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SPRING 2012

COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

Fairview School District Showcases its Academic Talent! INSIDE!

Fairview Parks & Recreation: Spring 2012 Program

Fairview Township Newsletter: Spring Clean-up & Comprehensive Plan


INSIDE

IN West County is a non-partisan community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the West County area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

IN West County | SPRING 2012 |

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FEATURES

Eco Tourism Travelling Green is Easier Than You Think ..

Home Improvement Reduce Costs with Attic Insulation ........... Small Updates Pay Off Big for Home Values ..................................... |

ON THE COVER

Superintendent Erik Kincade with Fairview Elementary Grade 3 students Julia Bleicher and Analia Coburn.

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INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Edward Jones Tax Talk ..................................................

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Circulatory Centers EVLA Minimally Invasive Procedure Brings Immediate Vein Relief .................

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State Farm 5

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30

COMMUNITY INTEREST

Helping People, Helping the Environment....................

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Fairview School District Newsletter................................

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Rick Sertz ....................................................................................

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Fairview Township Newsletter ..........................................

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A Trip Back in Time...............................................................

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Feeding Those in Need .........................................................

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30

Fairview Central Park Welcomes Visitors to the Township .....................................................

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The World Comes to Fairview School District .............

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34

Presque Isle in the Winter ...................................................

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Resident Profile:

Term Or Whole Life Insurance: Which Is Right For You? ..........................

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S TA F F PUBLISHER

Wayne Dollard

West County Magazine was designed to keep you, our readers, informed about what is happening in your community. You won’t find features about other communities here. We are dedicated to providing you with stories about your neighbors, the organizations you belong to, and of course township and school information. I want to extend a warm welcome to our partners Fairview School District and Fairview Township. The administrators of these two organizations came together in a dynamic partnership that will give you a snapshot of some of the great things happening in their area. If you happen to live in another community in West County we would welcome your input as well. Are you part of a rotary, scout or religious organization that is doing something that benefits the community? Let us know! Our managing editor - Marybeth Jeffries is always interested in hearing about what is important to you as a community. You can email her at the magazine at m.jeffries@icmags.com.

MANAGING EDITOR

Marybeth Jeffries m.jeffries@icmags.com REGIONAL EDITORS

Mark Berton [South and West] mark@incommunitymagazines.com Monica L. Haynes [East] m.haynes@incommunitymagazines.com N O R T H Z O N E C O O R D I N AT O R

Pamela Palongue p.palongue@incommunitymagazines.com S C H O O L & M U N I C I PA L C O N T E N T C O O R D I N AT O R

Megan Faloni m.faloni@incommunitymagazines.com OFFICE MANAGER

Leo Vighetti leo@incommunitymagazines.com A D P L A C E M E N T C O O R D I N AT O R

Debbie Mountain d.mountain@incommunitymagazines.com GRAPHIC DESIGN

Wayne Dollard Publisher

Cassie Brkich Anna Buzzelli Sharon Cobb Susie Doak

Jan McEvoy Joe Milne Tamara Tylenda

WRITERS

I want to welcome you to the Spring Edition of West County Magazine. In going through this edition, I hope you will take a look at the feature on food insecurity on page 30. It is astounding to see that so many people in West County don’t know where their next meal will come from. We hope that in bringing this important issue to your attention, you can help out in some way. Ways to help the food pantry are endless! Donations of your time, food items or a financial contribution are most needed at this time. Additionally, if you need help, there is a listing of food pantries listed at the end of the article with contact information. I truly believe that communities coming together to help their own is a basic tenet to which we should all subscribe. In getting to know organizations like our food pantries. I am truly so inspired by their generous spirit. It is amazing and awesome.

Heather Holtschlage Kelly Lotter Leigh Lyons Dana Black McGrath

Joann Naser Aimee Nicolia Gina Salinger Judith Schardt

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Mark Fainstein Ginni Hartle Brad Lauer

Len Pancoast Kathleen Rudolph Gary Yon

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGERS

Derek Bayer Tom Poljak

Tamara Myers

ADVERTISING SALES

Brian Daley Gina D’Alicandro Tina Dollard Karen Fadzen Julie Graff Jason Huffman Lori Jeffries Connie McDaniel Brian McKee Gabriel Negri Aimee Nicolia

Robert Ojeda Ralph Palaski Annette Petrone Vincent Sabatini Jennifer Schaefer Michael Silvert Karen Turkovich RJ Vighetti Nikki Capezio-Watson Sophia Williard

This magazine is carrier route mailed to all district households and businesses. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Copyright 2012. CORRESPONDENCE

Direct all inquiries, comments and press releases to: IN COMMUNITY MAGAZINES

Marybeth Jeffries Managing Editor

Attn: Editorial 603 E. McMurray Rd. Ph: 724.942.0940 McMurray, PA 15317 Fax: 724.942.0968 www.incommunitymagazines.com Summer content deadline: 4/17 Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.


Helping People,

Helping the Environment By Pamela Palongue

O

n Saturday, January 7, the townships of Millcreek and Fairview joined forces to help raise money for the Emmaus Soup Kitchen of Erie County and to encourage residents to re-cycle their Christmas trees. Residents of the two townships dropped off their trees and were asked to bring a donation for the soup kitchen. According to Township Manager Judy Zelina, this is the 22nd year for the event

“I would just like to thank all of our residents who came out and participated and also our volunteers who untied the trees, unloaded them from cars and removed the plastic from them,” stated Zelina. “Steve Cornelius, Roy Walkama, Jim Bartlett, Corey Walters and Mike Sornberger all did a wonderful job helping out.” Sister Mary Miller of the Emmaus Soup Kitchen located at 345 East 9th Street in Erie, was presented a check with proceeds from the event at a supervisors meeting on January 17. The soup kitchen serves all of Erie County and is “committed to the forgotten and the faceless of society.” Hot, nutritious meals are served every day to 125 to 200 people. According to Sister Mary, the tree recycling program has been responsible for contributing over $45,000 over the years to the Emmaus Ministries to feed the poor. Emmaus Ministries is made up of a staff of laymen, volunteers, Benedictine Sisters and Benedictine Oblates.

which raised $628 for the soup kitchen. “People are just so generous,” commented Zelina. “This event is a way to help us all to be more conscientious.” A total of 152 Christmas trees were collected for the Millfair Compost Center which will chip the trees into mulch, screen them and then age the trees for use in gardens and landscaping. The Millfair Compost Center will then open for the season on April 2 and the mulch will be available to the public at a cost of $17 per yard for unscreened mulch and $20 per yard for screened. The event was started 22 years ago by Charlotte Bartlett who is currently the recycling coordinator for Fairview Township. “Charlotte was previously the recycling coordinator for Millcreek and has tried to retire, but she is just too good at her job,” added Zelina with a chuckle. Devin Faulhauber, the recycling coordinator for Millcreek, also volunteered at the event.

The Millcreek Township and Fairview Township Supervisors presented to Sr. Mary Miller from Emmaus Soup Kitchen a check for $628.00 during a Millcreek Supervisors meeting. From left to right: Millcreek Supervisor Rick Figaski, Millcreek Supervisor Joe Kujawa, Sr. Mary Miller, Fairview Supervisor Pete Kraus, Millcreek Supervisor Brian McGrath

“Benedictines are committed not just to people, but to the environment as well. This [event] complements all of our loves,” says Sister Mary. The Millfair Compost Center, located at 2301 Millfair Road will open for the season on April 2. Individuals interested in purchasing compost can visit the center on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Fridays from noon to 7 p.m., Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.

Photos by Mark Fainstein

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 3


FAIRVIEW

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Superintendent’s Message The Fairview School District is excited to be a part of IN West County, our new community magazine that will allow us to share additional information regarding our schools with not only the Fairview community, but also with our neighbors to the west. This new publication will take the place of previous district mailings, including the Insights newsletter and our annual District Report Card. We are pleased that Fairview Township and Fairview Parks and Recreation will also be including information pertinent to the community in this quarterly magazine. The Fairview School District is committed to constantly improving our communication with our stakeholders, and joining forces with Fairview Township allows for one convenient publication.

Fairview School District

The Fairview School District employees and the Board of School Directors work hard to provide the very best education for our students, but it is the collective work of the entire Fairview School District community that makes a Fairview education such a rewarding one. Our mission statement, Developing the whole student. Achieving excellence in academics, athletics, and the arts, is graciously supported by a school foundation, three parent organizations, booster clubs for athletics and band, and an Adopt-an-Artist organization. With the support of these organizations, our students benefit from scholarships and teacher

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West County

Erik Kincade Superintendent mini-grants; have access to assemblies, field trips, and world-renowned speakers; travel to camps and festivals; and witness art and literature come alive. These relationships, coupled with the support of the entire Fairview community, allow us to offer educational opportunities that are truly unique. Our motto for the 2011-12 school year is “One Family...One Purpose...One Fairview.” This inaugural issue showcases the academic achievements of our students. We are fortunate that our students and teachers embrace our purpose and help to make Fairview one of the premier academic school districts in the state.


Roberts Signs Letter of Intent Fairview High School senior Danny Roberts signed a Letter of Intent to continue his academic and athletic career at Cleveland State University where he will dive for the Division I program. As a freshman, Danny finished his diving season as the D-10 runner-up, placed 5th in the PIAA state meet, and attained All-American status. In his sophomore year, Danny won both the McDowell and Iroquois invitationals, claimed the D-10 title, was the PIAA state silver medalist, attained All-American status, and was a USA Diving Regional and Zone qualifier.

D-10 champion, won gold at the PIAA state meet, attained All-American status, finished in 6th place at the USA Diving Regionals in both 1M and 3M and in 19th place at Zones in both 1M and 3M, and competed to an 18th place finish at USA Nationals. Danny is excited for what his senior year holds.

As a junior, Danny again won the McDowell and Iroquois invitationals, finished as the

Gado to Visit Fairview Middle School

The Daily Nation was started in 1958 as a Swahili weekly called

Taifa by the Englishman Charles Hayes. The publication was purchased in 1959 by His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan IV, the spiritual leader of the Ismaili community worldwide, and began daily production as the Daily Nation in 1960. Gado’s presentations and workshops at FMS will instruct students to recognize his distinctive cartooning style and will encourage students to create similar works. Through the ages, young artists have developed their talents by studying the masters. Through the

Adopt-an-Artist program, Fairview students are introduced to a variety of media and are encouraged to develop their individual talents.

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 5

Fairview School District

The Adopt-an-Artist program at Fairview Middle School (FMS) is pleased to announce that Daily Nation cartoonist Godfrey “Gado” Mwampembwa will serve as this year’s Artist-in-Residence. Gado is a Tanzanian comic artist who currently resides in Kenya. In the past, Adopt-an-Artist has helped bring nationally recognized authors, musicians, and artists to FMS. Gado is the first international guest to participate in Fairview’s Artist-in-Residence program.


