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SPRING 2013

Community Features Brentwood Borough School District News page 4

Briefly Brentwood page 47

Baldwin Borough News page 64

Dreams Hoop

Spring Feature

Home page 66 Improvements


From the Publisher   Welcome to the Spring issue of Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall magazine! I hope that you are as anxious as I am to get the cold and snow behind us and get busy planning projects around the house. This issue is dedicated to home-improvement projects great and small. Some projects will give you curb appeal, some will increase your home’s value, and others are for the sheer enjoyment or luxury of it. Regardless of your aims with your home, whether gutting the walls, or just planting the perfect tree in the yard, our homes are a source of pride for us, and not in a status sense. They are where we raise our families, where we feel safe, and where we invite our friends and loved ones for parties and fellowship. Our homes are where our children play, and where oftentimes we tend to sick loved ones. They are where we try hardest in life, and where the challenges of life hit us the most. Our homes bear witness to our triumphs as well as our sorrows, and they are as much a part of our personalities as what we choose to wear or adorn ourselves with. So with so much importance placed on the walls that contain us, we hope that you can find at least one project within these pages to be fodder for your next project around the home.

Have a wonderful spring! Wayne Dollard, Publisher

we want to know

How did you get into

Gardening? Gardens are commonplace in Western Pennsylvania, but why? What’s the allure of gardening that prompted you to first turn the dirt? Was it a relative who helped you plant your first tulip bulb, or was it your spouse who first introduced you to succulent, vine-ripened homegrown tomatoes? Let us know how you first got into gardening and send us some pictures of your garden as well! Summer content deadline: 5/16/13

Email your submissions to: mark@incommunitymagazines.com and2/17/13 please indicate Spring content deadline: which of our magazines you receive so we know where to place your story.


INSIDE

IN Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall is a non-partisan community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

IN Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 |

on the cover

18

Industry Insights

Hayes Chiropractic What You Might Not Know About Going to the Chiropractor (Part 3)! ..................... | 21

Baldwin Middle School Girls drive to the hoop.

Business Spotlight

UPMC TODAY

The Missing Semester ........................ | 46

Health and Wellness News You Can Use | Spring 2013

What’s Inside 2 3 4

When It’s More than Just Heartburn Hope and Healing A Healing Touch Food in a Glass

24

5

Clinical Trials Can Change Lives

6 7

Depression and Older Adults Comprehensive Care for Today’s Urology Patients

© 2013 UPMC

UPMC Today_Mercy_Spring_2013_v16.indd 1

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Features

Open Your Home, Open your Heart ....................................................... | 18 Conceptually Thinking...................................................................................... | 24 Dino-Mite Designs................................................................................................ | 28 Brentwood Food Pantry ................................................................................. | 42 Elroy Elementary Hears a Who.................................................................. | 44 Home Improvements.......................................................................................... | 66 community interests

Brentwood School District News .......................................................... | 4 New Advanced Treatment for Skin Cancer ............................. | 27 UPMC Today | Health and Wellness News ................................................. | 33 Tomosynthesis Offers Women Greater Detection of Breast Abnormalities ................................................................... | 45 Briefly Brentwood Borough News ........................................................ | 47 Baldwin Borough News .................................................................................. | 64

Success

Surface Works its Way to the

SEE page

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Brentwood Borough School District

News

S uperintendent ’ s

M essage

On February 5, 2013, Governor Corbett delivered his budget message to the Pennsylvania General Assembly. According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the 2013-2014 budget invests an additional $338.1 million into education from the previous budget year. With this increase, a total of $9.83 billion is allocated in the budget for state support of public schools. This includes: • $5.5 billion for Basic Education Funding for the 500 public school districts in the state • $1.03 billion for Special Education • $100 million for Accountability Block Grants • $62 million for Career and Technical Education • $1.08 billion for the Public School Employees Retirement System (PSERS) • $634.5 million for student transportation • $544.5 million for school employees’ Social Security Governor Corbett also stated in his budget address that additional revenues could be available for K-12 education through the privatization of the state’s wine and spirit stores and reforms to PSERS. It is estimated that $1 billion could be available from the privatization of liquor sales and $138 million from pension reform. So what does this mean for the Brentwood Borough School District? Under Governor

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Corbett’s budget proposal for 2013-2014, the district would receive increases in the following areas: • $85,499 in Basic Education Funding • $12,205 in School Employees’ Social Security • $24,617 in Pupil Transportation • $786 in Charter School Pupil Transportation • $175,075 in School Employees’ Retirement The district would receive $3,861 less in Special Education Funding. The net result is a total increase of $294,321 when compared to state funding for 2012-2013. Even though any increases in state subsidies are welcome, the proposed increases do little to return the district to post 20082009 funding levels and reverse the funding cuts experienced over the past two years. For example, the proposed increase in Basic Education Funding is approximately $68 per student. In the current year, no state funding was provided for charter school pupil transportation. The $786 increase will hardly offset the $18,875 allocated to transport charter school students. Next year’s special education costs are estimated to be $2,419,293. The proposed reduction in special education funding will require a greater reliance on local tax revenues to pay those costs. Our school district like others around the

state that have stagnant tax bases will continue to be faced with a gap between revenues and expenditures that cannot be closed by cuts in programs and personnel or by the limited tax increases permitted under Act 1, the Taxpayer Relief Act of 2006. Undoubtedly, this will result in a substantial portion of the fund balance again being used for the 2013-2014 budget. I encourage you to contact your state legislators and urge them to make every effort to return state education funding to levels that will reduce the financial burden placed on the local taxpayers. Ronald W. Dufalla, Ph. D. Superintendent of Schools


Changes Initiated to Enhance School Security can help by reporting any persons or activities that seem suspicious or out of place. The health, safety, and welfare of the children are paramount and must be protected.

Change is difficult. Human beings are creatures of habit because repetitive behavior puts them at ease and makes them comfortable. Following the tragic incident that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, many of the schools in Western Pennsylvania and across the country have reevaluated their safety procedures. The Brentwood Borough School District is no different and several changes have been implemented to enhance security at the schools. The important thing to remember is that changes were not made for the sake of change, but for the protection of students and staff. At Elroy and Moore Elementary Schools, times for student arrival have changed. In addition, new procedures were implemented for student dismissal. Changes were also made to the visitor and student entrance points at both buildings. Both schools have put into operation new visitor procedures. As additional safety measures, physical improvements on the grounds and to the facilities are underway.

At the middle/high school, a change to where students enter the building upon their morning arrival was made. Previously students entered at the main entrance and the park side entrance. Students are now only permitted to enter the building at the main entrance. All visitors to the building must enter and exit the building through the main doors. New procedures for visitors needing access to the middle/high school during the school day have been implemented. As at the elementary schools, physical improvements on the grounds and to the facilities are underway. It is hoped that these changes create only a minor inconvenience to parents, students, and visitors. The most important reason for these changes is to make certain that all schools operate at the highest levels of safety and security needed to protect our students and staff. Community assistance is also needed to enhance safety and security at the schools. You

Get a Great Low Price on Electric Generation

This offer is open only to eligible residential customers of Penn Power, Duquesne Light, West Penn Power and Penelec.

and Help Brentwood Borough School District

Current Electric Company Penn Power Duquesne Light West Penn Power Penelec

Your Utililty’s rate* (per kWh) is 5.50¢ 9.89¢ 5.37¢ 5.94¢

Brentwood Borough School District has partnered with FirstEnergy Solutions to offer its Friends and Family program to residents of the Brentwood Borough School District as well as their friends and family members. Through this special offer you and your friends and family can enroll with FirstEnergy Solutions to receive a special discounted price on your electric generation and save money on your monthly electric bills. Plus, for every person who enrolls in the program, FirstEnergy Solutions will contribute $10 to the BRENTWOOD BOROUGH SCHOOL DISTRICT! Signing up is easy to do by visiting www. fes.com/AIU3. You may also call 1-888-2546526 for more information. Make sure you have your recent electric bill handy. It takes

Your Price with FirstEnergy (per kWh) at 500, 1,000 or 2,000 kWh is: 5.22¢ 6.35¢ 4.99¢ 6.64¢

only a few minutes to enroll. We are glad that Allegheny Intermediate Unit and Brentwood Borough School District have the opportunity to offer the FirstEnergy Solutions Friends and Family Program to you and hope you take advantage of this exclusive savings opportunity. As with any great offer, please remember to pass this along to your friends and family. *The chart above shows the standard residential Price to Compare as published on www.PApowerswitch.com as of September 1, 2012. FirstEnergy Solutions is an unregulated affiliate of Penn Power, West Penn Power and Penelec, and is not the same company as your local electric utility. FirstEnergy Solutions’ prices are not regulated by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, and a customer is not required to buy electricity or other products or services from FirstEnergy Solutions in order to receive the same quality service from the local electric utility.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 5


Brentwood Borough What is a School ResourceSchool Officer?

District

News

What is a School Resource Officer? With the unfortunate events that took place at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, there have been multiple newspaper articles and news reports calling for School Resource Officers (SROs) to be placed in schools and the importance of arming those officers. This is supported by the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO). However, the School Resource Officer is more than just an armed protector. The mission of the SRO is to be a law enforcement agent, as well as a counselor and mentor/educator. In the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, a certified police officer must go through many hours of training. Many individuals attend the police academy and are trained in Constitutional Law, the Pennsylvania Crimes Code, the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code, weapons, and much more. When prospective police officers finish this training, they are certified under Act 120. Once certified, these individuals can serve as municipal police officers. However in order to be an SRO, the officer must earn certification through NASRO. Working in schools is vastly different than working in the community. Techniques and approaches that are proven to work with adults and private citizens are not the same for working with teachers and students. The training that officers receive from NASRO helps police officers with this transition. SROs are trained to educate children and to work in a positive manner in the school setting. This training is different from Act 120 training. The Brentwood Borough School District has been proactive in its approach to school safety through the use of SROs in the schools over the past seven years. Both SROs received 6 |

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

NASRO training in 2005. In 2012, the Board of School Directors approved for the SROs to carry firearms. School Resource Officer Joseph Kozarian, president of NASRO Region 3, is also certified as a NASRO practitioner/trainer and has provided training to many local school and municipal police officers in the area. The Brentwood Borough School District SROs are employed by the district and provide a variety of services to the students, teachers, and community. The SRO’s first priority is school safety. Officer Kozarian is responsible for writing, implementing, instructing, and practicing various portions of the school district crisis response plan. Officer Kozarian, and Officer Timothy Butler are present in the schools daily. They greet students in the morning, provide a security presence in the buildings during the school day, and monitor dismissal. They also work school related events such as sporting events and school dances. The SRO is also an educator. Brentwood SROs work in classrooms with students. Officer Kozarian has presented NASRO approved programs at the elementary schools pertaining to stranger danger, gun safety, drug awareness and team building. At the middle/high school, both officers have made presentations on texting and driving, underage drinking, Internet safety, and other age appropriate topics. Working with students in this manner not only educates them, but, hopefully prevents crimes from being committed, and builds a positive relationship between students and law enforcement. In 2006, Officer Kozarian instituted the SRO Cadet Program. This is an extracurricular activity geared to middle and high school students who are interested in law enforcement. The students meet several times a month

and are exposed to a variety of activities. Representatives from the local police, FBI, CIA, U.S. Marshals, SWAT, Pittsburgh City Bomb Squad, Pennsylvania State Police, and other agencies have presented to the students. The cadets also assist Officers Kozarian and Butler at dances and athletic events. Since both Brentwood SROs are Act 120 certified police officers, they understand police work. This understanding has served to develop a positive relationship with the Brentwood Borough Police Department, Chief Robert Butelli, and many of the Brentwood officers. Chief Butelli assigned Officer Matthew DeLallo as the police contact person for the school district. Officer DeLallo works with Officers Kozarian and Butler on various school and community issues. In addition, Officer DeLallo makes walkthroughs during school time at all the schools and has participated in the Brentwood Middle School Career Day. Officer Milton Mulholland III, the borough’s K-9 officer, supports the school by scheduling K-9 searches of the buildings and supporting Officers Kozarian and Butler at evening events. SROs are more than just armed protection in the Brentwood Borough School District. They are trained officers with a wide variety of skills that assist the students, teachers, and the community. SROs provide vital services to schools. We live in a time where there are no limits to the crimes people will commit. Since children are the community’s most valuable asset, all steps should be taken to reasonably ensure their safety. SROs need to be armed, but they must have proper training in working with students, teachers and parents to be successful in implementing school safety.


Kindergarten Registration 2013 Kindergarten registration for the 20132014 school year will be held April 2-4, 2013. Registration packets may be completed from 7:00 AM to 8:00 AM, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM and from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM during the registration period. The Brentwood Borough School District has revised the Kindergarten enrollment policy to bring the district in line with the vast majority of schools in southwestern Pennsylvania and across the Commonwealth. Beginning with the 2013-14 school year, a child must be five years of age on or before September 1, 2013. According to school district policy, placement of Kindergarten students will be

made using the attendance zones established by the school district as a guideline. Parents must register Kindergarten students at the school they will attend. The school administrators will make final assignments. Parents must bring the child’s birth certificate, immunization records and any other pertinent health information to registration. Parents must also provide proofs of residency, which may include a valid lease or mortgage agreement and a current utility bill with the parent’s name and address imprinted upon it. The child need not be present. Parents should be prepared to complete all forms at the time of registration.

School District Receives Federal Grants Each year the Brentwood Borough School District receives federal funds to operate programs in the schools. The grants are awarded through funding formulas established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education using federal guidelines under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The largest federal allocation the district receives is for Title I services. Title I provides funding to local school districts to operate programs for educationally disadvantaged students. Though the amount of funds set aside for a local educational agency is derived from the number of economically disadvantaged families living in a district, any student who meets eligibility requirements may participate in Title I funded programs. In Brentwood, Title I funds are used to operate an early intervention reading program for eligible Kindergarten, first, second, and third grade students. The district also operates a Title I Before School Reading and Math Program for students in third, fourth, and fifth grades and a Title I Summer School Reading and Math Program for students in Kindergarten through fifth grades. In addition, the school district contracts with the Allegheny Intermediate Unit to provide an equitable share of Title I services to eligible nonpublic school students. In 2012-2013, the Brentwood Borough School District received a Title I, Part A allocation of $292,085 to operate these programs. Title II, Part A provides allocated funds to allow schools to reduce class size in the elementary schools. This year the Brentwood Borough School District received an entitlement of $39,176 to reduce class sizes at Elroy School. Questions regarding federal programs may be directed to Mr. Robert P. Monaghan, Federal Programs Coordinator at monaghanr@ brentwoodpgh.k12.pa.us.

Parents may download Kindergarten registration forms from the school district’s website to complete in advance. Registration materials may be accessed at www. brentwoodpgh.k12.pa.us. You may download and complete the forms at any time but we will not accept them until April 2, 2013. Parents must still bring the required forms, along with the original birth certificate, immunization records, and proofs of residency to the school office in person during the registration period. Information regarding readiness screenings and Kindergarten orientation will be available during the registration period.

gram ro P d a o R e th n o r e th a We y entar Comes to Elroy Elem

WTAE’s Chief Meteorologist, Mike Harvey, and the Carnegie Science Center visited Elroy Elementary School as part of the Weather on the Road Program. Elroy PTA’s treasurer, Chantel Fry, arranged for the assembly. Students in grades K-5 participated in the weather discussion with energy and enthusiasm. Students created and wore various weather hats for the occasion. The Carnegie Science Center taught the students about severe weather and weather safety by encouraging numerous students to participate in hands-on experiments. Finally on behalf of the students, the Elroy PTA made a generous donation in the amount of $350 to Project Bundle-Up. Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 7


Brentwood Borough School What is a School Resource Officer?

District

News

Big Box of Books Comes to Brentwood On November 15, 2012, the Brentwood Borough School District hosted its first Big Box of Books program at the Brentwood Middle/High School. Partnering with the ReadAloud organization, the district offered an evening of food and fun activities for families in the community. According to ReadAloud, their goal in funding the program is to get parents excited about reading with their children, give families tools to enhance their reading experience, demonstrate how to make reading aloud fun and engaging, and to praise them for their commitment to reading aloud as a family. Event invitations were distributed in early November to parents of preschool, kindergarten, and Title I students in the Brentwood community. Approximately 50 families with nearly 100 children from infant to age 12 attended the event. The evening began with light refreshments, followed by an introduction from Mrs. Lindsay Vinay, the

program coordinator, about the importance of reading aloud at home from the time that children are born. Then, families were divided into six different groups, where they rotated through three reading stations. At each station, children listened to a story based upon the event theme, “I’m Here to Help,” and then completed a craft to complement that story. Story presenters modeled read aloud techniques and strategies for parents to use when reading with children at home. Before leaving, each child was given a box of age-appropriate books, provided through ReadAloud, to take home and enjoy. The success of this event was largely attributed to the many volunteers who donated their time. A group of 35 men and women comprised of teachers, school administrators, community leaders, high school students, and parents worked diligently to ensure that the evening ran

smoothly and that families enjoyed their time together. Brentwood hopes to partner with ReadAloud and sponsor another Big Box of Books program in the spring.

Brentwood Middle School Ninth Annual Toy Drive Each school year, the students, teachers and staff of Brentwood Middle School participate in several community service projects through their advisory program. To demonstrate thankfulness and generosity, the monthly advisory themes for November and December, BMS sponsored their annual holiday toy drive. Once again, everyone worked together to make this a huge success! For three weeks, spare change was collected in classrooms and during lunches and $321.09 was raised! Through their generosity, the students were able to brighten the holidays for eight area children by purchasing Christmas gifts for them. On Thursday, December 6, 2012, seventeen students, along with middle school staff members Diana Kleinhampl, Grace Fonzi and Lynne Golvash, spent the day shopping and wrapping gifts such as clothing, jewelry, toys and games. Way to go Brentwood Middle School! 8 |

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall


ART

Connections at Elroy Elementary Since September 2010, Elroy Elementary School has been lucky to have two high school students do their Senior Projects with Barbara Girone, the visual arts teacher. LeeAnn Hlavac approached Mrs. Girone in the spring of 2010 and proposed an idea for an after school art group. The idea would be that the students would use art media to learn about art, but also to make social and emotional connections. Students that were chosen could be artistically inclined, but who also could benefit from the social and emotional connections they would make by becoming a group and creating art. The first Art Connections group began in September 2010. Students were selected by Mrs. Girone and Kelly Donaldson, the Brentwood elementary schools’ social worker. The very first project was a mural to kick off the positive rewards program that Elroy Elementary was starting. The students ranged in age from kindergarten to fifth grade and they had their first bonding experience painting the Elroy mural near the gym. The group progressed

throughout the year, working on group art projects, individual projects, and always sharing their work with each other in guided discussions. The year ended with a party to celebrate the friendships that were made in Art Connections. In September 2011, LeeAnn Hlavac approached Mrs. Girone with a new idea for Art Connections. LeeAnn, now a junior at the high school, talked about Art Connections to sophomore student Dillon Kortz. She shared with him how much the experience meant to her and that this would be her last year working with the Art Connections students since she would be finished with her requirements for the Senior Project.

