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snow much fun! WINTER 2013 icmags.com

School District News

Page 23

Special Section Health & Wellness

Page 11


Dealing with Digestive Disorders UPMC McKeesport’s Center for Digestive Health offers the latest technology for early detection and treatment of digestive disorders.

Preventing colon cancer

Healthy digestion is something we all take for granted — until something goes wrong. From heartburn, diarrhea, and bloating, to constipation, nausea, and vomiting, gastrointestinal woes can wreak havoc with your life.

“When caught early, colon cancer is curable,” says Dr. Narla, who recommends colonoscopy screening for everyone age 50 and older. “Screening enables us to remove polyps before they become cancerous.” One of the most powerful tools available for preventing cancer is the colonoscopy, which uses a small camera to examine the colon.

Sudhir Narla, MD, chief of gastroenterology at UPMC McKeesport and director of the hospital’s Center for Digestive Health, says prompt diagnosis is key to resolving digestive problems. “An early diagnosis usually means we can cure it,” says Dr. Narla. “But if you wait too long, all we can do is treat it.” At UPMC McKeesport’s Center for Digestive Health, board-certified gastroenterologists use the latest tests and technology to prevent, diagnose, and treat a wide range of digestive conditions, including colorectal cancer and disorders of the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon, pancreas, liver, and biliary tract.

Providing comprehensive care As a comprehensive inpatient and outpatient unit, the center offers a full range of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal (GI) procedures. Featuring the latest technology, the center was designed with the comfort and privacy of patients and family members in mind. Each month, gastroenterologists perform hundreds of procedures in the fully equipped GI unit — certified by the American Society for Gastro-intestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) for promoting the highest standards of safety and quality. Because the center is located within UPMC McKeesport, many therapeutic procedures can be performed immediately.

Colon cancer often has no symptoms, which is why screening is so important. A colonoscopy detects polyps — abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which are removed and tested. Most forms of colorectal cancer are slow growing, taking five to 10 years to develop, he adds.

A wide range of tests In addition to colonoscopy screenings and polyp removal, the center offers a wide range of diagnostic tests and procedures to evaluate and treat problems of the digestive tract, including: • Upper intestine — abdominal pain, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), difficulty swallowing, ulcers, and intestinal bleeding. • Colon and rectum — lower abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, hemorrhoids, rectal spasm or pain, and diverticular disease. • Gallbladder and pancreas — diseases of the pancreas, gall bladder stones, tumors, and blockage of bile ducts. To learn more about UPMC McKeesport’s Center for Digestive Health, call 412-664-2119.

“We can take care of anything, from a simple polyp to bleeding or cancer,” says Dr. Narla. “As a full-fledged GI unit, we can provide immediate treatment.”

This advertorial has been provided by UPMC. © 2013 UPMC


noW HirinG Turn Your CommuniTY inTo a Career

Join in Community magazines’ Team of Professional Sales reps

something

fresh for everyone

Overbrook Point offers new conc e in senior living ept

see page 14

Headline

Page 34

Headline

Page 47

Special Section: Education Page 23

Volant Mill Win ery Brings a Taste of Tuscan y to Mars Page 30

Fall 2013 icmags.com

Fall 2013 icmags.com

Special Section: Edu Top 5 Classroom cation Trends Page 17

Dynamic Duo:

Back to

parks and recreation Butch Truitt, South Fayette's new manager Ryan Eggleston director (right), with township

School!

School and Township News Page 29 Special Section: Education

Page 7

Fall 2013 icmags.com

Special Section: Education Page 6

School News

Page 16

Fall 2013 icmags.com

IN Community Magazines is seeking an energetic salesperson to sell print advertising in your area. Full-time is preferred, but part-time will be considered. Please contact our General Sales Manager, Tamara Myers, at t.myers@icmags.com for more information.


CONTENTS winter

2 013

features 11 Special Section: Health & Wellness How to live a healthier, happier, longer life.

15 O Christmas Tree Choosing a live evergreen in Norwin.

16 The Haunted New documentary explores paranormal activity at Larimer Mansion.

20 For the Love of Dance Owner of Janet’s Dance Studio has been inspiring and encouraging local performers for nearly four decades.

20

on the cover

It’s the most wonderful time….to stay fit. Winter sports abound in western Pennsylvania, but if you prefer indoor workouts, we’ve provided several local fitness centers and classes in our Health & Wellness section so you can stay fit, motivated and warm this season.

departments 4 6 8

From the Publisher IN the Loop IN Person

10 23 32

Norwin Public Library School News INCognito

11 IN Community is a publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Norwin area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 3


FROM THE

PUBLISHER PUBLISHER Wayne Dollard EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Julie Talerico j.talerico@icmags.com REGIONAL EDITORS Mark Berton [South, West and Erie] m.berton@icmags.com

At Seven Springs with my wife Lisa and our three sons.

Top-notch health care, education, banking and technology are what make Pittsburgh known, but our communities are what make us home. Home – where you live, go to school, shop, work and play – is what IN Community Magazines is all about. Each quarter, we bring you the latest news and information about schools, businesses, nonprofits and the people who make them exceptional. We also bring you coverage of interesting events and articles about historical sites you may pass every day without even knowing. We like to surprise you with little-known facts about your community and profile intriguing people who’ve made their mark locally – and sometimes even globally. One thing that makes our communities in western Pennsylvania special is the beautiful seasons. As autumn comes to an end and the snow begins to fall, we hope you take some time to enjoy the many winter activities our area has to offer and hit the slopes, sled ride, cross-country ski or ice skate at one of our many beautiful parks. Or simply build a snowman in the backyard! The staff at IN Community Magazines wishes you and your family a wonderful holiday season and a happy, healthy New Year!

Wayne Dollard Publisher

Send Us Your Story Ideas!

To Advertise

We’d love to hear from you if you know someone in your community who is making a difference or has done something extraordinary. We’re also looking for interesting story ideas (little-known facts, history or other news) within your community.

As the largest magazine publisher in Western Pennsylvania, IN Community Magazines are direct mailed to more than 518,000 households, reaching 1.15 million readers. If you'd like to partner with us, please contact our general sales manager, Tamara Myers, at sales@icmags.com.

If you have suggestions, email us at editors@icmags.com.

4 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

Pamela Palongue [North and East] p.palongue@icmags.com OFFICE MANAGER Leo Vighetti l.vighetti@icmags.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Debbie Mountain d.mountain@icmags.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Michael Miller m.miller@icmags.com DESIGNERS Cassie Brkich Jim Paladino Melissa St. Giles Anna Buzzelli Tamara Tylenda Sharon Cobb Jan McEvoy CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jonathan Barnes Leigh Lyons Jennifer Brozak Joanne Naser Earl Bugaile Melanie Paulick Tracy Fedkoe Melissa Rayworth Brenda Haines-Cosola Marilyn Wempa Elvira Hoff Mandie Zoller Heather Holtschlag CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ginni Klein Kathleen Rudolph Evan Sanders Jennifer Steenson Primetime Shots Gary Zak GENERAL SALES MANAGER Tamara Myers t.myers@icmags.com SALES MANAGER Brian McKee b.mckee@icmags.com ADVERTISING SALES Sophia Alfaras Holly Hicks-Opperman Pamela Arder Aimee Nicolia Nikki Capezio-Watson Connie McDaniel Jennifer Dahlem Gabriel Negri Tina Dollard Vincent Sabatini Julie Graff Michael Silvert Robin Guest RJ Vighetti ICM PRINTING SALES MANAGER Tom Poljak ©2013 by IN Community Magazines. All rights reserved. Reproduction or reuse of any part of this publication is prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. Direct all inquiries, letters to the editor and press releases to:

IN Community Magazines 603 East McMurray Road McMurray, PA 15317 724.942.0940; Fax: 724.942.0968 icmags.com Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.


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Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 5


in the

COOKIE TOUR

LOOP What’s news in Norwin?

The Irwin Business and Professionals Association (IBPA) will sponsor its annual Cookie Tour on Dec. 6. Come join friends and neighbors on a cookiegathering mission through the streets of downtown Irwin. An event guaranteed to get you into the holiday spirit and to leave your tastebuds tickled. The IBPA is an all-volunteer organization which endeavors to promote the vitality of Main Street in Irwin.

NORWIN HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND PERFORMS “RISE OF THE KNIGHT”

The band is led by new high school band director, and former Norwin Band member, Tim Daniels. The Norwin Band had an awardwinning season competing in local and regional competitions. It was named the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Marching Band Association (PIMBA) State Champions for a third year in a row, and captured Best Music Performance, Best Visual Performance and Best General Effect.

The band traveled to two Bands of America (BOA) Regional Championships this season. It competed with 28 bands from Georgia, North Carolina, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and placed third overall in the BOA Regional held in Towson, Maryland. Congratulations Norwin Band on a great season!