FAIRVIEW

Fairview School District

SCHOOL DISTRICT

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Fairview School Board of Education

Meghan Corbin – 2010-present

Mike Dougherty – 2007-present

Andy Foyle – 2007-present

2012 – Employee Relations/ECA/ Operations Committee 2010-present – Public Relations Committee

2011-2012 – Board Vice President 2012 – Education/Policy Committee Chair

2009-present – Vo-Tech Liaison 2011-2012 – Board President 2012 – Education/Policy Committee

Ed Grode – 2010-present

Alan Natalie – 2007-present

Fran New – 2012

2012 – Employee Relations/ECA/ Operations

2012 – Budget/Finance Committee and Legislative Liaison

2012 – Education/Policy Committee and Technology Committee

Dan Stroup – 2004-present

Laura Symes – 2002-present

Brad Westfall – 2007-present

2012 – Budget/Finance Committee Chair

2010-present – I. U. #5 Liaison 2012 – Budget and Finance Committee

2011 – Budget/Finance Committee

West County


District Report Card Fairview Celebrates Academic Excellence

Highlights of 2010-2011 Assessment Data

Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, school districts are required to provide parents and community members with an overview of the performance of students on their state’s standardized test series. In Pennsylvania, this series is called the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) and it is administered in grades 3-8, and 11. The goal of No Child Left Behind is to have every student at the “Proficient” level or above by the year 2014. Each year schools are expected to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) toward this goal.

Out of 17 school districts in our region, including schools in Erie, Crawford, and Warren counties, Fairview School District received the highest proficiency rates on the following assessments: • Grade 4

Science Reading & Science

• Grade 5

Writing

• Grade 7

Reading

• Grade 8

Math, Reading, Science & Writing Reading, Science & Writing

• Grade 11

Writing

Throughout this report you will find the 20102011 PSSA results and an overview of our district’s academic achievement, as well as information regarding test participation, attendance, and graduation rates. Because a single test cannot provide a fair picture of how well a district is performing, additional information about student performance on other standardized tests and overall achievement is also included.

Fairview School District West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 7


FAIRVIEW

SCHOOL DISTRICT

2010-2011 Performance by All Students

The following charts illustrate that Fairview students exceeded state minimum benchmarks in both math and reading.

ED (Economically Disadvantaged) – Students from families with an income level that meets eligibility requirements for free or reduced-price lunches

State Math Target – 67% Proficient or Above

IEP (Individualized Education Plan) – Students enrolled in special education programs

State Reading Target – 72% Proficient or Above Grade 3 - 127 students

Grade 7 - 114 students

Math

Reading

Math

Reading

All

93.7%

89.0%

All

86.8%

92.1%

ED

86.2%

72.4%

ED

50.0%

85.7%

IEP

77.8%

44.4%

IEP

69.2%

69.2%

Grade 4 - 113 students

Grade 8 - 129 students

Math

Reading

Math

Reading

All

94.7%

90.3%

All

94.6%

94.6%

ED

87.0%

78.3%

ED

77.8%

77.8%

IEP

83.3%

75.0%

IEP

75.0%

62.5%

Grade 5 - 104 students

Fairview School District

Math

Grade 11 - 144 students

Reading

Reading

All

87.5%

80.0%

All

69.4%

75.0%

ED

81.8%

81.8%

ED

60.0%

73.3%

IEP

60.0%

66.7%

IEP

36.4%

22.7%

Grade 6 - 117 students

All

8

Math

Math

Reading

92.3%

83.8%

ED

84.0%

72.0%

IEP

60.0%

46.7%

West County


District Report Card 2010-2011 Qualifications of District Teaching Staff The Fairview School District is very fortunate to have highly qualified teachers. 2010-2011 Qualifications of District Teaching Staff

Overall Performance of Fairview Students Compared to Pennsylvania Students Fairview School District outperforms the state performance averages in both math and reading. Fairview vs. Pennsylvania 2010-2011 PSSA Results % Advanced & Proficient Math

Total Number of Teachers

113

% of Teachers who are PA Certified

100%

# of Teachers with Emergency Credentials

1

% of Total Classes Taught by Non-Certified Teachers

0

% of Teachers who have a Master’s Equivalency, Master’s, or Doctorate Degree Average Teaching Experience (Years)

80.53% 13.85

Fairview Class of 2010 Graduation Rate

Reading

Grade

Fairview

PA

Fairview

PA

3

93.7%

82.9%

89.0%

76.8%

4

94.7%

84.1%

90.3%

72.8%

5

87.5%

75.2%

80.0%

66.8%

6

92.3%

77.7%

83.8%

69.3%

7

86.8%

77.1%

92.1%

74.9%

8

94.6%

75.4%

94.6%

80.5%

11

69.4%

59.4%

75.0%

68.4%

The Graduation Rate measure has a goal of 85%, or a 10% reduction of the difference between the previous year’s graduation rate and 85%. The graduation rate applies to schools that have a high school graduating class, and includes only students enrolled as members of that class. The graduation rate lags one year behind; therefore, the most current information available is for the class of 2010. School Year

Graduation Rate – FHS

2009-2010

100%

Fairview School District

Fairview School District Attendance Rate The attendance goal is 90%, or a target of any improvement from the previous year. Attendance applies to schools that do not have a high school graduating class, and the rate is based on the entire school.

School Year

Attendance Rate – FMS

Attendance Rate – FES

2010-2011

95.92%

96.16%

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 9


FAIRVIEW

Writing and Science Performance of Fairview Students Compared to Pennsylvania Students

SCHOOL DISTRICT

At this time, writing and science test scores are not used to determine AYP. The results are reported statewide and schools use the data to guide instruction. Fairview vs. Pennsylvania 2010-2011 PSSA Science Results % Advanced + Proficient Grade

Fairview

Pennsylvania

4

96.5%

82.3%

8

87.5%

57.9%

11

58.9%

40.9%

Fairview School District

Fairview vs. Pennsylvania 2010-2011 PSSA Writing Results % Advanced + Proficient Fairview

Pennsylvania

5

81.7%

67.1%

8

93.8%

73.1%

11

96.5%

84.7%

The SAT Average SAT Scores 2010-2011

The ACT Average ACT Scores 2010-2011

The SAT Reasoning Test is the nation’s most widely used admissions test among colleges and universities. The SAT exam measures critical reading, mathematics, and writing skills. Each section is scored out of a possible 800 points for a combined total of 2,400 points. At Fairview, 120 students from the class of 2011 took the SAT exam.

The ACT is a national college admissions exam that consists of subject area tests in English, mathematics, reading, and science. An optional writing test may also be taken. The highest possible score on the ACT is 36. ACT results are accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the United States.

2010-2011 SAT Scores

FHS State

500

400

West County

FHS State

2010-2011 ACT Scores

30

600

10

Grade

539

501

Math

517

493

Critical Reading

517

25

479

Writing

20

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District Report Card About Our Graduates An extremely high percentage of Fairview High School graduates continue with postsecondary education. About Our Graduates

Advanced Placement Each year Fairview High School students have the opportunity to experience college-level work while still in high school by enrolling in Advanced Placement (AP) courses. During the 2010-2011 school year, over 200 FHS students enrolled in 10 AP courses. Students may also choose to take the AP exam and if they score a 3 or better, they can earn college credit or advanced placement status at many colleges and universities.

Year

Class Size

% Attending Postsecondary Education

2008

137

85%

2009

141

80%

2010

160

89%

2011

147

89%

2011-2012 PSSA Testing Schedule 2011-2012 PSSA Testing Schedule Standardized Test

Participating Grades

Testing Window

PSSA Math & Reading

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 11

March 12-23, 2012

PSSA Writing

5, 8, and 11

April 16-April 20, 2012

PSSA Science

4, 8, and 11

April 23-27, 2012

AP Courses Offered at FHS AP American History

AP Language

AP Biology

AP Literature

AP Calculus I/II

AP Physics B

AP Chemistry

AP Psychology*

AP Environmental Science*

AP Spanish

AP European History

AP Statistics

AP French

AP U.S. Govt. & Politics*

RCI and Dual Enrollment Through Regional Choice Initiative (RCI), junior and senior students can enroll in Gannon University and Edinboro University courses offered at the Academy of Collegiate Excellence. Students receive college credits that can be transferred to almost all accredited colleges and universities. During the 2010-2011 school year, Fairview High School students enrolled in 25 different courses offered through RCI or Dual Enrollment directly on campus.

For additional information regarding this Report Card, visit our website: www.fairviewschools.org or contact Dr. Katy Wolfrom, Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, 474-2600 ext. 9-6215

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 11

Fairview School District

*Offered via distance learning. Additionally, some AP courses are offered every other year.


12 724.942.0940 to advertise

West County


: E IL F O R P T N E ID RES

RICK SERTZ By Pamela Palongue

Tennis, Anyone?

F

or Rick Sertz, tennis was not love at first sight. His father introduced him to the sport as a child. “Tennis used to be one of those games that guys thought were sissy,” says Sertz. “I was more of a gym rat.” The Erie native came from a family of athletes including his father, Richard, who coached basketball. Sertz eventually became a basketball coach himself, training young athletes from 1976 to 1992. But Sertz began to play tennis recreationally as an escape from his basketball job and soon fell in love with the sport. “It’s a creative game,” explains Sertz, “every shot creates a different line.” One thing that Sertz likes about the game is that it is all up to him. “I love team sports, but with tennis, I get all the blame and all the success. You control your own destiny.” His hobby soon turned into his livelihood as he was asked to coach a girls tennis team at Villa Maria Academy. When his friend first approached him about the job, Sertz thought he was joking. But despite his reluctance, he took the position and remained at Villa Maria for six years.

and Recreation Department in 2004 for young tennis players at Pennbriar Athletic Club. “We have the Yankee Stadium of tennis courts,” says Sertz of the Chris Batchelor Tennis Courts. About 60 to 80 children participate in the program. The elementary players are called “The Paws,” the middle school team is known as “The Claws” and the high school-aged players are “The Tigers,” as a nod to the local high school. There is also a program for adults which has had participants ranging in age from 21 to 75. In July, the kids will participate in the Erie County Championships. Sertz adds that the fees are very reasonable and that if anybody would like to participate and does not have a racquet, there are usually a few extra ones around for people to use. At the age of 51, Sertz still is on the courts an average of 24 hours per week, playing and coaching. He works out in his basement riding a stationary bicycle about 10 miles per week and paying particular attention to exercises that strengthen the abdominals and legs. Knee replacement surgery appears to have only slowed him down slightly. Over the years he has won the Erie City Recreational Tournament five times and won the doubles division twice. He has also won the club championships at Pennbriar five times and a tournament at Silver Lake, N.Y., seven times. Despite his reputation for winning, both as a competitor and coach, Sertz says, “It’s not all about winning. The rewarding part is the different personalities you get an opportunity to coach and helping them to be their best.”