LeeAnn was hoping that Art Connections would continue after she was graduated. Dillon, who has an interest in art and music, and did not know what he wanted to do for his Senior Project thought that this sounded like a great idea. They decided they could do a team approach to lead Art Connections with Dillon learning from LeeAnn and then continuing the group the following year. They worked together to create lesson plans and facilitate group discussions which they would co-lead for the 2011-2012 Art Connections group. The same group of students was asked to attend with some new additions. At this point, teachers at Elroy were recommending students that they felt would benefit for Art Connections because of interests in the arts or to make social and emotional connections. The students again used a variety of art materials in collaborative projects and individual projects forming friendships and learning about art. Art Connections ended that year with creating a mural for Art in the Park, an event in June created by high school art teacher Ben Miller. Art Connections is now in its third year with Dillon Kortz as its sole leader. Eighteen students currently attend Art Connections. Some of the former students who are now sixth, seventh, and eighth graders stop by and join the groups to offer their assistance to the younger students. Art Connections meets every Wednesday for one hour after school. Dillon is incorporating music this year into the Art Connections sessions and continuing to incorporate the collaborative arts and the group discussions. The students have greatly benefited from this wonderful project which has grown from the enthusiasm and dedication of LeeAnn Hlavac and Dillon Kortz. Mrs. Girone is grateful for being able to work with these students of all age levels in such a fun setting.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 9


Brentwood Borough School District

News

Mock Presidential

Election HELD

The Brentwood Middle/High School Social Studies Department planned a schoolwide “Mock 2012 Presidential Election” and successfully coordinated the activity on Monday, November 5, 2012. The event included the following highlights: • Prior to November 5th, each social studies teacher instructed a lesson on the election process as well as political parties and/or this year’s issues and campaigns. Some lessons included projects that helped coordinate the activity. For example, some of Jennifer O’Shea’s Civics students made flyers which summarized the viewpoints of the candidates on various issues.

• Technology coordinator Melissa Fulmer created an “election link” on the school’s website that easily allowed every student to log on and vote as well as answer survey questions and questions regarding political party affiliation. High school and

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middle school students voted in the computer labs located in each school. On Wednesday, November 7th, the winning candidate was announced by each of the following categories: the entire student body at the middle/high school; middle school students; high school students; individual grades; and, gender. Also, the issues which according to the student surveys were the most important were also announced. • An “exit poll” was conducted by students which surveyed approximately 25% of the student voters and the results were announced at the end of 8th period on November 5th. The results of the sample showed an advantage for President Barack Obama. This activity obviously reinforced learning regarding random sample surveys and voter “exit polls.” • Some high school students volunteered to “stump” for the candidates. They made signs and flyers and spent the day outside the “polls” trying to convince students to vote for their candidate. The students who did this took this task very seriously, and it seemed to be a tremendous learning experience for them as well as some of the students they approached. • Groups involved in fundraising activities sold candy and baked goods throughout the day outside the polling rooms. The high school Student Council, the girls softball

team, and Beau Sedlar’s students involved in the “Toys for Tots” program all helped to raise a fair amount of money. • Members of the high school band played patriotic songs throughout the day which helped create an exciting and festive atmosphere. Also, some students volunteered to decorate the doorways to the polling rooms and the hallways nearby and their efforts greatly added to the event. • Student reporters from the high school newspaper, The Minaret covered the event throughout the day, interviewing and photographing several students and teachers. After the election, students were able to view the data retrieved from the election including the winner, the loser, and the answers to exit poll questions. Overwhelmingly, the students in both the middle and high schools voted to re-elect incumbent Barack H. Obama.


Educators Present at Improving Schools Conference

A

team of educators from Elroy Elementary School that included Principal Amy Burch, Kindergarten teachers Suzanne Ailes, Christina Dietz, and Jacelyn Pulleo, and Learning Support teacher Meghan Weinman recently presented at the Improving Schools Conference held at the Sheraton Station Square Hotel in January. The focus of the presentation was the recipe of success the teachers followed in the classroom to improve student behavior and achievement. Over the past five years, the economically disadvantaged population at Elroy Elementary has grown from 31% in 2007 to 59% in 2012. In addition, the number of students identified with a specific learning disability who are entering kindergarten has grown at alarming rates. According to the DIBELS benchmark test administered in Fall 2011, 30 out of 60 students required strategic or intensive interventions. By mid-year ( January 2012), the number was reduced to 15 students. At the end of the year (May 2012), eight students required strategic or intensive interventions. The story not told through the data was the undesirable behavioral challenges demonstrated by the incoming kindergarten students. Ten percent of the incoming kindergarten population presented with significant undesirable behaviors. These students lacked self-awareness, responsible decision making, relationship skills, social awareness, and self-management. Individual student progress was monitored through charts, teacher observation, therapy session reports, and progress reports. Even with all of these challenges the kindergarten teachers, special education teachers, social worker, reading specialist, behavior therapist, and principal worked together to improve student achievement. Elroy Elementary has attained Adequate Yearly Progress(AYP) since the inception of the PSSA. Success has been a five-year journey of self-reflection and adaptation. A thirty minute

daily intervention period was added in the 2009-2010 school year. This was in addition to the ninety minute Language Arts block. Students were placed into one of three tiers based on the DIBELS Fall benchmark and classroom based assessments. The tiers were based on the Pennsylvania Response to Intervention and Instruction (RtII) model. Each team member was responsible for specific tasks during each nine week period. The special education teacher and reading specialist provided both academic and behavioral targeted intensive interventions daily. The classroom teachers progress monitored through DIBELS and teachercreated behavior charts. The teachers rotated among the tiers each nine weeks. The social worker and behavioral therapist created social stories and worked with small groups of students. During these small group sessions, students worked on recognizing one’s emotions as well as one’s strengths and

weaknesses, making responsible decisions and making constructive choices, forming positive relationships, showing empathy, understanding for others, and managing behaviors to achieve one’s goals. The principal provided support through the purchasing of materials, arranging for outside supports, or as serving as another resource inside the classroom. Parents were updated daily or weekly of student progress. Team meetings were held monthly to review strategies, chart student progress, and reflect and adjust academic and behavioral goals. After each meeting, the notes were emailed to the team for future reference. Students moved between tiers based on three to four data points. Through this recipe for success, student behavior and achievement have improved. The administration and staff at Elroy Elementary School look forward to continuing this approach in the future.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 11


Brentwood Borough School District

News

High School Student Athletes Attend

Sportsmanship Summit The annual WPIAL Sportsmanship Summit was held at the Heinz History and Sports Museum on November 14, 2012. This was the fourth summit that the WPIAL has hosted. Attending the event were 550 student-athletes representing one hundred WPIAL member schools and the Pittsburgh Public Schools. Brentwood High School was represented by Alexis Gaughan, Sydney Luther, Billy Madeja and Jack Murano. The theme of the event was “Respect the Game.” The students listened to guest speakers that included: Elliot Hopkins from the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), Tom Bradley, former Defensive Coordinator at Penn State University and ESPN radio personality, and finally, Swin Cash, WNBA All-Star and 2012 Olympic Gold Medalist who was the keynote speaker. The students also took part in integrated activities where they worked with students from other schools. The students also discussed the “Five Good Deeds on Game

Day” and shared their thoughts on the five good deeds and gave examples of what can be done by students in their home schools. During Elliot Hopkins’ speech on sportsmanship, he recognized the students of Brentwood and Monessen High Schools who worked cooperatively together to display sportsmanship and leadership. All four of the Brentwood students participated in the WPIAL conferences between Brentwood and Monessen to repair the negative perceptions that the communities had with each other. These students dedicated their personal time and great

effort to work together to pull off a wonderful display of sportsmanship and positive spirit at the Brentwood/Monessen football game in September. These students were honored for not only understanding good sportsmanship, but putting what they knew into action. This was a wonderful day and a great tribute to the Brentwood High School students to be acknowledged for all of their hard work. All four students have been asked to assist other schools whenever there is a need to resolve community differences, and to improve sportsmanship in other communities.

Students Observe Open Heart Surgery On Thursday, February 7, 2012, fourteen Brentwood High School students had the opportunity to visit Allegheny General Hospital and observe open heart surgery. Students were chosen based on their interest in pursuing a career in the health professions. The field trip was arranged by Nancy Kaminski, middle/ high school nurse, and Jackie Johnson, Biology teacher. During the experience, the students saw how the entire operating room team works together to perform the surgery. This included surgeons, the anesthesiologist and nurse anesthetist, physician’s assistants, nurses, surgical technicians and perfusionists. After the surgery, Dr. Stephen Bailey met with the students and answered questions about the procedure and about his career path to cardiac surgery.

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Brentwood Junior and Senior Classes

Explore Washington, D.C. The Brentwood High School junior and senior classes had the opportunity to participate in an educational tour of Washington, D.C., on November 19, 20, and 21, 2012. This tour was provided by Metro Tours Inc. under the direction of high school social studies teacher Jennifer Ditoro, and chaperoned by David Radcliffe , Helen Hughes-Smith, Nancy Kaminski, Joe Kozarian, and Steve Leopold, all administrators and faculty in the Brentwood Borough School District. All students who attend Brentwood High School have the opportunity to participate in this biennial field trip during either their 11th or 12th grade year. This fall, 60 students attended the trip to our nation’s capital. This tour gives students the unique opportunity to get an in-depth look at all

aspects of our nation’s history. Students were provided with a guided informational tour of each of the destinations and also were given the opportunity to privately investigate the Federal District’s offerings and its vast historical past. This year, the students were treated to a once in a lifetime experience while visiting Arlington National Cemetery. Brentwood graduate and current U.S. Army Corps Soldier 1SG Clint D. Wunderlich (BHS Class of ’87) took time out of his schedule to meet with the students. 1SG Wunderlich, who has been in the U.S. Army since 1992, is the Platoon Sergeant/Operations Sergeant in the 289 Military Police Company, 4th Battalion, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (Old Guard) at Ft. Myer, Virginia. He provided the students with a question and answer session with a Sentinel Guard Soldier while the students were in attendance at a Wreath Laying Ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns. 1SG Wunderlich and his wife Tracey also met with the students and spent a great deal of time and care in escorting and speaking with the student body while touring through Arlington National Cemetery. Current Brentwood students Alexis Gaughan, Drew Gross, Jason Pilarski, and Shannon Tichenor participated in laying a wreath in memoriam to the fallen identified

The students visited the following buildings, memorials, monuments, and museums: Washington Monument The National Marine Corps Memorial Lincoln Memorial Korean War Memorial World War II Memorial Vietnam War Memorial Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Jefferson Memorial White House National Archives Smithsonian Institute Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institute Museum of American History Smithsonian Institute Museum of Air and Space United States Memorial Holocaust Museum U.S. Capitol Union Station Ronald Reagan International Trade Center Ford Theatre The Peterson House Mt. Vernon (Plantation of George Washington) John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts/Performance of Shear Madness Arlington National Cemetery The Fashion Center Mall at Pentagon City

soldiers that lie entombed at Arlington. The November experience was educational and entertaining for all in attendance. The next trip will be offered in November of 2014. Information will be distributed to students in the junior and senior classes in April of 2014.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 13


Brentwood Borough School District

News

Brentwood Middle School Groups

visit local nursing home

On Friday, December 14, 2012, students from Brentwood Middle School visited the Brentwood Care Center. Fourteen students, who are members of the Teens That Care and National Junior Honor Society clubs, visited with nursing home residents, made holiday crafts with them and sang holiday songs. This holiday service event has become a tradition for BMS and the nursing home. Both students and residents look forward to it each year! This field trip was coordinated and chaperoned by staff members Diana Kleinhampl, Grace Fonzi and Lynne Golvash.

Students Apply Language Skills On January 7, 2013, forty students from Brentwood Middle/High School , accompanied by French teacher Stephanie Faust and guidance counselor Linda Capozzoli, attended a field trip to Paris 66 Bistro. Students tasted authentic French cuisine prepared by a chef who comes directly from France. Each student had the option to choose one of three main entrees that included Crôque Monsieur (ham and cheese sandwich with béchamel cheese), Crôque Madame (the same as a Crôque Monsieur but with a sunnyside up egg on top) and a Galette (a buckwheat crêpe filled with ham and cheese). Students also enjoyed a dessert of either crème brulée or a crêpe with either butter/sugar or nutella/chocolate. Students had a wonderful time experiencing true French cuisine. Owner Lori Rongier also visited each table to converse with students in French to help them practice the French language in a real setting and to answer any other questions they had about French culture and cuisine. 14 |

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

Brentwood Middle School Students Help Restore the Shore Hurricane Sandy was only a Category 1 storm, but became the largest Atlantic hurricane with winds spanning 1,100 miles. The estimated damages from the storm are expected to total $65.5 billion making it the second costliest Atlantic hurricane only behind Hurricane Katrina. During the months of November and December, the Brentwood Middle School advisory classes focused on the themes of thankfulness and generosity. In keeping with this theme, the students in Jennifer Loshelder’s and Kim Hite’s advisory classes decided to raise money for the victims of Hurricane Sandy. Students collected money through various means such as coordinating bake sales, a staff jean day, a halfcourt shootout at a faculty versus students basketball game, and collections during the advisory classes. Over the course of two weeks, the student body was able to generate $327.00 to donate to the American Red Cross. It is through projects like these that students are able to truly understand the impact they can have on events outside of their own community.


Brentwood Students Excel

S

at Steel Center AVTS

everal Brentwood High School students were recognized for their performance at Steel Center Area Vocational-Technical School with the Extra Effort Award. Instructors at Steel Center select Extra Effort Award recipients each grading quarter based on their demonstration of outstanding attitude, work ethic, attendance, and dependability. These are qualities the instructors believe are the most highly valued by employers in their workers. Awardees for the first quarter included Zachary Donnelly in Electrical Construction, Johnathan Grant in Medium/Heavy Truck, and Drew Mattie in Medium/Heavy Truck. Awardees for the second quarter included Sandra Andric in Health Assistant, James Eagle in Carpentry, Gwendolyn Schmidt in Advertising and Design, and Casey Schmitt in Health Assistant.

Steel Center also announced the winners of its “Top of the Shop” award for the first semester of 2012-2013. The “Top of the Shop” awards are given once each semester at an all-school ceremony. Instructors from each of the 15 technologies may select one morning student and one afternoon student to receive the award. Selection is based on Conduct, Attendance, Proficiency in course work, and Professionalism (quality and quantity of work; dependability and cooperation; initiative and self improvement; and professional personality). The award ceremony and reception were held on January 29, 2013 where three Brentwood High School students were honored as “Top of the Shop” winners. Those students included Marissa Cook in Cosmetology, Zachary McGuire in Protective Services, and Chelsea Sacco in Cosmetology. At the SkillsUSA District Competition

held at McKeesport Technology Center on January 17, 2013, Chelsea Sacco placed first in Nail Care that was one of the contests in the Cosmetology technology. Chelsea will have the opportunity to compete at the state level competition to be held in Hershey, Pennsylvania on April 3-5, 2013. Steel Center provides quality career and technical education to meet the changing workforce needs of our region. The school services 11 different school districts in southern Allegheny County. A half day of instruction is available in 15 different technologies for students in 10th, 11th, and 12th grades. Since 1964, Steel Center’s goal has been to assist students in developing the knowledge, skills, and work ethics necessary for success in their chosen career. More information is available at www.scavts.net or by calling 412-469-3200.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 15


Brentwood Borough School District

News

How to Talk to Children about

Tragic Events

By Frank Krawiec, MSW, LCSW, Wesley Spectrum School Based Services Mental Health Therapist and Intervention Specialist

When a tragedy arises that shakes our faith in human nature and our own sense of safety in the world, it is often difficult for parents to have discussion with their children. Traumatic events, such as the school shooting tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, the theater shooting in Aurora , Colorado, or just the tragedies on the evening news can be a challenging topic for parents to discuss with their children, especially when parents are struggling to make sense of the situation themselves. This article will offer some ideas to keep in mind when talking with children about tragic events: • Complete a self-assessment. Before talking to a child about an act of violence like a school shooting, a local tragedy, or a traumatic family event parents must make sure that they are okay themselves. Think about the effect it will have on children before expressing your own emotions. It is difficult for parents to reassure children that they will be safe when parents aren’t so sure themselves. Children are very sensitive

16 |

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to how their parents feel. They are aware of the expressions on their parents’ faces and the tone of their voices. Children can sense when their parents are really worried. Use common sense when discussing tough issues with children. If you are upset by what you’ve just read or heard, calm yourself before interacting with your child. Find a way to process your own emotions first. You can do this by talking privately with another

adult, breathing deeply, shaking the tension out of your hands, or taking some quiet time to process. • Turn off the television. Images shown on the news are often horrific and may scare children. Knowing there’s been a shooting is one thing but hearing the (often gory) details over and over is quite another and can be traumatic for young children. Images on


television news are often much too graphic and disturbing for young children. The intent is not to keep a tragedy a secret, but to protect vulnerable children from seeing or hearing more than they are developmentally capable of processing. • Be age-appropriate. Younger children may not need to know about a disaster at all. Unless a younger child has been directly exposed to the situation or will be directly affected by it, there is no need to expose them to it. However, many younger children may hear about a situation from somebody else and may need your help processing it. Be careful not to over-share details. • Ask your child what he/she already knows. If a child brings up a tragic situation, ask him/her what they have heard about it. Listen to the answer before jumping to explain. Repeat to make sure you’ve understood. Even if children do not mention what they have seen or heard, it can help to ask what they think had happened. If parents do not bring up the subject, children can be left with their misinterpretations. You may be really surprised at how much your child has heard from others. • Explain in a way that your child can understand. Keep your explanation very simple. Try not to add unnecessary details that may cause your child to become more anxious or upset. In times of crisis, the best thing to convey to a child is that you are doing everything you can to keep them safe. • Answer questions. Answer the question that they ask—and keep it simple. Sometimes children are satisfied with the short answer and details can confuse them. Your child may have questions regarding their safety or the safety of people they care about. You might use this time to explain that sometimes we do not know why people do things. This might be a time to bring up that some people have mental health issues. Sometimes people’s brains do not work properly and they may become violent. Explain that this is not the norm in society— stress that most people who are mentally ill would not do something like this—it is very rare. Tailor your explanation to your child’s developmental understanding. It depends on their age how much information they really need or want. With all ages, let your child talk as much as he or she will. Answer questions truthfully, but with as limited

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’’

information as possible. There is no reason to give your child details he/she isn’t asking you for. Keep your own feelings controlled as much as possible to avoid misrepresenting the facts. • Listen and allow feelings. It is impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorism, abuse, murder, major fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. Any child who hears about a tragedy such as a school shooting may experience feelings such as fear and confusion. If your child senses that he or she is not permitted to display vulnerability, they can internalize those feelings which may result in nightmares or anxiety. When parents provide an understanding of their child’s feelings, the feelings can be expressed in a healthy manner. When children are scared and anxious, they may produce some unwanted overly dependent behaviors such as becoming more clingy and afraid to go to bed at night. You do not need to have all the answers. Just letting them talk it out is helpful. If you do not know an answer, it is definitely alright to say that you do not know. • Stress that this is a rare occurrence. Stress to children that traumatic and tragic incidents are very rare. Add that it is the job of grownups to keep kids safe and that you and other adults in your child’s life will always work hard to keep your child safe. Give your child extra comfort and physical affection, like hugs, or snuggling up together with a favorite book. Physical comfort goes a long way toward providing inner security. That closeness can nourish you as well.