HONORING OUR MILITARY

The Norwin High School Marching Band featured their school’s symbol, the Knight, in its 2013 competitive show, “Rise of the Knight.” The band performed an exciting show that expressed the underlying theme and quote, “The block of granite, which was an obstacle in the pathway of the weak, becomes a stepping stone in the pathway of the strong!” The dramatic ending to the show featured a “knighting” and revealed the new Norwin Band symbol, a shield, and the motto, “Presence, Pride and Artistry.” 6 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

The Rotary Club of Norwin is accepting applications from Norwin area residents who are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces, or from any of their family members, to honor them on a banner to


be displayed along Main Street in Irwin and Norwin Avenue in North Huntingdon beginning May 2014. Residents will have the opportunity to recognize an active military member in good standing by having his/her face, name and rank printed on a banner that will hang in Irwin and North Huntingdon from May – November. This Military Banner Program was initiated by Frank and Mary Aiello, members of the Rotary Club of Norwin, who saw the banner program in a small California town while on vacation. The Aiellos felt that our local military heroes should be similarly supported. The project was unanimously approved by Rotary with sanctions given by the Irwin City Council, North Irwin and the North Huntingdon Township Commissioners. To enter a military service member, applicants should fill out an online application at NorwinRotary.com/ MilitaryBanners. Be sure to include a photo of the service member. Applications may also be picked up at area businesses. For more information, call 724.864.6982.

HOLIDAY HOUSE TOUR

programs at the arena, visit the website at GreensburgPA.org and click on Recreation Department.

NORWIN AREA MEALS ON WHEELS 15TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Norwin Historical Society is hosting its Annual Holiday House Tour on December 7 from 3 – 8 p.m. The tour will feature seven different historic locations in the area which will be decorated for the holidays. Tickets are $17 each. For more information on the historical society, visit the website at NorwinHistoricalSociety.org.

ON THE ICE IN GREENSBURG

2013 ANNUAL HOLIDAY MIXER

The Norwin Area Meals on Wheels celebrated its 15th anniversary on November 3 at Stratigo’s Banquet Center in North Huntingdon. Approximately 120 people turned out to show their support for the organization which provides meals for homebound elderly and disabled. Lee Alverson, a tribute musician and talented pianist and vocalist, provided the entertainment for the event. In addition to the banquet, a Chinese auction was held along with drawings and table prizes.

The Kirk S. Nevin Arena offers Public Ice Skating Sessions the following days and times:

The Norwin Chamber of Commerce is holding its Annual Holiday Mixer on Wednesday, December 4, at the Shidle Lodge in Downtown Irwin, from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. The cost is $5 per person and includes a food buffet, desserts, wine and beverages. It's a great way to meet members of the community, so bring your employees, co-workers, family and friends! RSVP for the event at c.miller@NorwinChamber.com.

Mon. - Fri., 10 a.m. – 12 noon. Wed. & Fri., 1:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Fri., 8 – 10 p.m. Sat., 8 – 10 p.m. Sun., 2 – 4 p.m. The prices for public skating sessions are $5 for adults (18 and over), $4 for youth and seniors (17 and under) and $2 for skate rentals (both hockey and figure skates). Another Learn to Skate program will be held January 2 to February 6, for ages 5 to adult and classes will be held on Thursdays. For more information on these and other

The Norwin Area Meals on Wheels receives no government funding and provides meals to residents in the Norwin area for $4 per day. For more information on the organization or to get involved, call 724.861.9202 or visit the website at NorwinAreaMOW@aol.com.

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 7


INPERSON

National Treasure Norwin resident Don Kattic dedicates a lifetime of service to his country and community. BY JENNIFER BROZAK

My career as a veteran made me proud to teach history.

T

he year was 1951. Don Kattic had just graduated from high school and was working in a steel mill in his hometown when he decided that he needed a change. The United States was embroiled in a conflict with Korea, so Kattic enlisted in the Marines. His decision to join the Marines launched a lifetime of commitment and service not just to his country at large, but to his local community as well. After completing boot camp at Parris Island, S.C., Kattic was sent to California and then to fight on the front lines in the Korean War. “I didn’t mind getting shot at,” says the veteran. “What I didn’t like was being in a 8 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

foxhole in 50-degrees-below-zero weather while the Chinese and North Koreans were playing Christmas music. That I’ll never forget.” After the conflict with Korea ended, Kattic joined the prestigious Marine Corps shooting team at Camp Lejeune, N.C. After his enlistment ended however, he knew he didn’t want to return to work in the steel mills. Moreover, he remained affected by reports of U.S. soldiers who had defected to the enemy’s side in the middle of battle, referencing a research study that was conducted by military captains after the war ended. “[The study] found that they defected because they lacked the knowledge to fully appreciate our country,” he explains. This

information spurred Kattic’s desire to pursue a career teaching U.S. history. He earned his teaching degree at St. Francis University in Loretto, Pa. In his senior year of college, he married his wife, JoAnne, after completing his student teaching at Lilly High School in Lilly, Pa. He found a teaching job in Barberton, Ohio, and a few years later, he was hired for a position at East McKeesport Junior High and moved back to Pennsylvania. Kattic and his family settled in North Huntingdon, and two years later, he was hired by Norwin Senior High School, where he spent the next 30 years teaching social studies classes. He retired 21 years ago.


“My career as a veteran made me proud to teach history,” says Kattic, who will turn 81 this January. Throughout his career, he has belonged to both the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 781 in North Huntingdon and the American Legion in Irwin. Approximately 12 years ago, he was elected commander of the North Huntingdon VFW by the 450-member organization, a position he resigned from in October so that he could spend more time with his family, which includes his wife, five daughters, 13 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. As a veteran, he makes every effort to support both active and returning troops. In 2007, he worked with Staff Sergeant Michael Batdorf and Reserve Officer Dave Davis to collect and donate more than 1,000 soccer balls and approximately 800 stuffed animals to the children of Iraq. The collection was designed to give Iraqi children a moment of peace while in the midst of destruction—but it also had an unexpected result. “The Iraqi children would get so excited about the soccer balls, they would run home and tell their parents. Then, the parents would be so thankful they would give our soldiers intel about the enemy,” says Kattic, grateful and humbled that he could help influence the enemy’s defeat from half a world away. Along with former Norwin High School principal and retired Marine Corps Colonel Ronald Peduzzi, Kattic has also been instrumental in the fundraising and restoration of the Veterans Memorial in front of the North Huntingdon Township building, as well as the memorials on Main Street in Irwin and near the post office in Ardara. In addition, Kattic makes presentations to Boy Scout troops periodically and volunteers to deliver donated library books to veterans hospitals. He serves as the master of ceremonies for the area’s Memorial Day and Veterans Day parades. “Mr. Kattic is a true Norwin icon, not only devoted to his family but also to veterans past and present,” says Barbara Flynn, the children’s librarian at Norwin Public Library. “He’s gone above and beyond to ensure the Norwin area remembers its veterans and their dedication to our country. And, speaking as just one member of the Norwin community, I truly treasure him for his efforts...and they are always done with a smile.” True to his nature, Kattic humbly says, “In my own way, I just want to do what I can to help veterans.” ■

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1 0 0

N O R W I N P U B L I C L I B R A R Y C a r u t h e r s L a n e • I r w i n , P A 1 5 6 4 2 w w w . N o r w i n P u b l i c L i b r a r y . o r g 7 2 4 / 8 6 3 - 4 7 0 0

Top 14 Reasons

to Use the Norwin Public Library in 2014

1.

Getting a library card is FREE. Checking books out of the library (unless you forget to return them…but you wouldn’t do that) is FREE! Where else does this occur? We’ll wait while you think…and NOWHERE ELSE is the answer.

2.

With your library card, you can browse the online catalog and place books on hold from all over Westmoreland County. That’s over 20 libraries’ worth of materials…that you can access in your bunny slippers and pajamas.

3.

Smartphone users, we didn’t forget you! There’s a mobile site too; it’s easy to place holds when you are on the go!

4.

Don’t have a computer at home? We have 28 public computers. (Leave the bunny slippers and pajamas at home, please!)

5.

Need to LEARN how to use a computer? Don’t know a JPEG from a GIF? Just want to email your grandkids? We have people to teach you.

6.

No matter how obscure the question, we’ll help you find an answer. We love a challenge.

7.

What else is free? Ebooks! Download your favorite!

8.

Using our genealogy resources (and classes!) you just might be able to find out where your Great Aunt Genevieve’s youngest brother Henry is buried to finish climbing a branch on that family tree.

9.

We have much more than books! We offers music CDs and tons of movies (but you have to supply the popcorn). All free!

10.

Look Ma, no wires! We’re wireless! Bring your own device!

11.

Looking for something to do? This is the place. From cooking to genealogy to local authors to local history to children’s storytimes, we offer TONS of FREE programs.

12.

Would you rather do research from home? Check out our DATABASES tab. By clicking on POWER LIBRARY, you can even chat with a librarian 24/7 utilizing ASK HERE PA! (You won’t reach one of Norwin’s librarians. Don’t be sad. We assure you they are still awesome and skilled, just like us. But we are home in our bunny slippers and pajamas.)

13.

We are open SEVEN DAYS A WEEK! In fact, we are the only library in the county open on Sundays!

14.

You can renew your books over the phone OR online…let’s keep that FREE thing going! Make overdue fines a thing of the past with just a few clicks!

We believe there are many MORE reasons to use our library. Make it a New Year’s Resolution to discover your own!

