in their training and conditioning and how drugs and alcohol would interfere with their training, their performance and their safety. A heartfelt thanks to the Gill Hall Elementary PTA for presenting the students this life- long, valuable message and for the awesome BMX “Dialed Action Sports Team Assembly.”

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Creating Lightning, Tornados and Rainbows The magic of Science and predicting weather patterns was the spotlight of the whole school assembly at Gill Hall Elementary. W.T.A.E.- TV Meteorologist Ray Petelin and staff from the Carnegie Science Center utilized science in relation to predicting varying weather conditions such as snow storms, rain, lightning and tornados. Using yard sticks, cylinders and dry ice, they created various weather conditions, which demonstrated the scientific concepts of chemistry, optics, and physics. The students, dressed in the “colors of the rainbow,” enthusiastically participated in the interactive assembly. Kudos to the Gill Hall Elementary PTA, students, faculty, and staff for their generous donation to Project Bundle Up and to Thomas Jefferson High School sophomore Hanna Lynch, for the beautifully decorated, time-honored, “Weather Assembly Cake.”


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Family Fun DANCE The Gill Hall Elementary PTA sponsored a “Family Fun Dance” featuring a “walk down the Red Capet,” as the paparazzi clamored to photograph our young celebrities. Glamorously dressed in their tiaras and lovely dresses the young guests sparkled as they danced in the beautifully decorated space. The highlight of the celebration was the “flash mob” dance to their OLWEUS theme song, Firework by Katie Perry. The PTA also sponsored a bake sale, Basket Auction and a food drive, benefiting our local food bank, during their Red Carpet Gala.

Story Laboratory Family Book Fair The students at Gill Hall Elementary had the opportunity to flaunt their reading “super powers” at the Gill Hall Elementary PTA “Story Laboratory” Family Book Fair. Highlighting this annual event, was the “Super Hero” face painting, games and rows upon rows of wondrous books. This family, fun- filled event, which promotes reading, offered our students and their families the opportunity to purchase delectable desserts, numerous books for family reading time and personal enjoyment, pizza, hot dogs and cold beverages. Kudos to the Gill Hall Elementary PTA for combining this “love for reading” with a fun-filled, family-focused event.

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Life-Size Lessons The students at Jefferson Elementary had the opportunity to “see how bullying feels� through the magical performance of the renowned Sadecky Puppets. The whole school assembly, sponsored by the Jefferson Elementary PTA, emphasized the value of friends and the significance of choosing to always do what is right. The life-size puppets inspired our young students to care for others, respect all and appreciate our differences through the touching story of New Friends.

Annual Family

B I N G O! Family BINGO was much more than a game of fortune for Jefferson Elementary students and their families. The Annual Family Fun BINGO Night sponsored by the Jefferson Elementary PTA once again proved to be a huge success. The entire gymnasium, which was jam-packed, was abuzz with activity. In between the call of the games, music was provided by the guest DJ. Families gathered, patiently listening to the letters and corresponding digits, carefully marking their numerous BINGO cards with the synchronized number. Those in attendance also had the chance to win one of the beautifully decorated gift baskets, which were contributed and designed by each individual classroom. The Auction Baskets donated from each class had a basket for everyone; the classroom themes included, kitchen gadgets, spa delights, Pittsburgh sports teams, chocolate, pets, movies, coffee, books, and games. Proceeds from the BINGO and the Chinese Auction fund the numerous educational programs, assemblies and classroom activities sponsored by the PTA. Kudos to the Jefferson Elementary PTA for once again sponsoring this entertaining, annual family event. 18

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Science at Work The third grade students at Jefferson Elementary were cloaked in their crisp white lab coats as they actively mixed a variety of secret ingredients. Exploring basic chemistry concepts, the young scientists were encouraged to utilize critical thinking skills to identify the unknown solids. By conducting a range of physical and chemical experiments, observing the results of mixing the unknown solids and liquids and documenting and analyzing the results they could draw and support a scientific conclusion and correctly identify the mystery ingredients. This hands-on scientific process is part of the district -wide Science Curriculum, which incorporates the ASSET Science Chemistry Unit.

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Jumping For Their Heart’s Health “Jumping for their heart” was embraced by the students at Jefferson Elementary. This annual, week long, “Jump for Heart” fund raising activity, sponsored by the American Heart Association, was coordinated by the Jefferson Elementary PTA and Physical Education Teachers Laurie Conboy and Dustin Guidash. This life –long, heart healthy, learning event encourages our students to take care of their health and their heart through fun physical activity. Kudos to the Jefferson Elementary students, parents, PTA, faculty and staff who raised more than $2,000 to benefit the American Heart Association.

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Kids of Steel Take First Place

Jump Rope for Heart Hoops for Heart Congratulations to the McClellan Elementary students, parents, Ms. Marie Bartoletti, faculty, and staff, for enthusiastically sponsoring their Sixteenth Annual “Jump Rope for Heart,” and “Hoop for Heart” Program. More than 145 elementary students participated in this fund raising hearthealthy event. The students, who collected monetary pledges from family and friends during a weeklong pledge drive, “jumped and hooped” to raise more than $5,500. A touching honor to the students’ successful efforts were the numerous memorial paper hearts and posters bearing the names of family members lining the gymnasium’s walls. What a tribute to the students and parents at McClellan Elementary who support this heart-healthy, lifelong learning event. Through their noble accomplishment, the students, faculty, staff, and parents at McClellan Elementary have, to date, raised more than $139,729 for the American Heart Association in their ongoing mission to combat heart disease and strokes.

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More than 130 students at McClellan Elementary are participating in the Kids of Steel Program. This annual physical fitness running event cumulates with the students running their last mile at the Pittsburgh Marathon Children’s Event. To prepare for this big event and to encourage our students to make healthy food choices, a writing contest was sponsored by Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon and Giant Eagle. Congratulations are extended to the following McClellan Elementary students who won first place in the writing competition; Fifth Grader Tyler Turk, Fourth Grader Natalie Eperthener, and Third Grader Joey Wodarek. Their First Place efforts resulted in a healthy food choice “Tasting Party” for their classmates.


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Story Science McClellan Elementary PTA sponsored a “Story Laboratory” event to kick off their Annual Family Fun Book Fair. Those in attendance had the opportunity to create “DNA molecules,” peruse the bake sale and answer Science based questions posed by guest “Mr. Mad Science.” Throughout the week-long Book Sale, donations were collected to benefit Scholastic Books “All For Books Program.” The generosity of our students and parents who contributed to the Program’s goal of one million books, can also be credited with the donation of 20 new books for the Pleasant Hills Public Library. The Family Fun Book Fair event is designed to connect students with books and to make reading a positive experience.” Kudos to the McClellan Elementary PTA volunteers for coordinating this “Story Laboratory” reading event.

Wildlife Animal Encounters The students at McClellan Elementary recently experienced a brief encounter with a scorpion, a monkey, a boa constrictor, an eagle owl and a beautiful snow leopard. The exotic animals were introduced to the students during their assembly, the “Wild World of Animals,” sponsored by the McClellan Elementary PTA. This “up close, hands-on” assembly afforded our students the opportunity to gently touch, observe, understand and learn to appreciate animals from habitats all over the world.

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WEST ELIZABETH JEFFERSON HILLS PLEASANT HILLS

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Thomas Jefferson High School Jaguars

VARSITY SPRING SPORTS ROUNDUP Bill Cherpak, Athletic Director

In recognition of our Thomas Jefferson High School student Varsity Athletes whose talent, team discipline, team spirit, dedication, and athletic ability contributed to the successful Winter Sports Season. Each of you impressively demonstrated “Jaguar Pride” both in victory and defeat. We are proud of you and your athletic accomplishments. The 2012-2013 Thomas Jefferson High School Winter Varsity Athletic Team Record and Student Athlete Recognition:

Boys’ and Girls’ Swimming and Diving Qualified for WPIAL Section V AA Individual Championships Sam Etzi Qualified for the WPIAL Diving Championships Qualified for the PIAA State Diving Championships Jen Hill Qualified for the WPIAL Championships Julia Skoff Qualified for the WPIAL Championships Beatrix Kovacs Qualified for the WPIAL Championships Miranda Mihal Qualified for the WPIAL Championships

Girls’ Varsity Basketball Placed Fourth Section IV AAA

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Boy’s Varsity Basketball

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Placed First in Section 4 AAA Season Record-12 wins-0 losses Qualified for the WPIAL Playoffs Qualified for the PIAA State Playoffs

Austin Airhart 60m Hurdles TSTCA Championships Alyssa Arnold 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Pat Graham Pole Vault TSTCA Championships Lia Meden 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Severin Scott 1mile TSTCA Championships Matthew Bourgeois Distance Medley Relay TSTCA Championships Lucas Good Distance Medley Relay 4x400m Relay TSTCA Championships Renee Miller Long Jump Triple Jump TSTCA Championships Mitchell Poljak High Jump TSTCA Championships Tyler Sestito 4x400m Relay TSTCA Championships Chris Sichi 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Melissa Wagner 400m Dash 4x200m Relay TSTCA Championships Olivia Airhart 60m Dash Sean Birch 4x400m Relay TSTCA Championships

Varsity Wrestling Dominic Devine Qualified for the WPIAL Individual Tournament Jason McKown Qualified for the WPIAL Individual Tournament Byron Minous Qualified for the WPIAL Individual Tournament

The Thomas Jefferson High School Ice Hockey Club Section Champions Matt Bowers PIHL All Star Kevin Ringling PIHL All Star Nick Ripepi PIHL All Star Zach Uhylar PIHL All Star PIHL November Player of the Month

Congratulations to all of the Thomas Jefferson High School athletes who participated in Winter Sports. Gracie Duda Shot Put TSTCA Championships Joshua Francis 4x800m Relay Distance Medley Relay TSTCA Championships Anthony Gentilcore Distance Medley Relay TSTCA Championships Timothy Grassi 4x400m Relay TSTCA Championships Jennifer Johnson 4x200m Relay Long Jump Triple Jump High Jump TSTCA Championships Placed Seventh Overall Riley Walsh 4x200m Relay TSTCA Championships Cole Devine 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Kylie Gedman 4x200m Relay Long Jump, Triple Jump Placed Sixth Overall TSTCA Championships Jared Kelly 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Angelina Manning 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Amanda Micklo 4x800m Relay TSTCA Championships Emily Scheidter Shot Put TSTCA Championships Chasey Wain High Jump TSTCA Championships


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business spotlight

BILL FEW ASSOCIATES

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or 22 years, I have been advising clients about financial planning decisions. I was trained and worked on a team with our founder, Bill Few, a pioneer in the Pittsburgh financial planning community. During those years, I found that many women simply were not interested in their finances. Unfortunately, statistics consistently show that many women will have to manage on their own at some point in their lifetime. As a financial advisor, I saw the need for helping women work towards financial independence. Being a working mom, like many women today, plus dealing with older clients and female surviving spouses led to my desire to be focused on women in my practice. As a result, I began co-

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hosting Healthy, Wealthy & Wise – a radio talk show for women by women. We focused the show on health, financial and legal issues that women face. Thus I began my career goal of helping women gain financial independence. As a result, I have spent the better part of my career advising women of all ages to develop a strategy and a plan to meet their financial goals. This means getting educated, setting goals and having a plan. The foundation of which is establishing a strategy based on goals such as paying down debt, saving for college or saving for retirement. Next, we develop a plan to meet those goals. The plan should be easy to understand, flexible and reasonable to follow. Revisiting the plan periodically is

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ReShelle Barrett crucial to making sure the plan remains appropriate and effective. We start with basic steps such as making sure cash flow is positive. If you spend more than you bring in, you are heading the wrong way. If income cannot be changed, then we need to look at the spending side of the equation. The goal is to not only minimize debt, but to build on the savings side. Once cash flow is addressed, we begin focusing on a savings and investment strategy. We talk about the goals focusing on the time horizon of the goal. For example, saving for a down payment on a car means setting aside money in a savings account or shortterm certificate of deposit. Even if the interest is low, it’s more important to maintain the principal. On the other hand, savings for retirement can be invested in longer-term investments such as blue chip stock mutual funds. Addressing estate plan issues are important as well. This includes having a current will (especially if you have young children), durable power of attorney and healthcare power (living will) in place. Reviewing life insurance needs at this point is an integral part of the estate plan. Taking control of your financial future requires the same tenacity and determination that women give to other areas of their lives. I make it a priority to help women do this. Financial independence is a powerful thing.