• When possible, guide the discussion to heroism. There is often no way to make sense of public tragedies. Mr. (Fred) Rogers had given the best advice on this. He said, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping. To this day, especially in times of “disaster,’ I remember my mother’s words and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers—so many caring people in this world.” We are able to take solace in the fact that dire circumstances can call for the best in human beings. There are always ordinary people who act with great courage to help others. Focus attention on the helpers, like the police, firefighters, doctors, nurses, paramedics, and volunteers. It is reassuring to know there are many caring people who are doing all they can to help others in this world. • When tragedy affects someone your kids know, be truthful. If you are dealing with the death of a friend or family member, be truthful about it, but try to offer some separation between what happened and what your child(ren) fear might happen. This is a good time to reassure children that they can talk to you about feelings and explain to them that you are going to do everything in your power to make sure they are safe. There are many resources available online, at your local library, bookstore, in public mental health agencies, or doctor offices. Parents are encouraged to take advantage of resources and talk with other parents and school personnel for advice.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 17


FEATURE

Sarah’s last d with BFF Jen Jack-Henry T

Marie Lux with family dog Cain

Open your home, Open your heart By Tracy Fedkoe

When Mary and Eric Bennett of Baldwin learned about becoming a host family for foreign exchange students, they thought it would be a good idea because they had always wanted to have children. After the first few times they communicated with their German “daughters,” it was instant family. They hosted Sarah VonOppenbach, a junior from Cologne, last year, and Marie Lux, a senior from Karlsruhe is staying with them through June this year. “They’re definitely a big part of our family,” said Mary. International organizations arrange for

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students ages 15 to 18 to stay for a full or half school year in the United States through the generosity of host families. Students are selected based on their academic standing, fine character, and ability to get along with others. Host families are involved in the selection process and get to choose their student based on information, essays, and pictures. The requirements for being a host family include passing clearances, background and reference checks as well as being able to provide appropriate living arrangements, transportation, and three meals per day. There is no school, state or other funding provided for the program from the

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

Eric and Mary Bennett with Marie Lu

Baldwin Couple Hosts Foreign Exchange Students from Germany U.S. side. The student’s family bears the expenses of travel and spending money, unless scholarships are available from their government. It is the host family’s responsibility to enroll the student in school and help him/her select classes based on what has been taken in the home country. Most take a moderate schedule because there is so much additional learning that comes from living in another country and experiencing the culture and events. Some of the classes that Marie is taking include U.S. History, Math, English, Senior Class, and Photography and Guitar as electives. Marie also played on the varsity


Foreign Exchange Student Sarah VonOppenbach with Goliath

day in America n Debski and Tulenko

Sarah’s American Birthday Party with Eric and Mary Bennett

y h x

tennis team in the fall and is on the junior varsity basketball team this year as well. “She just jumped right in feet first. She’s really good at making friends,” said Eric. In addition to practicing daily with her sports teams, she has an active social life and is happy to just hang out, like most American teenagers. Only a few months after coming to Pittsburgh, she took a trip to New York City with the DaVinci Club at school. She’s also been to downtown Pittsburgh and liked it because “it was not so big and intimidating”. Marie likes the variety of changing classes and the sports and extra-curricular activities associated with school because it isn’t like that in Germany, where school is strictly academic. “She’s made herself part of the school,” said Sima Misquitta, counselor. German teenagers are used to traveling to other cities and countries often and have less strict laws regarding alcohol. “Kids grow up faster there,” said Eric. Marie will be going on a trip to California for her spring break with other foreign exchange students from ASSE International Student Exchange Programs. For her last semester at Baldwin, Marie will be looking forward to many of the end-of-the-year senior activities Continued on next page Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 19


FEATURE including prom, spring softball, and she will even be walking through graduation with her classmates. Although Marie is a senior, she will still have classes to finish when she returns to Germany as none of her U.S. classes are accepted as credit. However, she has gained a new understanding of U.S. culture as well as a sense of accomplishment and independence that will last her a lifetime. Marie’s school activities are only part of her experience in the United States. She is lucky to have a caring family who considers her one of their own. Marie has visited the extended family of the Bennetts in North Carolina as well as right around the corner. The nephews of Mary and Eric, Nick and Joe Tulenko, also attend Baldwin High School and look out for Marie. “I can always call them for rides and know they are there for me,” said Marie. For Mary and Eric, adjusting to having teenagers in their previously child-free home has been an eye-opener. While they are not strict, they do enforce appropriate rules and curfews such as to pick up after yourself and

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“love our dogs as your own.” Many special memories have been created with Sarah and Marie at events and family trips, but the bond goes much deeper. After Marie had to fly home for her grandfather’s funeral in January, it would have been a good enough reason to remain in Germany but she returned to finish her stay with the Bennetts. “I had no doubts she’d come back,” said Mary. Some of Marie’s most memorable moments include the surprise party Mary and Eric threw for her on her 17th birthday, as well as Senior Recognition Night at her school. “The best part for us has been the day to day of having them here and coming home to a child in the house,” said Mary. Marie will be returning to Germany in June with a tearful good-bye, but not forever. Mary and Eric plan to visit Germany in the next year or so and Marie hasn’t ruled out attending college in the United States. Their first foreign exchange student Sarah, will be staying with them for a visit this summer. “It’s hard to say good-bye, but it’s definitely worth it,” said Mary, who plans to continue to serve as a host

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

family for foreign exchange students. “This has been such a wonderful experience. I want to thank my parents (Eric and Mary) for everything,” said Marie. For the Bennetts, more than enough payment has been received through the many great memories, cultural awareness, and a family bond that can’t be separated by a little thing such as the ocean. Becoming a host family will open up a world of experience and opportunity not only for the high school student, but also for the family and community. Support and information is available at AYUSA International (www.ayusa.org), a nonprofit organization founded in 1981 that has provided cross-cultural experiences to more than 50,000 participants. To find out more about being a host family, please contact the local community representative, Rachel Wilson, at rwilsonconsulting@comcast. net.


Industry Insights

What you might not know about going to the Chiropractor (part 3)! When people hear “going to the chiropractor” their thoughts normally go immediately to treatment for lower back pain. It is true that low back pain is one of the most common problems that people seek chiropractic care for, but what many people don’t know is that lower back pain is only one of many problems chiropractors are trained to treat. At Hayes Chiropractic, Drs. Sean Hayes, Michael Martini, and Matthew Houston treat what they refer to as “neuromusculoskeletal pain.” These are conditions that involve the muscles, nerves, and joints in the body. This could be the neck, back, shoulders, elbows, knees, ankles, and any other joint in the body. Chiropractic is all about anatomy and physiology or simply put structure and function. If you are experiencing pain, spasm, stiffness, decreased range of motion, headaches, numbness, tingling, or any combination of these symptoms then you most likely have a problem that can benefit from chiropractic treatment. If you practice good habits on a regular basis you will be able to minimize the pain, but even good habits can’t completely eliminate the need for a chiropractic treatment. Just like going to the dentist for a routine cleaning, or to your medical doctor for a yearly physical, chiropractic care can be used as maintenance to keep the body healthy and working properly.

Dr. Sean Hayes

Dr. Michael Martini

Extremity Adjustments Chiropractors adjust extremities? Yes! Your extremities are the parts of the body that are outside the spinal joints. These joints include the ribs, shoulders, elbows, wrists and hands, hips, knees, ankles, and feet. When joint function is impaired, there is a loss of normal range of motion, inflammation, pain, and scar tissue formation. Chiropractors treat the spine for misalignments, joint fixations, and subluxations. In a similar way, extremities can have misalignments, joint fixations, and subluxations. These can be caused by repetitive motions, improper seated postures, overexertion, slips, falls, sports injuries, and accidents. Many people are aware of the more common problems such as tennis elbow, golfer’s elbow, frozen shoulder, carpal tunnel syndrome, runner’s knee, and ankle sprains. Signs and Dr. Matt Houston symptoms of extremity problems can include pain in or, weakness in the extremity/joint, stiffness, loss of motion, and numbness or tingling. Traditionally, these problems have been treated by pain medications, muscle relaxers, steroid injections, splinting or bracing, and even surgery. More people are seeking an alternative approach to the treatment of these conditions without the use of drugs or surgeries. Chiropractic care is being used in the treatment of elbows, wrists, knees, ankles, and other joints of the body, and restoring them to their normal and proper function. The doctors at Hayes Chiropractic have received additional training in the treatment of extremities beyond the typical techniques learned in school.

Massage Therapy is Back! We are pleased to announce that Heidi Baciak, LMT, NCTMB, a licensed massage therapist, has joined our staff to provide therapeutic massage to our patients. Heidi specializes in deep tissue massage, Swedish, Shiatsu, and sports massage, trigger point therapy and neuro-muscular massage. Massage therapy can provide welcome relief from the symptoms of chronic or acute muscle tension. Deep tissue massage and trigger point therapy reduce the waste products (lactic acid and carbonic acid) that build up in the muscle causing spasms and pain. Give the gift that keeps on giving! Massage gift certificates are available for purchase.

Pain Free! Your Goal… Our Mission! Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Winter 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 21


Community Interests

Success Surface Works its Way to the

I

f you have a child who is disabled, you might think you have nowhere to turn, where people will not only help you, but be compassionate and understanding. However, there is a valuable resource to help you right in the Baldwin area. The Easter Seals Linda Lanham Zeszutek School Program (ESLLZSP) provides comprehensive special education and therapy services for children ages 3-8 with a diagnosis of neurological impairment, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy or along the autism spectrum. An interdisciplinary team of trained and caring staff work alongside with the families to maximize children’s academic and functional skills, increase and create independence, and develop a solid foundation for continued success. The Baldwin school program is one of four school sites that are conveniently located in the north, south, east and the City of Pittsburgh. Each school has a 2:1 student to staff ratio and small class sizes of roughly six to nine students per room. This provides individualized teaching designed specifically to meet each student’s educational and therapeutic needs. The program offers a full

day and a traditional 180-day calendar and an additional half-day Extended School Year program offered in July for qualifying students to keep them on a routine in the summer. Tiffany Mori, social service manager, said, “Easter Seals knows the importance of incorporating traditional therapies such as occupational, physical, speech, behavioral, sensory processing and therapeutic feeding into the daily schedule. The importance of community-based locations is that they allow students to be educated close to home and provide regular opportunities for interaction with typical peers from within the community.” In operation for nearly 40 years, the Easter Seals School Program also provides social services and parent and siblings support groups that assist families in the areas of social, educational, medical and psychological functioning. It is one of 34 Approved Private Schools (APS) in Pennsylvania, licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Pennsylvania Bureau of Private Academic Schools. “The potential possibilities of any child are the most intriguing and stimulating in all creation.” (Ray L. Wilbur, third president of Stanford University) Jamie Welsh, a mother whose child,

ing a fourtherapist Rose us Chase with speech ommunication device.
 tive
c choice augmenta

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Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

Chase, has been attending the school program for over two years (he is five now) because of Williams Syndrome, a rare genetic condition that is present at birth and can affect anyone. It is characterized by medical problems, including cardiovascular disease, developmental delays, physical limitations and learning disabilities. These occur side by side with striking verbal abilities, highly social personalities and an affinity for music. Mrs. Welsh said he loves his school and that knowing her child is getting assistance with daily living skills has been life changing for both her and her son. She feels totally comfortable to be as involved with his daily school activities as she wants. Since being at the school, Chase has learned to walk without a walker, received training in eating and learned some toileting skills–huge milestones for Williams Syndrome children. Mrs. Welsh said the parent support groups are invaluable in leading to acceptance and eventually action. “When you give birth to a disabled/ special needs child, at first you grieve the life of the child you thought you would have! The support group then teaches you how to embrace the challenges ahead of you and helps you feel there is hope and that you’re not alone.” Mrs. Mori said the Baldwin Easter Seals School understands that imitation, routine and consistency are vital to the students’ successes. She went on to say, “There is intention in everything the staff does and we all work on the same goals for the students.” When you enter the Baldwin Linda Lanham Zeszutek School, you immediately get the sense it’s a secure, bright and welcoming place with a caring and involved staff. The school and/or Easter Seals participate in some very interesting and creative events to bring recognition, fun and extra funds to their cause. They participate in the Taste of Independence. This year marked the third annual Taste of Independence which was a night to benefit children and adults with disabilities or other special needs.


This amazing event took place in September 2012 at the Carnegie Science Center and included an unforgettable night of music, hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction, wine tasting and an exciting opportunity to meet one of the families that they serve. The tickets started at $65. All funds raised benefitted the children and adults that Easter Seals serves. Patty Braendle, director of education, said the school also participates in an annual Christmas Light-up Night at the home of Juanita Collet (she oversees the operations of the entire school) and all proceeds go to the school. There is a Day of Giving in October (a United Way project) and a Day of Caring which offered families a fun day of bowling. You can also purchase a new ornament, A View from Mt. Washington. Chase pretending to be the school bus driver


This beautiful gold plated ornament, made exclusively for Easter Seals, is available for you to enjoy this holiday season! She said the greatest need for the school is donations of iPads, age appropriate musical instruments (for those age 3-8) and volunteers, who they will train. If you would like to volunteer, donate or learn more about The Easter Seals Linda Lanham Zeszutek School Program

Vivian (left) and Christine practice saying “good morning” at Circle
Time with Miss Mi-Mi. Janelle enjoying tactile play in the classroom sensory group


in Baldwin, please contact Tiffany Mori 412.281.7244 x269 or tmori@westernpa. easterseals.com. She will enthusiastically answer your questions about the school. You will also be inspired by seeing the good work being done there. “Resolve to be tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant with the weak and the wrong. Sometime in your life you will have been all of these.” (Dr. Robert H. Goddard, American Professor and Inventor) ¿

In operation for nearly 40 years,

the Easter Seals School Program also provides social services, parent and siblings support groups that assist families in the areas of social, educational, medical and psychological functioning.

Joshua

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 23


FEATURE

Conceptually Thinking

CHALLENGE 1 Architecture Earthquake Tower Challenge: During the 2012 school year Mr. Beau Sedlar’s Technology Education classes started a new and innovative project that fits into Brentwood Borough School District’s architecture curriculum. The project involves using balsa wood to design towers that must weigh less than a half pound and be at least five feet in height. The overall goal for the students is to design towers that incorporate engineering principles. The students then compete against each other using an earthquake machine that has measurable tremors. In order for this project to take place, Mr. Sedlar and his architecture class designed an earthquake machine that is fully functional and can test student made towers. The pictures included shows Justin Kemmler, Derek Houge, 24 724.942.0940 to advertise |

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall


Architecture Earthquake Tower Challenge and Ryan Vickless testing their towers on the earthquake machine. The students make educated decisions on truss designs as well as incorporating dynamic dampers to help counteract the tremors produced by the earthquake machine.

CHALLENGE 2 Engineering Bridge Design Challenge: Mr. Sedlar’s Engineering courses are designed to invoke critical thinking and problem solving skills in high school aged students. The bridge design challenge encourages students to build a 1-pound bridge made of merely ¼-inch stock material to hold the maximum amount of weight possible. Zack Downie and Matt Benedik, juniors at Brentwood Borough School District, show off their Continued on next page ›

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Engineering Bridge Design Challenge

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Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 25


winning bridge design that held a staggering 370 pounds. The students are taught about bridge design principles through STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) philosophies within the classroom and then they are allowed to use their skills and knowledge gained in constructing their bridge ideas.

CHALLENGE 3 F1 in Schools Challenge; Brentwood Borough Middle School: For the first time, the Brentwood Middle School has been crowned the Pennsylvania State Champions in a worldwide competition called F1 in Schools. The F1 in Schools challenge hosts over 12 million participants from 34 countries in which students compete for scholarships and the chance to represent their country on a global stage. This event required that the students work diligently to design, build, and test a model Formula One race car that runs on pressurized CO2 gas. The cars are propelled at about 60 miles per hour down an 80-foot track. But, this competition is not all about speed! The teams are also judged on several other categories including Team Unity, Marketing, Presentation, Engineering, and Design. Before teams can be named as international finalists, they must first win the regional challenge at the state level followed by the national championships. Each level is highly competitive and it is a great honor to win at the

Engineering Bridge Design Challenge state, national or international levels. This past year, Chris Hines, Luke O’Shea, Luke Benedik, Teddi Sedlar, Mike Lane, Brenden Topping, and Abby Shaffer proudly represented Brentwood Middle School at the state level where they won the Judge’s Choice Award as well as being named overall competition champions. The Brentwood team rallied behind their car named Sabertooth. Team Sabertooth worked together brainstorming marketing and application ideas for display boards, display props, a Power Point presentation, and various aspects of the team and car as defined by the competition rules. Countless hours were logged by members of the team as they perfected every element of their presentation, display, and car. Students could be seen surreptitiously hand sanding wheels and spoilers while continuing to take notes in language arts, algebra, and math. The hours of hard work paid off when the team heard the state judges call Sabertooth to claim their place in the winner’s circle and a spot at the national competition. 26 724.942.0940 to advertise |

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall


Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 27


FEATURE

Dino-Mite Designs Brent Industries is a senior-level manufacturing and entrepreneurship assignment. Senior IML (Industrial Materials Lab) students are challenged to identify a needed or wanted product and then research, design, prototype, manufacture, market and ultimately sell. Each student is assigned a job with specific responsibilities (e.g. President, Design Engineer, Marketing Manager, Manufacturing Engineer, Quality Control Manager, Production Manager, Finance Manager etc.). The assignment is designed to expose students to aspects of manufacturing and business. This year, Brent Industries is offering for sale a child’s chair in the shape of a T-rex dinosaur. The chairs will be made available in limited quantities for $75 with a color option of Purple, Green or Orange. Orders can be placed by emailing: Brentindustries13@gmail.com.

See more designs on next page ›

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T-rex dinosaur child’s chair


The faces of experience at

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FEATURE Sophomores in IML start the year with an opportunity to choose from one of two projects. They can make an Adirondack chair (current variations include traditional and a bear shaped chair) or a Craftsman style end-table with mortise and tenon joinery. Each project allows a certain amount of customization and individualism.

