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SPRING 2012

outh Fayett Fayette COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

Groundbreaking Ceremony Intermediate Elementary School Construction Project Begins


S TA F F PUBLISHER

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Wayne Dollard MANAGING EDITOR

Marybeth Jeffries m.jeffries@icmags.com REGIONAL EDITORS

Mark Berton [South and West] mark@incommunitymagazines.com Monica L. Haynes [East] m.haynes@incommunitymagazines.com Pamela Palongue p.palongue@incommunitymagazines.com S C H O O L & M U N I C I PA L C O N T E N T C O O R D I N AT O R

Megan Faloni m.faloni@incommunitymagazines.com OFFICE MANAGER

Leo Vighetti leo@incommunitymagazines.com A D P L A C E M E N T C O O R D I N AT O R

Debbie Mountain d.mountain@incommunitymagazines.com GRAPHIC DESIGN

Cassie Brkich Anna Buzzelli Sharon Cobb Susie Doak

Jan McEvoy Joe Milne Tamara Tylenda

WRITERS

Heather Holtschlage Joann Naser Kelly Lotter Gina Salinger Leigh Lyons Judith Schardt Dana McGrath PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jessica DeLuca Brad Lauer

Kathleen Rudolph Gary Yon

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGERS

Derek Bayer Tom Poljak

Here’s hoping that the start to your year has been a good one! Wayne Dollard

Tamara Myers

ADVERTISING SALES

Brian Daley Gina D’Alicandro Tina Dollard Karen Fadzen Julie Graf Jason Huffman Lori Jeffries Connie McDaniel Brian McKee Gabriel Negri Aimee Nicolia

Welcome to the Spring issue of IN South Fayette Magazine! I hope everyone is enjoying the lengthening days as we forge onto summer. And while Spring usually brings more rain to the region than we normally get throughout the rest of the year, I’m glad we’ve had a few days of nice weather to get outside and remember what the snow covered up. We’ve grown once again over the winter, and have shifted some staff around to accommodate that growth. I want to point this out to you because you, the readers, give us most of the great story ideas that you see featured in these pages, and I want you to have the right point of contact so that your story can be heard. The Editor for the South West Region is Mark Berton (mark@incommunitymagazines. com). Please forward your good news to Mark, and he’ll make sure it finds a place in the magazine. If you’re not sure whether you have a good story, give Mark a call at 724.942.0940 and ask! While our editors have re-aligned into better-organized zones, we still want everything in those zones to be 100 percent local to you. We also appreciate your feedback (good and bad) to let us know where we missed the mark and where we hit it out of the park. Lastly, it’s not too soon to start thinking about the rest of the year! I know we just got through the holidays, and are thawing out, but since we’re quarterly, we’re already looking ahead to fall. So if you have events planned and would like to promote them, call or email Mark. If you have an event coming up earlier, let us know so we can send our photographers and document the occasion!

Robert Ojeda Ralph Palaski Annette Petrone Vincent Sabatini Jennifer Schaefer Michael Silvert Karen Turkovich RJ Vighetti Nikki Capezio-Watson Sophia Williard

This magazine is carrier route mailed to all district households and businesses. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Copyright 2012. CORRESPONDENCE

Direct all inquiries, comments and press releases to: IN COMMUNITY MAGAZINES

Attn: Editorial 603 E. McMurray Rd. Ph: 724.942.0940 McMurray, PA 15317 Fax: 724.942.0968 www. incommunitymagazines.com Summer content deadline: 4/20/12 Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.

FROM THE EDITOR While IN Community Magazines is a non-partisan publication, we don’t live in a vacuum. This year is a presidential election year, and striving to keep readers engaged and active in the community is part of our mission statement. We’re not here to endorse anyone, but we are here to remind you that voting is a hard-earned right that we have as Americans. However, many people pass on that right, which is a shame. If you view your vote as insignificant, then you are not only forfeiting your right to be counted, but also your right to be heard. Voting isn’t just about numbers, it’s about opinions as well. Your vote lends your voice to a chorus that decides who should be deciding our foreign and domestic policies, budgeting for specific social programs and who sends our young people into conflicts around the globe. These are critical issues that everyday people have to live with. If your candidate loses, you didn’t lose. The margin of loss sends a strong message to the victor as to whether people agree with their views, or found them to be less appealing. To be part of that process is something that those before us fought for through marches, protests and even death. To sit it out casts aspersions on their efforts and memory. We may not wake up happy on Nov. 7, but we should all be happy that we participated on Nov. 6. The deadline for registering to vote is 30 days prior to the next primary or general election. For more information, go to www. alleghenycounty.us/elect/registration.aspx. See you at the polls! Mark Berton