“It’s not all about winning. The rewarding part is the different personalities you get an opportunity to coach and helping them to be their best.” –Rick Sertz Sertz has been the coach of the Fairview High School boys tennis team for the past 12 years. “It’s very different coaching girls and boys,” notes Sertz. One of the biggest contrasts he has observed is that girls need encouragement and to be reminded of their potential, whereas boys become almost too overconfident with praise. According to Sertz, boys also need a little help focusing at times. “You have to get their attention.” Apparently, Sertz’s coaching methods have worked extremely well. Twelve years ago he inherited a team that had won only one match the year before. After he took over the program, they won the AA District Championship and have repeated the feat for 11 years straight. Sertz eagerly shares the credit, “We have great kids and great parents who are very supportive. It’s a great honor to represent your school, to run out there in your school’s colors. I think a lot of times we forget that.” Sertz, who has a two-year degree in tennis from Mercyhurst College, began the Junior Development Program offered through the Fairview Parks West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 13


EVLA Minimally Invasive Procedure

Brings Immediate Vein Relief

D

o you suffer from tired, achy legs with bulging varicose veins., Or maybe you just have clusters of unsightly, small purple veins that bother you and you wonder what can be done about them? Rest assured you are not alone in these concerns. Approximately 30% of American adults has signs and symptoms of varicose veins. Varicose veins are essentially superficial veins that have lost the ability to effectively transport blood back to the heart. Varicose veins can range from large, ugly, ropy veins to smaller clusters of superficial (close to the surface) purple veins. Many patients will experience pain, achiness, heaviness and swelling. If left untreated these varicose veins can lead to inflammation of the vein (phlebitis), skin discoloration of the lower legs, skin breakdown and ulcers can ultimately occur. Years ago patients ignored this problem or were told the condition was “cosmetic”. Many times, if they did seek treatment, the results were often disappointing, or they were left with disfiguring scars. Over the past several years, greater understanding of varicose veins has allowed for more effective treatments. The use of painless, noninvasive ultrasound to diagnose the problem and pinpoint the cause is the standard of care. Treatment for even the largest and most problematic veins can now

take less than an hour, require little or no anesthesia, and allow patients to return to their normal activities immediately. All this done in the safety and comfort of an office setting. Many times patients are anxious to receive treatment because they have previously heard an unpleasant story or known someone who had been subjected to previous treatment in years past that was much more invasive than what is available today. The majority of people are familiar with stories of past varicose vein treatments. Unfortunately, many are unfamiliar with the significant advances in treatment for varicose veins that allows for more effective and less invasive treatment. This minimally invasive, office-based care, is standard of care for the physicians at the Circulatory Centers. All new patients are initially evaluated at a no cost, no obligation consultation. A state of the art ultrasound evaluation is performed in our ICAVL accredited vascular lab to diagnose any venous problems. The Circulatory Center staff members will then meet with the patient and offer a customized treatment plan based on each patient’s specific needs. At the Circulatory Centers treatment protocols often involve effective therapies such as; sclerotherapy or Endovenous Laser Ablation (EVLA). The physicians at the Circulatory Centers continually review the evolving literature and treatment standards so a contemporary and effective treatment plan can be individualized for every patient. Sclerotherapy, performed in one of our local offices, by an experienced provider, is often used to treat smaller veins. During this visit a small amount of medication is injected into the target vein which causes it to collapse. The body then reabsorbs this vein over the course of several weeks. A support stocking is worn for a brief period to help compress the veins and allow for them to collapse naturally. Sclerotherapy is performed in a thirty minute office visit and involves no ‘down time.’ EVLA is also performed in the office by a physician. This procedure is often used to treat larger veins. A flexible laser fiber is inserted into the problem vein using ultrasound guidance. This procedure is done with local anesthesia and takes about forty minutes. The laser produces intense energy which causes the vein to close down. Patients return to their normal daily activities immediately. A support stocking is worn for several days after EVLA and patients are encouraged to walk to promote blood flow thru the remaining healthy veins. All this is done in the comfort and safety of our office through a 1/8 inch incision and little or no scaring! With the generally accepted knowledge of venous insufficiency and varicose veins, 95% of our procedures are covered by insurance. At the Circulatory Center each patient is assigned a Patient Account Representative who will help them navigate the often confusing sea of insurance regulations and billing. So what do you have to lose? Only those ugly painful varicose veins.

This Industry Insight was written by Dr. Paul Shields. Dr. Paul Shields completed his undergraduate studies at Gannon University in Erie, PA. He then went on to earn his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1999. Dr. Shields subsequently completed a three year Family Medicine residency and is board certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). Dr. Shields practices medicine full time in the Erie area as a physician with Erie Family Medical Group.

14 724.942.0940 to advertise

West County


Municipal Pages COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND ZONING AMENDMENTS

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN WORKSHOP - AGENDA FOR PUBLIC MEETINGS

As you may be aware, Fairview Township is in the process of finalizing our Comprehensive Plan, which will influence the direction of the township for the next 10 years. We have been gathering information for the past few years by survey, public meetings, census information, the Fairview Planning Commission, Fairview Planning/Zoning Office, a planning consultant and the supervisors.

1. Downtown District and Transportation – February 23, 2012

We have a proposed Comprehensive Plan and new zoning regulation changes which will be presented to the public by categories at four public meetings. Those categories and dates are as follows: February 23, 2012 Downtown District and Transportation March 8, 2012 Commercial and Industrial Changes and Growth Areas March 22, 2012 Changes to Agricultural and Residential Districts April 5, 2012 Infrastructure and Capital Improvement Projects Some of these changes may affect you and your property use as a home/business owner. Therefore, your input is valuable to this process. Please consider attending these meetings.

• Future land use map and list of future growth areas • Defining new zoning regulations (B-3 Districts) • Define boundaries of the new districts

Create a specific district (overlay) within Downtown along Route 20:

• Buffers • Impact of traffic is a major concern • Infrastructure both current and future

• Describe downtown district boundaries

3. Changes to Agricultural and Residential Districts – March 22, 2012

• Amendments to land development regulations • Amendments to zoning regulations • Discuss benefits of a LERTA District • Sidewalks • Developing pedestrian crossings in conjunction with traffic control devices • Parking areas Transportation: • Resolving traffic problems at key intersections • Encourage second means of access to residential developments

• Zoning regulation changes in the regulation changes in the A-1 and A-2 districts pertaining to animals and horticulture • Right to Farm Farm Act Adjustment of • Adjustment of zoning regulations in the R-2 District allowing for small animals such as poultry • Reducing the R-3 the R-3 Multi-Family District

• Expand pedestrian walkways and create 4. Infrastructure and Capital Improvement Projects – April 5, 2012 bike trails • Sewer expansion • Concerns on Rt. 98 and I-90 Interchange

• Septic management program

• Discussion on future roads

• Water expansion

• Improve school traffic patterns and EMTA service

• Stormwater management, County Act 167 and State MS4

• Amending the Fairview Township Official Map/ Ordinance

• Floodplain • Parks and Recreation • Capital improvements to any township easements, properties

2. Commercial and Industrial Changes and Growth Areas – March 8, 2012 • Understanding of existing zoning

Continued on page 16. West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 15


Municipal Pages Continued from page 15.

FINAL ADOPTION PROCESS FOR AMENDMENTS TO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, ZONING ORDINANCE, SUBDIVISION ORDINANCE AND OFFICIAL MAP ORDINANCE Comprehensive Plan A final hearing of the Board of Supervisors to adopt the Comprehensive Plan will follow the protocol set forth in the Pennsylvania Municipalities Planning Code. The Final Draft will be circulated by the Fairview Township Planning Commission to the Erie County Planning Office, our four neighboring municipalities (Millcreek, McKean, Franklin and Girard), and Fairview School District. The general public can view the Final Draft at the Township Building and on our website. The review period will be 45 days from the date of submission. The Fairview Township Planning Commission will hold at least one public meeting during this time to solicit comments from the public. After the review period, Fairview Township will then post the final hearing date at our building and on the website and advertise twice in a paper of general circulation not more than 30 days or less than 7 days from the date of the hearing. After adoption, the Comprehensive Plan will be sent to Pennsylvania’s Center for Local Government Services which will issue a Land Use and Growth Management Report.

Zoning Ordinance The Planning Commission has proposed amendments to the Zoning Ordinance. 16

West County

It will conduct at least one public meeting pursuant to public notice for comment and thereafter present to the supervisors the proposed amendments. County Planning will also receive the proposed amendments at least 45 days prior to the public hearing conducted by the supervisors. Neighboring townships will be notified prior to adoption of the ordinance amendments. After the review period we will then post the final hearing date at our building and on the website and advertise in a paper of general circulation not more than 60 days or less than 7 days from the date of the hearing. The final hearing of the Board of Supervisors for the adoption of the Fairview Township Zoning Ordinance amendments will occur at approximately the same time as the consideration for adoption of the Comprehensive Plan. Special notices will be provided to potentially affected landowners where appropriate.

Subdivision Ordinance Amendments Proposed amendments to the Subdivision Ordinance will be considered at a public hearing held pursuant to public notice. County Planning will receive the proposed amendments at least 30 days prior to the public hearing.

Official Map The Official Map is being considered for amendment. The proposed amendments are referred to the Planning Commission. Within 45 days of submission, comments are to be made, if any. The county and adjacent municipalities will also receive the proposed changes for comments. After the public hearing, if approved, notice is provided and the map is recorded.

UPCOMING CHANGES TO OUR STATE REPRESENTATION PA State House Representative John Evans will be completing his sixth term, a total of 12 years of service, as one of our state representatives. He and his office will continue to serve our community through November 2012. Proposed changes in district boundaries are currently before the state Legislature for final approval to be placed into effect with the next term starting in 2013. Fairview will be placed with State Rep. Brad Roae, District 6, which is currently covering the Meadville/ Titusville area.

PA State Senator Jane Earl will be completing her fourth term, a total of 16 years of service, as our state senator. She and her office will also continue to serve our community through November 2012. Petitions for senator and house representative can start circulating at the end of January. The Primary and General Elections will follow in May and November respectively. We encourage all residents of legal age to register and cast their votes at the elections.

STATE REGULATIONS Building Code The Pennsylvania Statewide Building Codes for residential structures came into effect in 2005. Fairview Township partnered with Millcreek and Harborcreek townships to have Building Inspection Underwriters of Pa., Inc. (BIU) handle the requirements of this new state law. Municipalities can choose to opt-in, as we have done, so that our zoning offices can work together with BIU in serving our residents. Municipalities can choose to opt-out as well, leaving the


responsibility to the property owners for hiring their own inspection agency to meet the state’s requirements. There are pros and cons to both choices and at this time Fairview plans to continue with the opt-in status. We are able to provide the required services at the Township Building with a BIU representative available every morning from 8 a.m. until 9 a.m. or by appointment. In an attempt to unify the quality and safety of residential construction, state legislators chose to initiate this law. Since that time there has been argument as to the real need for these regulations, questioning whether this is truly a state responsibility. Another debate has been whether the requirements should continue to grow, becoming more restrictive, and should they encompass even more aspects of construction. Fairview Township Supervisors have heard complaints from some of our residents who have had an issue with the excessiveness of the regulations. We would like to hear from more of you about the building codes and encourage you to contact your state legislators as well.