The Friends of the Norwin Public Library’s Famous Holiday Basket Sale is going on now! Choose from hundreds of book gift baskets and bundles for all the readers on your shopping list! All proceeds benefit the library! 10 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin


Great Ways to Live a Healthier, Happier, Longer Life in Norwin

Norwin HEALTH & WELLNESS SECTION BY MICHELE THOMPSON

Though finding the fountain of youth (or miracle product) is unlikely, you can embrace the following ways to feel and look younger. Gleaned from age-defying experts this list is a must-keep for your desk or refrigerator.

So turn the page — hack into the havoc that aging can wreak on your body! ››

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 11


H E A L T H & W E L L N E S S / Norwin

EAT HEALTHY EAT AN ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DIET. Holistic

EAT AND DRINK COCONUT. The type of saturated fat in

guru Dr. Andrew Weil recommends eating a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables and minimal processed foods to reduce inflammation in your body.

coconuts does not contribute to heart disease and it is rich in lauric acid, which boosts your immune system.

EAT ALL NATURAL. Avoid high-calorie foods full of sugar, fat and artificial ingredients and concentrate on eating high-nutrient, high-flavor foods such as fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices.

EAT MANY SMALL MEALS. Eat something every three hours to keep your metabolism high and your blood sugar and insulin levels steady. DON’T SKIP BREAKFAST. The easiest meal to skip but the most important. Eat something small, even if you aren’t hungry. READ LABELS. Opt for products with at least three grams of fiber, low sugars and no hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils.

EAT LESS AND LIVE LONGER. Maoshing Ni, author of Secrets of Longevity: Hundreds of Ways to Live to be 100, suggests the “three-quarters rule,” essentially not eating any more after you feel three-quarters full.

DRINK TEA. Ni recommends daily tea because tea is a proven

AVOID BAD FATS. Bad fats include saturated fats, which are primarily derived from animal products, and trans fats, which are used in commercial fried foods, margarines, and baked goods like cookies and crackers. SPICE IT UP. Dr. Wendy Bazilian, author of The SuperFoodsRx Diet: Lose Weight with the Power of SuperNutrients, recommends high-antioxidant spices and herbs such as cinnamon, ginger, curry, rosemary, thyme, oregano and red pepper.

DRINK UP. Drinking water throughout the day can decrease your urges for sweets, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, minimize pain associated with arthritis, migraines, and colitis, hydrate your skin, and help with your digestion. LIMIT YOUR ALCOHOL INTAKE TO ONE OR TWO DRINKS PER DAY. According to the Centers for Disease Control, too much alcohol can increase your risk for developing various diseases and physiological and social problems.

preventive and treatment for hardening of the arteries and has potent antioxidant powers.

SIDELINE THE SODA. The phosphoric acid in carbonated beverages, particularly colas, can put you at risk for osteoporosis.

SLIM DOWN WITH SOUP. People who eat soup before a meal reduce the total number of calories they consume.

DRINK RED WINE. Red wine is

SINK YOUR TEETH INTO SUPERFOODS. Experts say superfoods can help ward off heart disease, cancer, diabetes, cholesterol, bad moods, high blood pressure, and improve digestion, skin, hair, nails, bones and teeth. Superfoods recommended by WebMD.com are beans, blueberries, broccoli, oats, oranges, pumpkin, salmon, soy, spinach, green and black tea, tomatoes, turkey, walnuts and yogurt.

EAT MORE HEALTHY FATS. According to University of Michigan Integrative Medicine, healthy fats to include in your diet are monounsaturated fats, found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and some plant foods as well as polyunsaturated fats, like omega-3s found in fatty fish and omega-6s found in nuts.

P EAT A VARIETY Eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, dairy, and omega-3 fats better ensures you get all the nutrients your body needs. 12 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

renowned for its many health benefits, primarily for the heart. However, new research from the Institute of Food suggests that wine may also protect you from potentially fatal food-borne pathogens, such as E. coli, salmonella, listeria, and H. pylori.

MARINATE YOUR MEAT. Research from the Food Safety Consortium recommends marinades with rosemary, thyme, peppers, allspice, oregano, basil, garlic and onion to cut down on carcinogens.


H E A L T H & W E L L N E S S / Norwin

STRESS CONTROL SMILE. Smiling lowers blood pressure, heart rate, and the stress hormone cortisol.

AROMATHERAPY. Essential oils improve your mood, reduce stress and even improve your memory. Try lavender, lemongrass, cinnamon or cedarwood. Being outdoors with green plants, fresh air and the sounds of nature is a proven stress buster.

YOGA. The Mayo Clinic recommends practicing yoga to reduce stress and anxiety.

GET KNEADED. Research from the Touch Research Institute indicates that regular massage lowers heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety levels, depression, hostility, and the stress hormone cortisol. SEE A THERAPIST. Mental health professionals can help you deal with stress.

BEGIN WITH BREATHING. The first thing you ever did for yourself was breathe. And consciously focusing on your breath remains the epitome of self-care throughout your entire life.

P HUMOR YOUR STRESS Laughing improves circulation, lowers blood pressure, releases tension, and improves your immune system.

Reprinted with the permission from SeniorsForLife.com

LET NATURE TAKE YOUR STRESS AWAY.

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 13


Protect YOUNG ATHLETES The risks of sports-related traumatic brain injuries among professional athletes are making national headlines. However, prevention should begin at childhood, especially among those involved in contact sports. Each year, approximately 300,000 people in the United States experience sports-related concussions. A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury most often caused by a sudden bump or blow to the head or other parts of the body. It also can be caused by a fall. As a result of the sudden impact, the brain moves around in the skull causing chemical changes. These changes make the brain more sensitive to stress and other injuries until it fully recovers. In addition, the immature brain of a young athlete is known to take longer to recover. Most people who have experienced a concussion realize that something is wrong, however, the symptoms can be tricky, so those around the injured person must pay close attention for the warning signs. This is especially apparent among football players who are conditioned to being knocked down and getting back up again, only to realize later that they’ve been hurt. Many athletic directors for public schools require that athletes who participate in “high-risk” sports must have a baseline

symptoms of a concussion Difficulty concentrating Difficulty completing tasks Changes in behavior Worsening headache Persistent double vision Excessive drowsiness Stroke-like symptoms

neurocognitive test before their first contact football practice, within the first week of cheerleading or before the first game for other sports. Although treatment for concussions is individualized, almost all physicians recommend physical and mental rest immediately after the injury. This includes no texting, video games, TV, reading or physical activity. It’s also important to understand that medications will mask the pain and do not heal the brain. In fact, anti-inflammatory medications can be dangerous because they increase the risk of bleeding. However, there are situations where medications are warranted. It is paramount to have an evaluation and obtain clearance by a physician experienced in diagnosing and treating concussions before returning to sports activities. SOURCE: UCF PEGASUS HEALTH/UCF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

14 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

HEALTH &WELLNESS DIRECTORY Orthopedic Associates of Pittsburgh 412.349.8190 www.oapgh.com Orthopedic Associates of Pittsburgh was established over 40 years ago. Originally in Oakland, the Monroeville office opened in 1978 and White Oak in 2002. We have evolved from a general orthopedic practice into a sub-specialty practice encompassing hand & upper extremity, foot & ankle, total joint replacement, sports medicine and spine. We will strive to provide the finest service and care for your orthopedic needs.

SURGERY OF THE FUTURE IS NOW A relatively new approach to gynecological surgery is revolutionizing the standard of care in obstetrics and gynecology. daVinci is a technology that enhances a surgeon’s capabilities while offering patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, such as less surgical trauma, smaller incisions and a faster recovery time. “daVinci is like an extension of the surgeon’s hands,” said Shannon McGranahan, MD, a boardcertified obstetrician and gynecologist at St. Clair. “It can mimic the natural movements of my hand while causing less bleeding, less pain and fewer complications than traditional surgery.” Gynecological procedures being performed with daVinci include hysterectomies, which is the most common utilization; complicated hysterectomies; pelvic pain present with endometriosis; and myomectomies, or removal of fibroids. daVinci also is being used across many other disciplines as well, including urology, colorectal surgery and thoracic surgery. “In the past, surgery such as hysterectomy would require an extended recovery period of several weeks or more, which is a large reason why many women procrastinated with their care. The long recovery interfered with their daily responsibilities,” Dr. McGranahan said. “Surgery performed with daVinci, however, usually requires only one overnight stay in the hospital, and the woman can return to work in about one to two weeks.” A common patient misconception, however, is that daVinci is a programmed robot that will be performing the surgery. “That’s simply not true,” Dr. McGranahan noted. “Board-certified surgeons are still managing and performing the operation. daVinci is there to enhance their capabilities.”


O Christmas Tree

Choosing a live evergreen tree in Norwin By Matthew J. Fascetti

I

t’s the most wonderful time of the year, and choosing a real Christmas tree is a season highlight for many families. Whether you make the trek to a tree farm to cut down your own, or head to your neighborhood tree lot, the smell of fresh pine in your home signals the beginning of the holiday season. Your tree selection is often the result of personal preference and budget, but there are a few things to keep in mind. Perhaps the most popular type of tree is the Fraser Fir. It has one-inch needles that are silvery-green and soft to the touch. Because there is space between the branches, the Fraser is easier to decorate and the firm branches hold heavier ornaments. Also very popular is the Noble Fir, with a deep green color, soft needles and well-shaped, sturdy branches. Other varieties include the Colorado Blue Spruce, known for its blue foliage and pyramidal shape with strong limbs that can hold heavy ornaments. The Grand Fir has glossy dark green foliage and is soft to the touch, however it may not hold heavier ornaments. The Balsam Fir is a wonderful dark-green color with airy, flexible branches and a pleasant fragrance. The branches are not as sturdy so it’s not the best choice for heavy decorating.