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 3


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South Fayette


INSIDE

IN South Fayette is a non-partisan community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the South Fayette area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

IN South Fayette | SPRING 2012 |

38

FEATURES

Dining Out Peter’s Place: Serving up Excellence ........ | 55

Travel: Eco Tourism ........................ | 58 INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

ON THE COVER

|

Intermediate School Principal Greg Wensell, School Board Vice-President Teresa Burroughs and School Board Member Bill Newcomer at the intermediate elementary groundbreaking ceremony. See story on page 6.

Advanced Dental Solutions of Pittsburgh ................................... | 27 Teachout Insurance Agency ........ | 47 Henry Wealth Management Finding a “Tom Brady-like” Investment Manager ............................. | 61

Fitness Fanatics .............................. | 63 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT 12

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53

Premier Home Design Home Design Expertise ............................. | 51

COMMUNITY INTERESTS

South Fayette School District ..................................................... | 6 South Fayette Township ................................................................. | 18 UPMC Today | Health and Wellness News ..................................... | 29 South Fayette Municipal Authority Finds New Home ..... | 37 Resident Profile: Frances Cardillo ........................................ | 53 South Fayette Library News .................................................. | 48 FEATURES

Sports Equipment Drive for Haiti South Fayette Resident Organizes Athletic Equipment Drive .................... | 44

St. Anthony’s Parish Making Way for New South Fayette Development ..................................... | 38

Mercer County | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 5


South Fayette School District

3680 Old Oakdale Road McDonald, Pennsylvania 15057

Dr. Bille P. Rondinelli

Phone 412.221.4542

Fax 724.693.0490

www.southfayette.org

Dear South Fayette Township Community Members, Thank you! Those two important words possess meaning beyond measure. Everyone likes to be appreciated; however, during this critical time in education, it is imperative to let you know that you and your ongoing support make a difference to the children of the South Fayette Township School District. Ultimately, it also makes a difference to the community’s future – tomorrow. Jamie Vollmer, author of the book entitled Schools Cannot Do It Alone, states, “Educators are in the business of tomorrow.” The district embraces that it is both our job and our passion to unfold the potential of every child. As a community, you have embraced this responsibility with us and understand the importance of providing each child with a quality education. South Fayette is a community that truly makes a difference in the lives of growing children on a daily basis. As the district continues to grow, we welcome the new faces that walk through our doors each day. We metaphorically “Wrap Our Arms” around them, as with all of our students, so that all of our children receive personalized and real-world learning experiences. The South Fayette Township School District continues to operate as an academically oriented, highly efficient public school that provides students with excellent learning programs and customized educational opportunities in all buildings. The district maintains academic environments conducive to learning; and, offers nutritious and appetizing meals that nourish our students.

Y: Building CapaCIT al ation Teachers Earn N n Board Certificatio build,

nues to literally As the district conti onal , so does the Operati construct, and grow e of nc g CapaCITY.” Evide Plan theme “Buildin es lud inc ” uild CapaCITY ongoing efforts to “B er, dtn an ers Tracy Br the example of teach r Leapline who have ife nn Je d Frank Kruth, an Board achieving National “Built CapaCITY” by ate tun for is tte ye . South Fa Certification status ve ha o wh s er ch tea t of to have a growing lis ct tri dis ranking status. The achieved this highst we ons to the ne extends congratulati their outstanding for t lis teachers on the accomplishment.

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South Fayette

We stay strong in our passion for and commitment to children, remain dedicated to the mission and philosophy of South Fayette, and work together every day to achieve successful outcomes. The articles in this edition of IN South Fayette Magazine highlight only snapshot views of all that transpires in the district. Our children are the best storytellers of the district. Academic excellence and our students’ present and future success remains key in all that we do. The district is focused, forward thinking, and progressive in our belief that President John F. Kennedy expressed so well, “Children are the world’s most valuable resource and its best hope for the future.” Kennedy’s quote, selected for the program cover of the recent Intermediate Elementary Ground-Breaking ceremony, exemplifies our belief system. Educator and author Patricia Neudecker, Ph. D., states, “Our public schools are pillars for our democratic society and an educated public is critical if our nation is going to flourish.” A high quality public school system benefits the entire community. As Superintendent of Schools, I am committed to working with students, staff, and the community to face the difficult challenges and embrace the wonderful opportunities that lie ahead. Our children and our tomorrows depend on us. The ability to work together makes all the difference – you make all the difference. Again, thank you! All the best,