Bear Shaped Adirondack Chair

Table

Traditional Adirondack Chair

We’re in your neighborhood. Stop by and see us! • • • • •

Accounting & Taxes Process Outsourcing Transition Management Contract Staffing Business Consulting

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Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

Brentwood Office “The Pink Building” 3730 Brownsville Road · Pittsburgh, PA 15227 (412) 884-4829


Two IML II students (Zac Downie and Matt Culp) are currently working to make solid-bodied electric guitars. Auto-CAD software (Computer-Aided Design) is used to create drawings of the guitar parts. MasterCAM software (Computer-Aided Manufacturing) is used to write coordinate system codes that are input into the CNC router (computer numerical control) which cuts the parts out.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 31


Landscape Lighting

Boulderscapes

Unique Plants & Trees Design Build Install Call us for a free consultation.

724-941-6500

www.mcmurraynursery.com


UPMC TODAY

Health and Wellness News You Can Use | Spring 2013

What’s Inside 2

When It’s More than Just Heartburn

3 4

Hope and Healing A Healing Touch Food in a Glass

5

Clinical Trials Can Change Lives

6 7

Depression and Older Adults Comprehensive Care for Today’s Urology Patients

© 2013 UPMC


When It’s More Than Just Heartburn UPMC Mercy offers comprehensive testing and minimally invasive surgery for complex problems of the esophagus.

Most of us can count on an antacid or two to tame a bad case of heartburn. But acid reflux, of which heartburn is a symptom, can lead to a far more uncomfortable and potentially dangerous condition known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

• Large hiatal hernia (also known as giant paraesophageal hernia) repair • Achalasia (a rare swallowing disorder) surgical therapy • Esophageal diverticulum repair and removal “Patients travel hundreds of miles, and most have had prior surgeries,” notes Dr. Awais. “Before and after operating, we use a quality of life test to measure a patient’s degree of reflux. We’ve learned that our patients typically experience better outcomes, less pain, and faster recovery times through our efforts. We also work with patients on long-term lifestyle changes to maintain their health.” Linette says her re-operation “saved my life. I feel like a new person.” She has lost weight and no longer takes medication for diabetes, cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

Testing is key A variety of tests are needed prior to any esophageal or gastric surgery. At UPMC Mercy, patients can get these tests done quickly and efficiently at one location, including: Endoscopy — Allows a doctor to use a thin, narrow tube with a camera and light to view the inside of the throat and stomach Motility testing — Identifies how well the muscles of the esophagus are functioning

Linette Johns of Upper Burrell first underwent surgery for GERD in 2000. But in recent years, severe heartburn and other symptoms reappeared. “I knew the success rate of a repeat surgery on the esophagus wasn’t good, so I was hesitant to have it done,” says Linette. “But my son, Jeff, who’s studying to be a doctor, told me that I could be at risk for esophageal cancer. That motivated me to take the next step.”

Tackling complicated cases In March 2012, Omar Awais, DO, chief of thoracic surgery at UPMC Mercy, performed the repeat surgery on Linette. Under his expertise, some of the region’s most complex, minimally invasive esophageal surgeries are taking place at UPMC Mercy, including: • Minimally invasive surgery to remove all or part of the esophagus to treat esophageal cancer • Repair of recurrent hiatal hernia • Repeat esophageal surgery

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Acid ph testing — Measures the amount of acid exposure into the esophagus Impedance testing — Measures the frequency and amount of gastric fluids (both acidic and non-acidic) entering the esophagus and larynx from the stomach

Are you at risk? “Certainly not everyone with GERD requires surgery. Most cases can be controlled through medical therapy, weight loss, modified diet, and medication,” says Dr. Awais. “But early detection and treatment of GERD is key because of its associated risk with esophageal cancer.” At greatest risk are men over the age of 50 who are obese and have suffered from heartburn three or more times a week for five years or longer. To learn more about UPMC Mercy’s programs to diagnose and treat complex problems of the esophagus, call 1-800-533-UPMC (8762).


Hope and Healing UPMC is leading the way with new treatment options for hepatitis C.

Decades after receiving a childhood blood transfusion, Chris Sosinski was shocked to learn he had the hepatitis C virus, which had led to cirrhosis and the prospect of a liver transplant. Today, Chris remains hepatitis C negative, thanks to a new direct-acting antiviral therapy he received at the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases last year. Months after ending treatment in October, his viral load remains at zero. “That means it’s gone,” says Chris, 49, of Jeannette. “No more medicine and — if I take care of myself — no transplant.”

Baby boomers beware Chris is one of a growing number of baby boomers diagnosed with hepatitis C, a problem so serious that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends that everyone born between 1945 and 1965 be tested for the virus. The CDC estimates that more than 75 percent of the nation’s 3 million adults currently living with hepatitis C are baby boomers — and most don’t know they’re infected. “Hepatitis C is a silent disease; most people have no symptoms,” says Kapil Chopra, MD, director, UPMC Center for Liver Diseases. “But if diagnosed early, it can be cured or managed successfully before it can develop into cirrhosis or liver cancer.”

A new era of treatment Thankfully for Chris and other hepatitis C patients, two drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 ushered in a new era of treatment, delivering improved cure rates and shorter treatment time for the most prevalent — and hardest to treat — strain of the virus. Playing a critical role was the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases, where specialists have been at the forefront in the evaluation and clinical trials of promising new therapies.

Hundreds of UPMC patients took part in groundbreaking clinical trials for those new drugs. (Turn to page 5 to learn about other clinical trials and how they are affecting patients’ lives.) Today, even more are participating in clinical trials of new therapies at UPMC with the potential for even better results in fighting chronic hepatitis C infections. “These are exciting times. Over the next few years, we expect to have several new options that will eradicate the hepatitis C virus in most patients without side effects,” says Dr. Chopra. “It’s a new era of treatment and hope for our patients.”

A leading resource for complex care Treating and managing hepatitis C can be complex for both patients and health care providers. In the tri-state area, UPMC is the leading provider of comprehensive and advanced specialty care for patients with the virus. “Our multidisciplinary specialists are involved in researching and evaluating new treatments. They bring a unique perspective for managing these complex therapies,” explains Dr. Chopra. These specialists work together to assess patients, select appropriate antiviral therapies, educate patients, monitor for adverse effects and drug interactions, and provide support for patients and family members. “They are familiar with the latest, cutting-edge therapies and developing new ones,” adds Dr. Chopra. For those patients who don’t respond to treatment and are experiencing liver failure, the program also provides seamless transition to UPMC’s internationally renowned transplant program. To read about the risk factors for hepatitis C and what you can do, visit UPMC.com/Today. For more information about treatments for hepatitis C, contact the UPMC Center for Liver Diseases at 1-800-447-1651.

1-800-533-UPMC

3


Health Tips from UPMC Health Plan

A Healing Touch There are ways to relieve pain and nausea through alternative medicine. A growing number of patients are adding acupuncture and other alternative therapies to their medical care.

“You don’t have to be a believer for it to work,” says Betty Liu, MD, a physician and acupuncture specialist at the UPMC Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. “I’ve seen dramatic reductions in pain and nausea — some instantaneous, some after multiple sessions.”

Who uses it? Patients frequently turn to acupuncture and other therapies to control pain, including arthritis, back pain, fibromyalgia, migraines, and spasms, or to ease nausea due to pregnancy or chemotherapy. Integrating these therapies with conventional medicine can help patients find relief more quickly, or continue making progress toward their goals.

What are some treatments? Acupuncture, one of the most popular therapies, uses thin needles to stimulate various points around the body. “We’re not certain how it works, but we know it releases endorphins, which act like opiates to relieve pain,” Dr. Liu says. Massage therapy uses acupressure and deep tissue massage to increase blood flow to an injured area and release endorphins.

What is alternative medicine? If you visit an acupuncturist or chiropractor, you’re seeking treatment in the field of complementary and alternative medicine — an increasingly mainstream tool for doctors.

Chiropractic medicine adjusts the spine through manipulation to put the body into better alignment. For more information about alternative treatments, visit UPMC.com/Today.

Food in a Glass Choosing the best milk option for you. Are you lingering longer in the dairy aisle, pondering your ever-increasing options? Should you reach for your usual skim milk — or be adventurous and try rice, almond, or soy? Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, UPMC’s director of sports nutrition, says making the right choice is this simple: “Essentially, milk is food in a glass. Choose the drink that offers the best nutrition for your needs.” Not all milk and dairy alternatives are equal: read labels carefully, comparing the fat and carbohydrate contents. “For example, to reduce soy milk’s ‘beanie’ taste, sugar is added,” explains Ms. Bonci. “That can jump the carbohydrate count from 12 to 24 grams.” Look beyond just calories, too: milk is rich in protein, calcium, and minerals. “An 8-ounce serving of milk has 8 grams of protein, compared to 6 grams for soy milk and just 1 gram for almond and rice milk,” she adds. Unless a food allergy is present, the best choice for most of us is cow’s milk. “For children under two, select whole milk,” says Ms. Bonci. “Otherwise, reach for 1 percent or skim milk — both offer a lower saturated fat content and higher calcium. Enhanced or ‘super’ skim milk features a richer texture many people prefer.” And if you’re debating about organic versus regular milk, Ms. Bonci advises that your pocketbook be your guide. “There’s no nutritional difference between the two,” she says.

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UPMC.com/Today


Clinical Trials Can Change Lives Bringing patients, physicians, and researchers together to change the future of medicine.

Research opens the door for new possibilities in patient care. But long before a drug, medical device, treatment, or surgical procedure becomes widely available, it must first be proven safe and effective.

therapy from a patient’s own fat tissue,” explains Dr. Rubin. “By harnessing the body’s own regenerative capabilities, we’re applying new technologies and scientific advancements to restore both form and function in patients.” For more information, visit UPMC.com/restore or call 412-864-2587. Solutions for out-of-control blood pressure. Of the 67 million Americans with high blood pressure, more than half fail to keep it under control. Many have difficulty battling the disease despite taking three or more medications, a condition known as treatment-resistant hypertension. As part of the body’s sympathetic nervous system, our kidneys play an important role in regulating long-term blood pressure. In most patients with hypertension, the sympathetic nervous system is overactive, thereby increasing blood pressure and causing heart, kidney, and blood vessel damage.

At UPMC, clinical trials are the bridge between research and the future of modern medicine. As one of the nation’s top-ranked health care systems, UPMC annually directs or participates in hundreds of groundbreaking clinical trials in virtually every medical specialty. Some are offered only at UPMC, while others are part of national and even international trials. Each is carefully monitored and measured by expert UPMC physicians who are leaders in their fields. For a patients whose illness has no cure or no longer responds to current treatment, UPMC’s clinical trials offer potentially life-saving medical breakthroughs. Other patients enroll in clinical trials with the hope of finding a better or more costeffective treatment. The following three UPMC trials currently are seeking qualified patient volunteers: Healing soldiers disfigured in battle. A flash of light, the sound of an explosion … and a soldier’s life is forever changed by a traumatic facial injury. But thanks to two government-funded clinical trials, efforts are under way at UPMC to improve the lives of wounded soldiers through facial reconstruction using the person’s own tissue. The study is enrolling military and civilian patients with visible deformities of the head or face following trauma, applying minimally invasive therapy to restore a more normal appearance. These trials are led by J. Peter Rubin, MD, director of UPMC’s Center for Innovation in Restorative Medicine and an expert in adult stem cells derived from fat. “We’re using stem cell

John Schindler, MD, an interventional cardiologist with UPMC’s Heart and Vascular Institute, is participating in an industryfunded clinical trial in which a device is placed in an artery leading to the kidney. “This therapy uses a catheter to deliver low radiofrequency energy to destroy or disable the renal nerves,” says Dr. Schindler. “If effective, this device could be a valuable alternative to medications for patients with resistant hypertension.” For more information, contact Lisa Baxendell, RN, at 412-802-8672. Eliminating blood clots. In 2013, nearly a quarter-million adults will be diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), in which blood clots form mainly in a deep vein in the leg. DVT can result in persistent leg pain and swelling; if the clot breaks loose and moves to the lungs, a potentially deadly pulmonary embolism can occur. Conventional treatment involves blood thinners and wearing compression hosiery. “We want to dissolve the clot to eliminate its consequences,” says Rabih Chaer, MD, a UPMC vascular surgeon. Dr. Chaer is participating in a national, multidisciplinary clinical trial to determine if DVT patients would benefit from a more aggressive treatment involving the use of an image-guided catheter to dissolve the clot. “In vascular surgery, our work is technology driven; medical devices are constantly changing,” says Dr. Chaer. “By testing innovative devices, we offer our patients new opportunities to alleviate or resolve their illness.” For more information, contact Susan Tamburro at 412-623-8452. For a complete list of clinical trials now available, please visit UPMC.com/Today. To learn more about the benefits of clinical trials in patient care, please turn to page 3 and read about UPMC’s advancements in the treatment of hepatitis C.

1-800-533-UPMC

5


Depression and Older Adults While it may be common, it’s important to know that depression is not a normal part of aging.

Its services include: • Preventive services, evaluation, and consultation • Treatment through therapy and/or medication • Participation in innovative research studies • Educational support • Referrals for assistance

Research studies benefit patients today and tomorrow Among the center’s current research studies are efforts to improve sleep patterns, lower stress levels, promote brain health, and reduce pain as a way of preventing depression among adults age 60 and older. These include: RECALL: A study about reducing stress among seniors experiencing mild memory, language, or judgment loss RAPID: A study for adults with osteoarthritis knee pain More than 6.5 million Americans over age 65 experience latelife depression that can last for months and even years. But many older adults and their caretakers don’t seek treatment because they think depression is inevitable as we age. Its symptoms — irritability, social isolation, poor sleep, loss of appetite, and memory loss — also are easily mistaken as signs of other illnesses. “Depression erodes our quality of life, our productivity, and our ability to have fulfilling relationships,” explains Charles Reynolds III, MD, director, Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh. He also is director of the Center of Excellence in Late Life Depression Prevention and Treatment Research at the University of Pittsburgh. The center is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “Untreated, late-life depression puts older adults at risk for significant declines in their mental and physical health. It can be so debilitating that it threatens their ability to live independently,” he notes. “But the right professional help and medications can be life changing for these individuals.”

A wide range of support The center offers expertise in the detection, prevention, and treatment of depression, stress, complicated bereavement, or bipolar disorders in older adults. Through its research focus, all visits and medications are provided at no cost.

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UPMC.com/Today

Addressing Pain and Depression Together (ADAPT): A study for adults living with both depression and back pain Healing Emotions After Loss (HEAL): A study for adults ages 18 to 95 who are experiencing prolonged or acute grief lasting six months or more over the loss of a loved one

One of the nation’s leading programs of its kind The Center of Excellence in Late Life Depression Prevention and Treatment Research is located in the Oakland area of Pittsburgh at both the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC. It is one of only three centers of excellence in geriatric psychiatry funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the John A. Hartford Foundation. To learn more about the center’s services or to participate in one of its current research programs, call 412-246-6006 or visit latelifedepression.org.


Comprehensive Care for Today’s Urology Patients From medication to radiation to surgical robotic technology, the new UPMC Mercy urology center offers tailored, cutting-edge care for patients.

Whether you need medical care for bladder cancer, an enlarged prostate, urinary tract infection, or sexual dysfunction, UPMC Mercy offers comprehensive care to treat the special urological health needs of both men and women.

Percutaneous nephrolithotomy — A highly specialized, minimally invasive keyhole procedure to remove large kidney stones by using high frequency sound waves to break them down and a vacuum to quickly remove fragments.

“Our urologists are experts in caring for even the most complicated and difficult cases,” says Ronald Benoit, MD, a urologic surgeon and director of the UPMC Mercy urology center, where he leads a team of highly trained specialists in general urology, urologic oncology, reconstructive surgery, and kidney stone removal.

To schedule an appointment with a urologist at UPMC Mercy, call 412-232-5850.

As a Center of Excellence in Urologic Care, UPMC Mercy features a skilled multidisciplinary team of urologists trained in treating patients who have disorders and diseases of the kidneys, bladder, or prostate.

The latest in diagnosis and treatment techniques According to Dr. Benoit, the hospital’s urology specialists use advanced technologies, medical equipment, and treatments — including minimally invasive surgical technology and robotic surgery — aimed at reducing postoperative pain, recovery time, and side effects. “Robotic urology uses endoscopic techniques, so patients have smaller incisions and a faster recovery time,” says Dr. Benoit. This technology is ideal for complex and delicate urologic surgeries, such as a prostatectomy, where doctors must operate in a tightly confined area surrounded by nerves affecting urinary control and sexual function. Special procedures at UPMC Mercy’s urology center include: Robotic-assisted prostatectomy — A minimally invasive, nerve-sparing procedure for prostate cancer that preserves potency and urinary control. Laparoscopic nephrectomy — A minimally invasive procedure that allows all or part of the kidney to be removed through a keyhole procedure instead of a large open incision. Prostate brachytherapy (seed implants) — An effective treatment for patients with prostate cancer where seed implants are used to deliver a high dose of radiation to the tumor while reducing the risk of complications to surrounding tissue. UPMC Mercy is the only Pittsburgh hospital using Cesium-131, a newer compound that does not remain in the body as long as traditional treatments, resulting in faster resolution of side effects.

Leaders in urologic care As a Center of Excellence in Urologic Care, UPMC Mercy has recently recruited several prominent experts — all of whom earned medical degrees at the University of Pittsburgh, including: Mang Chen, MD, a reconstructive urology specialist, completed a fellowship in urologic trauma and reconstruction at the Detroit Medical Center. Michelle Jo Semins, MD, a kidney stone specialist, completed her residency in urology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, where she also underwent special training in endourology, a minimally invasive technique to treat kidney stones. Tatum Tarin, MD, a urologic oncology specialist, completed his residency in urology at Stanford University Medical Center and a urologic oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

1-800-533-UPMC

7


UPMC Mercy

1400 Locust St. Pittsburgh, PA 15219

UPMC Today is published quarterly to provide you with health and wellness information and classes and events available at UPMC. This publication is for information purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice or replace a physician’s medical assessment. Always consult first with your physician about anything related to your personal health.

Follow UPMC on Facebook.

Care that women can believe in as strongly as their Catholic faith.

UPMC Mercy provides a full range of women’s health services rooted in the Catholic tradition. From prenatal education, to menopause diagnosis and treatment, to complete oncological care, and much more, UPMC Mercy strives to ensure the comfort of patients in body, mind, and spirit. This holistic approach is the foundation of more than 150 years of women’s health services. To learn more about UPMC Mercy OB/GYN services, or to schedule an appointment, call 1-800-533-UPMC (8762) or visit UPMC.com/Mercy.

Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, UPMC is ranked among the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report.


d o o w t n Bre

Food Pantry

Every month the Brentwood Presbyterian Church Food Pantry distributes food, paper products, cleaning and hygiene products to over 100 families who are in need of assistance. The pantry also distributes food on an emergency basis throughout the month. On the three major holidays, Christmas, Easter and Thanksgiving, every family also receives a gift card from Giant Eagle. With that said, you can only imagine the cost. This is a very expensive undertaking. Yes, we are blessed by being situated in a very generous community. We receive money and food products from the local churches, scouts, schools in the Borough of Brentwood, philanthropic organizations, the post office, memorials, July 4th Parade Committee, CFC, United Way and many other sources. However, we spend a large amount of money each month. We purchase between one (1) and three (3) ton of food from the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank

every month at a cost that exceeds $1,000. A truck must be rented to transport the food to the Food Bank; there are the monthly utilities such as, the phone system, electric, heat, trash and additional expenses. The gift cards purchased for our clients are very much appreciated during the holiday season. We are an entirely volunteer organization and there is no compensation for their time and hard work. The Brentwood Presbyterian Church Food Pantry, located at 3725 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227, offers food to residents of the Borough. The Food Pantry is an affiliate of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. If you are in need of assistance, please contact the Brentwood Community Food Pantry and request information on the program. If you meet the financial requirements of the Brentwood Food Pantry

they assist you. Applicants must register in advance by calling 412-882-6035 and a large box of non-perishable food items will be waiting for you which include eggs from Giant Eagle. Distribution is on the third Saturday of the month On behalf of the Brentwood Community Food Pantry, we take this opportunity to thank all the individuals that volunteer their time and service; however, it is important that we continue to ask for volunteers and donations for this worthy cause. The Brentwood Food Pantry opened 32 years ago with 40 families receiving assistance. Every year the need grows larger and the cost continues to escalate. Your non-perishable items are greatly needed; please call 412-882-6035 to volunteer or to donate items. Again, thank you for your assistance as it is greatly appreciated as we continue to take care of our own in Brentwood!

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5

Wholesome Snacks for Families on the Go

A busy family schedule means there’s less time to gather around the dinner table each night, let alone ensure everyone in the family is getting the nutrients they need to live healthy. And what convenience foods offer in terms of portability, they often lack in vitamins and nutrients. But with a little preparation, you can ensure that convenient, wholesome, on-the-go snacks are at the ready when it’s time to head to play practice or ballet lessons. Here are a few snack ideas to keep your family happy and healthy.

Smoothies

While smoothies may not be the first thing that pops in your mind in terms of portability and convenience, with the right to-go cup, straw and lid, smoothies can be a great way to get some key nutrients en route. Pre-packaged smoothies, however, often contain a great deal of sugar. Ensure your family reaps the benefits of a fruit smoothie by whipping up a batch using all-natural ingredients and freezing it for later. Be sure to store blended smoothies in freezer-safe or airtight containers in the freezer, and allow for one to two hours of defrost time before grabbing them and heading for the door.

Homemade Trail Mix

For a shelf-stable snack that’s perfect for storing in the car, at the office, or in your purse, consider mixing up your favorite dry food snack items such as popcorn, almonds, peanuts, dried cranberries, raisins, banana chips and more.

Whole Food Bars Just because you’re short on time, doesn’t mean you can’t work wholesome foods in convenient pocket- or purse-sized portions into your diet. But make sure to check the labels when you grab a quick snack. While many snack bars contain few nutrients and may be high in sugar, there are many made using wholesome ingredients such as rolled oats, organic soynuts and almond butter that are not only tasty, but dairy- and gluten-free, as well as vegan. These bars are great go-to options you can feel good about giving your family. Learn more about these wholesome snacks online.

Apple Chips

If you’re a fan of apples, consider making apple chips. Simply cut apples into about 1/8-inch thick slices, add a pinch of cinnamon, and place them in the oven at 200°F for roughly two hours. You’ll end up with tasty, wholesome apple chips you can store in sealed sandwich bags for up to three days. Toss them in a backpack, your purse, or leave them in the car for snacking on the go.

Edamame While soybeans might not be something you regularly prepare, they’re actually simple to

cook, can be modified using different seasonings and are easily eaten on the go. The night before a busy day, simply add 1 teaspoon of salt to a large pot of water, bring to a boil and add the edamame. Cook between 4 to 5 minutes for frozen edamame, 5 to 6 minutes for fresh. Drain, and then add your favorite seasoning and store in a zip-top bag or storage container in the refrigerator until you head out the door.

Keep snacks readily available in your kitchen, such as in a basket on the counter or portioned out on a shelf within the refrigerator to ensure your family will choose wholesome foods over convenient, less-healthy snacks. With a little planning and preparation, you can save time on busy days, while ensuring everyone gets the nutrients they need. Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 43


n e t a m r e y l E y o Elr

Hears a WHO!

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Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

The Brentwood Borough School District believes that reading is the key to academic success and sustaining a vital community. Elroy Elementary School embraces the truth that we all need to work together to raise awareness and motivation for reading. The staff at Elroy Elementary work hard to provide a complete reading program to ensure every student has the necessary reading skills to be a successful learner. On this year’s “Read Across America Day” the Brentwood Borough School District’s Superintendent, Dr. Ron Dufalla, along with school board members Mr. David Schaap, Mrs. Donna Werner, and Mrs. Julia McCarthy made the commitment to mentor reading in primary classrooms through the playful rhymes of their favorite Dr. Seuss book. Librarians Kristen, Tracy, and Connie from the Brentwood Community Library and a retired reading specialist, Mary Ann McSwigan, were all eager to be a part of this great community endeavor. The culminating event took place in the gym where 300 locked pairs of eyes and ears were tuned in to the reading acrobats of principal Ms. Amy Burch presenting the Dr. Seuss book The Cat in the Hat.


Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 45


That Mysterious and Dollar Oscar Wilde once said, “There is only one class in the community that thinks more about money than the rich, and that is the poor.”

M

oney, or the lack of it, can affect every area of your life from healthcare to an individual’s peace of mind. And the lack thereof can cause it to take on an even greater significance to the point of obsession. In our society people feel that wealth is a matter of luck and happenstance, never realizing that is it actually the result of a series good financial decisions, guided by common sense and discipline. “With 7 out of every 10 American families living paycheck-to-paycheck, it’s all about changing the way that people think about money,” explains Gene Natali, co-author of The Missing Semester. “I recently spoke with a couple in their 30s who were able to save $1,000 in a 4-month period – not by avoiding big purchases, but by becoming more aware of small impulse buys that were chipping away at their monthly budget. A cup of coffee on the way to work every day, the purchase of a seldom-used kitchen gadget or the cost of those extra text messages, can all add up to hundreds of dollars each month collectively.”

T

he Missing Semester is a short course in making wise financial decisions that in turn can lead to financial freedom. The book offers timeless advice on money that demystifies the process of accumulating wealth. “Two things that every individual should ask themselves before making any purchase is if they actually need what they are purchasing and if so, why do they need it. It’s all about awareness and realizing that financial choices, even small ones, have consequences,” adds Natali. Although the book targets those between the ages of 18 to 30, the common sense approach can make an immense difference in

anyone’s financial status. “Take the analogy of a hammer, it works the same, no matter what age you start using it. The tools in this book work for anyone at any age. It’s never too late to start making good financial decisions, nor is it ever too early.”

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he culture of living from paycheck to paycheck doesn’t have to be the norm for the masses, and there is a benefit to forming good habits and starting young. Natali has

already seen the effects of the methods described in the book on students and their new perspective of the future. Several high schools and colleges have made use of the book in their curriculum, with students as young as high school freshmen benefiting from the lessons of The Missing Semester. “We are beginning to hear more and more firsthand accounts from folks who have been positively impacted by this book. This provides a lot of energy for Matt (co-author Matt Kabala a fellow Pittsburgh native) and I to continue working hard to introduce this book across the country. We want to help a lot of people.”

“The Missing Semester gives young adults the facts on how to manage and take ownership of their finances. This book is a gift every graduating student should receive.” – Richard A. Dioli - Director of Schools, Sacred Heart Schools, Atherton, CA

The book is currently available on Amazon, Kindle and Nook with a portion of every sale going to support charities that encourage young entrepreneurs and educational initiatives that bridge the knowledge gap among students. The book will also be carried at select Hallmark stores this spring for graduation season Visit the Facebook page for “The Missing Semester,” for helpful daily tips on money management and making smart financial choices. Gene Natali, Jr. is a Senior Vice President at C.S. McKee, L.P., a Pittsburgh-based investment firm. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Allegheny College, and an MBA with a concentration in finance from Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business. He is currently a Level III candidate for accreditation as a Chartered Financial Analyst.


Briefly Brentwood Borough News

A MESSAGE FROM THE DESK OF

MAYOR KEN LOCKHART

D

uring the winter months we pretty much stay at home and watch the snow fall hoping “Punxsutawney Phil” at Gobbler’s Knob is correct and spring is just around the corner; after all he is as good as any meteorologist with a 50/50 chance of being right. With that said, we now look forward to spring and the summer weather with all the events scheduled to take place in Brentwood. For starters, I’m sure the residents are aware of the construction that will take place in Brentwood Park. The Borough Council and the Brentwood Park Initiative agreed to move forward and the renovation of Brentwood Stadium will begin in the spring. With the renovations and construction equipment at the Stadium this will create an inconvenience to the residents, organizations and other festivities scheduled during the summer of 2013 at the park. Please consider safety when visiting Brentwood Park this summer especially near the Stadium where there will be heavy equipment and construction. Permits have been approved for several Borough organizations to practice and play ball, conduct track meets, school field trips, and the 4th of July festivities but all are subject to possible change and/or cancellation due to the construction. Once the construction begins, the organizations and all permit holders will receive notification regarding the change or cancellation of the permit for safety purposes. I believe for the first time in the history of Brentwood, due to the construction in the park and for safety reasons, the 4th of July Committee scheduled the 4th of July Fireworks Display on Wednesday, July 3, 2013, at dusk, approximately 9:30 P.M., in Brentwood Park at the upper field. Through the years, the 4th of July Fireworks would be rescheduled due to inclement weather and were always the following day on July 5th. SAVE THE DATES The festivities will begin on Wednesday, July 3, 2013 with the “Battle of the Barrels” sponsored by the Brentwood Volunteer Fire Company in front of the Borough Building. During this time the business owners on Brownsville Road, within the 3500 block through the 3700 block, will be selling their wares and distributing free samples. The fireworks display will be held at the upper field in Brentwood Park, with no ground fireworks display. The 5-K Race will be held on Thursday, July 4, 2013 at 9:00 A.M., followed by the Annual 4th of July Parade at 10:00 A.M. Looking forward to seeing you at all these events; invite your friends and family to celebrate Independence Day in Brentwood. Again, I ask the residents to please be aware of the construction and be mindful of “Safety First” for you and your family when visiting the park this summer. Wishing you a great summer! Mayor Ken Lockhart

SAVE THE DATES: March 19th Agenda Meeting March 26th Council Meeting April 20th SHRED Day April 23rd Agenda Meeting April 26th Brentwood Park Ground Breaking Ceremony for Phase I and Phase II April 30th Council Meeting May 3rd Brentwood Park Ground Breaking Ceremony for Phase I and Phase II May 4th Community/REDD Up Day May 21st Agenda Meeting May 25th Swim Pool Opens May 28th Council Meeting June 11th BBOA PNC Park Pirate Game June 18th Agenda Meeting June 25th Council Meeting July 3rd “Battle of the Barrels” Brentwood Fireworks 9:30 P.M. July 4th 5-K Race Brentwood Parade Borough Offices closed on the following dates: March 29th Good Friday May 27th Memorial Day June 14th Flag Day July 4th Independence Day

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Briefly Brentwood Borough News

“ The importance of money flows from it being a link between the present and the future.” - John Maynard Keynes

2013 Fiscal Year Overall Budget Summary and Overview General Fund Revenues A conservative and realistic approach was utilized when preparing the 2013 Budget by underestimating revenues and overestimating expenses. In an effort to enhance our residents’ quality of life, and to support local business growth, the Borough will continue to invest in public works, public safety (police, fire, and EMS), sanitary sewer infrastructure, parks and recreational facilities. The property tax rate will be reduced from 8.5 mils to 7.50 mils of property tax to account for the 2011 county-wide reassessments that goes into effect in 2013. This is expected to generate an estimated $2,970,744.78 based on a total local taxable assessed property value equally $406,975,730.00. It is unfortunate that not all of this is collectable due to the 2% discount rate as well as delinquent tax payers. Therefore, a 90% collection rate was assumed resulting in $2,673,670.30 in total current property tax revenues. This equates to the following dedicated millage:

A summary of the revenues sources being proposed for the 2013 Overall Brentwood Borough Budget are as illustrated below.

General Borough Operations 5.87 Mils $ 2,388,609.23 Library 0.50 Mils $ 203,487.87 Uncollected(1) 1.13 Mils $ 378,647.68 _____________________________________________ Total 7.50 Mils $2,970,744.78 (1)Includes $61,046 caused by the 2% discount payment and $317,602 in non-payment of real estate taxes.

General Fund Expenditures The proposed 2013 budget presents an estimated 14% decrease in revenues from $7.5 million to $6.40 million, in comparison to the 2012 Budget. The primary reason for the decrease in revenues is due to a decrease in revenues transferred from the Operating Reserve Fund. The Borough is not transferring as much as what was proposed in 2012. This is due to additional revenues attained through aggressive delinquent tax collections as well as revenue increases in other departments due to the increase in parking ticket fees, and increases in Zoning Hearing Board fees, etc. In addition, the 2013 general fund budget will continue to see a transfer from the Borough’s Sanitary Sewer Fund to account for General Fund expenditures that pertain to sanitary sewer related work and associated salaries. Expenditures will also be decreasing from $7.5 million to $6.40 million. The primary reason for the decrease in expenditures was on account of significant decreases in various departments. The Borough was able to hold the line on Employee Costs due to improved operations and cuts in other Department line items. However, due to maintenance of older facilities and an older community, the Borough saw some of their

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largest increases in such departments such as IT/Data (3%), Buildings (5%), Planning and Zoning (30%), Recreation (169%), Stadium (14%), Economic Development (10%), and Transfers (25%). Planning and Zoning and Recreation are associated with the hiring of a new full-time Assistant Code Enforcement Officer and a part-time Recreation Director. Brentwood Volunteer Fire Department and the Brentwood EMS total expenditures will not increase from 2012 levels. The Borough’s Long Term Debt Principal and Interest Payments in 2013 will actually see a decrease (22%) from 2012 levels. This equates to a total debt principle and interest payment of $400,187.46 $403,529.52 which is $3,342 less than 2012. This does NOT include a Tax Anticipation Note which the Borough will not be taking in 2013.


Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Cuts will be realized by continuing to implement efficiency measures into Borough Operations without sacrificing Borough services. For example, Council expenditures will decrease (-3%), Communications, Administration, Police, and Public Works remained constant or saw decreases due to savings in Healthcare costs.

A summary of the Proposed 2013 General Fund Expenditures are presented on the Table below.

Sanitary Sewer Fund Nearly $5 million dollars’ worth of expenditures is budgeted in the Borough’s Sanitary Sewer Fund for 2013. A majority of these expenses are associated with the increase in the ALCOSAN treatment fees as well as the major capital improvement repairs associated with the EPA Consent Decree Order. Capital Improvement Fund The 2013 Budget will also see an increase in the Capital Improvement Fund that will include nearly $3,753,644.00 in expenditures for such capital projects as the Borough’s 2013 Roadway Rehabilitation Project, new Police Vehicle and Public Works Backhoe, and the construction and relocation of the DPW from their current location in the Borough building to their own facility. It also includes over $300,000 for Design Fees associated with a new Municipal Complex. Brentwood Park Initiative Fund The 2013 Budget will also see a fund associated with design and repairs for the Brentwood Stadium and park. The Brentwood Park Initiative fund is budgeted with $2,546,000 that will be used to kickstart Phase 1 and Phase II of the six Phase, $8 million, park and stadium renovation project. Phase 1 & Phase II will begin in the spring of 2013. Highway Aid Fund Based on the November 2013 letter from Commonwealth of PA, 2013 Estimated Liquid Fuels allocation will be approximately $179,000.00. Due to the high price of motor vehicle fuels and the current economic conditions, revenue from liquid fuels purchases has declined. The amount available for the April 1, 2013, payment to municipalities is currently forecast to be less than the prior year. This amount is based on the mileage of 24.43 and a decrease in the population from 10,466 to 9,600 for Brentwood. As you can see, there is a lot going on in the Borough. Brentwood Council is dedicated to ensuring the future of the Borough by taking the necessary steps to invest in the Borough. They are to be commended for their vision and for making the hard decisions to invest in Brentwood. After all, if we are not willing to invest in Brentwood’s future, how can we expect anyone else to?

George Zboyovsky, PE Borough Manager

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 49


Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Welcome To The All New

Brentwood Borough Website! As affordable web development tools and high spend Internet connections have become available to the masses, organizations of all sizes have had the opportunity to more effectively communicate their brand electronically. For local governmental bodies, these changes have led to a substantial increase in citizen accessibility and accountability. In December 2012, Brentwood Borough launched an entirely overhauled webpage with an array of enhanced features, including: • An aesthetically pleasing front page design that incorporates our neighborly “windows on the town” rotating banner of photographs. • An easy-to-use navigation system. Our most frequently used links are stored directly on the home page, while all other information is sorted into one of four intuitive categories that are listed on the main menu. • An interactive “widget” that offers short synopses of our breaking news stories, a list of upcoming meetings and events, and an embedded Twitter feed. • A continuously updated stream of full length news articles, plus links to recent publications about our borough. • Informative calendars that promote local functions, denote important dates (garbage collection, holidays, etc.), and assist residents with reserving municipal facilities. • Quick access to our online SeeClickFix citizen reporting app, as well as our delinquent sewage and parking ticket payment module. • A multitude of readily available documents including permit applications, meeting minutes, ordinances and resolutions, financial data, and community outreach flyers. • New departmental articles that serve to answer frequently asked questions and provide a clear outline of governmental regulations and procedures. • An expanded collection of locally-focused material, including a street map, bus schedules, a business directory, and a community resource guide. • A prominent front page “featured event” section, a link to our social media accounts, one-stop employee contact information, and much more!

From the Desk of

John Balkovec, Operations Supervisor The 2013 subscription drive is on for Brentwood EMS. Your donation helps us supply the best quality patient care for the residents of Brentwood Borough. Please subscribe today. If you have any questions or did not receive a subscription packet call our office at 412-884-8740. Save the Date: Brentwood EMS Spring Craft and Vendor Show will be held on Saturday April 6th from 10am to 4pm at the St. Sylvester Church Hall. Information on tables contact our office at 412-884-8744 and leave message at Extension 416. Save the Date: Second Brentwood EMS Golf Outing will be held on June 14th at the Seven Springs Golf Club in Elizabeth Township. Spend the day on the golf course and support the Brentwood EMS. In case of an emergency, dial 911

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Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Borough Street Sweeping Schedule: As the warm, dry, sunny weather approaches, the Street Sweeper will begin taking action on the debris along the roads in the Borough. Beginning in April through October the Borough street sweeper will be combing the streets a minimum of once a month. This will be the second week of the month and when possible we will sweep on the last week of the month. During the month of March the sweeper will be used to clean the catch basins; hopefully it is a clean sweep and doesn’t go into the month of April. Beginning with the month of October and through the fall season, when the leaves continue to fall at its greatest volume, the sweeper will be used to pick up leaves in the street. Residents are not to rake or blow their leaves into the street/roadways. Annually, the Borough coordinates specific dates for “Leaf Pickup” with Allied Waste, the Borough’s hauler. That schedule will be announced later in the fall.