Tomosynthesis Offers Women Greater Detection of Breast Abnormalities Donna Peters, 46, was told she had breast cancer in July 2012 – a diagnosis that almost had not happened, had it not been for tomosynthesis, a revolutionary three-dimensional mammography imaging technology being used at Magee-Womens Imaging. Peters explained that she had a standard mammogram at a local hospital in March, only to be called to have a second one a few weeks later. “My doctors said that my breast tissue was dense, but they were not sure if something else might be going on,” she explained. She returned for the second mammogram, and had a sonogram immediately after, as her physicians were still somewhat unclear of what they were seeing.

“This is the biggest advance we’ve seen in breast imaging in a long time, and we are excited to provide it to our patients.”

A few weeks later, she had an MRI, which concluded a possibly benign tumor, so another MRI was performed, but this time with a guided biopsy. The results were in and showed no cancer. That is when Peters took matters into her own hands and sought a second opinion.

“I knew in my heart that they were wrong, so I called Dr. (Marguerite) Bonaventura’s office at Magee and made an appointment for a second opinion,” Peters said. “Thank goodness I did! She and Dr. (Denise) Chough saw something that my previous doctors had missed.”

- Dr. Margarita Zuley

Dr. Chough ordered tomosynthesis for Peters, who said that it did not feel any different from that of a standard mammogram. The diagnosis was confirmed. Peters had infiltrated ductal carcinoma, the most common kind of breast cancer. “Tomosynthesis provides physicians with the ability to improve upon the limitations of the standard two-dimensional mammography, which will hopefully allow us to find more cancers with fewer false-positives and limit the number of additional workups and potentially unnecessary biopsies,” said Margarita Zuley, M.D., director of breast imaging at Magee-Womens Imaging.

“And although tomosynthesis currently does not replace traditional 2-D mammography, especially in women with dense breast tissue, it does reduce the recall rate of patients by 30 to 40 percent.” The technology uses precise 3-D digital imaging to create a complete reconstruction of the breast, which gives radiologists the ability to identify certain abnormalities which can be more difficult to detect with traditional 2-D digital mammography screening. One of the main differences between tomosynthesis and 2-D mammography is its ability to capture 60 to 100 pictures through use of an advanced digital platform, compared to two pictures produced by the standard mammogram. Although the test can be performed on anyone, for now, tomosynthesis is used for patients who have an inconclusive mammogram or for patients who request it, according to Dr. Zuley, who does feel that it will eventually replace the two-dimensional test. Dr. Zuley also stressed that the radiation levels in tomosynthesis are equal to that of traditional two-dimensional mammography. Much of the research on tomosynthesis was conducted at Magee-Womens Imaging, and researchers there are the most widely published group in the country on the technology. “I am so grateful for this new technology,” Peters said. “I feel it was a big part in my diagnosis, because it gave my doctors a clearer image of what was going on inside my body. But the equipment is only as good as the doctors who know how and when to use it, and when Drs. Bonaventura and Chough saw something that they did not like, they immediately opted to use tomosynthesis to verify their suspicions. They made the process easy!” “This is the biggest advance we’ve seen in breast imaging in a long time, and we are excited to provide it to our patients,” Dr. Zuley said. Tomosynthesis is currently available at Magee-Womens Imaging locations in Oakland and Monroeville and at the Magee Breast Center at UPMC St. Margaret.

West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 25


Taking Care of the Neighbors By Ju d it h S ch ardt

“Until man extends his circle of compassion to all living things, he will not himself find peace.” (Albert Schweitzer, German Theologian) 26

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he Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation (SRCF) believes that life is like that of an oak tree; strong and beautiful and should be given every chance to grow. As a family foundation in Pittsburgh, their philanthropic traditions have been well rooted for three decades. They have one important goal: to continually support organizations that promote arts/culture, education, environmental, health, human services, and religious issues. How did this charitable foundation come into being? William and Katherine Snee made contributions to a variety of organizations in the Pittsburgh community during their lifetime. The gifts given by William and Katherine were originally in the areas of education, arts or medical research. The greatest concern for them about their giving was that neither would receive much if any public recognition for their philanthropy. After William passed away, Katherine decided to establish the Snee-Reinhardt Foundation in 1983 in order to continue giving contributions to establishments that serve the community. Five years after its inception, the Foundation Bylaws were reviewed and then modified for the purpose of expanding its grant giving capacity. The end result was the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation. The SRCF is a 501(c)(3) organization and is a small family foundation, but has been awarded over 1,000 grants since its beginning. There is a grant application and the Board of Directors has some guidelines that they follow. They review requests for funding on the second Tuesday of May and September and they hold an annual meeting on the second Tuesday of November. Requests for funding must be received at the Foundation office no later than the close of business (5 p.m.) on April 1st and August 1st, or the preceding Friday should the 1st occur on a weekend. The Board of Directors may adopt grant-making programs or make pledges to various organizations that will not exceed five years. They ask that when submitting a request to be very specific about the nature of the request and the amount requested, which must not exceed $50,000. All proposals must be submitted on 8.5 x 11 paper, be unbound and supportive material concerning the organization is greatly appreciated. The application is extensive and must be followed completely. The requests are then reviewed by the Board using a preliminary screening method. A copy of the Grant Request Summary (included in the Grant Request Application) is provided to each Board member on a per month basis. If there is not adequate interest, the request is automatically declined and the organization is notified. Those organizations whose request is reviewed at the Board meeting, will be notified within two weeks of that meeting to inform them of the Board’s decision. Precedence is first given to organizations within southwestern Pennsylvania, then northern West Virginia, northern Maryland, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and, lastly, the United States. Organizations that are not classified as a “Public Charity” under the provisions of Section 501(c)(3) or similar tax-exemption provisions by the IRS are not eligible for support. Some activities and programs will be excluded from the Foundation’s support. They are: capital improvements and operating expenses; chairs and professorships; endowment funds; individuals; political groups; specialized health/ medical programs that have no specific impact on the community; organizations that discriminate by race, color, creed, gender or national origin; and anything that promotes the prevention of life (abortion, euthanasia or cruelty to animals).

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The Foundation has seven categories to describe the awarded grants: Arts/ Culture grants include the performing arts, humanities, media and communications, multipurpose museums, public broadcasting, and historical preservations. Education grants support programs for elementary, secondary and vocational schools, colleges/universities, graduate programs, adult continuing education and multipurpose libraries. Environmental monies go toward protecting natural resources, beautification programs, pollution control, environmental education, and horticultural/botanical programs. Health/Medical grants sustain rural health care, crisis intervention, special programs in health centers, and prevention/treatment of specific diseases. Human Services supports youth development and recreation, disaster relief, employment training/ placement, multipurpose agencies, and abuse prevention. Religion grants are included because the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation recognizes the importance of theological education and ecumenical programs as well as missionary work of churches, synagogues, and religious charities. And lastly, they have a category for Miscellaneous grants because sometimes the causes or programs are not an exact fit into other categories. The SRCF allows for international/ethical services, sports, camps, economic development and matching gift programs. According to Christina Treadwell, Foundation Manager, they proudly provide much needed funding to making society better. If you have a cause that you’d like to see funded and don’t know where else to turn, try contacting the Snee-Reinhardt Charitable Foundation by mail at 470 Streets Run Road, Suite 401, Pittsburgh, PA 15236; by phone 412.884.3626 or by email: ctreadwell@snee-reinhardt.org. It is such a positive experience to go to their website (http://www.snee-reinhardt.org) under grants and see what organizations the Snee-Reinhardt Foundation have helped. You will be inspired by the good they do. “No one is useless in this world that lightens the burdens of another.” (Charles Dickens, English Novelist) West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 27


Insuring Your Home - The Importance of Replacement Cost vs. Market Value

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nfortunately, disaster can strike at any time. No one is immune to the threat of losing their home due to any number of possible hazards. A recent survey found that most homeowners are seriously underinsured. Marshall & Swift/Boeckh, a leading insurance data services company, found that 66 percent of homeowners had inadequate coverage by an average of 18 percent. That works out to $36,000 for a typical $200,000 home. While few people would willingly choose a policy with a $36,000 deductible, that is the net result of being underinsured by that much on what may well be their most valuable asset.

Market Value vs. Replacement Cost

The market value of what your home would sell for today is very different from the amount of replacement cost coverage to properly insure the rebuilding of a home. Market value takes into consideration the land value, depreciation and other nearby market factors while the replacement cost simply reflects the cost to rebuild a home. These can be very different numbers. For example, you can have a home that is worth $400,000 in one neighborhood while an identical home across town could have a market value of half that much. But actually replacing those homes and rebuilding them using similar construction methods and materials would essentially cost the same for both. Rebuilding costs can be higher or lower than market values, since factors like land value and depreciation don’t affect rebuilding. Sitting down with your agent to review the features of your home is very important. Features such as crown molding, hardwood floors and tile cost more to rebuild. Other factors that are weighed are the quality of kitchens and bathrooms. For example, custom kitchens can add significantly to the

rebuilding costs. Your agent will take these and other factors of your home into consideration, including the total square footage to determine the home’s replacement cost. This is the amount you should insure your house for; this is sometimes referred to as “Coverage A” in your homeowner’s policy.

Separate Structures

Separate structures, sometimes referred to as “Other Structures” or “Coverage B,” refers to any structure that is on your property, but not attached to your main house. Examples of separate structures include: detached garage, fence, garden shed, detached in-law unit, retaining wall, swimming pool, outdoor kitchen. Most homeowner policies automatically include separate structures insurance, “Coverage B” that equals 10% of the amount of insurance on the main house “Coverage A.” If the number and value of separate structures are significant, such as those listed above, a separate valuation should be done for each to determine if extra coverage is needed.

Contents Coverage

Your homeowner’s policy will automatically include personal property coverage, which is a separate item sometimes known as “Coverage C” that can equal 50% to 75% of the “Coverage A” amount. Determine if this amount is adequate. If you have higher valued items, then you may want to discuss an additional amount of coverage with your agent. Items such as jewelry, guns, coins, computers, business and high risk property typically have policy sub-limits. Such special items should be discussed with your agent. A homeowner’s policy has many options to increase these personal property coverage amounts.

Know the Value Before a Catastrophe

Knowing the value is part of good financial planning and risk management. What you are doing is protecting what you have as well as the investment in your home. The worst thing you can do is deal with value after a claim, because at that point, it is too late. That is why it’s best to address this now and let insurance serve its purpose and allow you to smoothly proceed with your life after a claim occurs.