The White Fir has a pleasing natural shape and aroma and good needle retention. The Eastern White Pine is known for making garlands, wreaths and centerpieces due to its long, feathery-soft needles. Though it’s a beautiful tree, the branches can be a bit too flexible to use as a Christmas tree. Finally, the Douglas Fir makes a visually appealing tree with soft, shiny green needles and wonderful aroma. If you purchase your tree at a lot, keep in mind some pre-cut Christmas trees may have been cut weeks earlier. Try to buy your tree early to extend its freshness. Check the tree for brown needles and perform a “drop test.” Raise the tree a few inches off the ground and then firmly place the tree trunk on the ground. If green needles drop, it could indicate the tree may have been cut for some time. Once you get your tree home, make a straight cut at the bottom of the trunk, removing about one inch. This will improve the tree’s ability to absorb water. Place the tree in a container that holds at least one gallon of water and add more as needed. The base of the trunk should always be in water which will help sustain the beauty of the tree for as long as possible.

Find it here...

e The Home Depot 102 Aldi Dr.

e Grandview Nurseries 119 Tolvinski Lane

e Pitt Rental Center 7670 Route 30

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 15


New documentary explores paranormal activity at

HAUNTED The

S

Larimer Mansion

BY JENNIFER BROZAK

ince the beginning of time, scientists and philosophers alike have attempted to answer the question, “Is there life after death?� A new documentary examining the extensive paranormal activity at a local historic mansion hopes to shed more light on this existential debate.

16 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin


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HAUNTED The

The film, “The Haunting of Larimer Mansion,” is the result of a three-and-a-half-year investigation into the paranormal phenomenon present at the Larimer Mansion Bed and Breakfast. The 223-year-old home stands near the corner of Maus Drive and Clay Pike in North Huntingdon. The documentary’s premiere took place at a private screening at the Oaks Theater in Oakmont on Oct. 19. For the past 30 years, owners Lynne and Larry Moisey, along with many of their guests, have reported a multitude of visual and auditory ghostly phenomenon, such as hearing voices, seeing inanimate objects move and full-body images of ghostly figures. “The message in this movie, in my mind, is that there is life after death,” says Lynne Moisey. “We may never see our loved ones again in our lifetime, but we know that they are still in and around our lives. The important message of the film is that life does continue.” According to Moisey, the documentary is scientific and educational, and not sensationalized for entertainment purposes. To make the film, the filmmakers relied on evidence collected by

18 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

Hauntings Research, a local paranormal organization founded by renowned paranormal expert Ed Ozosky. “We are not ghost hunters or ghost busters. This is not our goal,” explains Ozosky, who has been researching and studying paranormal phenomenon for 30 years. “This documentary is an attempt to educate the public in an unbiased way about the findings of our study. The goal is to help reinforce current concepts in the science of parapsychology and life after death.” “The mansion’s high degree of paranormal activity is extraordinary,” Ozosky continues. “Normally, the activity tends to be cyclical – it ramps up, it peaks and then it calms back down. The Larimer Mansion is one of the only places where the activity is constant. We’re hoping that this film shows the significance of the Larimer Mansion in the field of parapsychology.” Moisey said that the electronic voice phenomenon (EVPs) captured by Ozosky’s team enabled her to begin tracking down the mansion’s “lost years” – a period of time for which she could find no documentation about the home. She said that one of the names the research team heard was “McFarlane,” and Moisey was able to follow


The mansion’s high degree of paranormal activity is extraordinary. –Ed Ozosky

Paranormal Expert

up on the data to help her put the pieces of the puzzle together. After doing some research of her own, she was able to corroborate the names taken from the EVPs with historical records dating back to 1777. The film’s supervising coordinator and member of Hauntings Research, Brad Pedersen, was instrumental in helping launch the documentary. Pedersen, also a local reporter, says he was introduced to the Moiseys after writing a story about the mansion approximately three years ago. He spent an evening with the Hauntings Research team and after repeated visits, became intrigued not only with tales of the paranormal, but also with the history of the mansion itself and the extensive restoration efforts. Since the Moiseys purchased the mansion, they have completed every single restoration project by themselves. When Pedersen stopped by to visit one day, he saw Moisey on a ladder, scraping paint off of the side of the house. He knew he had to do something to help with the home’s continued restoration and maintenance efforts. “We made this film to raise awareness of the mansion itself and as a way to help raise funds for its upkeep,” explains Pedersen. “It’s a way

to showcase this bit of history that is present right in the middle of North Huntingdon.” Moisey acknowledges that she had been approached by major cable networks about filming the mansion’s story, but she refused because they wanted to turn the hauntings into “something evil and ugly.” Instead, she and her husband decided to work with a local team. Pedersen was responsible for finding the film crew, which includes local director Blase Ward and editor Katie Palamara. All of the proceeds from the film and subsequent DVD sales will be directed toward the continued restoration of the home. Despite their own experiences, both Moisey and Ozosky insist that they’re not attempting to change anyone’s views on the afterlife. “We don’t want to change anyone’s beliefs,” says Moisey. “You can believe whatever you want to believe. We’re just trying to put the truth out there.” Copies of “The Haunting of Larimer Mansion” are available for sale at the mansion. For more information, call 724.863.9150 or visit larimermansion.com. ■

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 19


Love ofDance For the

BY JENNIFER BROZAK

OWNER OF JANET’S DANCE STUDIO HAS BEEN INSPIRING, ENCOURAGING LOCAL PERFORMERS FOR NEARLY FOUR DECADES

hen Janet Naughton opened her dance studio 38 years ago, female business owners were few and far between and even a little snubbed. Still, from an early age, Naughton knew she had to be in the entertainment business. “Much of my family was in show business. It was a way of life for me.” She has been dancing since the age of two and began taking dance lessons at the age of three under the instruction of Garnet Heverly. She later studied with Virginia Toth and considers her to be her mentor and friend. Today, at 77, Naughton still straps on her dancing shoes on occasion. “I learned a lot from Virginia,” says Naughton. “Her choreography was way beyond the time period. She wasn’t afraid to be risky or daring.” At 14 years of age with her mother serving as her manager, Naughton began performing as a solo dancer, opening for some of the era’s biggest names, 20 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

including Red Buttons, Tommy Dorsey and Steve and Eydie Gormé. She worked as a solo performer for eight years until she met her husband Jack and started a family. The family then moved from Braddock to Irwin in 1975. Following the birth of her daughter, Naughton worked as an instructor with Virginia’s School of Dance, Hank Romero in Greensburg and with the Norwin YMCA. It was then that she decided to open her own studio in Irwin. Despite being looked upon as an outsider by some, she persevered, buoyed by her talent and drive. Nearly 40 years later, her studio is a thriving and enduring establishment in the Norwin community. Janet’s Dance Studio is a family business, with daughter Leisa Maghery also working as an instructor. Maghery left a flight attendant job to join the studio staff. She also teaches Zumba classes at the studio.


“Dancing is a community thing— we wouldn’t be in this business if it wasn’t for the community.” –JANET NAUGHTON

“I owe everything to my mom,” Maghery says. “If it wasn’t for her, none of us would be here.” Leisa’s daughter, Kaitlyn Maghery, 21, has also found her calling as an instructor and choreographer at her grandmother’s studio. She initially resisted getting involved in dance, but around the age of 18, something just “clicked.” When she would hear music, she couldn’t resist thinking about what movements would go with it. She also works as a costume designer and has earned numerous teaching awards, receiving the highest-scoring routine at a recent talent competition. “Having a granddaughter in her 20s has brought the business back to life,” says Naughton affectionately. Naughton understands that to stay competitive, you must constantly reinvent yourself. “Working with Kaitlyn and with the children forces me into staying young.” Naughton says that the dance industry has changed radically since she opened her studio.

“The music has changed dramatically, and so have the costumes,” Naughton notes. Her students often appear to be more mature, both emotionally and physically, than they were several decades ago. She also feels the kids today are better dancers. “They find songs on YouTube and learn the routines before they even set foot in the door.” While her students might be able to perform the steps, they still need fine tuning. “They might have the routine down, but not the technique. Technique is where we come in. I give them the absolute best dance education I can give them.” The studio, located at 407 Oak Street in Irwin, offers classes in many genres, including tap, jazz, ballet, hip-hop, modern and lyrical dance. The students perform a recital every other year at Norwin Middle School and during the in-between years they focus on technique, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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Love ofDance For the

bringing in outside coaches and special trainers from all over the country. Naughton says that approximately 180 students are enrolled in the studio each year from September through June. The studio also offers an intensive summer session which attracts students from other local schools and an adult tap and jazz program. There are recreational students and competitive students at the school, and the instructors make it a priority to strike a

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

delicate balance between the two. The studio participates in two formal competitions per year, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Charlotte, N.C. “We have fantastic talent,” says Naughton proudly, who explains that many of her students have moved on to roles in movies, on Broadway and in Los Angeles. Still, Naughton insists that teaching dance is not about credentials. “It’s about giving

each child a chance to be their best,” she explains. “The most important thing is to make a difference in a child’s life and in the community. Dancing is a community thing – we wouldn’t be in this business if it wasn’t for the community.” Dancers from Janet’s Dance Studio routinely perform at nursing homes and for community events, such as Light Up Night. The instructors encourage the dancers to give their all every time, just as they would for a recital or competition. The words “Imagine the possibilities” adorn the cover of the brochure for the dance studio, and for Naughton, they’re not just a slogan, but her life’s philosophy. “Dance is not just a job, it’s a lifestyle,” says Naughton. “Once it gets a hold of you, you can’t let it go.” ■

For more information about Janet’s Dance Studio, Call 724.863.8727 or visit

danceatjanets.com.