Emergency Management Title 35 is the state legislation that directs counties and municipalities in their responsibilities for emergency management. It is currently under review and re-draft by the state Legislature. One of the key components deals with the emergency management

coordinators and disaster event protocol. The amount of paperwork and planning has reached a level beyond the volunteer capacity that most coordinators operate under. Efforts are being made to regionalize this responsibility without losing local control.

Fairview Township agrees with the efforts to protect our streams and waterways but disagrees with the reasonability of the new standards. Fairview also feels that DEP needs to make better efforts with existing facilities to address any of their negative impacts on streams to balance and reduce the heavy burdens being placed on new development.

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL Stream Issues PROTECTION Stormwater Erie County Council, after much debate, chose to adopt new stormwater regulations with its updated Act 167 Stormwater Plan in 2012. The state Department of Environmental Protection required this update with increased regulation and associated costs to be covered solely by the property owner. The provisions lower the square foot thresholds significantly as to when a designed plan is required for the management of stormwater. Our current ordinance requires that any property owner who creates 10,000 square feet or more of impervious surface must submit a plan for managing the stormwater run-off. The state wants the threshold to be 2,500 square feet for volume control and 5,000 square feet for full control measures. The state would also like us to require the first inch of rain to be held indefinitely on the property to dissipate either through infiltration or evaporation.

The state has determined that there is a growing negative impact on our local streams. Walnut Creek and Trout Run have more segments of each stream now under the state’s 303D list of slightly impaired streams. The three major impairments are sedimentation, coli form bacteria and temperature. Efforts by DEP, County Conservation and local municipalities will help to improve matters. The challenge is finding a balanced approach and a common ground to work on that will produce the results desired.

Septic Management The failure of on-lot septic systems has always been a concern for homeowners. A failing system or group of failing systems can have a very detrimental effect on the surrounding area and nearby streams, not to mention the unpleasant odor. The proper care for a septic system varies according to the amount of use and soil type that it is functioning in. Good management practices are encouraged for all systems. Systems with heavy use and/or in poor soil would benefit from a three- to five-year pumping cycle. All systems will function more efficiently by giving the leach field a chance to rest and dry out. Yes, even septic systems need a vacation!

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 17


Recycling Department FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP ANNUAL SPRING CLEAN-UP DAY Saturday, May 12, 2012 8 am to Noon Location: Corner lot on McCray Road & Rt. 98 Tires - $1.00 Refrigerators, Dehumidifiers, Air Conditioners with Freon - $10.00 Small Propane Tanks - $3.00 Will take: Automobile batteries, radiators, large appliances, assorted metals NO: Household trash or recycling, paint, chemicals, gas cans, anti-freeze, motor oil, paint thinner or any other household chemicals Back per your request: We will have a collection for on-site shredding of paper and the e-waste collection that was so popular last year. Like last year, there will be a 50-50 charge for the e-waste collection. When the price is set in the spring, the Township will pick up half the cost of disposal.

COMPOST & LEAF WASTE PROGRAM Millfair Compost & Recycling Center The Millfair Compost & Recycling Center at 2301 Millfair Road is open six days per week for your convenience. Leaf waste to include leaves, garden residues shrubbery, tree trimmings and similar materials Millfair Compost will be accepted. All leaves and other & Recycling Center yard waste must be emptied out of the containers at the designated composting areas. NO grass will be accepted at this site. If you have not already done so, stop by the Township recycling office to pick up your free permit card. The Center will open for the 2012 season on Monday, April 2, 2012 at the following extended hours: HOURS Monday – Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

8 am to 7 pm Closed Noon to 7 pm 9 am to 5 pm Noon to 5 pm

Materials available for purchase: Bark mulch, screened and unscreened, leaf compost, logs and wood chips when available.

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WASTE MANAGEMENT 3-YEAR TRASH & RECYCLING CONTRACT EFFECTIVE DATE – JANUARY 1, 2011 ENDING DATE – DECEMBER 31, 2013 GUARANTEED RATE - $52.05 per quarter FOR 3 YEARS TO INCLUDE WEEKLY UNLIMITED TRASH AND RECYCLING PICKUPS There will be one spring (May 14 – 16, 2012) and one fall (November 12 – 14, 2012) curbside leaf waste pickup. CLEAR BAGS ONLY – NO OTHER BAGS WILL BE PICKED UP “PER BAG” SERVICE METHOD For residents on the “per bag” service method, the package of 5 bags will remain at $20.00 for 2012. For residents that put very little out and can get away with putting one of these bags out every two to three weeks, this is a good deal. You can still put all of your recyclables out every week. Bag customers will now be able to purchase a “tag” for $2.00 to place any large item (one item per tag) that will not fit into the green bag to place this item at the curb.

65-GALLON RECYCLING BINS The 65-gallon recycling bins are available. If you have not seen them before, this bin is on wheels, has a lid and will hold your entire household “single stream” recycling. All of your cardboard, cans, glass, plastics #1 through #7, newspapers, kitchen cardboard, magazines and misc. paper can be placed together in the one container. With the help of a grant, the cost of the recycling bin is $20 and if you have not gotten one, please don’t wait too long as they disappear fast.


Fairview Parks & Recreation: Spring 2012 Program

ACTIVITIES for CHILDREN JUMPBUNCH JumpBunch is a program designed to provide an introduction to sports and fitness at a young age. It teaches healthy habits and the importance of exercise. These classes help build confidence and self-esteem in a non-competitive atmosphere. The curriculum covers over 70 different activities and helps build coordination and an interest in sports at an early age. JumpBunch teaches through constant praise and encouragement and guides students through all phases of physical development: eye/hand coordination, large and fine motor skills, muscle development and body balance. A minimum of eight children is needed to hold any class.

FOR PRESCHOOLERS

Fee

$30.00 per child per session with 50% sibling discount

Fee

$32.00 per child per session with 50% sibling discount

Site

Fairview Middle School Multi-Purpose Room

Site

Fairview Middle School Multi-Purpose Room

Time

6:00-6:30 p.m.

Time

6:30-7:15 p.m.

Date

Session 1: Thursday - March 8–29 Session 2: Tuesday - April 10–May 1

Date

Session 1: Thursday - March 8–29 Session 2: Tuesday - April 10–May 1

Ages 3, 4 & 5

Coach: Jenny Kupczyk, Certified Children’s Fitness Specialist

Coach: Jenny Kupczyk, Certified Children’s Fitness Specialist

Class is limited to 14 toddlers.

Class is limited to 20 children.

The Fairview Parks & Recreation Authority Board of Directors meets the second Tuesday of every month at 7:00p.m. in the Fairview Township building. The public is welcome to attend & encouraged to bring new program ideas that will benefit the community. This program guide & registration form are also available at www.fairviewtownship. com/parks. You can call 814-474-5077 or email parks-rec@fairviewtownship.com. Office hours are M-F from 12:00-4:00p.m.

FOR TODDLERS

Ages 2 & 3

All programs are available to Fairview residents and non-residents alike.

THEATER FOR KIDS The Big Switcheroo! A Play about RESPECT Fee

$45.00 per child

Site

Fairview Elementary School LGI Room

Day

Tuesday

Time

3:30-5:00 p.m.

NEW! ANTI-BULLYING PROGRAM

Date

February 21–March 20

Fee

$20.00 per child

Site

Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium

Coordinator: Ellie Tanenbaum, Fairview School District Nurse

Day

Monday–Wednesday*

Time

After school until 4:30 p.m.

Date

April 30, May 1, 2, 7, 8 & 9*

Looking for actors/actresses, assistant directors and stage crew members. Each student will be given a Talented Tigers water bottle and will need to bring a piece of fruit each session for a snack. The play performance will be the week of March 26 at 9:15 a.m. at the Fairview Elementary School. Any questions, please contact Ms. Tanenbaum at 814.474.3109.

Grades K-4 *Final class (Graduation Day) to be held on Wednesday, from 7:00-8:00 p.m. at the Lund Martial Arts Academy.

Coach: Jeff Lund, Lund Martial Arts Instructor This program focuses on teaching respect, discipline and self control. Communication skills, how to deal with a bully, why you should never be a bully, how to defuse a fight, and nonviolent conflict resolutions are some of

Grades 3 & 4

the lessons taught. There will be daily homework assignments and parents are asked to attend the first and final classes.

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 19


Fairview Parks & Recreation: Spring 2012 Program

ACTIVITIES for SPRING LEARN TO SWIM PROGRAM - AMERICAN RED CROSS CERTIFIED LESSONS Class sizes are limited and spaces will only be reserved with payment. No checks will be accepted at the pool. The FPRA DOES NOT MAIL CONFIRMATIONS for class enrollments. Please assume you are enrolled for the class you paid for unless otherwise notified. FOR INFORMATION ON CLASS AVAILABILITY, CALL THE FPRA OFFICE AT 474.5077.

PARENT WITH TODDLER (AGES 1-3)

LEVEL 3

A water orientation class that will teach a parent how to work safely and effectively work with a young child in the water. Skillappropriate water activities will be included.

Prerequisite: Level 2 or equivalent. Builds on the skills in Level 2 by providing additional guided practice.

Time

5:45-6:15 p.m.

Time

6:45-7:30 p.m.

Date

Choose from sessions B and D

Date

Choose any session

Fee for all levels is $40.00 per session.

PRESCHOOL (AGES 3 AND UP)

Session A Day: Tuesday & Thursday Date: March 6 – 29

Designed for the child to develop a comfort level in the water as well as a readiness for learning how to swim. Children will also receive an introduction to the basic swimming skills.

Session B Day: Monday & Wednesday Date: March 19 – April 25 (No class April 2–11) Session C Day: Tuesday & Thursday Date: April 10 – May 3 Session D Day: Monday & Wednesday Date: April 30 – May 23 Session E Day: Tuesday & Thursday Date: May 8 – 31

Time

5:45-6:15 p.m.

Date

Choose any session

LEVEL 4 Prerequisite: Level 3 or equivalent. Develops confidence in the strokes learned and improves other aquatic skills. Time

6:45-7:30 p.m.

Date

Choose any session

LEVEL 1 Designed for children just beginning swim lessons who may be uncomfortable in the water. Time

6:15-6:45 p.m.

Date

Choose any session

LEVEL 2 Prerequisite: Level 1 with no fear of the water. Gives students opportunity for success with fundamental skills. Time

6:15-6:45 p.m.

Date

Choose any session

FAIRVIEW FINS SWIM CLUB The FINS swim team is a conditioning and technique-focused team that plans on competing in USA Swimming competitions for all interested members. We cover technique training for all four competitive strokes: Freestyle (front-crawl), Backstroke (back-crawl), Breaststroke and Butterfly. Skill testing will be held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Monday, March 19, FOR NEW SWIMMERS ONLY! The spring session will run from Tuesday, March 20–Thursday, May 31. No FINS practice April 2–9 & May 28.

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GRADES K-4 Fee

$115.00

Day

Monday–Thursday

Time

4:30-5:30 p.m.

GRADES 5-12 Fee

$155.00

Day

Monday–Thursday

Time

3:00-4:30 p.m.