Important Tip: Be sure to take a detailed home inventory before any disaster strikes. Take photographs and record serial numbers where applicable, particularly on high value personal property. There are a number of commercial websites that can help you with this process and will automatically store this information offsite, where these important records are not vulnerable to the same disaster that befalls your home and property. Cusumano Insurance, a local family-owned business, has been servicing the Pittsburgh area since 1958. The agency represents several insurance companies offering various options for your personal and business insurance needs. Their experienced staff are creative problem solvers who help find the suitable insurance companies, products and discounts to meet your specific needs. Give them a call today for a free insurance review. This Industry Insight was provided by: Joann Cusumano Sciulli, AAI Agency Principal

Rosann Cusumano Elinsky, AAI, LUTCF Agency Principal

Cusumano Insurance Agency, Inc. • 178 Clairton Blvd • Pleasant Hills, PA 15236 28

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UPMC TODAY

Health and Wellness News You Can Use | Spring 2013

What’s Inside 2

When It’s More Than Just Heartburn

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Hope and Healing A Healing Touch Food in a Glass

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Clinical Trials Can Change Lives

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Depression and Older Adults Comprehensive Care for Today’s Urology Patients

© 2013 UPMC


When It’s More Than Just Heartburn UPMC offers comprehensive testing and minimally invasive surgery for complex problems of the esophagus.

Most of us can count on an antacid or two to tame a bad case of heartburn. But acid reflux, of which heartburn is a symptom, can lead to a far more uncomfortable and potentially dangerous condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

• Achalasia (a rare swallowing disorder) surgical therapy • Esophageal diverticulum repair and removal “Patients travel hundreds of miles, and most have had prior surgeries,” says James Luketich, MD, director of the Lung and Esophageal Surgery Institute. “Before and after operating, we use a quality of life test to measure a patient’s degree of reflux,” says Dr. Awais. “We’ve learned that our patients typically experience better outcomes, less pain, and faster recovery times through our efforts. We also work with patients on long-term lifestyle changes to maintain their health, and have published many landmark studies on these topics.” Linette says her re-operation “saved my life. I feel like a new person.” She has lost weight and no longer takes medication for diabetes, cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Are you at risk? “Certainly not everyone with GERD requires surgery. Most cases can be controlled through medical therapy, weight loss, modified diet, and medication,” says Dr. Awais. “But early detection and treatment of GERD is key because of its associated risk with esophageal cancer.” At greatest risk are men over the age of 50 who are obese and have suffered from heartburn three or more times a week for five years or longer. Linette Johns of Upper Burrell first underwent surgery for GERD in 2000. But in recent years, severe heartburn and other symptoms reappeared. “I knew the success rate of a repeat surgery on the esophagus wasn’t good, so I was hesitant to have it done,” says Linette. “But my son, Jeff, who’s studying to be a doctor, told me that I could be at risk for esophageal cancer. That motivated me to take the next step.”

Tackling complicated cases In March 2012, Omar Awais, DO, one of UPMC’s thoracic surgeons specializing in lung and esophageal disorders, performed the repeat surgery on Linette. Under his expertise, some of the region’s most complex, minimally invasive esophageal surgeries are taking place at UPMC hospitals, including: • Minimally invasive surgery to remove all or part of the esophagus to treat esophageal cancer • Repair of recurrent hiatal hernia • Repeat esophageal surgery • Large hiatal hernia (also known as giant paraesophageal hernia) repair

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To learn more about UPMC Mercy’s programs to diagnose and treat complex problems of the esophagus, call 412-647-7555.

Testing is key A variety of tests are needed prior to any esophageal or gastric surgery. At UPMC Mercy, UPMC Presbyterian, and UPMC Shadyside, patients can get these tests done quickly and efficiently at one location, including: Endoscopic ultrasound — Allows doctors to better define tumors of the esophagus Endoscopy — Allows a doctor to use a thin, narrow tube with a camera and light to view the inside of the throat and stomach Motility testing — Identifies how well the muscles of the esophagus are functioning Acid ph testing — Measures the amount of acid exposure into the esophagus Impedance testing — Measures the frequency and amount of gastric fluids (both acidic and non-acidic) entering the esophagus and larynx from the stomach


Hope and Healing UPMC is leading the way with new treatment options for hepatitis C.

Decades after receiving a childhood blood transfusion, Chris Sosinski was shocked to learn he had the hepatitis C virus, which had led to cirrhosis and the prospect of a liver transplant. Today, Chris remains hepatitis C negative, thanks to a new direct-acting antiviral therapy he received at the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases last year. Months after ending treatment in October, his viral load remains at zero. “That means it’s gone,” says Chris, 49, of Jeannette. “No more medicine and — if I take care of myself — no transplant.”

Baby boomers beware Chris is one of a growing number of baby boomers diagnosed with hepatitis C, a problem so serious that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends that everyone born between 1945 and 1965 be tested for the virus. The CDC estimates that more than 75 percent of the nation’s 3 million adults currently living with hepatitis C are baby boomers — and most don’t know they’re infected. “Hepatitis C is a silent disease; most people have no symptoms,” says Kapil Chopra, MD, director, UPMC Center for Liver Diseases. “But if diagnosed early, it can be cured or managed successfully before it can develop into cirrhosis or liver cancer.”

A new era of treatment Thankfully for Chris and other hepatitis C patients, two drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 ushered in a new era of treatment, delivering improved cure rates and shorter treatment time for the most prevalent — and hardest to treat — strain of the virus. Playing a critical role was the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases, where specialists have been at the forefront in the evaluation and clinical trials of promising new therapies.

Hundreds of UPMC patients took part in groundbreaking clinical trials for those new drugs. (Turn to page 5 to learn about other clinical trials and how they are affecting patients’ lives.) Today, even more are participating in clinical trials of new therapies at UPMC with the potential for even better results in fighting chronic hepatitis C infections. “These are exciting times. Over the next few years, we expect to have several new options that will eradicate the hepatitis C virus in most patients without side effects,” says Dr. Chopra. “It’s a new era of treatment and hope for our patients.”

A leading resource for complex care Treating and managing hepatitis C can be complex for both patients and health care providers. In the tri-state area, UPMC is the leading provider of comprehensive and advanced specialty care for patients with the virus. “Our multidisciplinary specialists are involved in researching and evaluating new treatments. They bring a unique perspective for managing these complex therapies,” explains Dr. Chopra. These specialists work together to assess patients, select appropriate antiviral therapies, educate patients, monitor for adverse effects and drug interactions, and provide support for patients and family members. “They are familiar with the latest, cutting-edge therapies and developing new ones,” adds Dr. Chopra. For those patients who don’t respond to treatment and are experiencing liver failure, the program also provides seamless transition to UPMC’s internationally renowned transplant program. To read about the risk factors for hepatitis C and what you can do, visit UPMC.com/Today. For more information about treatments for hepatitis C, contact the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases at 1-800-447-1651.

1-800-533-UPMC

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Health Tips from UPMC Health Plan

A Healing Touch There are ways to relieve pain and nausea through alternative medicine. A growing number of patients are adding acupuncture and other alternative therapies to their medical care.

“You don’t have to be a believer for it to work,” says Betty Liu, MD, a physician and acupuncture specialist at the UPMC Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. “I’ve seen dramatic reductions in pain and nausea — some instantaneous, some after multiple sessions.”

Who uses it? Patients frequently turn to acupuncture and other therapies to control pain, including arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, migraines, and spasms, or to ease nausea due to pregnancy or chemotherapy. Integrating these therapies with conventional medicine can help patients find relief more quickly, or continue making progress toward their goals.

What are some treatments? Acupuncture, one of the most popular therapies, uses thin needles to stimulate various points around the body. “We’re not certain how it works, but we know it releases endorphins, which act like opiates to relieve pain,” Dr. Liu says. Massage therapy uses acupressure and deep tissue massage to increase blood flow to an injured area and release endorphins.

What is alternative medicine? If you visit an acupuncturist or chiropractor, you’re seeking treatment in the field of complementary and alternative medicine — an increasingly mainstream tool for doctors.

Chiropractic medicine adjusts the spine through manipulation to put the body into better alignment. For more information about alternative treatments, visit UPMC.com/Today.

Food in a Glass Choosing the best milk option for you. Are you lingering longer in the dairy aisle, pondering your ever-increasing options? Should you reach for your usual skim milk — or be adventurous and try rice, almond, or soy? Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, UPMC’s director of sports nutrition, says making the right choice is this simple: “Essentially, milk is food in a glass. Choose the drink that offers the best nutrition for your needs.” Not all milk and dairy alternatives are equal: read labels carefully, comparing the fat and carbohydrate contents. “For example, to reduce soy milk’s ‘beanie’ taste, sugar is added,” explains Ms. Bonci. “That can jump the carbohydrate count from 12 to 24 grams.” Look beyond just calories, too: milk is rich in protein, calcium, and minerals. “An 8-ounce serving of milk has 8 grams of protein, compared to 6 grams for soy milk and just 1 gram for almond and rice milk,” she adds. Unless a food allergy is present, the best choice for most of us is cow’s milk. “For children under two, select whole milk,” says Ms. Bonci. “Otherwise, reach for 1 percent or skim milk — both offer a lower saturated fat content and higher calcium. Enhanced or ‘super’ skim milk features a richer texture many people prefer.” And if you’re debating about organic versus regular milk, Ms. Bonci advises that your pocketbook be your guide. “There’s no nutritional difference between the two,” she says.

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UPMC.com/Today


Clinical Trials Can Change Lives Bringing patients, physicians, and researchers together to change the future of medicine.

Research opens the door for new possibilities in patient care. But long before a drug, medical device, treatment, or surgical procedure becomes widely available, it must first be proven safe and effective.

therapy from a patient’s own fat tissue,” explains Dr. Rubin. “By harnessing the body’s own regenerative capabilities, we’re applying new technologies and scientific advancements to restore both form and function in patients.” For more information, visit UPMC.com/restore or call 412-864-2587. Solutions for out-of-control blood pressure. Of the 67 million Americans with high blood pressure, more than half fail to keep it under control. Many have difficulty battling the disease despite taking three or more medications, a condition known as treatment-resistant hypertension. As part of the body’s sympathetic nervous system, our kidneys play an important role in regulating long-term blood pressure. In most patients with hypertension, the sympathetic nervous system is overactive, thereby increasing blood pressure and causing heart, kidney, and blood vessel damage.

At UPMC, clinical trials are the bridge between research and the future of modern medicine. As one of the nation’s top-ranked health care systems, UPMC annually directs or participates in hundreds of groundbreaking clinical trials in virtually every medical specialty. Some are offered only at UPMC, while others are part of national and even international trials. Each is carefully monitored and measured by expert UPMC physicians who are leaders in their fields. For patients whose illness has no cure or no longer responds to current treatment, UPMC’s clinical trials offer potentially life-saving medical breakthroughs. Other patients enroll in clinical trials with the hope of finding a better or more costeffective treatment. The following three UPMC trials currently are seeking qualified patient volunteers: Healing soldiers disfigured in battle. A flash of light, the sound of an explosion … and a soldier’s life is forever changed by a traumatic facial injury. But thanks to two government-funded clinical trials, efforts are under way at UPMC to improve the lives of wounded soldiers through facial reconstruction using the person’s own tissue. The study is enrolling military and civilian patients with visible deformities of the head or face following trauma, applying minimally invasive therapy to restore a more normal appearance. These trials are led by J. Peter Rubin, MD, director of UPMC’s Center for Innovation in Restorative Medicine and an expert in adult stem cells derived from fat. “We’re using stem cell

John Schindler, MD, an interventional cardiologist with UPMC’s Heart and Vascular Institute, is participating in an industryfunded clinical trial in which a device is placed in an artery leading to the kidney. “This therapy uses a catheter to deliver low radiofrequency energy to destroy or disable the renal nerves,” says Dr. Schindler. “If effective, this device could be a valuable alternative to medications for patients with resistant hypertension.” For more information, contact Lisa Baxendell, RN, at 412-802-8672. Eliminating blood clots. In 2013, nearly a quarter-million adults will be diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), in which blood clots form mainly in a deep vein in the leg. DVT can result in persistent leg pain and swelling; if the clot breaks loose and moves to the lungs, a potentially deadly pulmonary embolism can occur. Conventional treatment involves blood thinners and wearing compression hosiery. “We want to dissolve the clot to eliminate its consequences,” says Rabih Chaer, MD, a UPMC vascular surgeon. Dr. Chaer is participating in a national, multidisciplinary clinical trial to determine if DVT patients would benefit from a more aggressive treatment involving the use of an image-guided catheter to dissolve the clot. “In vascular surgery, our work is technology driven; medical devices are constantly changing,” says Dr. Chaer. “By testing innovative devices, we offer our patients new opportunities to alleviate or resolve their illness.” For more information, contact Susan Tamburro at 412-623-8452. For a complete list of clinical trials now available, please visit UPMC.com/Today. To learn more about the benefits of clinical trials in patient care, please turn to page 3 and read about UPMC’s advancements in the treatment of hepatitis C.