MONDAY Breman Owendale Kestner Newburn W. Bellcrest W. Francis W. Garden Bookman Laveton Willowhaven Kaplan Reagan Laveton Drebert Shadewell Van Wyck Hillson Pary Munsey Sceneridge Outlook Bracken Kuafman-Off Marylea Dauphin

TUESDAY Marylea Brownsville Greenlee-East Edge Tuxey Sankey Churchview Wainwright Burdine Bauman

WEDNESDAY Clermont Elroy Brentwood Ave. Glendale Pyramid Waidler Pentland Grayson Brevard Vernon Hazelhurst Circle Drive Korb Burgess Kingsley Villawood Fairway Shadyway Beechdale Lawnwood E. Bellcrest E. Francis Spangler Catskill-Lower

BOROUGH OF BRENTWOOD EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER The Borough Of Brentwood Is Currently Accepting Applications For The Following Summer, Part-Time Temporary Position: ASSISTANT POOL MANAGER– The Assistant Pool Manager will perform a variety of duties in planning, scheduling, maintaining the seasonal operation of the pool, and communicating with the Borough Recreation Director. This position is non-exempt under the FLSA. • Qualifications include experience in pool management. • Possess current Water Safety Instructors Certificate. • Act 33/Act 34 Clearances reflecting an appropriate criminal record for work around children. • Current CPR and first aid certified

THURSDAY Pointview Daily Raddison Oakton Conson Tyrol Woodrow-Off Willock Woodrow-Off Hillman Windsor Dalewood Elton Hilpert Meadowbrook Grad E. Garden Catskill-Upper Jacobsen Cloverlea Threnhauser E. Brentridge Hurson Way Graper Hillman Spangler

FRIDAY Colonial Park Old Clairton Lawnview White Oak Ct. Rockwood Dewalt Marylea Delco Sunview Greenlee-West Jameson Sunview Biesner Kaufman Theresa Mira W. Brentridge Lanmore Heathmore Olancha Koegler W. Willock Drebert Kaufman-Off Brownsville Brownsville

• Knowledge of the operation of a swimming pool, including sanitation, maintenance, safety, and public relations. • Knowledge of swimming pool cash management operations and recordkeeping. • Knowledge of principles, practices and application of lifesaving and first aid techniques. • Knowledge of rules and regulations pertaining to the pool use. Salary is set by Borough Resolution at $9.89 per hour. Applications can be picked up at the Borough Administrative Office at 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM Monday – Friday or downloaded from the Borough Website: www.brentwoodboro.com Applications are being accepted through Friday, April 5, 2013 until 3:00 P.M. at the Brentwood Municipal Building Administrative Office, Attention: Dawn Lane, 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227. Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 51


Briefly Brentwood Borough News

BRENTWOOD COMMUNITY CLEAN UP DAY/REDD UP DAY SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013

Brentwood Borough, in conjunction with Citizens Against Litter, has scheduled Redd Up Brentwood Day for Saturday, May 4, 2013, from 10 AM to 2 PM. Volunteer and earn four community service hours! – We are asking for volunteers to assist us by picking up litter from our streets, parks, and other “Garbagevilles” throughout the Borough. Volunteers will be able to earn four community service hours for participating in the event. Volunteers will meet at the Brentwood Library Community Room. For additional information or to register for this activity, please contact Robert Mackewich at 412-884-1500 ext. 113. E-cycle your e-waste! – Goodwill Industries will be on hand to collect your unwanted computers, monitors, printers, fax machines, digital cameras, chargers, adapters, microwaves, and other electronics on Park Drive in Brentwood Park. All hard drives and data are destroyed to Department of Defense standards. Goodwill reuses and recycles your donations to help improve job and educational skills, careers, and lives. Drop off your hard-to-dispose-of items! – A dumpster will be available at the Brentwood Park parking lot to drop off the following items: • Tires (no rims) • Large brush/clippings 4 inches or less (no logs) • Scrap metal and aluminum • Construction materials including larger items • Old gas grills, lawn mowers (gasoline and oil must be removed) • Refrigerators and air conditioners (Freon must be removed and item properly tagged) Note: No hazardous waste will be accepted (paint, varnish, motor oil, batteries, car parts, etc.)

“Spread the news and let’s “Redd Up Brentwood!”

Proof of Residency is required and will be Enforced! Vehicles Larger than a Standard Pick-Up Truck prohibited!

BOROUGH OF BRENTWOOD EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

2013 Summer Administrative Intern THE BOROUGH OF BRENTWOOD IS CURRENTLY ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING SUMMER, PART-TIME POSITION: ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN - The assigned Intern will work closely with the Borough Manager, the Finance Director, and Borough Council associated with assisting on the preparation of Grant Applications, Human Resources, and Budgeting. Qualified applicant must be currently enrolled in a college program majoring in political science, business, public administration or related field. Have the ability to deal with the public and others tactfully and courteously, to communicate effectively, orally and in writing and have the knowledge and efficient use of computers including proficient use of Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint. Salary is set by Borough Resolution at $10.00/hr. Applications can be picked up at the Borough Administrative Office at 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM Monday – Friday or downloaded from the Borough Website: www.brentwoodboro.com Applications are being accepted through Friday, April 5, 2013 until 3:00 P.M. at the Brentwood Municipal Building Administrative Office, Attention: Dawn Lane, 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227. 52

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BOROUGH OF BRENTWOOD EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER The Borough of Brentwood is currently accepting applications for the following 2013 summer, part-time temporary position: SUMMER TEMPORARY LIFEGUARDS—Must have proper certifications, CPR and First Aid requirements and must be at least 16 years of age at the time of employment. Salary is $8.00/hour. Applications can be picked up at the Borough Administrative Office at 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM Monday – Friday or downloaded from the Borough Website: www.brentwoodboro.com Applications are being accepted through Friday, April 5, 2013 until 3:00 P.M. at the Brentwood Municipal Building Administrative Office, Attention: Dawn Lane, 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227.


Briefly Brentwood Water Pollutio

Borough News No matter where you work, your b health of our watershed. Industri chinery, cleaning products, garba leased from industrial waste flow takes a significant toll on public h reational opportunities in water b What can I do to reduce my risk of sexual assault? many businesses choose to impl undertake activities that reduce o se activities include the efficient • When approaching your car, with have your keytoxic s limits. harsh chemicals less ready Fewer than 1/3 of all assaults are reported cesses. A Pollution Prevention P Watershed Protection to the police. If you are the victim of a sexual • Lock car first, then start it up shed while lowering operational c • If followed, go back inside the store assault, report the attack to law enforcement Ten Best Practices To Followauthorities. When the attacker departs, • If it’s late, ask security to follow you to your car contact help at once. Find a safe environment d out if your company has a Pollution Prevention Plan and become informed • NEVER get into a stranger’s car away from the attacker; if possible have a ts policies. • If you are forced to defend yourself, trusted friend stay with you for moral support. our business doesn’t have a plan, volunteer to help develop implement remember your best weapon is your voice• Doand not shower or wash SCREAM. • Preserve all clothing and the crime scene . • Strike at a vulnerable area. Your aim is to • Be prepared to describe the attacker and ere possible, use alternative materials, for cleaning, coating and other proinflict pain in the fastest possible manner. anything else that may be helpful tion processes. Some basic vulnerable areas are: the eyes, • Get medical attention even if there are no the groin, the knee area, the shins and the visible injuries. Personnel experienced ctice the Three R’s—Recycle, Reduce and Reuse. Do not leave your drink unattended or instep. in sexual assaults will examine you and ghten your office or cube with plants to help absorb indoor pollution. accept one from an open container while at a • Do whatever you can to get away. provide counseling and support ng in yourbar own washable mugs or club, since drugs haveand beenglassware known to beinstead of• using • Remember to contact your local police Ask thepaper hospital for a sexual assault kit For Owners and Mana passed this way. Be aware of your surroundings department immediately. exam ducts. 1. Evaluate your most frequently at all times. Do not allow yourself to become n’t dump isolated any pollutants down facilitiesPrevention premises cals and toxins and develop a with someone youstorm do notdrains know orwhile on your Chief Robert D. Butelli Helpful Tips anywhere for that matter!). trust. Travel with a companion whenever their use. • Avoid walking or jogging alone about the level of intimacy youbutts or •litter Always be driveways aware of your surroundings 2. Incorporate environmental co a smokepossible. or lunchThink break? Don’t dump cigarette onto wantDispose in a relationship and clearly state your • Park in a lighted area, close to store into the design of products, b parking lots. of appropriately. manufacturing systems to im an up any spills immediately. ciency of resources. 1. Find out if your company has a Pollution and become the office, try to print and copy double-sided and reuse paper. 3. Prevention Think of Plan alternative methods informed of its policies. tions and maintenance activit inatetowasteful management p 2. If your business doesn’t have a plan, volunteer help develop and crease costs and cause pollu implement one. 4. Re-engineering or re-designin 3. Where possible, use alternative materials, for cleaning, coating and other operation allows it to take adv production processes. equipment that is cleaner, new 4. Practice the Three R’s—Recycle, Reduce and Reuse. efficient. 5. Buying theindoor correct amount of 5. Brighten your office or cube with plants to help absorb pollution. will decrease the amount of e 6. Bring in your own washable mugs and glassware instead of using that are discarded. paper products. 6. One company’s waste may be pany’s gain. Finding 7. Don’t dump any pollutants down storm drains while on your facilities alternati premises (or anywhere for that matter!). your business's waste will ge and most importantly reduce 8. On a smoke or lunch break? Don’t dump cigarette butts or litter onto watershed. driveways or parking lots. Dispose of appropriately. 7. Develop a good leak and spill 9. Clean up any spills immediately. gram.

Sexual Assault

Reduce Your I

Watershed Protection Ten Best Practices To Follow

10. At the office, try to print and copy double-sided and reuse paper.

Hard at Work? Don’t Forget About Our Watershed

!

Source information for this article provided with permission by the EPA. Source photography: Mark A. Johnson Photography

Source information for this article provided with permission by the EPA. Source photography: Mark A. Johnson Photography

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 53


Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Rebuilding Brentwood For The Future! PHASE I & II PARK REDEVELOPMENT

Status Update: It has been a fast four years from the time the BPI and Borough teamed up to work towards getting the Brentwood Park and Stadium Redevelopment Project a reality. Knowing this project was coming, the Borough prudently began allocating funding each year to future construction costs (approximately $200,000 have been earmarked to date) and worked tirelessly on obtaining grant funding (over $1 million). The grassroots organization, the Brentwood Park Initiative, better known as The BPI, have also kept this community wide project on the forefront of everyone’s minds by holding regular fundraising events from Cash Bashes and Trips to Steelers Away Games to an Annual Golf Outing, all of which resulted in raising nearly $300,000 without a shovel being put into the ground. This is attributed to their hard work and belief in this project as well as the faith of those who have been donating and supporting these fundraising events in spite of the “naysayers” and “doubting Thomas’” who cry, “I’ll believe it when I see it!” Well, the time for the shovels (and bulldozers) to break ground

is here. By the time you are reading this, the Borough will be getting ready to open the Bid Documents from the many contractors who will have submitted bids for Phase I or Phase II. The Bid Deadline and Opening is March 28, 2013. Borough Council is planning a special Council Meeting to be held on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 7:30pm to award the two (2) contracts and authorize a “Notice to Proceed” to each of the contractors. Construction activities could commence soon after, depending on the weather in early April. The Borough is already planning an “official groundbreaking ceremony” for late April or early May. We hope we can get as many people from the community to attend. With any kind of construction project there will be a time of inconvenience for those who use the facility that is under construction. There are so many groups and youth sport organizations that use the stadium and “practice field” for practices and/or games. You can expect these areas to be unavailable from April through August. Believe it or not, the Stadium Field and Track are

scheduled to be completed by early August in time for the Spartans’ and Dukes’ fall schedule. We just ask everyone for their patience during this exciting project! More information will be available on the Borough’s newly revised web site for project updates, meetings, and progress: www.brentwoodboro.com. The estimated construction costs for Phase I is approximately $900,000 and for Phase II is roughly $1,700,000.

NEW MUNICIPAL COMPLEX PROJECT Brentwood Borough officials continue to whittle down the costs associated with the construction or renovation of a Borough Municipal Building. You may recall original estimates to build a new municipal complex at the site of the current building to house all existing operations (Police, Administration, Planning, DPW, and EMS) were around $14 million. This was subsequently reduced to $10 million. Since then, council approved the construction of a $1.25 million new DPW Facility. Moving DPW out of any new Borough Building project will further reduce the size needed to house Police, Administration, Planning, and EMS and subsequent costs. In January of 2013, Brentwood officials decided to look for an architectural firm with substantial municipal building experience. The Borough is seeking statements of qualification from interested architectural firms in regard to the proposed construction of a new municipal building. Applicant companies must have at least ten years of architectural experience and must have previously designed a minimum of 54

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five local governmental facilities. Candidates will be formally ranked based upon suitability for the project. The top firms will subsequently be invited to submit a proposal to design a new municipal facility or renovate the existing facility to ensure it is brought up to current codes and is ADA accessible.

2013 Paving Project – Brownsville Road and Hillson Avenue

Borough officials are committed to getting back on track with the much needed repairs needed to the 31 miles of Borough streets. To demonstrate their seriousness in developing a long term sustainable approach to maintaining

and repairing the Borough streets, Brentwood Council has approved $800,000 in the 2013 Capital Improvement Fund dedicated to streets. Unfortunately this does not go a long way and will cover the cost of only two (2) roadway projects. • Hillson Avenue from Dauphin Street to Shadewell will involve total reconstruction. Estimated cost = $300,000.00. • Brownsville Road from Hillson Avenue to East Brentridge Avenue will involve milling and repaving as well as repairs to the stormwater system. Estimated cost = $500,000.00. Hillson Avenue is slated to begin in the spring. Don’t worry, Brownsville Road is scheduled to begin in mid-July, AFTER the 4th of July race and parade. 


Continued from page 54

2013 Sanitary Sewer Defect and Emergency Repairs The Borough of Brentwood’s budget also includes a Sanitary Sewer Fund. The Borough continues to work towards the EPA Consent Decree requirements with expenditures equal to approx. $1,000,000 of Sanitary Sewer related upgrades. In addition, $714,000 is budgeted for the required Operations & Maintenance of the Borough’s Sanitary Sewer System in 2013.

Zoning Code Revisions Project The Borough is 90% through with the revisions to the outdated Zoning Ordinances. The firm, Delta Development, was retained to meet with Borough officials to look at bringing the Borough Zoning Code up to date with best practices, business friendly, and help maintain and protect the characteristics of the Borough. This project includes revising the Borough’s zoning districts to include more R-1 Residential areas as well as outdated provisions that are deterrents to business development along Rt. 51.

BOROUGH OF BRENTWOOD EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Briefly Brentwood Borough News

BOROUGH OF BRENTWOOD EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

PUBLIC WORKS SUMMER HELP Applications are being accepted by the Borough of Brentwood for Seasonal Public Works Employees for the 2013 Summer Season. Applicants must be 18 years of age and enrolled full-time in college, trade school or must submit letter of admission to Military Service. The job will require mowing grass, trimming shrubs, shoveling asphalt, installing signs, painting and general labor work. The applicant is required to wear steel-toed shoes. Hours are Monday through Friday 7:00 A.M. to 3:30 P.M. Preference will be given to Borough residents. Applications can be picked up at the Borough Administrative Office at 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM Monday – Friday or downloaded from the Borough Website: www.brentwoodboro.com Applications are being accepted through Friday, April 5, 2013 until 3:00 P.M. at the Brentwood Municipal Building Administrative Office, Attention: Dawn Lane, 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227.

The Borough of Brentwood is currently accepting applications for the following summer, part-time position: BOOTH ATTENDANT. Applicants must be at least 16 years of age. Salary is set by Borough Resolution at $7.78 per hour. Preference will be given to Brentwood Borough residents. Applications can be picked up at the Borough Administrative Offices at 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM Monday – Friday or downloaded from the Borough Website: www.brentwoodboro.com Applications are being accepted through Friday, April 5, 2013 until 3:00 P.M. at the Brentwood Municipal Building Administrative Office, Attention: Dawn Lane, 3624 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227.