Business Directory

22 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin


NORWIN School News

Norwin School District 24

Norwin STEM Innovation Center Steering Committee Begins Work

24

School District Awarded for Energy Conservation Program

25

Marching Band Highlights

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High School Student Named Commended Student

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Norwin School District Observes Red Ribbon Week

27

High School Branch of Norwin Teachers Federal Credit Union Sees Growth

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Middle School STEM Girls Camp a Success

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Norwin High School Winter Concerts

29

Norwin High School to Host Let Freedom Sing! Concert

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Freshman Academy Begins at High School

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Winter Sports Schedule

30

Norwin School District Announces New Athletic Director

31

Norwin Fall Sports Highlights


Norwin STEM Innovation Center Steering Committee Begins Work

A group photo of the Norwin STEM Innovation Center Steering Committee.

The Norwin STEM Innovation Center Steering Committee has begun its work to provide crucial input for a proposed building on the Norwin campus called “The Norwin STEM Innovation Center for Teaching and Learning.” STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. The proposed STEM Innovation Center is being designed to help Norwin students meet the fast-growing demand for knowledge, skills, and abilities through internships and mentorships on campus.

Cost and location are yet to be determined, but the District’s goal is to construct the Center without the use of local real estate tax dollars. The Norwin administration has been working on the preliminary steps of a business plan by exploring funding from state government, corporations, nonprofit foundations, and Norwin alumni. The Steering Committee held its first meeting on Friday, September 20, 2013, at Hillcrest Intermediate School, and also met October 29 and 30 so that members could share design

School District Awarded for Energy Conservation Program

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N OR WI N SC HO OL D IS TRI C T NE WS

Program Has Reduced District Energy Expenses by $532,314 During Past Two Years

Norwin School District received an award for its energy The program also delivers an environmental benefit from conservation program that has resulted in a savings of $532,314 reduced carbon footprint. Energy not used prevents the during the past two years. emission of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Norwin School District was presented with The Award According to EPA/EGrid figures, in the first 25 months of the for Energy Stewardship at the September 16, 2013, Board program, Norwin School District saved 26,893 MMBTU, the of Education meeting for the District’s energy conservation equivalent of 3,946 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions program, which is based on small changes in employee being prevented, 708 cars removed from the road, or 100,937 behavior. The program is administered through Cenergistic, a pine trees grown for 10 years. national company whose energy conservation programs have Norwin’s energy conservation program is overseen by Mr. saved more than $3.2 billion for educational and ministerial Christopher Baker, organizations since 1986. Supervisor of Energy During the past 25 months that Norwin has had an energy Conservation and conservation program, the actual cost for electricity, gas, Custodial Services. water, and sewer obtained directly from District utility bills was $1,881,677. However, had there been no energy program in effect during those 25 months, it is estimated that the School District’s expected energy costs Norwin School District was presented with The would have been $2,413,991.This means that Award for Energy Stewardship at the September because of the energy conservation program, 16, 2013, Board of Education meeting for the the District has saved $532,314, which equates District’s energy conservation program. From to a 22 percent savings. Left to Right: Board of Education President Mr. Robert Perkins and Dr. Tim McNamee, representing Cenergistic. 24 Norwin


1. 2. 3. 4.

What SKILLS will students and businesses need? What EXPERIENCES will you provide to transfer those skills? What TOOLS will all parties need? What SPACES will accommodate those experiences?

The Steering Committee has two additional meetings— one each in November and December—and then Hayes Large Architects will present a final report to the Board of Education in January 2014.

Norwin High School student representatives to the Steering Committee are, from left to right: Mason Bryan, Stephanie Hutchinson, Brandon Meier, and Marina Novotnak.

To learn more, please visit www.norwinsd.org and view information under “Academics” and “Norwin STEM Innovation Center.”

Marching Band Highlights Congratulations to the Norwin Band. Norwin won first place at the 2013 Pennsylvania Interscholastic Marching Band Association (PIMBA) Championships, held Saturday November 2, 2013, at Gateway High School. The Norwin Band also won in the categories of High Music, Visual, and General Effect. The Band also earned third place in one of the nation’s most prominent Bands of America championships – the Towson, MD Regional, presented by Yamaha, at Johnny Unitas Stadium (Towson University) in Towson, Maryland on October 26, 2013. Norwin also earned the honor of Outstanding Visual Performance. Some 27 outstanding high school marching bands from throughout Maryland, Massachusetts, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Connecticut competed. The Marching Band also defended their Regional title at the Bands of America Monroeville Regional on September 21, 2013. They won first place overall, and also won High Visual, High General Effect and tied for High Music (with Fairfax, VA). Bands from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia and North Carolina competed. The band also hosted the 52nd Norwin Band Festival on October 5, 2013, at Norwin High School. Norwin High School’s Marching Band show this year was entitled, “The Rise of the Knight.” Band directors include Mr. Tim Daniels, Mr. Greg Ondayko and Mrs. Kim Glover. Color guard directors are Mr. Tommy Allen and Mrs. Heather Shrump.

High School Student Named Commended Student Norwin High School Senior Sarah R. Kerr has been named a Commended Student in the 2014 National Merit Scholarship Program. A Letter of Commendation from the school and National Merit Scholarship Corporation will be presented by Principal Timothy Kotch to this scholastically talented senior. About 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation are being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Although they will not continue in the 2014 competition for National Merit Scholarship awards, Commended Students placed among the top five percent of more than 1.5 million students who entered the 2014 competition by taking the 2012 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.

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the STEM Innovation Center: SEEDS (PreK STEM Program), ASSET STEM (a national STEM education improvement nonprofit), and the Air Force Junior ROTC. The District also shared information about educational programs to be offered at the Innovation Center. They discussed how the remaining portions of the building will be organized to support each program by returning to four central planning questions:

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ideas. Hayes Large Architects, which is conducting a feasibility study about the proposed Center, facilitated the meetings. The September 20th session focused on "big picture" issues, such as developing the programmatic vision for Center, setting goals, and exploring the many ways that the facility could be used to further STEM education at Norwin. The group also discussed other parameters that will influence the design of the facility and its location on the campus. An enthusiastic and diverse group of educators, business leaders, community members, university representatives, STEM teachers and High School students participated. Throughout the day-long session, participants engaged in discussions and shared their opinions via a Web-based recording tool known as Padlet. The October 29 and 30 sessions focused on further refining the program, spaces and equipment that will be supported by the new Center as the Steering Committee works to create a conceptual design for the facility. The group explored site options in greater detail with the goal of selecting the best location for the Center on the Norwin campus. Architect Mr. Gary Nevius, who served as architect and planner for the Blue Valley Center for Advanced Professional Studies (Overland Park, Kansas), provided an overview of the Blue Valley facility, highlighting the types of spaces that were created to support business-education partnerships. Learning more about the approach at Blue Valley sparked ideas for the design of the STEM Innovation Center. The Steering Committee also reviewed the program and space needs of the three anchor programs to be included in


Norwin High School Sports Schedules

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Norwin School District Observes Red Ribbon Week Red Ribbon Week is the nation’s oldest and largest drug prevention campaign, and it was observed with a series of educational lessons at all seven Norwin School District schools from October 21 to November 1, 2013. “A Healthy Me Is Drug Free” was the theme of Red Ribbon Week 2013. Norwin Superintendent of Schools Dr. William Kerr distributed a letter dated October 21, 2013 to all Norwin parents to highlight the importance of Red Ribbon Week, which is more important than ever because Westmoreland County is experiencing a drug overdose epidemic. Westmoreland County is on pace to experience more than 110 deaths this year. This is a serious public health problem that affects all residents. “There is no family, school, or community that is immune from the drug problem,” Dr. Kerr said. “Norwin School District is doing all it can to help students become aware of the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse.” Children of parents who talk to their teens regularly about drugs are 42 percent less likely to use drugs than those who don't – yet only a quarter of teens report having these conversations, according to the Red Ribbon Campaign Web site at www.redribbon.org. During Red Ribbon week, the School District shared information about several educational programs and