1-800-533-UPMC

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Depression and Older Adults While it may be common, it’s important to know that depression is not a normal part of aging.

Its services include: • Preventive services, evaluation, and consultation • Treatment through therapy and/or medication • Participation in innovative research studies • Educational support • Referrals for assistance

Research studies benefit patients today and tomorrow Among the center’s current research studies are efforts to improve sleep patterns, lower stress levels, promote brain health, and reduce pain as a way of preventing depression among adults age 60 and older. These include: RECALL: A study about reducing stress among seniors experiencing mild memory, language, or judgment loss RAPID: A study for adults with osteoarthritis knee pain More than 6.5 million Americans over age 65 experience latelife depression that can last for months and even years. But many older adults and their caretakers don’t seek treatment because they think depression is inevitable as we age. Its symptoms — irritability, social isolation, poor sleep, loss of appetite, and memory loss — also are easily mistaken as signs of other illnesses. “Depression erodes our quality of life, our productivity, and our ability to have fulfilling relationships,” explains Charles Reynolds III, MD, director, Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh. He also is director of the Center of Excellence in Late Life Depression Prevention and Treatment Research at the University of Pittsburgh. The center is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “Untreated, late-life depression puts older adults at risk for significant declines in their mental and physical health. It can be so debilitating that it threatens their ability to live independently,” he notes. “But the right professional help and medications can be life changing for these individuals.”

A wide range of support The center offers expertise in the detection, prevention, and treatment of depression, stress, complicated bereavement, or bipolar disorders in older adults. Through its research focus, all visits and medications are provided at no cost.

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Addressing Pain and Depression Together (ADAPT): A study for adults living with both depression and back pain Healing Emotions After Loss (HEAL): A study for adults ages 18 to 95 who are experiencing prolonged or acute grief lasting six months or more over the loss of a loved one

One of the nation’s leading programs of its kind The Center of Excellence in Late Life Depression Prevention and Treatment Research is located in the Oakland area of Pittsburgh at both the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC. It is one of only three centers of excellence in geriatric psychiatry funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the John A. Hartford Foundation. To learn more about the center’s services or to participate in one of its current research programs, call 412-246-6006 or visit latelifedepression.org.


Comprehensive Care for Today’s Urology Patients From medication to radiation to surgical robotic technology, the new UPMC Mercy urology center offers tailored, cutting-edge care for patients.

Whether you need medical care for bladder cancer, an enlarged prostate, urinary tract infection, or sexual dysfunction, UPMC Mercy offers comprehensive care to treat the special urological health needs of both men and women.

Percutaneous nephrolithotomy — A highly specialized, minimally invasive keyhole procedure to remove large kidney stones by using high frequency sound waves to break them down and a vacuum to quickly remove fragments.

“Our urologists are experts in caring for even the most complicated and difficult cases,” says Ronald Benoit, MD, a urologic surgeon and director of the UPMC Mercy urology center, where he leads a team of highly trained specialists in general urology, urologic oncology, reconstructive surgery, and kidney stone removal.

To schedule an appointment with a urologist at UPMC Mercy, call 412-232-5850.

As a Center of Excellence in Urologic Care, UPMC Mercy features a skilled multidisciplinary team of urologists trained in treating patients who have disorders and diseases of the kidneys, bladder, or prostate.

The latest in diagnosis and treatment techniques According to Dr. Benoit, the hospital’s urology specialists use advanced technologies, medical equipment, and treatments — including minimally invasive surgical technology and robotic surgery — aimed at reducing postoperative pain, recovery time, and side effects. “Robotic urology uses endoscopic techniques, so patients have smaller incisions and a faster recovery time,” says Dr. Benoit. This technology is ideal for complex and delicate urologic surgeries, such as a prostatectomy, where doctors must operate in a tightly confined area surrounded by nerves affecting urinary control and sexual function. Special procedures at UPMC Mercy’s urology center include: Robotic-assisted prostatectomy — A minimally invasive, nerve-sparing procedure for prostate cancer that preserves potency and urinary control. Laparoscopic nephrectomy — A minimally invasive procedure that allows all or part of the kidney to be removed through a keyhole procedure instead of a large open incision. Prostate brachytherapy (seed implants) — An effective treatment for patients with prostate cancer where seed implants are used to deliver a high dose of radiation to the tumor while reducing the risk of complications to surrounding tissue. UPMC Mercy is the only Pittsburgh hospital using Cesium-131, a newer compound that does not remain in the body as long as traditional treatments, resulting in faster resolution of side effects.

Leaders in urologic care As a Center of Excellence in Urologic Care, UPMC Mercy has recently recruited several prominent experts — all of whom earned medical degrees at the University of Pittsburgh, including: Mang Chen, MD, a reconstructive urology specialist, completed a fellowship in urologic trauma and reconstruction at the Detroit Medical Center. Michelle Jo Semins, MD, a kidney stone specialist, completed her residency in urology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, where she also underwent special training in endourology, a minimally invasive technique to treat kidney stones. Tatum Tarin, MD, a urologic oncology specialist, completed his residency in urology at Stanford University Medical Center and a urologic oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

1-800-533-UPMC

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UPMC Mercy

1400 Locust St. Pittsburgh, PA 15219

UPMC Today is published quarterly to provide you with health and wellness information and classes and events available at UPMC. This publication is for information purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice or replace a physician’s medical assessment. Always consult first with your physician about anything related to your personal health.

Follow UPMC on Facebook.

Care that women can believe in as strongly as their Catholic faith.

UPMC Mercy provides a full range of women’s health services rooted in the Catholic tradition. From prenatal education, to menopause diagnosis and treatment, to complete oncological care, and much more, UPMC Mercy strives to ensure the comfort of patients in body, mind, and spirit. This holistic approach is the foundation of more than 150 years of women’s health services. To learn more about UPMC Mercy OB/GYN services, or to schedule an appointment, call 1-800-533-UPMC (8762) or visit UPMC.com/Mercy.

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.


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Shop Gill Hall Road in Your Community

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724.942.0940 to advertise |

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e r v Y o o C u ! o t t n a W We Do you have an event coming up that you’d like to publicize? Do you have an event that you want us to cover? Let us know! Go to www.incommunitymagazines.com/ events and fill out the form. Events will be announced in the upcoming issue. If our deadlines don’t match yours, we may decide to send our photographers to cover the event for an upcoming issue. We’re looking for fundraisers, charity drives, social functions, class reunions, church festivals, awards presentations and more! If you’re not sure you have an event worth featuring, give us a call at 724.942.0940 and we’ll help you out!

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West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 39


Jefferson Hills Borough Learning more about a great resource in Jefferson Hills… Peters Creek Watershed Association Protects the Natural Resources of the Peters Creek Watershed By Tim Schumann Peters Creek and its surrounding valley define the natural character of Jefferson Hills from its western border with South Park Township to the east where evidence of the area’s steelmaking heritage dominates the landscape. The valley has a rich and long history of human habitation.

Middle school student releases trout fingerlings into Peters Creek that he raised in his classroom.

Peters Creek derives its name from “Indian Peter,” a Native American who befriended local settlers and roamed the valley in search of fish and game. Early settlers used her waters to power mills and some of America’s finest whiskey, Monongahela Rye, was distilled along her banks. The valley played an important role in the steelmaking industry of the early 1900s. Railroad access and easily accessible coal deposits along her slopes would forever change the nature of the valley. Evidence of this coal mining era remains today. Many streams run orange and gray with excess loads of metals from abandoned mine drainage. These metals make life difficult for fish and other aquatic organisms. But much has changed since the 1970s when only four species of pollution-tolerant fish inhabited the creek. A survey in 2009 found 21 species of fish populating Peters Creek; some relatively pollution intolerant. Keeping Peters Creek healthy is not easy. It requires cooperation and dedication on many levels. Luckily, we are seeing that locally. In 1998 a group of dedicated local sportsmen formed the TriCommunity Anglers in an effort to bring trout fishing back to Peters Creek. A year later the Peters Creek Watershed Association was formed to better understand water quality issues within local streams. Since then tons of trash have been removed at annual clean-up events. Peters Creek has been kept stocked with trout and an annual Kid’s Fish for Fun Day has brought families to the creek for a day of fun and relaxation.

Pleasant Hills Middle School students plant the banks of Peters Creek at a Jefferson Hills stream restoration site.

An assessment of the watershed’s streams was recently completed with help from Pennsylvania’s Growing Greener program. Local students participated in stream bank plantings and raised trout in their classroom for the creek. Jefferson Hills has worked to restore portions of the stream degraded by erosion while maintaining the natural landscape. The work to keep Peters Creek healthy and fishable continues. We hope you can help! For more information see www.peterscreek.org or tcaa.peterscreek.org. 40

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Local residents enjoying fishing Peters Creek at Tri-Community Angler’s Kid’s Fish for Fun Day.


r u C o o m g m n i u v nity r e S This ongoing column is designed to acquaint our community with the men and women who work and volunteer at the Borough of Jefferson Hills.

Jan Cmar Councilwoman Jan Cmar Completing Her Fourth Term Serving the Borough This fall Jan Cmar will complete her fourth term on Borough Council. During those sixteen years, she has been instrumental in the planning and decisions that have produced much growth in the Borough of Jefferson Hills. And it’s not a surprise that right at the top of the Peters Township Middle School teacher’s list of favorite accomplishments on Council is the development and implementation of the Borough’s summer recreational program for children. “Our summer program with arts and crafts, sports, special events, field trips and opportunities to meet our community partners such as police, fire and ambulance personnel, has been a valuable, enjoyable experience for our children,” Cmar said. Cmar likes working with Council to provide quality services to the residents of Jefferson Hills such as the recreation programs, and she has always been a staunch supporter of the Library. She is also especially proud of her input into the hiring of the Borough staff. “We have worked hard to make sure that we always recruit and hire the most qualified, professional people,” she said.

Jefferson Hills Borough

Jefferson Hills Teen Earns Eagle Rank Thomas Jefferson High School senior and Troop 231 member Christopher Bredel has obtained the Boy Scout Rank of Eagle Scout. He is the 78th Eagle Scout from Troop 231 in Pleasant Hills. To earn his Eagle Scout award, Christopher earned 36 merit badges, served the troop as Assistant Sr. Patrol Leader, Sr. Patrol Leader, Historian, and Bugler. Christopher is now an Assistant Scoutmaster. His leadership service project consisted of designing, obtaining materials, and providing leadership for the Memorial Garden at Jefferson United Presbyterian Church. The project also included the laying of engraved stones and a walkway, design and construction of a bench, and landscaping of the area. A senior at Thomas Jefferson High School, Christopher plans to attend Robert Morris University in the fall, majoring in computers. Christopher is the son of Ron, Jr. and Ellen Bredel of Gill Hall.