CHILDREN KIDS FUN NIGHT OUT

GIRLS MINI LEAGUE BASKETBALL

Fee

$10.00 per night

Site

Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium

Fee

$36.00 (includes free t-shirt)

Day

Friday

Site

Fairview Middle School Gymnasium

Time

7:00-10:00 p.m.

Day

Saturday

Date

March 2–May 25 (No program March 23, April 6 & 13)

Date

March 10–May 19 (No basketball April 7)

Ages Grades 3 & 4 from 10:00-11:15 a.m. Grades 5 & 6 from 11:15 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Ages Open for ages 5 and up

Coach: Lance Brown, FHS Varsity Coach

Instructor: Carl Cody, Certified USA Gymnastics Instructor

PRIVATE SWIM LESSONS

Kids Fun Night is a light-hearted approach to mix general gymnastics in a fun environment, with a focus on fun! Games, contests, activities sure to keep the interest of all involved. Safe, supervised activities with pizza and drink served. You may pay when you attend.

$10.00 for ½ hour for private $15.00 for ½ hour for semi-private Call Kathy Iszkula to schedule lessons at 814.474.7439.

AMERICAN RED CROSS WATER SAFETY CERTIFICATION AND RE-CERTIFICATION The American Red Cross Water Safety Certification and Re-Certification course information can be found on our website at www.fairviewtownship.com or by calling the Rec. Office 814-474-5077.

OPEN DIVING Fee

$40.00

Day

Monday

Time

7:30-9:00 p.m.

Date

March 19–May 21 (No class April 2 & 9)

Instructor: Amanda Keane, FHS Diving Coach This is open diving time with instruction. Signed waivers and payment are due to the FPRA office prior to participation.

GIRLS & BOYS LACROSSE Fee

To Be Determined Fee must be paid by March 12

Site

Fairview Middle School Gymnasium

Day

Saturday (to expand outdoors when weather permits)

Time

Boys from 4:15-5:15PM Girls from 5:15-6:15PM

Date

Fairview mini league is a way for young athletes to learn the game of basketball in a fun filled environment. Players will learn the basic fundamentals of basketball including passing, shooting, ball handling, and pivoting. They will also see a lot of playing time. The ideals of good sportsmanship will be consistently reinforced. Please include t-shirt size on registration form!

BOYS 7th & 8th GRADE BASEBALL CLUB TEAM

February 4 thru mid-May

Ages 5th thru 8th Grade The boys team is a USA Lacrosse affiliated club team that will play in the Western PA Youth League. Players will be responsible for their own transportation. Each player must have required equipment including stick, helmet, shoulder pads, gloves, lacrosse arm pads, mouth guard and cleats. Registration/waiver forms MUST be received before the first practice date! For more information on the boys team email Cliff Jones at cliffjones@roadrunner.com or call 814-474-5450. For information on the girls team call Diane Morosky at 474-4954 or Bruce Gebhardt at 323-5354. Please include t-shirt size and email address on registration form!

Fee

To Be Determined

Site

Fairview High School Gymnasium & Fairview High School Baseball Fields

Day

Sunday

Time

1:00-5:00 p.m.

Date

March 4–May 6 (No program April 8)

This is a developmental league where the games are five innings with modified rules in some areas to allow for better individual player development. After tryouts, practices and games will be held on Sundays. There will also be some evening practices during the week outdoors as the weather improves. Registration/waiver forms are necessary for tryouts; however registration fees are only due after you make the team.

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 21


Fairview Parks & Recreation: Spring 2012 Program

ACTIVITIES for BOYS 5th & 6th GRADE SOCCER

GIRLS 5th & 6th GRADE SOCCER

Fee

$60.00 per player

Fee $60.00 per player

Site

Site Fairview Middle School Gymnasium through end of March Fairview Middle School Soccer Fields, April & May

Fee

$30.00 for each session (REGISTRATION & PAYMENT MUST BE SENT TO THE REC. OFFICE, NOT TO THE SCHOOL. THANK YOU.)

Day

Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium through April 12 Fairview Middle School Soccer Fields April 16– May 31 Monday–Thursday

Site

Time

4:30-5:45 p.m.

Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium

Date

March 5–May 31 (No soccer April 2-9 and May 28)

Day Tues in March from 7:00-8:30 p.m., in April & May from 3:00-4:30 p.m. Games Monday and Wednesday in April & May from 5:00-7:00 p.m.

Day

Monday–Thursday

Date March 6–May 31 (No soccer April 2-9 and May 28)

Time

3:30-4:30 p.m.

Coach: Diana Klochak

Dates Session 1: March 5–8 Session 2: April 16–19 Session 3: May 14–17 OR Ages TIGERS (Grades 3 & 4)

Coach: Jim Hrinda Practice will be indoors through mid-April or, weather permitting, outdoors on the middle school soccer fields through the end of the season. Players will be responsible for their own transportation to and from games. Registration/waiver forms and fees must be received by the first practice. Please include t-shirt size on registration form!

NEW! LITTLE TIKE SOCCER Fee

$30.00 per player

Site

Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium

Day

Thursday

Date March 8–May 3 (No soccer April 5) Time 6:00-7:00 p.m. Ages 4 years old & Kindergartners OR Time 7:00-8:00 p.m. Ages 1st & 2nd Grades Coach: Lauren Opalka This program will focus on basic soccer instruction and rules followed by mini games.

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The 5th and 6th grade girls outdoor soccer program is an opportunity for those interested to learn more about the game and improve their individual skills. The outdoor season will consist of both practice sessions and game opportunities on a weekly basis. The practice sessions will incorporate technical skills practice focusing on passing, receiving and dribbling. The players will also be introduced to tactical team topics at an age appropriate level. Please include t-shirt size on registration form!

AFTER SCHOOL SPORTS FUN CUBS (K-2) & TIGERS (3 & 4)

Ages CUBS (Grades K-2)

Dates Session 4: March 12–15 Session 5: April 23–26 Session 6: May 21–24 Coach: Aaron Garrity, FES Teacher An afterschool intramural sports program that enables children to be active while having fun with their peers. A focus will be to teach the correct fundamentals and skills in a variety of different sports and activities. The skill work, sports, and activities are geared toward being age appropriate. Learning skills such as listening, confidence, cooperation, following directions and teamwork will also be focused on throughout each session. All sessions are different…they include activities and games to keep the children active and having fun. A snack and drink will be provided right after school before all gym activities begin. A minimum of 8 students are needed to hold the program.


CHILDREN CHANGES IN TUMBLING PROGRAM! for each. When registering, please specify which class, level and day you wish your child to attend. If you wish to have your child attend multiple days you must register and pay for each class separately. Any questions, please contact the Parks & Rec. office at 814.474.5077 or email parks-rec@fairviewtownship.com.

The Fairview Parks & Recreation Authority (FPRA) would like to remind parents that registration and payment is requested to be sent to the Parks & Rec. office as walk-in sign-ups and payment to Coach Carl is highly discouraged and may not be accepted. Also, Coach Carl has opted to modify his classes and will now have different levels for all tumbling classes. Beginner through advanced programs offer two different days of class that are the same instructionally. Please note the changes of days and times

All classes will be taught by Coach Carl Cody, USA Gymnastics Certified Instructor, and will be held at the Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium.

BEGINNER TUMBLING 1 $21.00 per session

INTERMEDIATE TUMBLING 1

ADVANCED TUMBLING 1

Fee

Fee

$21.00 per session

JUNIOR ADVANCED TUMBLING

Day

Monday

Fee

$21.00 per session

Day

Monday

Fee

Time

6:00-7:00 p.m.

Day

Monday

Time

8:00-9:00 p.m.

Time

7:00-8:00 p.m.

Date

Date

Session 1: March 5–19 Session 2: April 16–30 Session 3: May 7–21

Session 1: March 5–19 Session 2: April 16–30 Session 3: May 7–21

$28.00 each for Sessions 1 & 3, $14.00 for Session 2

Day

Friday

Time

6:00-7:00 p.m.

Date

Session 1: March 2–30 (No class March 23) Session 2: April 20 & 27 Session 3: May 4–25

Dates Session 1: March 5–19 Session 2: April 16–30 Session 3: May 7–21

BEGINNER TUMBLING 2 Fee

$28.00 for Session 1, $21.00 for Session 2, $35.00 for Session 3

Day

Wednesday

Time

6:00-7:00 p.m.

Dates Session 1: March 7–28 Session 2: April 11–25 Session 3: May 2–30 This level is intended to introduce gymnastic skills to the very young tumbler (5 & under tentatively). Focus is on activity and fun. Goals are to introduce and improve basic gymnastic skills, improve strength, develop coordination and build confidence. Forward rolls, backwards rolls, cartwheels, candlesticks, bridges and kick over are some examples; also games and activities. No previous skills are required.

INTERMEDIATE TUMBLING 2 Fee

$28.00 for Session 1, $21.00 for Session 2, $35.00 for Session 3

Day

Wednesday

Time

7:00-8:00 p.m.

Dates Session 1: March 7–28 Session 2: April 11–25 Session 3: May 2–30 This level is intended to enhance gymnastic skills in the young tumbler (5 & over tentatively). Focus is on activity and fun. Goals are to improve and acquire gymnastic skills, improve strength, develop coordination and build confidence. Round offs, handstands, back bend kick over and working back handsprings are some examples; also games and activities. Skills required are cartwheel, round off, bridge, and working kick over.

ADVANCED TUMBLING 2 Fee

$28.00 for Session 1, $21.00 for Session 2, $35.00 for Session 3

Day

Wednesday

Time

8:00-9:00 p.m.

Dates Session 1: March 7–28 Session 2: April 11–25 Session 3: May 2–30 This level is intended to develop and maintain gymnastic skills in the advanced tumbler. Focus is on progressive skill development. Goals are to improve and acquire particular gymnastic floor skills, such as back handspring, round off back handspring and tucks. Skills required are cartwheel, round off, bridge kick over, working handspring, and/ or handspring working tuck.

This level is intended to develop and maintain gymnastic skills in the young advanced tumbler, with a “bed friendly” time start. Focus is on progressive skill development. Goals are to improve and acquire gymnastic floor skills, such as back handspring, round off back handspring & tucks. Skills required are to have or be working on bridge kick over, working handspring, and/or handspring working tuck.

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 23


Fairview Parks & Recreation: Spring 2012 Program

ACTIVITIES for CHILDREN and ADULTS OPEN RECREATIONAL SWIM Family Pass

ZUMBA

$75.00

Individual Pass $30.00

Fee

$40.00 each for Sessions 1 & 5, $30.00 for Session 3

55/Plus Pass

$27.00

Site

Fairview Middle School Cafeteria

Per person

$3.00

Day

Monday & Wednesday

Time 7:30-9:00 p.m.

Time 4:00-5:00 p.m.

Day Tuesday & Thursday

Date Session 1: March 5–28 Session 3: April 11–30 (No class April 25) Session 5: May 2–30 (No class May 23 & 28)

Date March 27–May 24 (No swim April 3, 5, 17, 19, May 8 & 10) Bathing caps required for shoulder length hair, no cutoffs or t-shirts. Pool users must be 10 years of age and able to swim one length of pool, unless accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Walk-ins

encouraged; you must sign in every day, payment due at every class and exact change is appreciated! Please be respectful of school property and do not throw and/or leave items in/around the pool.