Superintendent of Schools

South Fayette Foundation for Excellence: GOLFERS, SAVE THE DATE: FRIDAY, JULY 13! The South Fayette Foundation for Excellence, which supports scholarships for staff and students, is proud to announce its first golf outing Friday, July 13, 2012, at the Southpointe Golf Club. Community members and businesses that would like to support the upcoming event may contact the district at 724.693.3003 for information. Additional details to register for the outing will be forthcoming. For now, get your foursome together and plan to join us on July 13 for an exciting round of golf!


Intermediate Elementary Update: Construction Begins The trailers and “dozers” are here! Eckles Architecture, PJ Dick, and Massaro Corporation as well as all professionals working on the elementary project continue to follow the state required PlanCon process, required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE), as construction work commences. As PDE defines, “When a school district undertakes a major construction project and seeks reimbursement from the Commonwealth, a process known as PlanCon is initiated. PlanCon, an acronym for Planning and Construction Workbook, is a set of forms and procedures used to apply for Commonwealth reimbursement. The PlanCon forms are designed to: (1) document a local school district’s planning process; (2) provide justification for a project to the public; (3) ascertain compliance with state laws and regulations; and (4) establish the level of state participation in the cost of the project.” District officials meet regularly with the professionals and simultaneously work to determine the educational direction regarding curriculum, instruction, assessment, technology, and all processes encompassing transition to the new building in 2013. The educational program discussion remains focused on building students’ literacy skills and integrating STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) Experiential Learning/ProjectBased concepts. Additionally, construction update information is provided and discussed at the public Board of Education meetings.

1

2

3

4

5

Arts: AIU 3 Mosaic Art teachers Patrick McAndrew, Diane Lally, and Deborah

Sneberger, along with their students, recently participated in the completion of a visually outstanding mosaic mural on an entrance wall that welcomes visitors to the Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3 (AIU 3). South Fayette students and their teachers were recognized for their contribution at the January Board of Education meeting. We invite you to view the project at http://laurajeanmclaughlin. com/2011/10/allegheny-intermediate-unit-mosaic-mural-unveling/. If you attended the Intermediate Elementary Ground-Breaking

6

1. James Peterson, Garrett Miller, Justin O’Britz, Paul Azoury 2. Meghan Kuczinski, Ella Simms, Ava Leroux, Delaney Wensell, Trey Schooley, Mikenna Garbin, Madalyn Colangelo, and Primary School Principal Laurie Gray 3. School Board President Len Fornella 4. School Board Student Representative Paul Wakim 5. Intermediate School Principal Greg Wensell, School Board Vice-President Teresa Burroughs and School Board Member Bill Newcomer 6. Intermediate School Principal Greg Wensell, School Board Members Alan Vezzi, Frank Morelli, Bill Newcomer; Vice President Teresa Burroughs, Superintendent Dr. Bille Rondinelli, President Len Fornella, Student Representative Paul Wakim, Board Members Bill Sray and Jeff Smith, and Primary School Principal Laurie Gray

Ceremony, you also may have noticed the beautiful artwork decorating the hardhats. With art teacher facilitation, students designed outstanding educational and “Lion Pride” images for the occasion. South Fayette has initiated a new construction trend that integrates the arts – designer hardhats!

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 7


South Fayette School District

2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS VARSITY SOFTBALL SECTION II - “AA”

2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR VARSITY SOFTBALL Time

Bus

Dism.

Friday

Mar.

23

Seton LaSalle

Away

After Var

2:15

1:45

Saturday

Mar.

24

South Park

Away

After Var

9:45 AM

------

Tuesday

Mar.

27

Chartiers Valley

Home

After Var

------

------

Thursday

Mar.

29

Waynesburg

Home

After Var

------

------

Saturday

Mar.

31

Fort Cherry

Home

After Var

------

------

Wednesday

Apr.

4

Carmichaels

Away

After Var

2:00

1:30

Thursday

Apr.

12

Brownsville

Away

After Var

2:00

1:30

Monday

Apr.

16

Steel Valley

Home

After Var

------

------

Wednesday

Apr.

18

Avella

Home

3:30

------

------

Thursday

Apr.

19

Waynesburg

Away

After Var

2:00

1:30

Friday

Apr.