Sixteen years of work on Borough Council have helped to produce changes and growth in the Borough, including the renovation of the Borough Building and the building of a public works garage. Cmar sees the population surge in the community to over 10,000 as a positive sign for the Borough’s future and economic growth. The energetic, personable Councilwoman is married to Dennis Cmar and is the mother of a daughter, Nicole, 18 and son, Michael, 26. In her spare time, she likes to cook, sew and read. Cmar’s dreams for the future of Jefferson Hills predict only growth. “I’m happy to say that a lot of young families are moving into this community…I would like to see a recreation center here and more small businesses, which are the goals Council has outlined in its ten-year Comprehensive Plan,” she said. She has no doubts that will happen. “This is the best Council I have ever worked with,” she said. “We are bi-partisan, and I am very proud of that!” West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 41


Jefferson Hills Borough Borough Receives Grant to Begin Phase I Work at Beedle Park This winter, the Borough of Jefferson Hills won a $100,000 competitive grant from the PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR). The grant will allow Phase 1 of a Master Plan to begin that will improve and expand the facilities at Beedle Park in Floreffe. This work is Phase 1 of a six-phase project that was recommended in the Parks and Recreation Open Space plan adopted by Borough Council in 2010. Phase 1 will focus on the realignment and improvement of the existing soccer field, the creation of a new multi-purpose open-sports field and the realignment of the access to those fields. An additional parking area and necessary grading and improved storm water management on the site to help alleviate flooding on the fields will complete Phase 1.

In 2013, the necessary engineering and construction plans will be developed for this project and construction will begin in late 2013 or early 2014. The total project cost for Phase 1 is $350,000. The balance will be supported through the Borough’s Capital Improvements budget. Subsequent phases of the plan will be implemented over the next seven to 10 years and will depend upon additional funding being received from DCNR for this project. The Borough will seek funds for Phase 2 with an additional grant application this year. The goal of the Master Plan is to make Beedle Park a full-service community park for recreational and open space enjoyment by Borough residents as well as to provide an adequate number of sports fields for youth group programs within the Borough.

Attention: Borough of Jefferson Hills Homeowners Join Us for An Informative Presentation

PLANNING ON BUILDING A DECK THIS SPRING OR SUMMER? 42

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Our Borough Building Inspector, Mark Reis, will provide a brief presentation and discussion on “Deck Construction” for homeowners who are considering a deck project in the Borough of Jefferson Hills this year. The presentation will be held on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 7 p.m. in the Community Room at the Borough of Jefferson Hills Municipal Center. The presentation will cover the permits, code requirements and other approvals required when constructing a deck. Please RSVP by April 26 by calling the Borough Office at 412.655.7760.


2013 Borough Budget Summary The Council of the Borough of Jefferson Hills approved the 2013 Borough budget on December 10, 2012. The General Fund budget totaled $8,149,715, the Sewer Revenue Fund budget totaled $3,718,995 and the Highway Aid Fund totaled $277,500. When adopted in its final form, the budget becomes a working plan of deliverable services and projects to be completed over the next year.

Budget Highlights

• Because of the reassessment and anti-windfall legislation, the real estate tax millage rate decreased from 5.63 mills to 4.624 mills. The Borough still has appeals pending on 308 parcels totaling $28,302,680 in disputed assessment values. This is approximately 3.5% of total taxable assessed value within the Borough. The Borough will wait for the majority of these appeals to be decided and re-examine the millage rate in May 2013 in order to be in compliance with all applicable legislation. • Sewer user fees are scheduled to remain at the current level of $8.50 per 1,000 gallons in 2013. • The annual road improvement program is funded for 2013 at its current level in the amount of $435,000.

Jefferson Hills Borough • Three (3) significant projects are planned to be funded out of the Sewer Revenue Fund with the largest project being the Walton Road Sewer Upsizing Project budgeted at $1,125,000. • One of the most anticipated capital projects scheduled to begin in 2013 is the construction of the new Public Works Complex and Salt Storage Facility which will be funded out of the 2011 bond issue proceeds. • The projected fund balance for the General Fund is $1,770,902, or 21.7% of projected expenditures. The current economic environment continues to present fiscal challenges to all state and local governments and the Borough is not exempt from this challenge. Unfunded mandates by the federal and state governments continue to place a heavy financial burden on municipalities. The Borough of Jefferson Hills remains a desirable place to live as evidenced by its residential development. While the proposed 2013 Borough budget does maintain current service levels, there is a clear need to either adjust current service levels or find additional resources in the future to fund the services that residents and businesses have come to expect.

Cleanup Day IN OUR COMMUNITY The Borough of Jefferson Hills Cleanup Day for local roads will be held on Saturday, April 20 from 9 a.m. to noon. Supplies (vests, gloves and bags) can be picked up at the Municipal Center, 925 Old Clairton Road, or supplies can be delivered to your home by calling 412.655.7735. Families or groups are encouraged to participate. Participants can choose an area road or neighborhood, or one will be assigned. Refreshments will be provided at the Municipal Center at noon for cleanup participants. For more information call 412.655.7735.

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Jefferson Hills Borough JEFFERSON HILLS RESIDENTS HELP NEIGHBORS WITH MEALS ON WHEELS

Will you join them one morning a week? If you know a frail senior citizen who is living alone, you are probably aware of the struggle it can be to complete daily tasks including preparing meals. Meals on Wheels programs greatly help these seniors stay independent in their homes by delivering a nutritious, freshly prepared meal and offering a safety check Monday through Friday. However, local neighborhood Meals on Wheels Programs are concerned about a dwindling number of volunteers available to prepare and deliver the meals. Meet a few of the Borough of Jefferson Hills volunteers. They love their volunteer work with the program, the friendships they’ve made with their co-workers and the people they serve. Perhaps you can help! Mary Matthews of Gill Hall Road has been preparing meals twice a week at the Clairton Meals on Wheels for 21 years. She decided to give volunteer work a try after retiring from her full-time job at K-Mart and has been there ever since. She has made good friends at Pine Run Methodist Church, which is the preparation site for the Clairton Meals on Wheels. “Everyone is so nice,” she said. Virginia and Fred Slater of Jefferson Pointe Circle deliver meals together to about 11 homes every Monday morning from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Virginia began volunteering at the Clairton Meals on Wheels 15 years ago after retiring from her secretarial position at Lebanon Presbyterian Church. When the couple married six years ago, Virginia enlisted Fred’s help. The couple enjoys their Monday morning volunteering together as Fred drives and Virginia navigates their route. Ms. Matthews and the Slaters are three of approximately 45 volunteers in the Clairton Meals on Wheels group who deliver meals and wellness checks on Monday through Friday mornings to residents of Clairton and Glassport and parts of Jefferson Hills, Pleasant Hills and West Mifflin. Rob Zombek is the coordinator of the Clairton group. He would love to hear from area residents who have one morning a week to help, either in the kitchen from 7:30 to 9:30 in preparing and packaging the meals, or as a driver or “hopper” from 9:30 to 11. Call Rob at 412.233.6325 for more information if you might be able to help. For more information about all the Meals on Wheels locations and other programs offered by the Lutheran Service Society, visit its website: www.LSSWPA.org or call 412.366.9490.

Upcoming West Jefferson Hills Historical Society Programs Spring 2013 The public is invited to join the West Jefferson Hills Historical Society for its monthly programs at 7 p.m. in the Community Room of the Borough of Jefferson Hills Municipal Center April 24 “Chocolate Wars: 150-year rivalry between the world’s greatest chocolate makers,” including a candy making demonstration. May 22 “History of Kaufmann’s Department Store,” presented by Heinz History Center. (Please bring any articles from Kaufmann’s for speaker to discuss.) June 26 “Hatfield’s and McCoys” program by Dick Gaetano July 24 This evening is OPEN. Suggestions welcomed! Call the Library at 412.655.7741

Above: l-r Mary Matthews, Rochelynne Khoonsrivong, Rob Zombek, Virginia Slater and Fred Slater 44

West Jefferson Hills

Left: The Slaters get ready for their Monday morning run to 11 homes with their meals.

Historical Society Calendars, that contain photographs from the past, are available at the Jefferson Hills Library for $5.


Jefferson Hills

Library k News HELP US CELEBRATE NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK JOIN US FOR REFRESHMENTS APRIL 14-20, 2013

Communities Matter at Your Library During National Library Week and throughout April, libraries host special events to highlight the unique role libraries play in people’s lives. Today’s libraries can help you and your family discover a new and exciting world through collections, digital resources and more. Whether you come for homework or job searches, help with citizenship issues or finances, adult education classes or to find the best books for young readers, libraries are a great place to spend quality time and connect with loved ones and friends.

Jefferson Hills Borough

Friends of Jefferson Hills Library Book and Boutique Sale Jefferson Hills Library April 12 – 14, 2013 Featuring used books, costume jewelry, and boutique items Preview Party, April 11 from 7 – 9 p.m. Attending the Preview Party will entitle you to first choice of books, jewelry, boutique items, as well as door prizes, raffles, vintage books, signed author books, and a delicious hors d’oeuvre table and drinks! Tickets required. $10 day of event and $8 presale.

Regular Book and Boutique Sale Hours Friday, April 12, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. - BOGO all children’s and young adult Sunday, April 14, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. - Bag day $5/bag

Bring this ad to the sale and receive a free book!!!

(Does not include vintage/signed author books)

The Friends are still accepting books and boutique items for this year’s sale. Items can also be donated throughout the year at the Library. Thank you to everyone who contributed to the Friends’ fundraising efforts in 2012. Friends raised over $15,000 to supplement library funding. If you would like to join this active group, see their web page on www.jeffersonhillslibrary.org.

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Jefferson Hills Borough The 2013 Summer Library Program

“Dig Into Reading” For the Entire Family is Right Around the Corner. The Six Week Program begins the week of June 16 Registrations Begin June 1

Encourage Young Readers to “Unearth New Books This Summer!”

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Cub Scout Pack 562, who are third graders from Jefferson Hills and Pleasant Hills, visited the Jefferson Hills Library in February as they studied American Folklore. Children’s librarian, Ann Zettl sparked their interest with a tale about a Tennessee woodsman and a fearsome bear in Swamp Angel by Anne Isaacs.


SPRING PROGRAMS 2013 925 Old Clairton Road ~ Jefferson Hills, PA 15025 All Programs are held at the Library. See each program for registration requirements. Zumba Fitness 8 Weeks, Tuesdays, April 23 – June 11 Time: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Tuition: $5 per class Instructor: Noelle Taucher Zumba Fitness is the only Latin-inspired dance-fitness program that blends red-hot international music and contagious steps to form a “fitness party.” Zumba classes feature exotic rhythms set to high-energy Latin and international beats. Increase your energy and fitness levels. Join us for an easy to do, effective, and totally exhilarating exercise! Bring a friend and join us for this great class.

Learn to Play Bridge Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. Local bridge expert Thomas Morris has been working with students who meet on Tuesday evenings at the library to learn the most popular card game in the world. Call Mr. Morris for more information at 412.384.4378. Scrabble Club Meets Tuesdays from noon to 4 p.m. New members are always welcome. Story Times for Children Ages 3 and up Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. April 4, 11, 18, 25 May 2, 9

Jefferson Hills Borough To register: www.jeffersonhillslibrary.org or call 412.655.7741

Mt. Everest Climb Thursday, April 18 7 – 8 p.m. Teens, tweens, Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops are invited to attend a special program about courage and fortitude. Jim Holliday will talk about his climb to the top of Mt. Everest and will display the special gear required for this endeavor.