NEW! BEGINNER STANDUP PADDLE BOARDING Fee

$25.00 per session

Site

Fairview High School Pool

Day

Tuesday & Thursday

Time 7:30-8:30 p.m. Date Session 1-March 20 & 22 Session 2-April 17 & 19 Session 3-May 8 & 10 Ages 12 and up Instructor: Jeff Jones, Owner of Elements Board Shop

NEW! YOUTH & ADULT SOCCER Fee

$3.00 per night

Site

Fairview Elementary School Gymnasium

Time

8:00-9:30 p.m.

Day

Thursday

Date

March 1–May 24 (No soccer April 5)

Ages 14 & over with parent participation and/or supervision Play pick-up games and get some exercise with competitive fun. Signed waivers are a must. Walk-ins encouraged.

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West County

The sport of Standup Paddle Boarding (SUP) is exploding worldwide! Men, women and children of all ages, from all backgrounds are drawn to the sport for its ease of access, simple equipment, excellent core exercise potential and endless learning curve. SUP is a sport anyone can enjoy and it provides you with a total body workout. You will improve your balance & coordination as well as your strength & endurance. All equipment provided. 6 students maximum per session.

AND/OR Fee

$40.00 each for Sessions 2 & 6, $30.00 for Session 4

Site

Fairview Middle School Cafeteria

Day

Tuesday & Thursday

Time 6:30-7:30 p.m. Date Session 2: March 6–29 Session 4: April 10–May 3 (No class April 24 & 26) Session 6: May 8–31 Instructor: Lisa Sayers, Certified Zumba Instructor Zumba fuses hypnotic musical rhythms and tantalizing moves to create a dynamic workout system designed to be FUN and EASY TO DO! The routines feature interval training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt your body while burning fat. Zumba is designed for all fitness levels and ages – male and female. All participants are encouraged to wear comfortable workout shoes and clothing. Bring a small towel and water. Recommended for ages 13 and up.


ACTIVITIES for ADULTS HATHA YOGA

INDOOR WALKING

ADULT SOCCER

Fee

$40.00 per session

Fee

Fee

$3.00 per night

Day

Thursday

$5.00 per pass for entire session OR $1.00 per person per night Fairview Middle School Hallways

Fairview Middle School Gymnasium

Fairview Middle School LGI Room

Site

Site

Site

6:30-7:30 p.m.

Monday–Thursday

Monday

Time

Days

Day

7:00-10:00 p.m.

Session 4: March 3–24 Session 5: March 31– April 28 (No class April 5) Session 6: May 5–26

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Time

Date

Time Date

March 1–May 17 (No walking April 2-9)

Date

March 5–May 21 (No class April 2)

Instructor: Daniela Vassileva, Certified Yoga Instructor Classes represent a balanced flow of poses, working on all body parts to create strength, flexibility, and endurance. Stretches, twists and bends will energize, detoxify and sculpt your body. Balancing poses, breathing techniques and relaxation will help release stress, guide the focus within and clear the mind. Yoga offers you a great opportunity to improve your health, to cleanse your body and mind from negativity and to just enjoy the present. Classes suit participants of all levels. Bring floor mat and water. Minimum of five students needed to hold the class.

TAI CHI

Ages 16 & over

Join our walking club in the hallways of the middle school. Walk for either time or distance. Please sign in nightly. Passes must be purchased on site.

Play pick-up games and get some exercise with competitive fun. Signed waivers are a must. Walkins encouraged.

6 ON 6 CO-ED RECREATIONAL VOLLEYBALL Fee

$90.00 per 6-person team with 2 subs

Site

Fairview Middle School Gymnasium

Day

Thursday

Time 7:00-10:00 p.m.

MEN’S OPEN BASKETBALL

Date March 1–29 AND Time 6:00-10:00 p.m.

Fee

$3.00 per night

Site

Fairview Middle School Gymnasium

Date April 12–May 31

Day

Wednesday

Teams may have a maximum of 6 players on the court at any one time. There must be at least 4 players, 2 men and 2 women, on the court at all times. Team registrations must be received by February 29 and include one contact person with phone number and address. Will accept the first 8 team entrants. For more information, call Mark at 474.3235.

Time

7:30-9:30 p.m.

Date

March 7–May 30 (No basketball April 4)

Fee

$30.00

Site

Fairview Middle School Cafeteria

NEW! ADULT MASTER’S SWIM

Time

5:30-6:30 p.m.

Fee

$6.00 per night

Day

Monday

Site

Fairview High School Pool

Dates May 7 thru 21

Day

Wednesday

Instructor: Amy Eisenberg

Time

7:30-9:00 p.m.

Enjoy learning the Yang Long Form of Tai Chi: a series of slow, graceful movements developed in China to promote relaxation, increase flexibility, improve balance and enhance overall good health. Beginners are encouraged to attend. Minimum of five students needed to hold the class.

Date

March 7–May 30 (No swim April 4)

Ages 30 and over Play pick-up games and get some exercise with competitive fun. Signed waivers are a must. Walk-ins encouraged.

Instructor: Melanie Reade Gain speed and get time in the water with this competitive focused program. This is not a “learn to swim” program and is not for beginners.

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 25


Fairview Parks & Recreation: Spring 2012 Program

EVENTS AT PLEASANT RIDGE PARK Girls’ Softball Association of Fairview will have signups from February 15–March 16. The cost is $55.00 per person ($60.00 after March 16). Please contact Brian Sanders at brian.d.sanders@medtronic.com or 814.474.4754 for registration information. You can also

access the registration information on its website at http:// fairviewsoftball.clubspaces.com. On February 16, 21, 23, and 28 there will be open gym practices at the Fairview High School top gym from 7:00-8:30 p.m. Girls from any district are welcome.

TENNIS CLASSES for SUMMER 2012 JUNIOR TENNIS PROGRAM

CLAWS:

ADULT TENNIS CLASSES

• Classes will be held at the Chris Batchelor Tennis Courts at the Fairview High School.

Choose either Beginner or Intermediate, ages 10–14 years old

Fee

$40.00 per session

Site

Chris Batchelor Tennis Courts at Fairview High School

• All payments are due in advance of the first class session. • There are no refunds after the first playing date.

$50/once a week or $75/twice a week

Day

Monday and/or Wednesday

Time

10:00-11:00 a.m.

• Proper clothing and tennis shoes (no black soled shoes) are required.

TIGERS:

• Four students necessary for any class to begin.

Fee

$80/once a week or $130/twice a week

Day

Tuesday and/or Thursday

Time

10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

• Racquets are available for those who have never played before. • Please let instructor know when you will miss a class. Rain dates and missed classes can be made up by scheduling with the director. • You may leave a message for the director at the tennis court phone: 814.474.4592. Session 1: June 11 – July 13 Session 2: July 16 – August 16 Director: Rick Sertz, FHS Head Tennis Coach, Pennbriar Tennis Pro

PAWS: Beginner, ages 5–10 years old

26

Fee

Fee

$40/once a week or $55/twice a week

Day

Monday and/or Wednesday

Time

9:00-10:00 a.m.

West County

Advanced, ages 14–18 years old

GIRLS FITNESS CLASS Fee

$40.00

Day

Thursday

Time

9:00-9:45 a.m.

Fitness for girl tennis players as well as other female athletes who are entering the world of competitive high school athletics and aspire to increase flexibility and cardiovascular stamina. Will work on calisthenics and stretching that will help participants gain an edge in preparation for their sport.

PRIVATE TENNIS LESSONS $15.00 for ½ hour lesson $30.00 for 1 hour lesson Call Rick Sertz to schedule lessons at 814.825.8111 ext. 21.

Days Wednesday Time

7:30 – 9:00 p.m.

Date

Session 1- June 11–July 13 Session 2- July 16–August 16

All levels are welcome! See “Junior Tennis Program” description for further details.

ERIE COUNTY TENNIS TOURNAMENT Will be held at the Chris Batchelor Memorial Tennis Courts at the Fairview High School July 26–July 29, 2012. Visit www.fairviewtownship.com for registration form and more details or call the FPRA office at 814.474.5077. *In cases of financial hardship, scholarship applications are available upon request.


READ AND SIGN THIS WAIVER AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY INDEMNIFICATION In applying for registration in the program and facility, the following agreements must be endorsed: (1) I agree on behalf of myself and in behalf of my minor children to release and discharge the Fairview School District, Fairview Township, Fairview Parks and Recreation Authority, its officers, representatives, and employees from any and all liability and claims arising out of or in any way connected with any program being operated by the Fairview Parks and Recreation Authority. The applicant hereby assumes all risks of injuries or damages to the person on behalf of myself and any minors to which I am a parent or guardian which might occur as a result of participation in the program of the Fairview Parks and Recreation Authority. (2) I agree to abide by the regulations for operation of the facility used for the program, and regulations for the registered individual activity. (3) I further hereby agree to indemnify and save harmless the Fairview School District, Fairview Parks and Recreation Authority, Fairview Township, its officers, representatives and employees, from any and all liability that may occur to myself or members of my immediate family in any Fairview Parks and Recreation Authority program. This indemnification is to include and is not necessarily

limited to any and all cost of litigation, medical expenses, judgment, or subrogation interests. (4) I acknowledge that passes and registrations may not be loaned or transferred; the permit and privileges associated with it are not transferable and will be lifted, if presented by any other person than the one to whom issued. We will consider your application for registration as acceptance of the above items. THE SIGNATURE OF PARENT, GUARDIAN OR ADULT PARTICIPANT INDICATES ACCEPTANCE OF THIS WAIVER AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY AND INDEMNIFICATION. The waiver and release of liability must be signed before participation by adult participants or by a parent or guardian on behalf of minors. The Fairview Parks and Recreation Authority, Fairview Township and its Supervisors and the Fairview School District assume no liability for injuries that may be suffered as a result of participation in these activities as well as and including transportation to and from any class or program. If you have read, signed and agree to the waiver and release of liability, fill out the registration form to include all necessary information (name, address, telephone number, class, etc.).

MAKE YOUR CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO: THE FAIRVIEW PARKS AND RECREATION AUTHORITY AND MAIL TO 7471 MCCRAY RD, FAIRVIEW, PA 16415 REGISTRATION AND WAIVER FORM - FILL OUT COMPLETELY

PARTICIPANT NAME

AGE

ACTIVITY

T-Shirt Size S____ M____ L____ XLG____ Youth or Adult

SESSION

LEVEL

CHECK # __________

TIME

FEE

TOTAL

GUARDIAN __________________________________________________________________Home Phone ______________________ ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________________Work Phone _______________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP ______________________________________________________________Cell Phone ________________________ I HAVE READ AND UNDERSTAND WAIVER/RELEASE FORM Signature ___________________________________________________________________Date _____________________________

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 27


A Trip Back in Time By Dana Black McGrath

F

or more than two centuries, since its establishment in 1797, Fairview has been home to residents and businesses that have changed with the times. Early settlers of the community included mostly farmers looking to establish homesteads in the township’s rich soil, as well as businessmen building mills that were supported by the powerful current of Trout Run and Walnut Creek. “West Main Street” This photo was taken looking west at the main intersection about 1910. Notice the large building on the extreme left. It was the Old Fellows Hall, burned down in a truck collision accident in 1944.