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efforts aimed at raising awareness. For example, the School District promotes the North Huntingdon-based Reality Tour. This is a volunteer-driven substance abuse prevention program geared toward ages 10 and up, which students and parents must attend together. It is sponsored by the Norwin Lions Club and has a strong connection to Hillcrest Intermediate School because of the commitment of Principal Rosemarie Dvorchak. It is beginning its second year at its North Huntingdon location (JB's Bright Beginnings, Brush Hill Road, North Huntingdon). The Reality Tour is held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. Since the Norwin Reality Tour began in September 2012, 320 adults and 225 youths have attended. For details and a registration form, please visit www.norwinsd.org and look on the bottom right of the School District’s home page for Reality Tour information. Because of the rising misuse of prescription medications, especially among youths, the Norwin Lions Club and North Huntingdon Police Department have teamed up to install a prescription drug lockbox. The lockbox allows the public to drop off their unused prescription drugs, 24 hours per day, seven days a week, in the lobby of the North Huntingdon


Norwin Student Branch of the Credit Union Believed to Be First of Its Kind in Westmoreland County When the Norwin Teachers Federal Credit Union opened a student branch office within Norwin High School in February 2013, it was believed to be the first of its kind in Westmoreland County. Now in its second school year, this student branch office of the credit union has attracted a total of 57 student members who have created accounts, and the branch office is looking forward to expanding opportunities to increase financial literacy among students. According to Norwin High School Principal Mr. Timothy Kotch, increased financial literacy is one of the prime benefits of having a credit union located within Norwin High School. That’s important because soon many students will be heading off to college, where they will receive free credit card offers. “They have a convenient place to open an account and manage their money,” said Mr. Kotch, who also serves as president of the Norwin Teachers Federal Credit Union Board of Directors. “This is a real-world, practical application.” The student branch is open Tuesdays and Thursdays during student lunch periods in a place where student traffic is high: In the Norwin School Store at the cafeteria. Students from teacher Mr. Douglas Aftanas’ Money Matters classes volunteer as student workers who are responsible for branch operations under the supervision of credit union employee Ms. Amanda Wagner. The credit union held a logo contest, and 40 students submitted logos for consideration. Eleventh-grade student Corey Supel designed the winning logo using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator software, which he has used for Web design purposes for the past couple of years. Eleventh-grade student Alyssa Minko, a member of the art club and a stage crew scenic artist, painted the logo on a wall of the student branch office in October. Alyssa aspires to become a professional animator and has been serious about creating artwork since fifth grade, when one of her entries in the PTA’s Reflections art contest made it to the state level. Students from Mrs. Kristen Kelly’s Marketing Apps classes created a commercial for KWIN student TV broadcasts and numerous signs that were hung throughout the school to promote the student branch. Ms. Amy Lichwa, CEO of the Norwin Teachers Federal Credit Union, said that she is thankful that Norwin School District sees the value of financial literacy for students.

Norwin High School juniors Alyssa Minko and Corey Supel stand near the logo they created for the Credit Union located within Norwin High School. Corey created the logo using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator; Alyssa painted the logo in the student branch office.

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Township Police Department. During the nine weeks that the lockbox has been there, the police have collected 40 pounds of unused prescription drugs. Please remember the lockbox as a resource to help get prescription drugs out of the hands of our young people. The District hosted a prescription drug abuse summit for parents and the community on November 7, 2013 in partnership with Southwest Medical Center at the Norwin High School auditorium. A panel of medical experts, law enforcement agencies such as the Drug Enforcement Administration, and parents presented real-life stories and shared signs and symptoms of abuse. Also, during the school day on November 7, 2013, Norwin High School and Middle School students participated in assemblies with a similar awareness message. The North Huntingdon Police Department has a regular presence in all seven Norwin schools, and at Norwin High School and Middle School, Detective Sgt. Jeffrey Bouldin teaches students the unvarnished truth about how lives have been destroyed by drug use. Mr. Kevin Lintner, a school-based Westmoreland County Juvenile Probation officer, also teaches Norwin High School students about the horrors of addiction to opiate drugs, pain medication, and heroin. Earlier this year, the Norwin School District received a $1,000 grant from Communities In Schools of Pennsylvania (CISPA) to promote the My Life, My Choice, Drug Free campaign in the District. It is providing scholarships for a select number of students in Grades 5 and 6, and their parents, to attend the Norwin Reality Tour; and it also helped promote a “Postcard Pledge” for students in Grades 4 and 5. The School District also partners with the St. Vincent Prevention Projects to increase student awareness about harmful drugs. St. Vincent Prevention Projects provides in-class presentations called Realistic Education About Life (REAL) in the elementary grades and also through Project ALERT lessons in Grades 7 and 8 at Norwin Middle School. The Westmoreland County Overdose Task Force is a multi-year project to identify the root causes and find solutions that will dramatically reduce the number of overdose deaths in our community. Norwin School District serves on this task force, which includes 145 representatives from education, recovery, medical, law enforcement and the legal community, service providers, and concerned members of the public.

High School Branch of Norwin Teachers Federal Credit Union Sees Growth

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The St. Vincent Prevention Projects education program visited Stewartsville Elementary School on the first day of the school’s Red Ribbon Week observance. Photos by Erin Anticole


Middle School STEM Girls Camp a Success

or win

N OR WI N SC HO OL D IS TRI C T NE WS

“STEMettes Camp for Girls” Drew 14 Students in Grades 5-8 for Four-Week Camp Girls from Norwin Middle School and Hillcrest Intermediate School made their own lip gloss, met a research chemist, made a Rube-Goldberg Machine, created a solar-powered race car, and grew an indoor garden without soil at a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) camp for girls. Titled the “STEMettes Camp for Girls,” the camp was designed to excite Intermediate School and Middle School girls in Grades 5 through 8 about STEM Education and teamwork. Materials for the camp were funded through a grant by the Female Alliance STEM Excellence Center, which is affiliated locally with the Penn State Electro-Optics Center. Fourteen girls participated, and they ranged in grade levels from 5-8. The camp ran four consecutive Saturdays starting September 14, 2013. The girls explored cosmetics engineering, a CSI lab, engineering, sustainable energy, and hydroponics. During the first session, the girls explored cosmetics engineering and created their very own natural lip gloss complete with personalized labels. In the second session, they built solar-powered race cars and began working on their Rube Goldberg machines. In week three, the girls planted flowers and added nutrients to the hydroponics system. Session four started off with a CSI-style lab, complete with artificial blood samples, and the session ended with the final testing of the Rube Goldberg machines. Ms. Veronica Check, a Middle School technology education teacher, applied for the grant that provided the funding for the camp. “Running this camp was a very exciting couple of weeks,” Ms. Check said. “It was great to be able to give these young girls extra opportunities outside of the classroom to exercise their math,

science, design, and problem-solving skills. Everything we did was very hands-on, so they were able to apply math and science concepts they learned in class to real-life situations.” Ms. Kayla Lloyd, a former Norwin student who is currently working as a research chemist for the University of Pittsburgh, joined the students during the final week as a guest speaker. She shared with the girls how she became interested in her field and the path she took to become a research chemist. “After she left, it was great to hear the girls talking to each other about STEM careers that interest them,” Ms. Check said. “All in all, I think the camp was a success and I am looking forward to hosting another in the near future.” Eighth-grade student Marti Mandella said the camp was a lot of fun. “All the activities were interesting, even for an older student like me,” Marti said. “My favorite was building the solar-powered race car.” Ms. Check said this camp’s focus on girls was important, because many STEM careers are male dominated. “This camp allowed young girls to come together and be themselves, while exploring a variety of different fields,” Ms. Check said. “It was a great way for girls to put their math and science skills to use in hands-on situations and also to connect with positive female role models.” Future camps will be announced on the Norwin School District Web site at www.norwinsd.org under “Academics” and “STEM Education.” Click on “STEM Camps.” A photo slideshow from the first camp is available there as well.

Photos from “STEM-ettes” camp for Middle School and Intermediate School Girls. Photos by Veronica Check

28 Norwin


WINTER CONCERTS AT THE CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Norwin High School Band, Choral, and Orchestra students are inviting the general public to a series of holiday or winter concerts. We invite you to see and hear firsthand the stirring harmonies and musical artistry that have been a tradition of excellence at Norwin’s music program for years. Please find below a listing of the days, times, and admission details for the 2013-2014 holiday concerts that are open to the general public. ADMISSION / TICKET COST DETAILS FOR GENERAL PUBLIC

LOCATION AND TITLE OF CONCERT

DAY AND DATE

TIME

Norwin High School Orchestra Concert

Friday December 6, 2013

7 p.m.

$3 for adult, $2 for students and senior citizens at the door.

Norwin High School Winter Choral Concert

Sunday, December 15, 2013

2:30 p.m.

$3 for adult, $2 for students and senior citizens at the door.

Norwin High School Band Winter Concert

Thursday, 7 p.m. February 13, 2014

$3 for adult, $2 for students and senior citizens at the door.

PMEA Junior High District Band East at Norwin High School (featuring 130 student musicians in Grades 7 through 9 from schools in Westmoreland, Allegheny and Fayette counties)

Saturday, February 1, 2014

$5 for adults, $3 for students and seniors.

(featuring Freshman Choir, Concert Choir, Bel Canto, Chamber Choir, and Show Choir)

1 p.m.