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Briefly Brentwood Borough News

COUNCIL ACTIONS The following are highlights of Council Actions during their monthly meetings and do not reflect all items and issues discussed. Official meeting Minutes are available on the Borough website at www.brentwoodboro. com November 20, 2012: Agenda Meeting • Authorized J.T. Sauer & Associates to finalize the Phase I and Phase II Park Renovations Construction documents as presented in the Park Master Plan to include two (2) additional baseball fields next to the current baseball fields and in the area of the Practice Field the following: One (1) regulation size Deck Hockey Rink. One (1) tennis court, and One (1) basketball court • Adopted Resolution No. 2012-50, SHACOG Joint Bid for a Contract for Solid Waste. • Approved the Borough Manager and Solicitor to negotiate and enter into an Agreement without restriction with the Western PA Conservancy to accept its offer to give the Borough the property located adjacent and across from the Borough property where the proposed DPW facility will be located on East Willock Road. November 27, 2012: Council Meeting: • Adopted Resolution No. 2014-44, 2013 Fee Resolution • Authorize the Borough Manager to prepare and advertise Ordinance No. 20121209— 2013 Revenue Neutral Tax Levy. Setting the revenue neutral tax rate at 7.0 mils • Authorize the Borough Manager to prepare and advertise Ordinance No. 2012-1210— 2013 Final Tax Levy. Setting the 2013 Final tax rate to include the 5% windfall provision at 7.35 mils • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-45, 2013 Proposed Budget and give notice that the 2013 Budget will be available for public inspection beginning Friday, November 30, 2012 to Tuesday, December 11, 2012 • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-46, Entering the Borough into a Contract with The Allegheny Construction Group located in Bridgeville, PA for the Design/Build 56

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of a new DPW facility with a base bid of $1,239,000, Alternate B Bid — Truck Wash of $10,000, and Alternate C Bid — Truck Lift in the amount of $10,000.00 totaling $1,259,000 and authorize the Borough Manager and Solicitor to prepare the associated Contract Documents. (NOTE: Allegheny Construction also presented the best design and was the lowest bid out of five (5) other firms.) • Adopt Ordinance No. 2012-1208, Rental Property/Landlord Registration. • Adopt Ordinance No. 2012-1207, a Blight Reduction Ordinance • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-47, Reappointing Jayson Livingston to the Zoning Hearing Board for a five (5) year term to expire on December 31, 2017 • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-48, Reappointing Frank Kenny to the Brentwood Planning Commission for a four (4) year term to expire on December 31, 2016 • Authorize Council to donate the 1981 Grumman Fire Truck to the Brentwood Borough Volunteer Fire Company • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-49, “Buy Local.” • Adopt Ordinance No. 2012-1209 — 2013 Revenue Neutral Tax Levy. Setting the revenue neutral tax rate at 7.0 mils • Adopt Ordinance No. 2012-1210 — 2013 Final Tax Levy. Setting the 2013 Final tax rate to include the 5% windfall provision at 7.35 mils. • Adopt Ordinance No. 2012-1211 —Sewer Rates • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-52, titled Borough Auditor, entering into an Agreement with the firm of Hosack, Specht, Muetzel & Wood, LLP to prepare the year ending 2012, 2013, and 2014 Borough Audits at an annual cost of $16,650/year. • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers associated with Engineering Services to assist the Borough in complying with the requirements of their approved Consent Order Sanitary Sewer Operations & Maintenance Plan Year 3 at a cost not-to-exceed $141,000.00 • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-53, ReAppointing Mr. Michael Wooten to

another 4- year term to the Brentwood Planning Commission. • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-56, Appointing Mr. John Frombach to a 4-year term to the Brentwood Borough Planning Commission from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2016. • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-54, Appointing Mr. Clyde Zimmerman to the Brentwood Borough Civil Service Commission for the term beginning January 1, 2013 and expiring December 31, 2018 • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-55, Appointing Mr. Donald Makowski to the Brentwood Borough Civil Service Commission as its first Alternate for the term beginning January 1, 2013 and expiring December 31, 2018. • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-57, Appointing Mrs. Kelly Wichelmann to the Brentwood Borough Civil Service Commission as its second Alternate for the term beginning January 1, 2013 and expiring December 31, 2018. • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-59, RACP 2013 Concurring Resolution Municipal Public Safety Center, authorizing the filing of an application for funds with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Redevelopment Assistance Capital Projects Grant, Administered by the Office of the Budget for the Construction of New Public Safety Center. • Adopt Resolution No. 2012-60, the RACP 2013 Concurring Resolution for the filing of an application for funds with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Redevelopment Assistance Capital Projects Grant Administered by the Office of the Budget for the Construction of new Stadium bleachers and Press Box. January 15, 2013 Agenda Meeting: • Approve the Land Development Plan for Phase I and Phase II. January 22, 2013 Council Meeting • Adopt Ordinance No. 2013-1209 — 2013 Revenue Neutral Tax Levy. • Adopt Ordinance No. 2013-1210 — 2013


Briefly Brentwood COUNCIL ACTIONS

Borough News

continued

Final Tax Levy. • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-01, ReAppoint Borough Solicitor Thomas H. Ayoob, III for the year 2013. • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-02, Establish mileage reimbursement for employees on municipal business • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-04, Authorize pre-payment of cash invoices and payroll. • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-05, the South Hills Record, Tribune Review and Post Gazette as the Newspaper of Record • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-06, Signature Authorization on Borough Accounts • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-07, Live, LTD. STD Insurance Carrier — Standard • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-08, Professional Service Agreement ReAppointing The Gateway Engineers as the Borough Engineer for the year 2013. • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-09, Professional Service Agreement ReAppointing R. L. Kimball as the Borough Transportation Engineer for the year 2013. • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with Construction Administration for the DPW Facility Design/Building project in the amount

not to exceed $25,000.00. • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with the preparation of Construction Bid Documents and parttime inspection services during preparation work and full-time inspection during paving operations for the Hillson Avenue rehabilitation project in the amount not to exceed $30,000.00. • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with the Consent Order Alternatives Analysis (Feasibility Study) in the amount not to exceed $50,000.00 • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with the MS 4 Stormwater Phase II requirements in the amount not to exceed $12,000.00. • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with the Sanitary Sewer Operations and Maintenance requirements in the amount not to exceed $121,000. • Adopt Resolution No. 2013-10, setting Community/REDD UP DAY as May 4, 2013 from 10:00 AM 2:00 PM and limiting

Brentwood Council Appoints New President, Vice President and President Pro Tem During the Agenda meeting on Tuesday, February 19, 2013, Council reorganized and appointed Charlie Johnson as President of Council, Marty Vickless as Vice President and Rich Schubert as President Pro Tem. The re-organization was necessary due to the resignation of David Wenzel, former Council President.

the load size of material to be dumped to a standard Pick-Up truck • Approve the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with assisting the Borough in obtaining permitting approval for the East Willoek Culvert/Manhole Repair Project involving the repairing/ replacing of the existing culvert and repair of the damaged manhole and sanitary sewer line in the amount not to exceed $12,000.00. • Adopt Ordinance No. 2013-1212 — Transient Retail Business, Panhandling, & Solicitation. • Approval of the Work Authorization from Gateway Engineers for Engineering Services associated with a structural investigation of the existing stadium bleachers, bleacher supports and railings and hand rail supports at the Brentwood Park for the Borough Stadium Bleacher Investigation Project in the amount not to exceed $12,000.00.

Brentwood Centennial Committee Join us as we plan for Brentwood’s Centennial Event in 2015! Bring your ideas! Share your stories! Share your photos! Centennial Meetings are scheduled on the following dates: • Wednesday, March 13, 2013 • Wednesday, April 10, 2013 • Wednesday, May 8, 2013 The meetings are held at the Community Room, lower level of the Brentwood Library at 7:00 P.M. These meetings are open to the public. For further information, please contact Audrey at 412885-5378. Volunteers are welcome.

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Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Readshaw House Bill 262 Would Allow Communities to

Control Liquor License Transfers

Harrisburg, Jan. 29 — State Rep Harry Readshaw, D-Allegheny has introduced House Bill 262, which would allow local communities to control the number and type of liquor-license establishments that are located in a specific community. Current law only limits liquor licenses on a county-wide level. “Under my bill, municipalities would have the right to control the number of these establishments, not the state,” Readshaw said. “Local communities are better judges of the needs and abuses of alcohol on a more personal level. While I have heard numerous complaints about bars in the South Side of Pittsburgh, this bill would give all communities an avenue to say “enough is enough.” The bill would allow a community to establish a liquor license maximum saturation ratio which can be community-wide or neighborhood or district based. Readshaw’s bill would make it harder to transfer liquor licenses between communities if one of the communities has established a maximum saturation ratio, and the transfer would exceed the preestablished ratio. Readshaw introduced a similar bill, House Bill 353, last session, but the bill was not considered by the House Liquor Control Committee.

Councilman Zimmerman with Pirate legend Steve Blass during the December BBW Chamber of Commerce luncheon.

N ews & V iews Message From Senator Fontana

As the 2013-14 legislative session begins, many important issues will be before the General Assembly. I want to remind constituents of the ways they can stay connected. I publish a weekly E-Newsletter, titled News & Views, that is emailed to constituents throughout the 42nd Senatorial District. To sign up for the weekly newsletter, simply go to my website, www. senatorfontana.com, and enter your email address on the home page. The website also allows you to view news releases, watch Senate session live, research legislation, download applications and forms and provides toll-free numbers to a variety of state departments and agencies. As the General Assembly debates issues affecting our Commonwealth, I encourage you to weigh in with me and my office to discuss matters of importance to you. I can be reached directly at Fontana@pasenate.com. I represent all my constituents and your opinions are important so I look forward to receiving correspondence. If you need assistance on a state matter, you can visit or call any one of my offices to receive full service on a variety of items including: notary services; PennDOT issues; unclaimed property forms; tax forms; senior bus passes; and more. Most importantly, I want you to know that I and my staff are always available to assist you. Since my election in 2005, we have always made sure that any constituent who comes to us has their problem solved and if we can’t solve the problem directly, we at least provide direction to get a solution. Senator Wayne D. Fontana 42nd Senatorial District www.senatorfontana.com

58 724.942.0940 to advertise |

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Newly Hired Asst. Code Officer Brentwood Borough remains committed to a policy of aggressive code enforcement. After serving two stints as an intern in the Department of Building Inspection/Code Enforcement, Eric Peccon was hired as a full time employee with the municipality. Peccon is a native of Star Junction, a fellow Route 51 corridor town located in Fayette County. He received a BA in Political Science from California University of Pennsylvania and completed the school’s rigorous Honors Program. In 2012, Peccon earned a Masters of Public Administration at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. In the course of his studies, he focused on public sector management, housing policy, and urban affairs. While working toward his undergraduate degree, Peccon was employed as an intern with the County of Fayette. In addition to performing code inspections, Peccon is charged with completing a diverse array of activities for the Borough. He manages our community’s complex and comprehensive GeoPlan database, which stores information on a wide range of important topics, including planning, zoning, public works projects, permitting, and code enforcement. Peccon served as the primary architect of our enhanced Borough website. Utilizing his research skills, he authored drafts of several of the critical new ordinances that have been implemented by Council. He enjoys working in a “jackof-all-trades” capacity and welcomes the challenges of new assignments. Peccon presently resides in Friendship with his long-time girlfriend, Allison.

INTRODUCING THE NEW

BRENTWOOD FLAG

After several months of deliberation, Brentwood Council approved the design of a new municipal flag. For information on purchasing a Borough Flag please call the Borough Administrative Office at 412-884-1500.

Briefly Brentwood Borough News

New Rental Property Ordinance Holds Landlords Accountable Many landlords take seriously their duty to keep tenants safe and have a keen interest in the health of our community. Unfortunately, some landlords, especially those who live long distances from the Borough, are concerned only with profit maximization. Brentwood Council has recently enacted a revised rental registration and licensing program, which expands the authority of the Department of Building Inspection/Code Enforcement to crack down on noncompliant rental property owners. Over a decade ago, Brentwood authorized the establishment of a basic tenant registration program, which increased our capacity to ensure that all residents, including those who do not own real estate, satisfy their local earned income tax levy. Today, as then, landlords are required to annually submit a list of tenants; owners must also inform the Borough each time that a change in occupancy occurs. The yearly registration processing fee is $10 per unit. Our new and improved rental property ordinance requires all landlords to obtain an operating license and directs the Building Code Official to conduct a health and safety inspection of each rental unit in the Borough at least once every five years. This license may be revoked for unpaid real estate taxes, delinquent sewage fees, or failure to abate major code violations. Renting without a license is a summary offense punishable by a fine of up to $1,000. Additionally, any property owner who does not reside in Allegheny County or an adjacent county must designate a person age 21 or older who lives in the aforementioned area as a responsible agent. This individual shall be charged with receiving all notices of violation and shall have responsibility to remedy any code infractions.

Borough Works To Enhance Zoning Regulations In order to encourage development while concurrently maintaining the unique charm of our community, Brentwood is engaged in a comprehensive overhaul of our antiquated zoning ordinance. The updates have been performed with the aid of Delta Development, an experienced public sector consulting firm, as well as with the input of our elected officials, our staff, and the general public. Under the new ordinance, the disjointed collection of zoning districts included on the Route 51 strip will be replaced by a single, business-friendly designation. The revised map also better preserves our stable single-family neighborhoods and our unique mixed-use Brownsville Road corridor. The ordinance also augments our authority to restrict uses that are unsightly, immoral, or damaging to the integral character of our community. Additionally, the new code simplifies outdated or confusing chapters of our regulations while maintaining sections that have served our community well, such as our fence and sign provisions. Brentwood Borough will tentatively hold a formal public hearing on the revisions in April. We invite the public to review the draft ordinance online at www.brentwoodboro.com/index.php/documents/viewcategory/86project-studies. Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 59


Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Brentwood Meals-On-Wheels – Requesting Donations and Volunteers The Brentwood Borough Meals-On-Wheels has been serving the elderly, including temporary shut-ins of the surrounding communities for over 40 years. Currently the volunteers at Meal-On-Wheels take time out of their hectic schedules to serve approximately 40-50 residents of Brentwood as well as various parts of Baldwin and Whitehall. Within the past few years, the Meals-On-Wheels Program became our own independent kitchen and does not receive or rely on any government funding. As a nonprofit organization, our budget only exists due to the small fee of $30 we receive from each client per week. With this $30 stipend, customers receive one hot meal, one cold sandwich meal with a salad, dessert, juice and milk. These meals are prepared and delivered Monday through Friday by approximately 100 local volunteers. With the rising costs of food and gasoline we are fortunate to continue this program with the current budget. Our sole purpose is to help those who are unable to cook and provide daily meals for themselves whether it is due to old age, injuries or serious illness. If you can spare a few hours per day or per week or if you know a friend who may be interested in volunteering, please call 412-881-6688 for additional information. The Brentwood Meals-On-Wheels program is in dire need of monetary donations in order to keep this worthy program available to the residents in need. During these hard times, please find it in your heart to donate any amount to this worthy cause. All donations are appreciated and volunteers welcome. Thank you. 60

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Briefly Brentwood Borough News

3501 Brownsville Road Pittsburgh, PA 15227 412.882.5694 • www.brentwoodpubliclibrary.org

Brentwood Library Enrichment. Lifelong Learning. Community Center

Spring 2013

at Brentwood Library

Story and Music Times for Little Ones

Family Easter Party!

Musical Mondays - At 11 AM is for children age 2-5. A program full of singing, dancing, and playing instruments.

Saturday, March 23rd from 2 – 4 PM Come for an egg hunt, games, treats, and prizes! Registration required at www.brentwoodpubliclibrary.org.

Family Storytimes – The first Wednesday of each month at 6:30 PM we invite families with members of all ages to come for stories and songs. Book Babies - 10 AM every Thursday, a program especially for babies aged birth to 18 months and their caretakers. Program includes songs, rhymes, and stories. Toddler Tales - Thursday at 11 AM, crafted for children aged 18 months to 3 years. The program includes stories, songs, finger plays, and a craft. Preschool Parables – Tuesdays at 3:30 PM is for children 3 years old and older. Program includes a variety of stories, songs, finger plays and crafts. The program concludes with free-play and a snack.

Events Especially for Elementary School Aged Kids Each Tuesday at 3:30 PM 1st Week - Gaming - Join us in the Program Room for Wii and Xbox gaming! Snacks included! 2nd Week – Stories & Games – Come enjoy a snack while you hear a story, and play some games, too. Sometimes we even act out some stories on the stage, too! 3rd Week - Rec Room - Enjoy pool, air hockey, ping pong, and basketball in our downstairs Rec Room! All kinds of snacks and drinks are available for purchase, so bring your change! 4th Week - Craft Time – Come get creative and make something cool to take home with you!

Something fun for Teens on Fridays 1st Week @ 3:15 PM - Gaming - Join us in the Program Room for Wii and Xbox gaming! Snacks included! 2nd Week @ 3:15 PM – Teen Lounge – Come hang out, have a snack, play some party games, and just be you. 3rd Week @ 6:30 PM – Teen Night @ the Library – The library is closed, but not for teens! Come have a light meal, watch a movie, and just hang out. Registration required. 4th Week Rec Room @ 3:15 PM - Stop by after school and enjoy pool, air hockey, ping pong, and basketball in our downstairs Rec Room! Snacks and drinks are available for purchase, so bring your change!

Book Clubs for Adults

(New members are always welcome! If you’re interested, call 412-882-5694 or stop in.) Classics Book Club – 2nd Wednesday of each month at 6 pm - Do you love the classics, or maybe you’ve always wanted to explore those canonical books but never had the opportunity? Join us! Cook’s Book Club – 4th Tuesday of each month at 1 PM – We’ll meet to discuss cookbooks and other books that feature food. Of course we’ll try out some of those recipes for ourselves, too, so bring your appetite! The Mystery Book Club – will meet on 3/5, 4/16, & 5/28 to discuss “who done it” in the mystery of choice. The Evening Book Club – will meet on 3/11, 4/22, & 6/3 to share thoughts about a historical fiction novel.

Programs for Adults Bingo! - On the 3rd Thursday of each month, meet in the Program Room at 2 PM to enjoy a light meal, play Bingo and win prizes! It’s free! Crafters Circle - Join fellow area crafters to work on projects or learn a new craft. Crafters Club is a patron-run club which meets every Monday at 6 PM. Game Day - Wake up with games, word puzzles, logic riddles, and plenty of coffee! Game Day is held every other Wednesday at 11 AM. Movie Mondays - Watch a recently released feature film and enjoy some popcorn every Monday beginning at 2 PM in the program room! Wii Games - Join us the 1st Thursday each month for Jeopardy, the 2nd Thursday for Bowling, and the 4th for Carnival Games. We start at 1 PM in the program room. New to using the Wii? No problem! We’ll teach you how to play! Wanderlands - Join us every Friday at noon for a documentary or travelogue. Visit a different place or time each week! Wise Walk – Starting in April, lace up your sneakers and join us every Tuesday at 9:30 AM to rack up enough miles to walk all the way to an exotic destination.

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Briefly Brentwood Borough News

Communities Join in on Brentwood Tree-Planting Establishing a partnership between green thumb volunteers in several South Hills communities is just as important to them as the trees they plant. “We have to stand together,” said Jonathan Turban, chairman of a multi-municipal shade tree commission, established through Economic Development South. “Trees are definitely important ... the urban forest is starting to get pretty bare.” More than 30 volunteers from Brentwood, Baldwin Borough, Whitehall and other neighboring communities planted 25 trees on Nov. 10 in Brentwood Park as part of a grant received through Economic Development South from TreeVitalize and the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Economic Development South is a nonprofit organization working to boost community growth in Baldwin Borough, Brentwood, Whitehall and the Pittsburgh neighborhoods of Carrick and Overbrook. The grant is the first for TreeVitalize to include multiple municipalities. “It’s these kinds of things that make the community better,” said Greg Jones, director of Economic Development South. Jones said he hopes the group can receive another grant in the spring to plant trees in Whitehall. One of Jones’ main goals for the project is to develop a network of volunteers in the EDS communities. Kentucky Coffeetrees and Princeton American Elms are just some of the species newly planted in Brentwood Park near the parking lot and on the hillside near the baseball fields. Volunteers planting the trees said they did so to aid in the beautification of Brentwood Park, to establish more pride in each EDS municipality and to

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build stronger ties between the neighboring communities. “It’s bringing back the neighborhoods,” said Susan Simmers, a Baldwin Township resident. Likewise, Brentwood Park is scheduled to begin the first two phases of a multi-phase $8 million renovation in 2013. The TreeVitalize grant, though separate from the park renovation, is a nice way to kick it off, said Frank Cappetta, a Brentwood Park Initiative director. The BPI is a nonprofit organization formed by Brentwood residents to raise money for the park refurbishment. Several of the volunteers on Saturday are BPI members. “This is a nice first step,” Cappetta said. “This isn’t just a Brentwood planting.” Other volunteers said they remember when previous park renovations caused the demolition of trees, so it’s nice to be a part of the rebuilding. “I want to watch it grow as my kids do,” said Jamie Kephart, a Brentwood resident. “It’s just a good way to give back, beautify.” Teegan McDonough, community outreach assistant at TreeVitalize, helped the volunteers plant the trees. She said

that TreeVitalize will help more than 30 communities in the Pittsburgh area plant trees from Oct. 19 to Dec. 1.