June Hetz, past president of the Fairview Area Historical Society, has lived in the township since 1961. Although not a native of the area, she has experienced much of the community’s history since arriving in Fairview. Hetz explains that the historical society was formed as a result of the United States’ bicentennial celebration in 1976. The nation’s year-long celebration spurred enough interest

“Old Hotel” This old building was erected between 1862 - 1873. Originally it was called “The Monitor” after the Union’s ironclad ship. It had many names and many owners over the years.

According to the published history of the township, its name can be attributed to one of those early settlers, Col. Thomas Forster, who is said to have exclaimed, “This is the fairest view I have seen yet,” when looking out over his land near Walnut Creek. Eventually the town would come to see stagecoaches traveling a regular route along Ridge Road, generating the need for inns, restaurants and other businesses. As times changed and technology evolved, railroad service brought people, freight and mail to town. Trolley and bus service arrived at the beginning of the last century, and even one of the country’s earliest and most 28 724.942.0940 to advertise

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“Treasure Island” It was turned around, porches taken off and looked like this for its last 70 years or so and was torn down in 1994.

successful airports is part of the township’s rich history. Today, superhighways like I-90 provide easy and efficient access to points east and west.

in local history that many local historical societies were established around that time. After its establishment, the Fairview Area Historical Society began to look for a place to


meet, and eventually purchased the Sturgeon House, one of the area’s most historically significant homes. Members and volunteers began to slowly but lovingly restore the home, which dates back to at least 1838 or possibly earlier, according to Hetz. Built by Robert Sturgeon, the son of one of Fairview’s first settlers, the house is listed on the National Register – a distinction earned by merit of its saltbox style of architecture and the importance of the family to the community. Interestingly, Fairview Borough was originally named Sturgeonville in honor of the family, which owned the property from when it was built until it was sold to the historical society in 1979. The property had been used as a rental from the 1890s through the time of the historical society purchase, but the family did manage to maintain some of the home’s original furnishings, which were donated to the society. Hetz believes one of the most significant turns of events in the township’s history

“Eventually the town would come to see stagecoaches traveling a regular route along Ridge Road, generating the need for inns, restaurants and other businesses.” was when the area began to change from a farming community to being home to many subdivisions. “It led to the change of the school system and to the growth of the township.” Another milestone, in Hetz’s opinion, was the consolidation of Fairview Borough and Fairview Township. Previously the borough was within the township, but each had its own governing body. After a referendum in which residents voted to consolidate, the borough ceased to exist. That consolidation occurred in 1998 and since then has had a large impact on the area, says Hetz. For more information about the township’s history or the Fairview Area Historical Society, visit the website at www.fairviewhistoryeriecountypa.org.

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Those in Need By Pamela Palongue

T

o many, hunger is someone else’s problem; a difficulty that will happen to someone else’s family. But according to a 2004 study by Washington University of St. Louis, at least 42% of Americans will deal with food insecurity at some time during their lives. It is interesting to note that this study was done four years prior to the beginning of the recession. It is hard to overestimate the importance of food to quality of life and overall health. Medical experts now tell us that the major factors in determining disease are DNA, exercise and nutrition. A person may be able to stay alive by eating cereal everyday, but how healthy is a consistent diet of nothing but cereal? Unfortunately, the poor are many times forced to buy what is cheap without regard for nutritional value. Indeed, many people are lucky to have enough money to buy food at all.

need. Those who find themselves in need do not have to be a member of the church to seek help from New Beginnings, says Friend. “People know they can come here and get the help they need.” The food pantry also can help with emergency situations and can arrange for delivery as well.

Many situations can cause a person or family to be in a position of need for food. Unexpected job loss and health problems like the families previously mentioned are just a couple of reasons that individuals may experience a food shortage. Many persons work in low-paying jobs with limited education and are unable to make ends meet even in stable times. Divorce often leaves mothers with small children in difficult financial situations, unable to provide for their families, especially if child support is nonexistent. The death of a spouse or other wage-earner in the household can deal a sharp economic blow to any family. Individuals who live with very little disposable income may find themselves with food insecurity if expensive car repairs are needed in order to maintain transportation to work. The causes of food insecurity are as numerous as the people dealing with the problem of Jordyn Sanner is carrying a box hunger.

As people age, nutrition becomes even more important to sustaining life. For individuals with health problems such as diabetes or heart problems, good food is essential. To growing children, proper nutrition of food to the vehicle If a family is fortunate enough to have enough to eat, is vitally important for optimal learning in school and there are important things that anyone can do to help those normal physical development. Unfortunately, many who are hungry. people in our area do not have enough food to eat, much less the financial resources to buy healthy, nutritious food. One of the most obvious ways is to donate money to your local food One common misconception is that people who are hungry are unemployed. Although this is sometimes the case, many individuals who work at full-time jobs do not have enough to eat. With employee benefits such as health care decreasing, many workers are faced with the choice of paying for their health care insurance and prescriptions -or food. Workers have also accepted cut backs in the number of hours worked or decreases in hourly wages in order to retain their jobs. This shortage in pay has to be made up in other areas and one way that individuals stretch their paycheck is by skipping meals to the detriment of their health.

pantry. This enables the food bank to buy the nutritious foods that are needed, rather than having to cope with limited amounts of random food items. The support of individuals in the community is crucial.

For some families, a donation of $25 or $50 may pose a hardship on their budget. But even with limited incomes, there are things that almost anyone can do to help. Some grocery stores offer shoppers the opportunity to make a contribution to food pantries at the check-out line. If every family who is

At the New Beginnings Food Pantry in Fairview, numbers have jumped dramatically since October, increasing from 120 families to 240 families served. Ann Friend, director of the food pantry that operates out of New Beginnings Gospel Church, has been involved with the organization for 25 years and says she has never before seen so many in need of assistance. An elderly couple recuperating from illness and injury found themselves in need of not just food, but also assistance with meal preparation. One of the ways the food pantry was able to help was by providing them with prepared items that just required heating in the oven. Another new client, a parent of five children, turned to the pantry for help after her spouse suddenly walked out on the family, leaving them in 30 724.942.0940 to advertise

West County

Volunteers of Fairview Presbyterian Food Pantry

Photos by Mark Hutchinson


able makes a donation of $1 each week when they shop for groceries, think of the money that could be generated to help feed the hungry! By donating a smaller amount more frequently, it is less painful than writing a check for $20 or more. A small donation of one dollar will most likely not be missed in the family budget, but will help make a big impact when combined with the dollars from other area households. Although monetary donations allow the food pantry the ability to buy food supplies to fill their particular needs, food donations are also helpful. Many times we buy things at the store with good intentions, but those items at the back of the cupboard are just not being eaten. Chances are if you take a quick inventory of your pantry, there are a few items that could be donated to your local food bank. In particular need are high fiber cereals, rice, pasta, canned beans such as kidney, black and navy which are an important source of protein. Peanut butter, canned tuna and salmon also supply much needed protein. Canned vegetables and fruits are always welcomed as well as fruit and vegetable juices, although they should be 100% juice, so be sure to check the ingredients label before donating. Chili, stews and soups are also valuable items because they offer a quick and easy way to get several daily nutrients in one, convenient source. Although many foods remain nutritious and palatable after they expire, some do not. Therefore donated food items should not be expired.

Rebecca Church and JR Mountain help carry food at Food Pantry

Another practically painless way to donate food is to take advantage of store specials. When your local grocery runs a special where two items may be purchased and the third one is free or a ‘two for the price of one’ special, consider donating that extra can of carrots to the food pantry. If this is done weekly, the items will add up quickly and the surplus will help feed hungry families.

At the New Beginnings Food Pantry in Fairview, numbers have jumped dramatically since October, increasing from 120 families to 240 families served. Last of all, but in no way least, if individuals cannot afford even small sacrifices of money or groceries, time is another valuable commodity. Most food banks are operated entirely by volunteers. There are many different jobs to do which allow a person to be matched with a task that fits their own unique personality. Groceries must be organized and stocked on the shelves and later packed into boxes for food pantry clients. Individuals are also needed to work directly with clients to determine eligibility and the distribution of food. Still other persons are needed for fundraising activities, food drive events and marketing duties. One of the best things about helping your local food pantry is that you are helping your neighbors. Often times the hungry go unnoticed because hunger cannot be seen or felt by those around it. The person who is hungry could even be your neighbor, a co-worker or the waitress at your local coffee shop. If 42% of U.S. citizens will be visiting a food bank at some time in their lives, the hungry person may even be you or your family. Helping the food pantry to help others will build a stronger, healthier community for us all. To contact New Beginnings Food Pantry, call 814.474.3223. Another food pantry that provides assistance to the Fairview community is Fairview Presbyterian Church, 814.474.3914. West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 31


Term Or Whole Life Insurance: Which Is Right For You? When shopping for life insurance, you’ll face several important decisions. One of the most basic is whether you want term life or whole life coverage. Understanding the benefits and risks of each will help you choose the best policy for your current and future financial needs.

Term Life With term life, you pay premiums for a certain period, say 20 years, and in exchange, the insurer agrees to pay your beneficiaries a stated benefit if you pass away during that time. Pros • You’ll receive great value. Term insurance can be purchased in large amounts for relatively small premiums. • You can match terms to needs. Most people purchase term life to provide for their dependents. Once your kids are grown, your mortgage is paid off, and your retirement is nicely funded, you may have little use for a policy. Cons • The policy is temporary. One of the key benefits of term life is also its biggest risk. If your term expires and you still have life insurance needs, you’ll re-enter the market as an older

and potentially less-healthy consumer. That means significantly higher premiums, provided you’re coverable at all. • The benefit may not be paid. Some people chafe at the idea of paying for a benefit their beneficiaries may never receive. If you stay current with your premiums and take care of your health, you’ll receive no reward for outliving your policy.

Whole Life Whole life insurance provides a death benefit throughout your life. It also includes a cash value component that accrues value over time, allowing you to borrow or withdraw funds as needed. Pros • Lifetime coverage. A whole life policy covers the rest of your life, not just a stated term. As long as your policy is in force when you pass away, your beneficiaries will receive a death benefit. • You’ll retain access to your money. The premiums you pay for a whole life policy become part of the policy’s cash value. After an introductory period, this cash value becomes available to you through loans1 or as a surrender value. You can even report the cash value as an asset when applying for a line of credit. Any way you choose to use it – if you choose to use it – the cash value of a whole life policy provides another level of financial security for your family. • You may receive dividends. The insurer may pay dividends to whole life policy owners, depending on the company’s financial performance.2 Although dividends are not guaranteed, the possibility of earning extra income is an attractive feature of whole life policies. • Estate planning. If you plan to pass on sizable assets, your attorney or estate planner can help you use the policy’s death benefit to remove some of the burdens of estate taxes3 for your heirs. Cons • Higher initial premiums. In the first years of a whole life policy, the premiums are often higher than comparable term life coverage. However, the lifetime level premiums available for a whole life policy become more affordable over time, while term renewals can involve significant increases in premiums. • Long-term commitment. Insurers offer several payment plans for whole life policies, but the most common plans require regular premiums for an extended period of time. Policyholders who cannot consistently pay their premiums may see their policy lapse. Good financial decision-making is based on solid research and sound advice. If you’re in the market for life insurance, be sure to discuss your options with a qualified insurance representative or certified financial planner and consult your tax and legal advisor regarding your situation.