Gentle Beginners Yoga This is an ongoing Saturday morning program. Feel free to drop in any Saturday and get your day started with this beneficial class! Saturdays, 9:30 – 10:45 a.m. Tuition: $5 per class Instructor: Linda Frost is currently teaching therapeutic yoga in the Dr. Dean Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease, and brings over 25 years of experience to her teaching. This gentle yoga class includes gentle stretches, breathing, relaxation and simple movements or postures to increase range of motion of the major joints, guide relaxation and meditation. Wear loose, comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat, 2 yoga blocks, a yoga strap, towel, pillow or blanket. Arrive early, remove shoes and turn off your cell phone. This time is just for you! SAT Preparation Classes Four Sundays, April 7, 14, 21, 28 Time: 1 – 4 p.m. Fee: $175 Permission forms can be picked up at the Library. The SAT exam is being given at TJ High School on May 4. Mosaic Stained Glass Garden Stepping Stones Wednesdays, April 3, 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8 Time: 6 – 8 p.m. Tuition: $30 Materials/Supplies: approx. $50 Instructor: Wesley Luckey Wesley Luckey has taught the art of stained glass to local craftsmen as well as students at Lake Chautauqua in New York. A handcrafted stained glass stepping-stone will be a lovely addition to your spring garden.

ALLEGHENY COUNTY/ PENN STATE MASTER GARDENERS Programs at Jefferson Hills Library Our first two programs with the Allegheny County/Penn State Master Gardeners (Pruning Trees & Shrubs and Vegetable Gardening) were a huge success. One program remains. Don’t miss Container Gardening! CONTAINER GARDENING (3rd seminar of Winter/Spring series) Thursday, April 25, 2013 Time: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Fee: $5 Master Gardener, Ron Boron will discuss “Container Gardening” explaining its advantages, selection of appropriate containers and soil, proper watering, fertilizing and selection of plants for sun and shade conditions. Come learn about “Thrillers, Fillers and Spillers.”

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The Friends of the Pleasant Hills Library will hold its annual Book Sale at the Pleasant Hills Borough Building, April 11 through April 14. Thursday April 11, 6 - 8 p.m. is Preview Night where a $6 entrance fee will be charged for this night only. You may be first to purchase the books available for sale. Snacks will be served. Friday, April 12, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. The book sale is open, and no entrance fee will be charged for the balance of the sale. Saturday, April 13, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday, April 14, noon - 3 p.m. is BAG DAY. Fill one of our bags for $5! Or, fill as many bags you want, at $5 per bag. Sunday, April 14, 3 - 5 p.m. is Clean-Up Day! Offer us a price to take some or all of the unsold books! Or stay and help us box them up to give as a donation!

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Home

Improvements In West Jefferson Hills I

f you have a home, you know how challenging it is to maintain it. Roofs leak, landscapes need weeding, and kitchens and baths need facelifts. If you’re handy, you can get by with your own sweat equity. However, most people don’t have the skills, let alone the time, to tackle major household projects – many of which will require you spending more time at the office just to be able to tackle the price tags such projects come with. Here, we try to cover it all for you – from financing your project to enjoying it when it’s complete. Building a home addition can be a good alternative to buying a new home or building a house from scratch. Besides saving money, it can be a means of investing in your home and customizing your home to serve your family’s specific needs and desires. But additions also bring up potential problems that may not make them the best option for everyone. An addition can drastically change the way a house looks from the road or yard. An addition that isn’t well planned can look like it doesn’t belong or doesn’t match the rest of the house in terms of style or overall shape. Planning an addition carefully with a skilled architect is the best way to ensure that the house looks as good, or even better, than it did before the addition. An architect should be able to produce sketches that give a sense of how the finished addition will look. To minimize the appearance of an addition, homeowners can usually choose to build onto the back of the existing house, thereby hiding the new construction from the road.

Depending on the size of an addition and the construction schedule, it may take weeks or months before an addition is completed. Bad weather can cause unanticipated delays, and working with an unreliable contractor can prolong the process even further. If a homeowner can’t afford to be patient during the planning and construction process, moving into a new, larger home may be a better option. An addition can be a good investment, helping to increase the value of a home. Using a home equity line of credit or getting a new mortgage that includes money to pay for the addition can be a wise financial decision, especially when interest rates are low. However, if the expected value of an addition – which a homeowner can estimate by studying the sale prices of nearby homes with similar characteristics – is less than its cost, it may be a poor investment. An addition is likely to raise the value of a home. After the addition is completed, a new assessment will raise property taxes. Prior to adding on, homeowners should estimate the value of their home with the addition and compute a new annual tax liability based on current tax rates. Building an addition is an ideal time to invest in energy-efficient fixtures and construction. Windows that prevent hot or cool air from escaping and low-energy-consuming appliances can minimize the cost of an addition by reducing energy bills and its environmental impact. Remodeling your bathroom is another popular way to jazz up your home as well as build equity. In some cases, not only is remodeling the bathroom an aesthetic choice but a functional choice as well. Giving your bathroom a boost doesn’t always have to require a boatload of cash or space – just a little planning and creativity before you get started. Refresh your bath’s

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look with a wow-worthy makeover that improves its style and function. Perhaps you have an old toilet that you want to replace with a highefficiency model that will lower your water bill. Or perhaps the old tile is falling off your shower and you need to replace it. Whatever your situation is, there are many options to choose from, including do-it-yourself options. One popular and inexpensive option is to have a theme for your bathroom. Examples could be a Disney theme for a child’s bathroom, or perhaps a beach theme. This can be accomplished by painting the walls, adding a wall border and by well-placed décor. Some larger and more costly bathroom updates include new flooring, new sink and vanity and a new bathtub or shower. These improvements will get even costlier if you paid someone to do it for you. Decks on the rear or side of homes have become extremely popular in the United States. Used for entertaining or just relaxing, decks come in all shapes, sizes, designs and material. The most popular, and least expensive, deck material is treated wood. It is durable, however it will need to be painted or stained yearly or every other year depending on your climate. Composite decking products are building materials manufactured using a mixture of plastic and wood fiber. Composite decking materials are very popular because they require less maintenance than wood and often use recycled materials. Composite decking is easy to install and is guaranteed with a 20-year warranty against rotting, splitting, splintering or termite damage. However, composite decking can be very costly. Vinyl decking made from Cellular PVC is a great choice for decking because it is essentially resistant to stains, mold, insects and fading. PVC material is low maintenance and is a sustainable building material. But like composite, it can get costly. Powder coated aluminum decking can be used to create a watertight floor for your deck. This unique material will never splinter, rot or rust. LockDry Aluminum decking is cool to the touch and is available in five colors. Aluminum decking is strong and lightweight. The LockDry system can be used to create a dry space to use under your deck on rainy days. Decks can be built right on the ground, or be elevated high in the air, depending on the design of your home. If you are building a deck yourself it is very important to check all local building codes and follow all of the

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Our Home Improvement Partners In 1987 Inks Installations, a home remodeling business was established by Michael T. Inks. Today, Inks Installations is ranked at the top of the businesses involved in home remodeling. Inks is family owned and operated, serving Allegheny County and the surrounding areas, specializing in bathrooms, kitchens, additions, game rooms, roofing, siding, and other small jobs. For more information call or stop by the showroom! Inks Installations 412.653.0850 • www.inksinstallations.com

For 32 years, residents in and around the Pittsburgh area have turned to Davis Remodeling for full-service kitchen and bathroom design - we offer cabinetry (stock or custom), a wide variety of countertops, flooring, plumbing fixtures and all that is necessary for a complete kitchen or bath remodel. Enjoy the best service from a staff that really cares! Member - Better Business Bureau since 1981 PA# 043293 DAVIS REMODELING 412.469.1181 • www.daviseremodeling.net Hess’ Landscape Nursery is located in Jefferson Hills at 1505 Gill Hall Rd, half way between Pleasant Hills and Finleyville. The nursery encompasses 5 acres of the area’s largest selection of unique conifers, Japanese maples and ornamental trees and shrubs. Owner Chris Hess has been designing and installing quality residential landscapes since 1984 upon graduating from Penn State University with a degree in ornamental nursery management. Hess’ Landscape Nursery 412.384.8002 • www.Hesslandscapenursery.com Jefferson Hills Lawn Equipment has the largest selection of homeowner and commercial equipment in the South Hills of Pittsburgh. From minor tune-ups and maintenance to major overhauls, our certified master technicians can get you up and running quickly. Visit our showroom filled with all your lawn & landscape equipment needs. Chainsaws, trimmers, blowers zero turns & tractors. Stop by today & see Harry, Michelle, Tom & Pat. JEFFERSON HILLS LAWN EQUIPMENT 412.655.2279 • www.jeffersonhillslawn.com

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Home Improvements guidelines very closely to ensure the safety and long-term durability of your deck.

with the contractor about creating an additional half bathroom for guests and family members to use when you’re entertaining.

Bringing your family together is often difficult. A family game room is a fantastic way to upgrade your home and bring the family together. Whether you have an unfinished basement, an unused attic room or an empty garage, you can transform it into a fantastic oasis where your family can spend countless enjoyable hours. There are many aspects to making your game room remodel a success. First you should talk to a Design/Build contractor about water access, waste lines and additional electricity needs. The contractor can also offer advice on any changes that might be necessary to update the space, whether it be additional insulation for a garage or attic room or waterproofing for a basement room.

Electricity for lighting and appliances is also incredibly important. If you are updating an unused area of your home, the current electric wiring may not be able to handle the additional demands of a game room. The Design/Build contractor can guide you through what will need to be updated and how much it will cost.

Water access could also be an important aspect if you plan to have a bar or sink area. A Design/Build contractor can offer advice on what needs to be done to make the area completely usable. You might also want to speak

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If finances are an issue there are definitely still projects you can complete yourself including painting, laying carpet, adding shelves or simply updating the dĂŠcor. Gone are the days when it was frowned upon to bring work home. Today a home is not a home unless it has a home office. Whether you are turning an extra bedroom into a workspace with store-bought furniture or constructing a full-scale two-level library and office, home offices are a regular part of what makes a house a home in 2013. Making the space your own is essential to effective use of a home office. Create a space that makes you more productive and relaxed at the same time and that is a winning combination. A desk is an essential part of most offices. Choose one that meets your needs. If all you need is a work top to use your laptop from, consider a computer cart and save the space for a comfortable chair or small sofa. If you are in the market for a larger desk, consider office furniture resellers. They sell executive-grade used furniture for a fraction of the cost.


Our Home Improvement Partners

In West Jefferson Hills Bookcases or other storage can be a nice addition. Not only can they store books, but they are also great places to display awards or showcase your favorite collection of knickknacks or memorabilia. Decide whether you prefer furniture pieces or built-ins. Antique shops have great deals on beautiful bookcases, and most local cabinet shops can design and install custom built-ins. If you have a closet in your office, visit your local home center for a plethora of storage and organizing options. A comfortable chair or two is a necessity. Choose long-lasting fabrics and sturdy frames. Go with classic styles that won’t end up as next year’s garage sale item. Test out the chair before you buy it. Desk chairs especially need to provide good support and be comfortable. We live in a society of over-indulgence. Nothing shows this like the home theater. So many popular home magazines have a page dedicated to converting your basement into a home theater, or something similar. The HGTV website has 16 home theater features alone. But how doable is the home theater in reality? First, you need a fairly large space, either a big family room or a basement. Second, you need to budget for all the furnishings including, of course, the stars of the show: home theater equipment – a big-screen TV, DVD player and speakers – and comfy seating. Also very popular for home theaters is floor and aisle lighting similar to real movie theaters, and perhaps even an old-fashioned popcorn maker.