The Norwin High School Choral Department is honored to celebrate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King by hosting the 2014 Let Freedom Sing! Choral Festival at Norwin High School. Several area choirs will join forces at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 20, 2014 at Norwin High School, to celebrate the ideals of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Let Freedom Sing! will include the musical talents of church, community and school choirs, as well as featured jazz artists and prominent orators. Rev. Dr. Herbert V.R.P Jones, Director of the Pittsburgh Gospel Choir, will conduct combined choirs at the concerts. Through choral selections and oratory, the event will demonstrate the importance of becoming actively involved in community affairs, working toward a common goal, and how local action can make a contribution to a national effort. The Norwin Select Choir began participating in Let Freedom Sing! in 2011, and student interest has grown in it each succeeding year, according to Mrs. Bridget Faulk, Norwin High School Choral Director. “It was my students’ favorite experience all year last year,” Mrs. Faulk said. “I hope that we can really get this community on board with the mission of this concert. It is such a great way to celebrate Dr. King and his message.”

WHO: Norwin Choirs, Other High School Choirs, and the Pittsburgh Gospel Choir WHAT: Let Freedom Sing! public concert WHEN: 7 p.m. Monday, January 20, 2014 WHERE: Norwin High School Auditorium, 251 McMahon Drive, North Huntingdon, PA 15642 COST: FREE! However, donations will be accepted at the door and will benefit the Food Bank of Greater Pittsburgh and the Westmoreland County Food Bank. DETAILS: This is a choral concert with Norwin Choirs, other area high school choirs, and the Pittsburgh Gospel Choir.

Freshman Academy Begins at High School A new Freshman Academy has been created for select ninthgrade students at Norwin High School. This new program focuses on supporting the academic, social, and emotional needs of first-year High School students still needing to pass the Algebra 1 Keystone Exam. The Freshman Academy consists of a core group of four teachers in the subject areas of Mathematics, Science, English, and Social Studies. Teachers provide instruction in the content area and also help students develop the necessary academic skills to be successful throughout their High School experience. This group of dedicated teachers is working almost exclusively with the selected group of students in the Academy to build deeper relationships and to provide students with targeted instruction. The Freshman Academy schedule provides more focused time in both Algebra I and Biology, with courses having an every-other-day

lab/application period. Additionally, students’ schedules include U.S. and PA II (social studies) and English 9/Communications II along with their elective selections. “This opportunity to build deeper relationships, support the academic needs, and transition students from the Middle School to the High School will positively impact students’ academic achievement and continue to build a successful foundation for college or career readiness,” said Assistant Principal Mr. Michael Choby. “Research shows that the ninth-grade year is the most important year in High School for building the foundation of academic success. It’s a transition year.” Parents have been giving the program great reviews thus far, Mr. Choby said. The program builds upon the teaming concept used at the Middle School. Ninety-six students are enrolled. Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 29

N OR WI N SC HOOL DI STRI C T N E WS

Let Freedom Sing! Concert

Norwin High School

Nor win

Norwin High School to Host


WINTER

Date

Time

Opponent

Facility

Boys Varsity Basketball 12/3/13

5:00PM

Shaler/Penn Hills

Shaler High School

12/6/13

5:30PM

Tip-Off Tournament Norwin vs Mt. Pleasant

Penn Trafford High School

12/4/13 12/7/13

12/10/13 12/11/13 12/13/13 12/17/13 12/20/13 12/23/13 1/2/14 1/7/14

1/10/14 1/14/14 1/15/14 1/17/14 1/21/14 1/22/14 1/24/14 1/27/14 1/31/14 2/4/14 2/5/14 2/7/14

4:00PM 4:30PM TBA TBA

7:30PM 7:30PM

Pine Richland

Tip-Off Tournament Norwin vs Hampton Franklin Tournament Franklin Tournament

7:30PM

McKeesport

7:30PM 7:30PM

7:30PM

Woodland Hills

7:30PM

7:30PM

Latrobe

Connellsville H. S.

Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym Kiski High School

Greensburg Salem H. S. Norwin H.S. New Gym

Franklin Regional

Albert Gallatin

7:30PM

Clairton High School

7:30PM

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Greensburg Salem

7:30PM 7:30PM

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Hempfield

Kiski

7:30PM

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Penn Trafford

7:45PM 7:30PM

Latrobe High School

Albert Gallatin

Connellsville

7:30PM

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Baldwin

7:30PM

Franklin Regional H.S.

Hempfield High School

Kiski

Latrobe

Penn Trafford High School Franklin Regional H.S.

Hempfield

7:30PM

Pine-Richland H.S.

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Albert Gallatin High School

Connellsville

Norwin H.S. New Gym Clairton High School

Penn Trafford

Penn Trafford High School

Boys Varsity Wrestling 11/30/13

9:00AM

Chartiers Valley Mega Scrimmage

Chartiers Valley H. S.

12/7/13

10:00AM

E.A.I.W.T.

Gateway H.S.

12/6/13

12/11/13 12/12/13 12/18/13 12/27/13 12/28/13 1/8/14

1/10/14 1/11/14 1/16/14 1/20/14 1/25/14 2/8/14

2/10/14 2/27/14 2/28/14 3/1/14

4:30PM 7:00PM

E.A.I.W.T. Latrobe

Norwin H.S. Old Gym

7:00PM

Kiski

8:30AM

Powerade Christmas Wrestling Tournament

7:00PM 10:00AM 7:00PM TBA TBA

7:00PM 7:00PM

Powerade Christmas Wrestling Tournament Greensburg Salem

WCCA Wrestling Tournament WCCA Wrestling Tournament Penn Trafford

Indiana Area Senior HS

Char Valley Duals

7:00PM

Baldwin

9:00AM TBA TBA TBA

Kiski High School

Hempfield

9:00AM

WPIAL AAA SW Regionals WPIAL AAA SW Regionals

Hempfield High School

Canon McMillan High School Canon McMillan High School Greensburg Salem H. S. TBA TBA

Norwin H.S. Old Gym Norwin H.S. Old Gym

William Jenkins Memorial Duals WPIAL AAA SW Regionals

Gateway H.S.

Chartiers Valley H. S.

Penn State/Fayette Campus Baldwin H. S. TBA TBA TBA

or win

N OR WI N SC HO OL D IS TRI C T NE WS

Coed Varsity Swimming 12/3/13

6:00PM

Greensburg Salem

Greensburg Salem H. S.

12/10/13

6:00PM

Blackhawk High School

Norwin High School

Derry

Derry High School

12/6/13

Mt. Pleasant

Norwin High School For the most up to date schedule, visit www.highschoolsports.net. 12/12/13 12/16/13 12/19/13

6:00PM 6:00PM 6:00PM 6:00PM

Indiana Area Senior HS Elizabeth Forward

Norwin High School Norwin High School

Norwin School District Announces New Athletic Director

1/7/14 1/9/14

1/16/14 1/21/14

6:00PM

Laurel Highlands

6:00PM

Franklin Regional

6:00PM 6:00PM

Hempfield

Uniontown

the Connellsville new Director of 1/27/14 6:00PM Penn Hills Athletics & Student Activities for Norwin 1/30/14 6:00PM Kiski School District. He is a 2008 graduate 1/31/14 TBA WCCA Swim Tournament of Slippery Rock University, where he 2/1/14 TBA WCCA Swim Tournament received his 6:00PM Bachelor of Latrobe Science Degree 2/6/14 in Sport Management. Prior to his tenure 2/11/14 6:00PM Gateway at Norwin he held the following positions: 2/13/14 6:00PM Penn Trafford 2/27/14 TBA Championships Assistant Football CoachWPIAL at Keystone 1/23/14 Mr. Brandon 6:00PM Rapp is

2/28/14

30 Norwin

TBA

WPIAL Championships

Laurel Highlands

Norwin High School

Franklin Regional H.S. Norwin High School

Norwin High School High School; Head Football Coach at Penn Hills High School Redbank Valley High School; Executive Kiski High School Director of the Clarion County YMCA and TBA Director of Athletics and Transportation TBA at Derry Area School District. Mr. Rapp Norwin High School resides in Derry Township with his wife Gateway H.S. Sheena and son Logan. Penn Trafford High School Trees Pool, Pitt Univ. Trees Pool, Pitt Univ.

Girls Varsity Basketball 11/23/13 12/3/13

10:00AM 4:00PM

Pine Richland

Blackhawk High School

Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym


3/1/14

TBA TBA

WPIAL AAA SW Regionals

TBA

WPIAL AAA SW Regionals

TBA

6:00PM

Greensburg Salem

Greensburg Salem H. S.

12/10/13

6:00PM

Blackhawk High School

Norwin High School

12/6/13

12/12/13 12/16/13 12/19/13 1/7/14 1/9/14

1/16/14 1/21/14 1/23/14 1/27/14 1/30/14 1/31/14 2/1/14 2/6/14

2/11/14 2/13/14 2/27/14 2/28/14

6:00PM 6:00PM

Mt. Pleasant

Indiana Area Senior HS

6:00PM

Derry

6:00PM

Laurel Highlands

6:00PM

Franklin Regional

6:00PM

Connellsville

6:00PM 6:00PM 6:00PM

Elizabeth Forward Hempfield

Uniontown

6:00PM

Penn Hills

TBA

WCCA Swim Tournament

6:00PM TBA

6:00PM

Kiski

WCCA Swim Tournament Latrobe

6:00PM

Gateway

TBA

WPIAL Championships

6:00PM TBA

Penn Trafford

WPIAL Championships

Norwin High School Norwin High School Derry High School

Norwin High School Laurel Highlands

Norwin High School

Franklin Regional H.S. Norwin High School Norwin High School

Penn Hills High School Kiski High School TBA TBA

Norwin High School Gateway H.S.