20

Burgettstown

Away

3:30

2:15

1:45

Wednesday

Apr.

25

Avella

Away

3:30

2:15

1:45

Friday

Apr.

27

Brownsville

Home

After Var

-----

------

Thursday

May

3

Burgettstown

Home

After Var

-----

------

- All Home Games Will Be Played At South Fayette’s Softball Complex Which Sits Behind Middle School.

Time

Bus

Dism.

Wednesday

Mar.

14

Upper St. Clair (Scrimmage)

Home

3:30

------

------

Wednesday

Mar.

21

South Allegheny (Scrimmage)

Away

3:45

2:00

1:30

Friday

Mar.

23

*Seton LaSalle (JV Game After)

Away

3:30

2:15

1:45

Saturday

Mar.

24

*South Park (JV Game After)

Away

11:00 AM

9:45 AM

------

Tuesday

Mar.

27

*Chartiers Valley (JV Game After)

Home

3:30

------

------

Thursday

Mar.

29

Waynesburg (JV Game After)

Home

3:30

------

------

Friday

Mar.

30

*Chartiers Houston

Away

4:00

2:45

------

Saturday

Mar.

31

*Fort Cherry (JV Game After)

Home

11:00 AM

------

------

Tuesday

Apr.

3

Washington

Away

4:00

2:45

------

Wednesday

Apr.

4

*Carmichaels (JV Game After)

Away

4:15

2:00

1:30

Tuesday

Apr.

10

Bentworth

Home

3:30

------

------

Thursday

Apr.

12

Brownsville (JV Game After)

Away

4:00

2:00

1:30

Friday

Apr.

13

Charleroi

Home

3:30

------

------

Monday

Apr.

16

*Steel Valley (JV Game After)

Home

3:30

------

------

Tuesday

Apr.

17

Burgettstown

Away

4:00

2:45

------

Thursday

Apr.

19

Waynesburg (JV Game After)

Away

4:00

2:00

1:30

Friday

Apr.

20

Washington

Home

3:30

------

------

Monday

Apr.

23

*Bishop Canevin

Home

3:30

------

------

Thursday

Apr.

26

Bentworth

Away

4:00

2:15

1:45

Friday

Apr.

27

Brownsville (JV Game After)

Home

3:30

-----

------

Tuesday

May

1

Charleroi

Away

4:00

2:15

1:45

Thursday

May

3

Burgettstown

Home

3:30

------

------

*Non-Section Games - All Home Games Will Be Played At South Fayette’s Softball Complex Which Sits Behind Middle School.

 

2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL VARSITY BASEBALL SECTION I - “AA” Monday

Mar.

12

Our Lady Of Sacred Heart (Scrimmage)

Time

Bus

Dism.

Away

5:00

3:30

-----

(Youthtowne Field)

2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS & GIRLS VARSITY SPRING TRACK SECTION 5 - “AA” Time

Bus

Dism.

Tuesday

Mar.

13

Central Valley (Scrimmage)

Home

3:30

-----

------

Monday

Mar.

19

West Allegheny (Scrimmage)

Home

3:30

-----

------

Mar.

23

*Western Beaver

Home

3:30

-----

------

Mar.

27

Keystone Oaks/Carlynton

Home

3:30

-----

------

31

*TSTCA Championships

Away

8:30 AM

6:45 AM

------

Monessen/Brentwood

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

Wednesday

Mar.

14

Trinity (@ Consol Energy Field) (Scrimmage)

Away

7:30

6:00

-----

Friday

Mar.

23

*Canon McMillan

Home

3:30

------

-----

Monday

Apr.

2

Bishop Canevin

Away

3:30

2:00

1:30

Friday

Wednesday

Apr.

11

Sto-Rox

Home

3:30

------

-----

Tuesday

Thursday

Apr.

12

Seton LaSalle

Home

3:30

------

-----

Saturday

Mar.

Friday

Apr.

13

Freedom

Away

4:00

2:15

1:45

Monday

Apr.

16

Quaker Valley

Home

3:30

------

-----

Wednesday

Apr.

18

Northgate

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

Friday

Apr.

20

Carlynton

Home

3:30

------

-----

Monday

Apr.

23

Bishop Canevin

Home

3:30

------

-----

Wednesday

Apr.

25

Seton LaSalle

Away

3:30

2:00

Friday

Apr.

27

Sto-Rox

Away

3:45

Monday

Apr.

30

Freedom

Home

Wednesday

May

2

Quaker Valley

Friday

May

4

Monday

May

7

(@ West Mifflin HS) Tuesday

Apr.