Voss TV & Appliance is a family owned and operated appliance and electronics store which was established in 1960. For over 53 years we have serviced the Pittsburgh area by offering the highest quality products and services. Voss offers a large variety of kitchen appliances, consumer electronics, laundry appliances, outdoor grills, mattresses, furniture, home theater equipment and seating. For more information, call or visit us on the internet. www.vosstv.com Voss TV & Appliance 412.653.3548 • www.vosstv.com Our services include: • New Landscape Designs and Shrubbery • Edging and Mulching of Beds • Retaining Walls • Concrete Driveways • Concrete or Paver Sidewalks and Patios • Fire Pits and Seat Walls Santel Landscape and Design 412.835.1854 • www.santellandscapeannddesisgn.com

Frankly, home theaters are generally for those with deep pockets because there really is no way to make a home theater cheaply. Still thinking of taking the plunge? The home improvement website Home Time has a really useful feature on home theater planning. It covers everything you’ll need to consider, like the space you’ll need and even suggested room layouts, to maximize your viewing pleasure. Kitchens are the most popular room in the house to remodel. Many people consider the kitchen to be the center of the home and its most important component. Another reason it is so popular to remodel is there are so many things in the kitchen that can be remodeled... cabinets, cabinet hardware, countertops, floor, appliances, lighting, walls and sinks. There is very little right or wrong when it comes to remodeling your kitchen; it comes down to personal taste. There are so many choices when it comes to style, design and type of material for every component of your kitchen. When remodeling there is much to consider: cost, what is

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Home Improvements your goal, what is your situation (pets or small children could help decide what type of flooring to use, for example) and what is the cost vs. equity value of the remodel. If finances are an issue and you are not the handiest individual, there are still many simple and easy things you can do to add pizzazz and value to your kitchen. For example, you can paint your cabinets and add new handles rather than buying new cabinets. Adding a stylish splashguard behind your stove and sink is easy to do and adds great appeal. Painting the walls can also make a huge difference in your kitchen, as can changing the light fixture. If done well, landscaping can completely change the character and perception of a home. Landscaping encompasses anything on the outside of the home including grass cutting, plants, flowers, rock, mulch, borders, vegetable gardens and more. Beyond the aesthetics, landscaping can be beneficial to a property if designed properly. Solar heat absorbed through windows and roofs can increase cooling costs, and incorporating

shade from landscaping elements can help reduce this solar heat gain. Shading and evapotranspiration (the process by which a plant actively moves and releases water vapor) from trees can reduce surrounding air temperatures as much as 9°F (5°C). Because cool air settles near the ground, air temperatures directly under trees can be as much as 25°F (14°C) cooler than air temperatures above nearby blacktop. Using shade effectively requires you to know the size, shape, and location of the moving shadow that your shading device casts. Also, homes in cool regions may never overheat and may not require shading. Therefore, you need to know what landscape shade strategies will work best in your regional climate and your microclimate.

Evapotranspiration (Et) is the amount of water that is evaporated from the soil and transpired through the plant’s leaves. This amount of water needs to be replaced through watering. If you know your area’s Et rate, you can plan the amount of water to be replaced through irrigation. It’s best to water or irrigate your plants in the early morning when evaporation rates are low. This also provides plants with water before midday when the evaporation rate is the highest.

Examples of exterior lighting include: torches, candles, lanterns, solar ground lighting, flood lights, lamp posts, landscape 724.942.0940 to advertise |

With countless styles and options available, there are no right or wrong choices. The outdoor lighting a homeowner will choose will come down to budget and personal preference. Many of us take pride in our homes, investing countless hours rearranging and remodeling the interior. But it can also be refreshing to step out

Also, if you can determine how much water your plants actually need, then you won’t overwater them and waste water. It is important to not only understand a plant’s particular watering requirements, but also evapotranspiration.

Lighting is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to cast an enchanting spell on any outdoor space. It is also very effective for safety and security purposes.

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lighting and general light fixtures. For setting a mood the most popular lighting is candles or small lanterns. For security and safety purposes, it is critical to have flood light or lamp posts or ground solar lighting or all. A burglar is much more likely to enter a home without a lot of light on the outside illuminating the property.

West Jefferson Hills

of the confines of the inside and spend some time outside. It’s especially enjoyable during the spring, summer and fall months. When the weather is favorable, it’s difficult to miss out on a nice day outside. But spending time outside doesn’t mean you have to forfeit your creature comforts. With a few small adjustments you can make your outdoor space comfortable and inviting. Turning a yard, patio, porch or other outdoor area into a functional living space can be a rewarding task, and will expand your living space to the outdoors. With the right setup, you can spend more time in the sunshine and fresh air, and host events al fresco for friends, family and neighbors. Options for outdoor living include outdoor kitchens, dramatic lighting, fireplaces or fire pits, a water feature (like a fountain), outdoor living rooms, gazebos and pavilions. With so many options to choose from, for most people it will come down to price, climate where they live and available space in which to be creative. Ponds can be a wonderful addition to your


In West Jefferson Hills property’s outdoor experience. Surprisingly, they are not as difficult to build as one might think. Before you start, call 811 or your local one-call center to have electric and gas lines marked so you know where to dig to steer clear of them. Then, when you map out the location of your pond, put it where it will be noticed – visible from a window, off a patio, or along a walkway – but away from the play areas of small children or pets. Keep clear of major root systems or mature trees, which can block too much of the sunlight plants and fish need. You’ll also need to be within reach of a grounded exterior outlet so you can plug in a pump, an essential tool for keeping the water aerated; most pumps come with a maximum cord length of 25 feet, and extension cords are not recommended. You may need to bury the power cord a few inches down in PVC pipe to hide it. Space permitting, you need at least 40 cubic feet for your pond – about 7 feet by 4 feet – to keep the water clean. An initial shallow terrace just inside the perimeter of the pond holds rocks that conceal the liner edge and keep it in place. A second, deeper terrace supports plants that live in the water and help balance the pond’s ecosystem. As you dig, you must slope the sides of the pond so that if the water freezes, the ice will push up instead of against the liner. Even in warmer climates, small ponds can change temperature rapidly, so if you’re adding fish you’ll want a deeper pond that will maintain a more consistent temperature and accommodate the fish – 18 to 24 inches for goldfish and at least 3 feet for koi. To maintain the consistent depth of the water, you need to line the pond. A thin layer of sand and old newspapers or burlap bags softens the jagged edges of rocks and roots. But over that you will need to put a waterproof skin. There are several types of flexible liners meant for small ponds – made from polypropylene and EPDM, among other

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Home Improvements

materials. Look for one that’s weather-resistant, so it will stand up to UV rays and freezing temperatures. It should also be rated “fish-safe” if you plan to stock your pond and come with a warranty of 10 to 20 years so your pond will be watertight for many years to come. Remodeling your home can generate tremendous equity for the future, as well as personal enjoyment in the present. Remodeling projects come in all shapes, sizes and costs. Projects can range from replacing flooring or a faucet, to installing new trim work or tile and replacing windows and doors. Remodeling can also take on the form of revamping or adding a bathroom, redoing a kitchen, overhauling your home’s exterior for improved curb appeal, or completing an addition to increase your home’s square footage and add valuable space. Big and small changes can both have an impact and will improve the way your home looks and functions, increasing its value and making it more enjoyable for you and your family. The key to any remodeling job is to make sure it makes sense financially. Not all remodeling jobs are cost-effective. For example, it is possible to pay $75,000 for a new addition, but an appraiser may be of the opinion that it only raised the value of your house by $50,000. It is very important that you do as much research as possible and talk to as many experienced professionals as possible so you can make an informed decision about what is best for you.

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In West Jefferson Hills Financing Remodeling Projects While home sales may be sluggish, home remodels are roaring. In the second quarter of 2011, Americans were expected to spend $132.8 billion on remodeling – up 12.8% over the previous year, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University. And it’s no surprise that these projects aren’t cheap. In fact, the same studies report that 57% of home-remodeling projects cost at least $20,000.

requirements, can be high – both of which can pose a challenge in this economy.

Return on your Investment Thinking about adding a deck or revamping the kitchen so you can up the price of your home before you sell? You might want to crunch the 2010-11 Cost vs. Value numbers, compiled by Remodeling magazine, before you do.

Since saving your pennies in a pickle jar is probably not enough to update your master bathroom with a slate walk-in shower or add granite countertops to your kitchen, explore these options to finance your newand-improved home.

Projects with highest return on investment

Purchase a Variable-Rate CD

• Adding a wood deck (73%)

What it’s good for: Projects that can wait until a fixed time in the future with a price tag you can pay by saving.

• Minor kitchen remodel (73%)

If you plan to pay for the kitchen of your dreams the old-fashioned way – by saving for it – consider a variable-rate certificate of deposit. This savings vehicle is similar to a traditional savings account in that you can add money to it at any time (a fixed-rate CD does not allow additional deposits during the term of the CD).

• Vinyl siding replacement (72%)

In return for an interest rate that may go up or down, the interest rate often is slightly higher than a traditional CD when you buy it. You make a low minimum deposit and lock in your money for a fixed time – usually at least 6 or 12 months. If you withdraw your funds before then, you pay penalties and lose the interest.

• Attic bedroom addition (72%)

Open a Home Equity Line of Credit

• Home office remodel (46%)

What it’s good for: Long-term projects that can be paid off over five or fewer years.

• Sunroom addition (49%)

The beauty of using the equity in your home is that you write yourself checks from a line of credit and pay interest on only what you borrow. Plus, the interest is typically tax deductible. While current low interest rates add to the allure, these credit lines can be tough to come by in this climate of lowered home values and tight credit. When interest rates rise, your home improvement project may become more expensive than you anticipated.

Refinance Your Home What it’s good for: Larger projects for a home you plan to live in for the long term. A “cash-out” refinance allows you to refinance your mortgage for an amount that is larger than your current mortgage. You get the difference in a check – effectively rolling the sum into a newly financed 15- or 30-year mortgage. This can be an attractive option, as mortgage rates have hovered at historic lows in recent years. The downsides include closing fees that can be in the thousands of dollars. Plus, the threshold to qualify, including income and home-value

• Replacing entry door with steel door (102%) • Garage door replacement (84%)

• Wood window replacement (72%)

Project with lowest rate of return on investment

• Bathroom addition (53%) • Garage addition (59%) The data includes national and regional averages on over 20 common home improvement projects ranging from kitchens and baths to roofs and decks. Data for both midrange and upscale projects is provided on: • Average cost of project. • Added resale value. • Percentage of investment recouped. • Change from last year’s report. The above numbers assume you’re hiring out the labor on the project. If it’s a do-it-yourself project, and you do a good job, the rate of return on your investment will be higher. Unless you plan on doing the work yourself, or not doing the project makes your house undesirable or unsellable, most home improvement projects will return less from your investment than you put in, so you might want to consider staying in your home a while to enjoy the results of your improved home! West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 57


Planting is believing for new West Jefferson Hills family

Uprooting a family and moving into a strange city with plenty of unknowns can be nerve-racking, for sure. But for Pastor Chris Autry, his wife Becca and their almost-three-year-old son Sam; it’s all about faith. Pastor Autry and family left the comforts of a wellestablished congregation housed in a 200-year-old historic church in Fort Mill, South Carolina and came to Jefferson Hills in April of 2012 to plant or start a new church. “I served as Senior Pastor of Flint Hill Baptist Church for over four years, so we left plenty of friends and memories behind,” Pastor Autry recalled. But for this family, sharing the Gospel means sharing the message where it’s needed the most. “Pittsburgh is a ‘send’ city for our North American Mission Board (NAMB) of the Southern Baptist Convention. Our goal is to increase the presence of Southern Baptists.” He added, “We’re sending Church Planters/Pastors to Pittsburgh to proclaim the love of Jesus Christ throughout the city.” Here’s how it’s being done. The Baptist Network of Church Planters called the Multiplying Church Center or MC2 is a local Baptist congregation focusing on starting or planting new churches. “We moved here as formal partners with an MC2 congregation in McMurray, Faith Community Lakeside (FCCL). FCCL gives us 18 months to settle in Jefferson Hills, build relationships, start a bible study and launch Abide Church with upfront costs and manpower needed to accomplish the task,” Pastor Autry explained. Officially, Pastor Autry is the lead pastor of the Abide Church. “Abide means to dwell and it comes from the Gospel of John, chapter 15 where we are called to be one with Christ. Abide describes our mission to bring others into a growing, intimate relationship with Christ. Abide is unique in that we intentionally focus our efforts on loving our community and sharing the gospel.” The mission is a team effort. “Becca is my minister who cares