32 724.942.0940 to advertise

West County

1 Unpaid loans and withdrawals will reduce the guaranteed death benefit and policy cash value. Loans accrue interest. 2 Dividends are not guaranteed. 3 State Farm agents do not provide tax, legal, or investment advice. Please consult your tax, legal, or investment advisor regarding your specific circumstances.


Fairview Central Park

Welcomes Visitors to the Township By Dana Black McGrath

S

ituated at the busy intersection of Route 20 and Route 98, Fairview Central Park serves a distinct purpose for the community – welcoming visitors and residents to the heart of the township. On the spot where a doughnut shop once stood, the park took quite a while to be established, explains Pete Kraus, director of parks and recreation for the township.

PennDOT had acquired the property as part of an extensive expansion project at the intersection. At the end of that project, this particular parcel of land was left in the rightof-way that had been secured by PennDOT, so the department offered it to the township to utilize as a welcome center. After securing some state funding to improve the site, the township was able to build a wall that is illuminated by lights and enhanced by landscaping trees to offer “Welcome to Fairview” greetings to the public. Work on the park was completed nearly five years ago, says Kraus. The park also features a trellis, or pergola, with benches underneath for visitors to rest and reflect. In the wintertime, the spot attracts Christmas carolers, while during the milder months cyclists often can be spotted taking a rest there. Another interesting

feature, resting beside the pergola, is an old school bell that once called students to class at one of the township’s early schools. “It really has been a big improvement to the area,” says Kraus. “It helps to make the area look more personalized and gives it more of a hometown feeling.” The park has benefited from the support of local community groups whose efforts help to keep the spot looking picture-perfect. Brownie, Girl Scout and Boy Scout troops, as well as the Fairview Garden Club, have worked on plantings and maintenance there. “It definitely has improved the look of downtown and that area,” says Kraus. “A lot of people seem to really enjoy it.” Classified as a passive recreation park, Fairview Central Park is newer, but not the newest park in the township. That distinction is reserved for Avonia Beach Park, another passive recreation area situated on 3.6 acres along the shores of Lake Erie. Completed nearly three years ago, it provides a place for visitors to drop by and enjoy the lake or fish. There have even been a few weddings at the park, Kraus reports. Kraus says he is anticipating work on the existing building that is located on the property and hopes the township will be able to secure grant money for the project, which would include overall improvements as well as making the facility accessible to those with disabilities. For more information about the township’s parks and other recreational programs, visit the website at www.fairviewtownship.com/parks.

West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 33


The World Comes to

Fairview School District By Pamela Palongue

S

tudents at Fairview schools have recently been benefiting from a program called Distance Learning. By using video conference machines, students can have conferences with authors and artists, receive instruction in language classes from native speakers, and visit museums and aquariums in other states—all without leaving the Fairview campus. Fairview High School students are currently studying Mandarin Chinese from a native Mandarin speaker. The class has the

FMS Mandarin class

additional advantage of exposing students to Chinese culture, rather than just learning the patterns and rules of the language itself. Also offered NASA this semester are American government classes that are currently being taught at Fort LeBoeuf High School located in Waterford, Pa. The high school has even offered college-level history and geography courses from Clarion University in past semesters.

According to Katy Wolfrom, director of curriculum, instruction and assessment with Fairview School District, the cost of taking a class through distance learning is much cheaper than hiring a special instructor or arranging a field trip to a museum in another state. The cost ranges in price from about Alaskan Sea Life Center $150 to $500 per class. The Fairview School Foundation is able to help provide some of the funds necessary to offer these subjects. “It gives us the opportunity to offer something that we ordinarily would not be able to afford,” says Wolfrom. “It also allows the school to share classes between districts.” For example, another school district may be offering a language course that is not offered at Fairview schools and Fairview may have a particular history class that could be offered to yet another high school. The classes and experiences offered by Distance Learning are extremely varied and go way beyond teaching the simple subjects of reading, writing and arithmetic. “Our kindergarten classes were recently able to participate in a program called ‘A is for Apple’ with the Cleveland Museum of Art,” notes Wolfrom. “They have a wonderful art program there.” In another program called e-Missions, which originates from NASA, middle school students are Sandra Day O’Connor

34 724.942.0940 to advertise

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given a scenario—such as an impending hurricane—and they must make decisions based on the raw data provided by NASA of how to handle the situation effectively. It involves the use of math skills, communication, problem-solving abilities and teamwork. “The kids get so excited and involved in the [scenario], we sometimes have to remind them that it’s just a scenario,” says Wolfrom. Another favorite classroom experience has been a video visit to the Alaska Sea Life Center, where students are able to get a close-up view of Alaska’s diverse aquatic life.

Some important visitors to Fairview schools via video conference machine have been U.S. senators and representatives, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and author Wendy Mass. Some important visitors to Fairview schools via video conference machine have been U.S. senators and representatives, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and author Wendy Mass. The middle school students all read the same books by Wendy Mass: A Mango-Shaped Space and 11 Birthdays. The author was then able to hold a video conference with the children to discuss the book. Wolfrom hopes that in the future, even more classes may be offered by video conference. The machines themselves cost approximately $10,000 each. The first machine was offered through a grant from Wide Area Network (WAN) and two additional machines were purchased through the school’s technology budget. This new type of global classroom has allowed students to experience the world firsthand while still at their desks in Fairview. West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 35


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West County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 39


Discover Presque Isle

in the Off-Season By Aimee Nicolia

Six more weeks of winter,” proclaimed Punxsutawney Phil, when he emerged from his cozy den this February only to be frightened by his own shadow. Though he may be the number one most famous groundhog in Pennsylvania, his weather forecasting skills sometimes leave a bit to be desired. Of course, just a few hours north of Phil, up here in the northwest corner of Pennsylvania, it doesn’t take a groundhog for us to know that the weather this time of year can bring us just about anything! Lucky for us, no matter what the meteorologist brings us during these next couple of months as we transition from winter into spring, the Tom Ridge Environmental Center (TREC) offers plenty of things to do. In fact, the folks at TREC would like you to come in and see what’s inside, but what they really want you to do is GET OUT… and discover the peninsula in the off-season!

Photo contributed courtesy of Presque Isle State Park. the ice dunes have formed is an otherworldly kind of beautiful; it is amazingly peaceful.” According to Desarro, this time of year is a great time to experience the region’s wildlife. “You can see the animal tracks, the critters and the birds.”

Photo by Brian Berchtold If you’re a nature lover, the peninsula is a spectacular place to explore, right here in your own backyard. What makes it such a special place to be during these colder months is its quiet beauty. As Anne Desarro, Presque Isle’s environmental education specialist supervisor puts it, “The landscape of the peninsula when it is frozen over and 40 724.942.0940 to advertise

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Presque Isle has always been an ideal spot for bird watching in every season; in fact the peninsula has been named as one of the top ten birding spots in the country! In the colder months, you’ll see birds such as the Tundra Swan that fly here from the north. As spring arrives, so too will many migrating birds appear for their annual visit to the peninsula. Mid-April marks the peak migration time for the shore birds, which are soon followed by the warblers and songbirds. As part of the peninsula’s public programming, there are a number of bird watching excursions, which are led by experts from the park who are able to show you how to spot and identify various birds in their natural habitat. Park visitors looking for a little fresh air and exercise are always encouraged to enjoy the easily accessible trails. The multipurpose trail is kept open and cleared from the park’s entrance to the ranger station so that walkers and joggers can enjoy a view of Presque Isle Bay and the cityscape, as well as the beauty of the nature surrounding them.


For the slightly more adventuresome, the wooded trails are a perfect place for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing and hiking. On February 18, weather permitting, the peninsula will offer a Cross Country Skiing 101 course to teach the basics of the sport. The only fee is for rental equipment, which will be available on site. Those who have their own equipment and knowledge of the sport are free to venture off on the trails on their own. If you’re brave enough, or curious enough, to walk the wooded trails in the dark, then the peninsula’s popular night winter hiking tour is the one for you. One such tour will be offered from 6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. on Friday, February 17 along the Pine Tree Trail. It is free and registration is not required. These tours are offered monthly and are facilitated by the park’s naturalists, who keep things exciting by varying the locations and topics each time. Some of the hikes take place under the light of the full moon, while other hikes are purposely scheduled for darker nights so that hikers must rely solely on their own night vision and other senses. According to Desarro, “It’s a really unique opportunity for folks to enjoy the peninsula after dark, since the park closes at sunset, and otherwise you would not be able to walk on the trails at night.” On Sunday, February 19, golfers can put a spin on the phrase “having a ball.” The second annual Joe Roots Frostbite Open Golf Tournament will be hosted by the Presque Isle Partnership. Pins, flags and cups will be set up on the ice to form the course, with lots of giveaways and prizes. “Last year, the tournament proved to be such a hit that not only did we have 170 golfers, but even more signed up on a waiting list to play!” said Steve McDermott, executive director of the Presque Isle Partnership. For dates and registration for the Frostbite Open, visit www.discoverpi.com.

you to see “Volcanoes of the Deep Sea,” an adventure film that will take you 12,000 feet below the ocean’s surface. You can then learn more about the undersea volcanoes by visiting the museum’s special exhibit on the

“The landscape of the peninsula when it is frozen over and the ice dunes have formed is an otherworldly kind of beautiful; it is amazingly peaceful.” –Anne Desarro, Presque Isle’s environmental education specialist supervisor second floor. For movie listings, show times and specials visit www.trecpi. org or call the Big Green Screen Theatre at 814.838.4123. So there you have it. There really is something here for everyone at Presque Isle during the off-season. Why not start planning your next adventure on the peninsula right now! The Tom Ridge Environmental Center is open seven days a week and general admission is free. For specific dates or more information on any of the programs or activities listed in this article, please visit www.trecpi.org or call 814.833.7424.

At the beginning of May, aspiring young artists can take part in the “Natural Impressions – All Things Presque Isle” art competition. Students can submit artwork, which will be judged and then kept on display at TREC throughout the month of May. Did we hear somebody mention popcorn? You can always sit back and enjoy the entertainment at TREC’s Big Green Screen Theatre with its four-story high, 45-foot wide movie screen that’ll really make you feel like

Photo contributed courtesy of Presque Isle State Park. you’re a part of the action. Many of the movies have an educational and environmental theme like the film “Journey Into Amazing Caves” which will be showing until the end of February. Starting in March, TREC invites

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