Penn Trafford High School Trees Pool, Pitt Univ. Trees Pool, Pitt Univ.

Girls Varsity Basketball 11/23/13

10:00AM

Pine Richland

Norwin H.S. New Gym

12/6/13

7:00PM

Tip-Off Tournament Norwin vs Shaler

Penn Trafford High School

7:30PM

Bethel Park

12/3/13 12/7/13 12/9/13

12/12/13 12/16/13 12/19/13 12/23/13 12/27/13 12/28/13 1/2/14 1/6/14 1/9/14

1/14/14 1/15/14 1/16/14 1/20/14 1/23/14 1/27/14 1/29/14 1/30/14 2/3/14 2/7/14

4:00PM 3:00PM 7:30PM

Blackhawk High School

Tip-Off Tournament Norwin vs Plum Latrobe

7:30PM

Hempfield

7:00PM

North Allegheny

7:30PM 4:30PM 4:30PM 6:00PM

Connellsville

Betsy Tournament Betsy Tournament Albert Gallatin

7:30PM

Laurel Highlands

6:00PM

Penn Trafford

7:45PM 6:00PM

Kiski

Woodland Hills

7:30PM

Latrobe

7:30PM

Connellsville

7:30PM

Hempfield

7:30PM

Albert Gallatin

7:30PM

Laurel Highlands

7:30PM 7:30PM 6:00PM

Gateway Kiski

Penn Trafford

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Penn Trafford High School Bethel Park H.S.

Norwin H.S. New Gym

Hempfield High School Connellsville H. S.

North Allegheny High School Elizabeth Forward H. S. Elizabeth Forward H. S. Norwin H.S. New Gym Laurel Highlands

Kiski High School

Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym Latrobe High School

Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym

Albert Gallatin High School Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym Norwin H.S. New Gym

Penn Trafford High School

Norwin Fall Sports Highlights Congratulations to the Norwin High School Girls Varsity Volleyball Team! The Norwin Girls Volleyball team finished their regular season with a record of 11-1, which put them in first place in their section. The team finished third overall in the WPIAL and advanced to the state championships for the first time in many years. The girls defeated Erie McDowell, but lost to Bethel Park in the state quarterfinals, which placed them in the top eight teams in the state. Congratulations also to the varsity Boys Soccer Team and the Girls Cross-Country Team, both of which won a section title. Freshmen student Kelley Giles qualified for the state meet and was the first finisher from Westmoreland County for the AAA girls at the PIAA Championships at Hershey.

Norwin Girls Varsity Volleyball Team Photo by Norwin High School Journalism Production Students

Norwin | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 31

N OR WI N SC HOOL DI STRI C T N E WS

12/3/13

SPORTS

Coed Varsity Swimming

Nor win

2/28/14


INCOGNITO

DID YOU KNOW?

Irwin Interchange is Turnpike’s Original Exit By Jennifer Brozak

Sources: www.paturnpike.com/geninfo/history/history.aspx www.pahighways.com/toll/PATurnpike.html

Did You Know? We are looking for little-known facts, history or other interesting stories about your community. Please send your ideas to editors@icmags.com. 32 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE | Norwin

W

ith the approaching holidays, the Pennsylvania Turnpike will once again be filled with cars from every state, desperate to get home for family celebrations. Every year, more than 150 million motorists travel along the Pennsylvania Turnpike, perhaps taking for granted the timesaving convenience it offers. Seven decades ago, however, the opening of the turnpike— which took place right here in Irwin—was cause for great celebration. Although today it stands as exit 67, the Irwin interchange was originally Pennsylvania Turnpike Exit 1, and at midnight on October 1, 1940, more than 100 anxious motorists waited in line to drive the turnpike’s first route: a 160-mile trek from Irwin to Carlisle (and vice versa). Visitors came in droves, sometimes hundreds of miles out of their way, to travel the new highway, and with good reason: after years of grueling construction, the turnpike was considered an engineering marvel referred to as “America’s First Superhighway.” According to the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission’s website, once word got out that the turnpike was set to open, travelers came in droves, waiting hours or even days to be among the first to ride the futuristic highway. Despite the jostling for pole position, the honor went to Carl A. Boe of McKeesport, who purchased his ticket from attendant Morris Neilberg of Pittsburgh and became the first motorist to cross through the Irwin interchange and onto the turnpike. The scene was charged with excitement. Once the road opened, drivers passed through the tollbooth honking their horns and cheering, and attendants waved them through as if they were starting a car race. The first day approximately 1,550 drivers in Irwin and 1,900 in Carlisle traveled the turnpike, with most drivers maintaining average speeds between 70 and 80 miles per hour. But with no worries about cross traffic—and no set speed limit—some drivers clocked speeds of between 90 and 100 miles per hour without fear of a speeding ticket. Even at moderate speeds, most drivers made the trip in about two-and-a-half hours—a trip that used to take them more than five-and-a-half hours via the Lincoln or William Penn highways. No accidents or injuries were reported, although several drivers miscalculated fuel requirements and subsequently ran out of gas. In its first year, more than two million cars made the Irwin to Carlisle drive for the modest fee of $1.50. Today? The same route will cost you $16.45, and would likely include much less fanfare. ■


Your Doctor and You: A Healthy Relationship Whether you have a minor concern or a more serious medical issue, your primary care physician (PCP) is the first line of defense in getting well and staying well. If you don’t already have a PCP, it’s best to find the right one before you get sick.

A trusted partner in your good health “It’s important to have a relationship with a PCP you trust and are comfortable with, even when you feel great,” says David Harinstein, MD, chair, Internal Medicine and a physician with Health First Medical-UPMC McKeesport. By getting to know you and your health history, your PCP can provide you with the best care possible.

Someone to watch over you Research indicates that people who have an ongoing relationship with a PCP are healthier than those without one. “Personalized care leads to patient trust, and that is vitally important in the doctorpatient relationship,” says Dr. Harinstein. Patients who trust their doctors are shown to have improved outcomes, such as better control of their diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. If you need advanced care, your PCP is the most effective and efficient link to medical specialists, or advanced services or treatments. “For patients and their families, having a PCP to coordinate their care with specialists and other providers is a huge relief,” adds Dr. Harinstein. Since early detection can minimize the impact of many illnesses, your PCP will recommend screenings, including annual physicals, ap tests, breast examinations and mammograms; prostate screenings, and colonoscopies. “Without a PCP, you might ignore important health maintenance issues,” he says.

Make a date with your doctor When you’re in good health, it’s easy to put off going to the doctor. But regular checkups can help you stay healthy, and avoid disease and disability. “Your annual exam is the perfect time to talk with your doctor about illness prevention, healthy lifestyle choices, and any screenings,” says Dr. Harinstein. “That information helps you and your doctor create a plan to maintain your health, or get you started on making changes to improve your health.”

One final piece of advice: Be honest. “Never be afraid or embarrassed to tell your doctor something,” he advises. “What you don’t disclose could be important for your doctor to make an accurate diagnosis.” To schedule an appointment with Dr. Harinstein or another UPMC physician, call 1-800-533-UPMC (8762) or visit UPMC.com/FindADoc.

This advertorial has been provided by UPMC. © 2013 UPMC


PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PITTSBURGH, PA PERMIT NO. 887

603 East McMurray Road, McMurray, PA 15317 724.942.0940 www.icmags.com

Time for our area VolunTeers

to Shine! Seeking nominationS for 2014

Community awardS for ServiCe exCellenCe (C.a.S.e.) What makes communities great are the special people who volunteer their time, talent and effort in order to help others. At IN Community Magazines, we would like to honor these special people who have made a positive impact in their community and whose philanthropic leadership sets an inspiring example for us all.

2013 Master of Ceremony

Andrew Stockey WtAE Channel 4

IN Community Magazines' second annual C.A.S.E. Awards will recognize volunteers from each of ICM’s 35 magazines. Awardees will be selected in the following categories: Volunteer of the Year Youth Volunteer of the Year (21 years and younger) Small Nonprofit of the Year (staff of 10 people or less) Large Nonprofit of the Year (staff of 11 or more)

SponSored by

Awardees will be honored at an awards dinner in Spring 2014.

PlEAsE fIll out foRM bEloW AND sEND IN youR NoMINAtIoN Name of Nominee_______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________Email_________________________________________________________ Category (check one)

❍ Volunteer of the Year ❍ Youth Volunteer of the Year (21 years and younger ) ❍ Small Nonprofit of the Year (staff of 10 people or less) ❍ Large Nonprofit of the Year ( staff of 11 or more) Which community is this nomination for?___________________________________________________________________________ Name of person submitting nomination_____________________________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________Email_________________________________________________________ Why are you nominating this person or nonprofit organization? Please submit a typewritten statement of no more than 600 words. Send nomination form and statement to: Wayne Dollard, IN Community Magazines, 603 E. McMurray Road, McMurray, PA 15317. If you have any questions, please contact Debbie Mountain at 724.942.0940. Deadline for nominations is February 1, 2014.

In Norwin  

In Norwin Winter 2013

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