By Mike Ference

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for my needs and keeps me grounded. My wife has served by my side as my teammate since the day we met,” he proudly stated. “Becca will play a crucial role reaching out and relating to the women which is critical when starting a new church,” he adds. Starting in February the Pastor and his wife will host bible study in their home. By springtime, a series of community outreach programs will be initiated to serve the needs of families in the Jefferson Hills area. For more information on the outreach programs follow the couple on the church’s blog: autryadventures.wordpress.com. A website will be added soon. “We encourage anyone to participate in any of our outreach programs. There’s never a closed door; everyone is welcome.” Pastor Autry estimates it will take a season or two before he and his wife launch their church. “Maybe by the fall of 2013 or 2014,” he hopes. “We’ll look at a variety of storefronts, compare costs and work out a budget.” In the meantime, Pastor Autry, Becca and Sam will continue to become a part the the Jefferson Hills Community. “We love the four seasons... Friends visited and we took them to Round Hill Park – what beautiful and natural resources to share and show off,” Pastor Autry proudly stated. West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 59


Being Called A

ccording to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 64 million Americans volunteer for an organization at least once in their lives; many continue for several years. Women tend to volunteer more than men, regardless of education, age and other demographics and adults age 35-50 volunteer more than any other age group. The dominant activity is fundraising (selling items to raise money), followed by tutoring or teaching and church work. The Pleasant Hills Presbyterian Church (PHCPC) is one such church that literally exists as it does today because of its volunteers. “Volunteers are critical to what the church does both inside and outside. One of the best opportunities for our volunteers is the Unselfish Beggars, run by our Deacons, which takes place each October. This was the 66th year for this program,” said Rev. David Antonson, Interim Pastor at PHCPC. Each year, Unselfish Beggars collects new or gently used clothing and non-perishable food items in the Pleasant Hills area. All items collected go to Rock Forge, WV, to help people get out of poverty. Unselfish Beggars is a huge endeavor that is only possible with the involvement of many volunteers! They need individuals to distribute flyers in the neighborhoods and then to pick up and pack all items. Most importantly, they need people to drive the trucks to Rock Forge Presbyterian Church. Rock Forge is very dependent on this drive for their clothing bank from which they can sell to those in need and all monies collected support the church for a year. Rob Carr, Communications Director for PHCPC, knows that volunteers help in all aspects of the church’s ministry. “From answering the phones to performing maintenance on church grounds to teaching Sunday school, the church would be nowhere near as effective as it is without our volunteers. The elderly are particularly active in the church since it is a win/win situation for them, the church and the community.” Mr. Carr acknowledges that their age may have slowed them down a bit physically, but by volunteering, they can feel important and feel “youthful” again. “You can’t turn back the clock. But you can wind it up again.” Bonnie Prudden (American Mountain Climber and Fitness Guru for the elderly). Mr. Carr is proud of all of the volunteers that help around the church, and he highlighted some of them as examples of selfless and tireless individuals: Marilyn Weisensee volunteers at the Receptionist Desk. She’s been a member of PHCPC for 22 years and has been a volunteer for five years because she loves to give back to the church that has given so much to her. Mona Mattarock also volunteers as a Receptionist and helps with Bereavement Meals. Mona has been a member of PHCPC since 1946 and has volunteered since 1997. She feels it is a blessing and privilege to volunteer and said the staff also treats each person like gold! 60

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Noel Moebs helps with painting, as well as the grounds maintenance. He’s been a member of the church for over 40 years and has volunteered for 15 of them. Mr. Moebs enjoys helping out wherever the need is greatest. Bruce Webster assists the facilities crew and Music Ministry (he sings in the choir). He has been a member for 40 years, and has volunteered for 6 years. He said, “I just like to get things done.” Barbara Nieman works with the Women’s Ministry; helps with Bereavement Meals and has been a Deacon and Sunday School Teacher. Mrs. Nieman has been a proud member of the church for 42 years and has volunteered for 25 of them. She loves working with the members and staff. With great sadness, the church said goodbye to one of their beloved volunteers, Robyne Hinson who passed away on 9/18/12. She was a long term member who helped willingly and always with a smile in various areas of the church. She served 18 years in the Altar Guild Women’s Ministries; served as a mentor for the Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS); acted as Wedding


to Serve By Judith Schardt

Coordinator and had recently been ordained as a Deacon. Her cheerful and helpful presence will be greatly missed by all in the church and in the community.

John Wavle works with Crossover (high school youth group). He has been a church volunteer for the last eight years and loves spending time with the youth and enjoys seeing the positive impact Crossover provides them. He’s helped with Interfaith Hospitality Network (IHN), a group that helps families facing difficult times. Chuck Weber volunteers in Music Ministry by playing the organ. Mr. Weber has been a long time member of PHCPC: for 51 years and volunteered for 30 of them! He also finds time to be a member of Session. He says, “I get special fulfillment in volunteering.” Lastly, Barbara Carnes fills in as a receptionist and helps cook meals for the Interfaith Hospitality Network. She’s been a member of PHCPC for approximately 50 years and has volunteered for 10 years. Mrs. Carnes loves volunteering because she loves the church and her church family. So the angels for this Pleasant Hills church can routinely be seen working the phones, teaching Christian Education classes; singing in the choirs or playing an instrument; reaching out to members/shut-ins and visitors; providing maintenance or driving trucks. These earthly angels go on mission trips; serve as Deacons or Elders and even donate blood for regular blood drives. Mr. Carr said there may be dozens and dozens of places to serve in the church, but each volunteer is one of a kind. If you’d like to learn how you can either become a member and/ or volunteer for PHCPC, you can contact Rob Carr at 412.849.4935 or the church at 412.655.2000. Probably a volunteer will answer and happily give you all the information you need. “If every American donated five hours a week, it would equal the labor of 20 million fulltime workers.” Whoopi Goldberg (American Actress)

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Five Wholesome Snacks

A

for Families On-the-Go

busy family schedule means there’s less time to gather around the dinner table each night, let alone ensure everyone in the family is getting the nutrients they need to live healthy. And what convenience foods offer in terms of portability, they often lack in vitamins and nutrients. But with a little preparation, you can ensure that convenient, wholesome, on-the-go snacks are at the ready when it’s time to head to play, practice or ballet lessons. Here are a few snack ideas to keep your family happy and healthy.

Smoothies While smoothies may not be the first thing that pops in your mind in terms of portability and convenience, with the right to-go cup, straw and lid, smoothies can be a great way to get some key nutrients en route. Pre-packaged smoothies, however, often contain a great deal of sugar. Ensure your family reaps the benefits of a fruit smoothie by whipping up a batch using all-natural ingredients and freezing them for later. Be sure to store blended smoothies in freezer-safe or airtight containers in the freezer, and allow for one to two hours of defrost time before grabbing them and heading for the door.

Whole Food Bars

Just because you’re short on time, doesn’t mean you can’t work wholesome foods in convenient, pocket or purse-sized portions into your diet. But make sure to check the labels when you grab a quick snack. While many snack bars contain few nutrients and may be high in sugar, there are many made using wholesome ingredients such as rolled oats, organic soynuts and almond butter, that are not only tasty, but dairy and gluten-free, as well as vegan. These bars are great go-to options you can feel good about giving your family. Learn more about these wholesome snacks online.

Homemade Trail Mix For a shelf-stable snack that’s perfect for storing in the car, at the office, or in your purse, consider mixing up your favorite dry food snack items such as popcorn, almonds, peanuts, dried cranberries, raisins, banana chips and more.

Edamame

While soybeans might not be something you regularly prepare, they’re actually simple to cook, can be modified using different seasonings and are easily eaten on-the-go. The night before a busy day, simply add 1 teaspoon of salt to a large pot of water, bring to a boil and add the edamame. Cook between 4 to 5 minutes for frozen edamame, 5 to 6 minutes for fresh. Drain, and then add your favorite seasoning and store in a zip-top bag or storage container in the refrigerator until you head out the door.

Apple Chips If you’re a fan of apples, consider making apple chips. Simply cut apples into about 1/8-inch thick slices, add a pinch of cinnamon, and place them in the oven at 200°F for roughly two hours. You’ll end up with tasty, wholesome apple chips you can store in sealed sandwich bags for up to three days. Toss them in a backpack, your purse, or leave them in the car for snacking on-the-go.

Keep snacks readily available in your kitchen, such as in a basket on the counter or portioned out in a shelf within the refrigerator to ensure your family will choose wholesome foods over convenient, less-healthy snacks. With a little planning and preparation, you can save time on busy days, while ensuring everyone gets the nutrients they need.

West Jefferson Hills | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 63


New Advanced Treatment for Skin Cancer Patricia Sinicki found a scratch on her nose back in 2010 and didn’t think much of it. “I thought that one of my cats had scratched me,” she said. At the time, she was undergoing total knee reconstruction followed by physical therapy, so she didn’t have time to really worry about that scratch. As time went on, however, the scratch continued to get worse. Her primary care physician referred her to a dermatologist who biopsied the lesion and confirmed the diagnosis: basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, according to Melissa Pugliano-Mauro, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at UPMC St. Margaret and Mohs surgeon. “I have a strong family history of skin cancer, so my primary care physician had prepared me for this type of diagnosis,” Sinicki explained. Fortunately for Sinicki, her dermatologist referred her to Hakeem Sam, MD, PhD, director, Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery at UPMC Presbyterian and in April 2012, she underwent Mohs surgery, a procedure performed for skin cancer that offers the highest potential cure rate; 99 percent. During the surgery, Dr. Sam removed layers of tumor until it was gone. Sinicki now ranks among that 99 percent, and though she continues to visit Dr. Sam regularly for follow-up, she feels very happy with the progress she has made. “I just look at it as one more thing in my life that I have conquered,” she said. Physicians have been performing Mohs surgery for more than 50 years, according to Dr. Sam, with the majority of procedures done on non-melanoma cancers on the head and neck, specifically the areas of skin around the eyes, nose, mouth, lips, and ears. There also is a type of melanoma, called melanoma insitu, on which Mohs surgery is effective.

Dr. Sam explained that the procedure is done in stages, or layers, of tumor removal and is performed under local anesthetic. “We remove a layer of tumor along with a small margin of surrounding healthy tissue and examine it under a microscope. If, upon examination, which can take up to one hour, we find more cancer, we remove another layer. This process is repeated until all of the cancer is removed. This is the most conservative way of removing the entire tumor while still leaving behind as much healthy tissue as possible.” When that part of the surgery is finished, reconstruction begins, and that could be as simple as side-to-side closures or as extensive as flaps and grafts. In cases where the tumor is more extensive, the patient also may be referred to appropriate specialists. “Patients can go home the same day with a pressure dressing applied to the surgical area,” Dr. Sam said. “Pain is primarily managed with over-the-counter medications, though patients who experience more pain can be given a prescription.” More than 3.5 million people in the United States are diagnosed with skin cancer annually, Dr. Pugliano-Mauro said, and one in five will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas are the most common types of skin cancer, with basal cell being the most common out of the two, and melanoma is the deadliest form. “There are similar risk factors for both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers, and those include fair skin complexion, a lot of outdoor sun exposure, or the use of indoor tanning beds, which the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently determined are linked to melanoma,” Dr. Pugliano-Mauro explained. “The most effective way to prevent skin cancer is to limit sun exposure. We also strongly advise using sunscreen labeled ‘broad spectrum and water resistant’ and with an SPF of at least 30. Sunscreen should be applied every two hours or more often after swimming or sweating.” To learn more about skin cancer and Mohs micrographic surgery, visit UPMC.com/skincancerprogram or call 855-SKN-SPOT (855-756-7768).

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