3

Thursday

Apr.

12

Burgettstown/Bishop Canevin

Away

3:30

2:00

1:30

Saturday

Apr.

14

*Central Valley Classic

Away

TBA

TBA

-----

1:30

Tuesday

Apr.

17

Chartiers Houston/Fort Cherry

Home

3:30

-----

-----

2:15

1:45

Saturday

Apr.

28

*South Fayette Invitational

Home

TBA

-----

-----

3:30

------

-----

Friday

May

4

*Baldwin Invitational

Away

TBA

TBA

TBA

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

Northgate

Home

3:30

------

-----

Carlynton

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

*All Home Games Played At South Fayette High School Baseball Field.

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South Fayette


2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR VARSITY BASEBALL Wednesday

Mar.

14

Trinity (Scrimmage) -

Time

Bus

Dism.

Away

4:00

2:45

------

2011-2012 2011-2012 FAYETTE MIDDLE SCHOOL 7TH GRADE & 8TH GRADE SOUTHSOUTH FAYETTE MIDDLE SCHOOL 7TH & 8TH BOYS&&GIRLS GIRLSSPRING SPRINGTRACK TRACKSOUTHWEST SOUTHWESTCONFERENCE CONFERENCE BOYS

(Consol Energy Field) Friday

Mar.

23

Canon McMillan

Away

4:00

2:45

------

Wednesday

Mar.

28

Steel Valley

Home

3:30

------

------

Tuesday

Apr.

3

Bishop Canevin

Home

3:30

------

------

Wednesday

Apr.

4

Seton LaSalle

Away

3:30

2:15

1:45

Monday

Apr.

16

Quaker Valley

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

Wednesday

Apr.

19

Northgate

Home

3:30

------

------

Friday

Apr.

20

Carlynton

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

Saturday

Apr.

21

Moon

Home

11:00 AM

------

------

Saturday

Apr.

21

Freedom

Home

1:30

------

------

Tuesday

Apr.

24

Bishop Canevin

Away

3:30

2:00

1:30

Wednesday

Apr.

25

Seton LaSalle

Home

3:30

------

------

Saturday

Apr.

28

Moon

Away

1:00

11:45 AM

------

Wednesday

May

2

Quaker Valley

Home

3:30

-----

------

Thursday

May

3

Freedom

Away

4:00

2:15

1:45

Monday

May

7

Carlynton

Home

3:30

-----

-----

Tuesday

May

8

Northgate

Away

4:00

2:30

2:00

Time

Bus

Dism.

Wednesday

Apr.

4

South Side Beaver/Moon

Home

3:30

------

------

Wednesday

Apr.

11

West Allegheny/Brentwood

Away

3:45

2:30

2:00

Thursday

Apr.

12

California University Invitational

Away

TBA

TBA

TBA

Wednesday

Apr.

18

Ambridge/Quaker Valley

Away

3:30

2:15

1:45

Wednesday

Apr.

25

Burgettstown/Montour/Cornell

Home

3:30

------

------

Friday

May

4

Moon Invitational

Away

3:00

TBA

TBA

Monday

May

7

Quaker Valley SWC Meet

Away

2:30

1:15

12:45

Wednesday

May

9

Plum Invitational

Away

TBA

TBA

TBA

First Practice Date: March 12, 2012

*All Home Games Played At South Fayette High School Baseball Field.

2011-2012 FORT CHERRY HIGH SCHOOL BOYS JUNIOR VARSITY TENNIS

2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE MIDDLE SCHOOL 7TH & 8TH GRADE JV/VARSITY GIRLS VOLLEYBALL SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE

Time

SF Bus

SF Dism.

Time

Bus Dism .

Monday

Mar.

19

Peters Township

Away

3:30

1:30

1:15

Tuesday

Feb.

14

Quaker Valley (Middle School) - (Scrimmage)

Home

3:45

----- -----

Wednesday

Mar.

21

Moon

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Tuesday

Feb.

21

Montour & Quaker Valley (Scrimmage)

Home

3:45

----- -----

Friday

Mar.

23

Trinity

Away

3:30

1:30

1:15

Thursday

Feb.

23

Carlynton (High School Gym)

Away

4:00

2:45

Monday

Mar.

26

Ringgold

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Monday

Feb.

27

Burgettstown

Home

3:45

----- -----

Wednesday

Mar.

28

Chartiers Valley

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Wednesday

Feb.