Speaker

Polar Plunge 2013 Bob Healey Bob McKown Chris Woods Craig Tilbrook Donna Courson Eric Riesen Frank Cappetta Greg Jones Jay Geisler Jeff Golvash Jennie Schultz Jim Maksin Mia Maksin Laura Van Wert Sean Richter Owen Richter

Bethany Narey, Owner, CCT, Health Enhancing Thermography (HE@T) 855-254-4328 • www.heat-images.com What thermography is and how it is used as a diagnostic medical imaging tool, the benefits of thermography, some key medical applications that thermography has including chiropractic, unexplained pain, and sports medicine. Lastly, She will speak on women’s breast health, thermography’s role in the earlier detection of breast disease, and provide case studies and comparisons.

GENERAL MEETING LUNCHEONS The Brentwood Baldwin Whitehall Chamber of Commerce meets the first Thursday of each month, noon at various area locations. Lunch for Chamber members with a reservation is $15, non-members and members without a reservation will be charged $18. Please make reservations with Mary Dilla, Chamber secretary, at secretary@bbwchamber.com.

Philip Reichner Mark Blohm Sean Hayes John Slater

GENERAL MEETING DATES

THANK YOU to all who participated!

51 Corridor’s Golf Outing 2013 The 11th annual 51 Corridor Communities Golf Outing is scheduled for Monday, September 23, 2013 at South Hills Country Club. This year’s event will again be successful due to the many volunteers from Economic Development South, The Brentwood Baldwin Whitehall Chamber of Commerce and The Brentwood Business Owners Association that help coordinate the outing. The continued success will also be attributed to all the businesses and individuals who participate. A BIG THANK YOU to all those involved in the past. This event is the major fundraiser for these organizations which utilize the funds to help promote the business community and the area’s redevelopment efforts. Historically, over the past ten years this event has generated $138,000.00 in net proceeds that have been given to the groups for their business and redevelopment efforts. Please consider participating this year in some fashion. All will have a great time and it’s a great feeling knowing the monies raised stay here locally to help our communities where we live, work and play. Thanks again, Bob McKown, Co-Chair.

All luncheons begin at noon March 7, 2013 ~ Salvatores April 4, 2013 ~ Blvd. Café May 2, 2013 ~ Legacy Lanes June 6, 2013 ~ South Hills Country Club

THE WOMEN’S NETWORKING GROUP The Women’s Networking Group of the Brentwood Baldwin Whitehall Chamber of Commerce meets the second Friday of each month at 12 noon for lunch at South Hills Country Club. We welcome members and non-members. Tables are available for ladies who would like to display products or merchandise. Lunch for Chamber members is $15, nonmembers $18 and a display table is $10. Please make reservations with Mary Dilla, Chamber secretary, at secretary@bbwchamber.com. – Dottie Coll, Chairman

WOMEN’S NETWORKING MEETING DATES

South Hills Country Club All luncheons begin at noon March 8, 2013 April 12, 2013 May 10, 2013 June 14, 2013 July 12, 2013 August 9, 2013 All locations are subject to change; please check the web site. RSVPs should go to Secretary@bbwchamber.com. All luncheons open to members and nonmembers. Web site is www.bbwchamber. com for more information and updates.

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 63


Baldwin Borough News

Electronic Recyling Beginning January 1, 2013, the refuse collector will no longer pick up televisions and computer equipment for disposal. Computer equipment includes laptops, monitors, CPU’s, printers, scanners, keyboards, mouses, speakers, cables and battery backups. These items, if placed at the curb, will be left at the curb. The Borough will sponsor a collection in June, 2013, of these items by Goodwill. Check our website or call the municipal building for additional information. Please visit the website at www.eloopllc.com or www.baldwinborough.org for a list of available facilities.

The Baldwin Borough Swimming Pool will officially open on a limited schedule May 25, 2013. Passes will be sold beginning May 20, 2013 between the hours of 4 pm to 8 pm. and at the pool during operation hours. Check our website: www.baldwinborough.org for updated information.

The Borough Of Baldwin’s Annual “Community Day” Will Be Held On Saturday, June 1, 2013 Parade, Booths, Daily Activities, Fireworks Please check the local papers or visit our website at: www.baldwinborough.org for upcoming news and information.

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3344 Churchview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15227 412.882.9600 www.baldwinborough.org

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Home

Improvements In Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall

If you have a home, you know how challenging it is to maintain it. Roofs leak, landscapes need weeding, and kitchens and baths need facelifts. If you’re handy, you can get by with your own sweat equity. However, most people don’t have the skills, let alone the time, to tackle major household projects – many of which will require you spending more time at the office just to be able to tackle the price tags such projects come with. Here, we try to cover it all for you – from financing your project to enjoying it when it’s complete. Building a home addition can be a good alternative to buying a new home or building a house from scratch. Besides saving money, it can be a means of investing in your home and customizing your home to serve your family’s specific needs and desires. But additions also bring up potential problems that may not make them the best option for everyone. An addition can drastically change the way a house looks from the road or yard. An addition that isn’t well planned can look like it doesn’t belong or doesn’t match the rest of the house in terms of style or overall shape. Planning an addition carefully with a skilled architect is the best way to ensure that the house looks as good, or even better, than it did before the addition. An architect should be able to produce sketches that give a sense of how the finished addition will look. To minimize the appearance of an addition, homeowners can usually choose to build onto the back of the existing house, thereby hiding the new construction from the road. Depending on the size of an addition and the construction schedule, it may take weeks or months before an addition is completed. Bad weather can cause unanticipated delays, and working with an unreliable contractor can prolong the process even further. If a homeowner can’t afford to be patient 66 724.942.0940 to advertise |

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during the planning and construction process, moving into a new, larger home may be a better option. An addition can be a good investment, helping to increase the value of a home. Using a home equity line of credit or getting a new mortgage that includes money to pay for the addition can be a wise financial decision, especially when interest rates are low. However, if the expected value of an addition – which a homeowner can estimate by studying the sale prices of nearby homes with similar characteristics – is less than its cost, it may be a poor investment. An addition is likely to raise the value of a home. After the addition is completed, a new assessment will raise property taxes. Prior to adding on, homeowners should estimate the value of their home with the addition and compute a new annual tax liability based on current tax rates. Building an addition is an ideal time to invest in energy-efficient fixtures and construction. Windows that prevent hot or cool air from escaping and low-energy-consuming appliances can minimize the cost of an addition by reducing energy bills and its environmental impact. Remodeling your bathroom is another popular way to jazz up your home as well as build equity. In some cases, not only is remodeling the bathroom an aesthetic choice but a functional choice as well. Giving your bathroom a boost doesn’t always have to require a boatload of cash or space – just a little planning and creativity before you get started. Refresh your bath’s look with a wow-worthy makeover that improves its style and function. Perhaps you have an old toilet that you want to replace with a highefficiency model that will lower your water bill. Or perhaps the old tile is falling off your shower and you need to replace


it. Whatever your situation is, there are many options to choose from, including do-ityourself options. One popular and inexpensive option is to have a theme for your bathroom. Examples could be a Disney theme for a child’s bathroom, or perhaps a beach theme. This can be accomplished by painting the walls, adding a wall border and by well-placed décor. Some larger and more costly bathroom updates include new flooring, new sink and vanity and a new bathtub or shower. These improvements will get even costlier if you paid someone to do it for you. Decks on the rear or side of homes have become extremely popular in the United States. Used for entertaining or just relaxing, decks come in all shapes, sizes, designs and material. The most popular, and least expensive, deck material is treated wood. It is durable, however it will need to be painted or stained yearly or every other year depending on your climate. Composite decking products are building materials manufactured using a mixture of plastic and wood fiber. Composite decking materials are very popular because they require less maintenance than wood and often use recycled materials. Composite decking is easy to install and is guaranteed with a 20-year warranty against rotting, splitting, splintering or termite damage. However, composite decking can be very costly. Vinyl decking made from Cellular PVC is a great choice for decking because it is essentially resistant to stains, mold, insects and fading. PVC material is low maintenance and is a sustainable building material. But like composite, it can get costly. Powder coated aluminum decking can be used to create a watertight floor for your deck. This unique material will never splinter, rot or rust. LockDry Aluminum decking is cool to the touch and is available in five colors. Aluminum decking is strong and lightweight. The LockDry system can be used to create a dry space to use under your deck on rainy days. Decks can be built right on the ground, or be elevated high in the air, depending on the design of your home. If you are building a deck yourself it is very important to check all local building codes and follow all of the guidelines very closely to ensure the safety and long-term durability of your deck. Bringing your family together is often difficult. A family game room is a fantastic way to upgrade your home and bring the family together. Whether you have an unfinished basement, an unused attic room or an empty garage, you can transform it into a fantastic oasis where your family can spend countless enjoyable hours. There are many aspects to making your game room remodel a success. First you should talk to a Design / Build contractor about water access, waste lines and additional electricity needs. Electricity for lighting and appliances is also incredibly important. If you are updating an unused area of your home, the current electric wiring may not be able to handle the additional demands of a game room. The Design / Build contractor can guide you through what will need to be updated and how much it will cost. If finances are an issue there are definitely still projects you can complete yourself including painting, laying carpet, adding shelves or simply updating the décor.

Our Home Improvement Partners For 32 years, residents in and around the Pittsburgh area have turned to Davis Davis Remodeling Remodeling for full-service kitchen and bathroom design - we offer cabinetry (stock or custom), a wide variety of countertops, flooring, plumbing fixtures and all that is necessary for a complete kitchen or bath remodel. Enjoy the best service from a staff that really cares! Member - Better Business Bureau since 1981. PA# 043293 Davis Remodeling 412.469.1181 • www.davisremodeling.net

Most homes in this area were built by the Perri family. We are a third and fourth generation contractor that are adding onto and updating these homes. Our company is licensed and fully insured. Unlike most contractors who specialize in one thing, we are a general contractor that can handle all phases of your project from start to finish which saves you money. Call today.

Jefferson Hills Renovations, inc.

Jefferson Hills Renovations, Inc. 412.653.7000 • www.jeffersonhillsrenovations.biz

Hess’ Landscape Nursery is located in Jefferson Hills at 1505 Gill Hall Rd., halfway between Pleasant Hills and Finleyville. The nursery encompasses 5 acres of the area’s largest selection of unique conifers, Japanese maples and ornamental trees and shrubs. Owner Chris Hess has been designing and installing quality residential landscapes since 1984 upon graduating from Penn State University with a degree in ornamental nursery management. Hess’ Landscape Nursery 412.384.8002 • www.hesslandscapenursery.com Taylor Rental, a premier rental center, has been serving the Pittsburgh area for 34 years. Our products include canopies, tables, chairs, concession equipment, pipe/drape, staging, contractor’s equipment (Bobcats, excavators), lawn/garden, floor care, plumbing, home improvement, etc. Delivery and pickup service is available. Reservations recommended. We fill propane tanks and motorhomes. New and used equipment for sale, and repair available. Visit our newly renovated showroom. Taylor Rental 412.833.7300 • www.taylorrentalpittsburgh.com Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 67


Home Improvements In Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall Making the space your own is essential to effective use of a home office. Create a space that makes you more productive and relaxed at the same time and that is a winning combination. A desk is an essential part of most offices. Choose one that meets your needs. If all you need is a work top to use your laptop from, consider a computer cart and save the space for a comfortable chair or small sofa. If you are in the market for a larger desk, consider office furniture resellers. They sell executive-grade used furniture for a fraction of the cost. A comfortable chair or two is a necessity. Choose long-lasting fabrics and sturdy frames. Go with classic styles that won’t end up as next year’s garage sale item. Test out the chair before you buy it. Desk chairs especially need to provide good support and be comfortable. We live in a society of over-indulgence. Nothing shows this like the home theater. So many popular home magazines have a page dedicated to converting your basement into a home theater, or something similar. The HGTV website has 16 home theater features alone. But how doable is the home theater in reality? First, you need a fairly large space, either

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a big family room or a basement. Second, you need to budget for all the furnishings including, of course, the stars of the show: home theater equipment – a big-screen TV, DVD player and speakers – and comfy seating. Also very popular for home theaters is floor and aisle lighting similar to real movie theaters, and perhaps even an old-fashioned popcorn maker. Frankly, home theaters are generally for those with deep pockets because there really is no way to make a home theater cheaply. Still thinking of taking the plunge? The home improvement website Home Time has a really useful feature on home theater planning. It covers everything you’ll need to consider, like the space you’ll need and even suggested room layouts, to maximize your viewing pleasure. Kitchens are the most popular room in the house to remodel. Many people consider the kitchen to be the center of the home and its most important component. Another reason it is so popular to remodel is there are so many things in the kitchen that can be remodeled….cabinets, cabinet hardware, countertops, floor, appliances, lighting, walls and sinks. There is very little right or wrong when it comes to remodeling your kitchen; it comes down to personal taste. There are so many choices when it comes to style, design and type of material for every component of your kitchen. When remodeling there is much to consider: cost, what is your goal, what is your situation (pets or small children could help decide what type of flooring to use, for example) and what is the cost vs. equity value of the remodel.


Our Home Improvement Partners If finances are an issue and you are not the handiest individual, there are still many simple and easy things you can do to add pizzazz and value to your kitchen. For example, you can paint your cabinets and add new handles rather than buying new cabinets. Adding a stylish splashguard behind your stove and sink is easy to do and adds great appeal. If done well, landscaping can completely change the character and perception of a home. Landscaping encompasses anything on the outside of the home including grass cutting, plants, flowers, rock, mulch, borders, vegetable gardens and more. Beyond the aesthetics, landscaping can be beneficial to a property if designed properly. Solar heat absorbed through windows and roofs can increase cooling costs, and incorporating shade from landscaping elements can help reduce this solar heat gain. Shading and evapotranspiration (the process by which a plant actively moves and releases water vapor) from trees can reduce surrounding air temperatures as much as 9° F (5°C). Because cool air settles near the ground, air temperatures directly under trees can be as much as 25°F (14°C) cooler than air temperatures above nearby blacktop. Using shade effectively requires you to know the size, shape, and location of the moving shadow that your shading device casts. Also, homes in cool regions may never overheat and may not require shading. Therefore, you need to know what landscape shade strategies will work best in your regional climate and your microclimate. Also, if you can determine how much water your plants actually need, then you won’t overwater them and waste water.

With Angelo Associates, a professional installation means your work will be done by skilled, experienced craftsmen using the finest tools and equipment available. We want to serve you. Please visit our office/showroom or call for a free design consultation and estimate in your home. You can also visit our website at: www.angeloassociates.com Angelo Associates Inc. 412.655.3430 • www.angeloassociates.com Lighting is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to cast an enchanting spell on any outdoor space. It is also very effective for safety and security purposes. Examples of exterior lighting include: torches, candles, lanterns, solar ground lighting, flood lights, lamp posts, landscape lighting and general light fixtures. For setting a mood the most popular lighting is candles or small lanterns. For security and safety purposes, it is critical to have flood light or lamp posts or ground solar lighting or all. A burglar is much more likely to enter a home without a lot of light on the outside illuminating the property. Many of us take pride in our homes, investing countless hours rearranging and remodeling the interior. But it can also be refreshing to step out of the confines of the inside and spend some time outside. It’s especially enjoyable during the spring, summer and fall months. When the weather is favorable, it’s difficult to miss out on a nice day outside. But spending time outside doesn’t mean you have to forfeit your creature comforts. With a few small adjustments you can make your outdoor space comfortable and inviting. Turning a yard, patio, porch or other outdoor area into a functional living space can be a rewarding task, and will expand your living space to the outdoors. With the right setup, you can spend more time in the sunshine and fresh air, and host events al fresco for friends, family and neighbors. Options for outdoor living include outdoor kitchens, dramatic lighting, fireplaces or fire pits, a water feature (like a fountain), outdoor living rooms, gazebos and pavilions. With so many options to choose from, for most people it will come down to price, climate where they live and available space in which to be creative. Ponds can be a wonderful addition to your property’s outdoor experience. Surprisingly, they are not as difficult to build as one might think. continued on next page ›

Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall | Spring 2013 | incommunitymagazines.com 69


Home Improvements In Brentwood Baldwin-Whitehall Before you start, call 811 or your local one-call center to have electric and gas lines marked so you know where to dig to steer clear of them. Then, when you map out the location of your pond, put it where it will be noticed – visible from a window, off a patio, or along a walkway – but away from the play areas of small children or pets. Keep clear of major root systems or mature trees, which can block too much of the sunlight plants and fish need. You’ll also need to be within reach of a grounded exterior outlet so you can plug in a pump, an essential tool for keeping the water aerated; most pumps come with a maximum cord length of 25 feet, and extension cords are not recommended. You may need to bury the power cord a few inches down in PVC pipe to hide it.

will maintain a more consistent temperature and accommodate the fish – 18 to 24 inches for goldfish and at least 3 feet for koi. To maintain the consistent depth of the water, you need to line the pond. A thin layer of sand and old newspapers or burlap bags softens the jagged edges of rocks and roots. But over that you will need to put a waterproof skin. There are several types of flexible liners meant for small ponds – made from polypropylene and EPDM, among other materials. Look for one that’s weather-resistant, so it will stand up to UV rays and freezing temperatures. It should also be rated “fish-safe” if you plan to stock your pond and come with a warranty of 10 to 20 years so your pond will be watertight for many years to come.

Space permitting, you need at least 40 cubic feet for your pond – about 7 feet by 4 feet – to keep the water clean. An initial shallow terrace just inside the perimeter of the pond holds rocks that conceal the liner edge and keep it in place. A second, deeper terrace supports plants that live in the water and help balance the pond’s ecosystem. As you dig, you must slope the sides of the pond so that if the water freezes, the ice will push up instead of against the liner. Even in warmer climates, small ponds can change temperature rapidly, so if you’re adding fish you’ll want a deeper pond that

The key to any remodeling job is to make sure it makes sense financially. Not all remodeling jobs are cost-effective. For example, it is possible to pay $75,000 for a new addition, but an appraiser may be of the opinion that it only raised the value of your house by $50,000. It is very important that you do as much research as possible and talk to as many experienced professionals as possible so you can make an informed decision about what is best for you.

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Remodeling your home can generate tremendous equity for the future, as well as personal enjoyment in the present. Remodeling projects come in all shapes, sizes and costs. Projects can range from replacing flooring or a faucet, to installing new trim work or tile and replacing windows and doors. Remodeling can also take on the form of revamping or adding a bathroom, redoing a kitchen, overhauling your home’s exterior for improved curb appeal, or completing an addition to increase your home’s square footage and add valuable space. Big and small changes can both have an impact and will improve the way your home looks and functions, increasing its value and making it more enjoyable for you and your family.


B u s i n e ss Directory

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B u s i n e ss Directory


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