29

South Side Beaver

Home

3:45

----- -----

Mar.

2

Fort Cherry (High School Gym)

Away

3:30

2:45

Mar.

6

Brentwood

Home

3:45

----- -----

2:35

Beth Center

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Friday

Peters Township

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Tuesday

10

Moon

Away

3:30

1:30

1:15

Thursday

Mar.

8

Carlynton

Home

3:45

----- -----

16

Trinity

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Tuesday

Mar.

13

Burgettstown (High School Gym)

Away

3:30

2:15

2:05

18

Ringgold

Away

3:30

1:00

12:45

Wednesday

Mar.

14

South Side Beaver (High School Gym)

Away

3:30

2:15

2:05

Mar.

20

Fort Cherry

Home

3:45

----- -----

Friday

Mar.

30

Wednesday

Apr.

4

Tuesday

Apr.

Monday

Apr.

Wednesday

Apr.

2:35

Monday

Apr.

23

Chartiers Valley

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Tuesday

Wednesday

Apr.

25

Beth Center

Away

3:30

1:00

12:45

Thursday

Mar.

22

Brentwood (Middle School Gym)

Away

3:30

2:15

2:05

Tuesday

Mar.

27

Carlynton (High School Gym)

Away

4:00

2:45

2:35

Thursday

Mar.

29

Burgettstown

Home

3:45

----- -----

*South Fayette Junior Varsity Tennis Team is a cooperative sport with Fort Cherry High School as the host team.

- First Day Of Practice: Monday, February 6, 2012. - JV Games Will Be Played First. - South Fayette Home Games Will Be Played At South Fayette Middle School.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 9


South Fayette School District

2011-2012 FORT CHERRY HIGH SCHOOL BOYS VARSITY TENNIS Monday

2011-2012 SOUTH FAYETTE MIDDLE SCHOOL 7TH & 8TH GRADE BOYS/GIRLS SWIMMING SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE Time

Bus

Dism .

Monday

Apr.

2

Carlynton (Scrimmage)

Home

4:00

-----

-----

Wednesday

Apr.

4

West Allegheny

Home

4:00

-----

-----

Thursday

Apr

12

Hopewell

Home

4:00

-----

-----

Tuesday

Apr.

17

Moon

Away

4:00

2:45

2:35

Thursday

Apr.

19

Montour

Home

4:00

-----

-----

Tuesday

Apr.

24

Northgate

Away

4:00

2:30

2:15

Thursday

Apr.

26

Southwest Conference Relay

Away

TBA

TBA

TBA

Tuesday

May

1

Brentwood

Home

4:00

-----

----

Thursday

May

3

Carlynton

Away

4:00

2:45

2:35

Tuesday

May

8

Blackhawk

Home

4:00

-----

-----

Thursday

May

10

Cornell

Away

4:00

2:45

2:35

First Practice Date: March 26, 2012

Mar.

19

Peters Township

Time

Bus

Dism.

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Wednesday

Mar.

21

Moon

Away

3:30

1:45

1:30

Friday

Mar.

23

Trinity

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Monday

Mar.

26

Ringgold

Away

3:30

1:45

1:30

Wednesday

Mar.

28

Chartiers Valley

Away

3:30

2:00

1:45

Friday

Mar.

30

Beth Center

Away

3:30

1:45

1:30

Wednesday

Apr.

4

Peters Township

Away

3:30

2:00

1:45

Thursday

Apr.

5

WPIAL Section Individual Qualifier

Home

TBA

TBA

TBA

Tuesday

Apr.

10

Moon

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Thursday

Apr.

12

WPIAL Individual Championship

Home

TBA

TBA

TBA

Friday

Apr.

13

WPIAL Individual Championship

Home

TBA

TBA

TBA

Monday

Apr.

16

Trinity

Away

3:30

1:45

1:30

Wednesday

Apr.

18

Ringgold

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Monday

Apr.

23

Chartiers Valley

Away

3:30

2:00

1:45

Wednesday

Apr.

25

Bethel Center

Home

3:30

2:15

2:00

Thursday

Apr.

26

WPIAL Section Double Qualifier

Away

TBA

TBA

TBA

Friday

Apr.

27

WPIAL Section Double Qualifier

Away

TBA

TBA

TBA

Thursday

May

3

WPIAL Double Championship

Home

TBA

TBA

TBA

Friday

May

4

WPIAL Double Championship

Home

TBA

TBA

TBA

*South Fayette Boys Varsity Tennis Team is a cooperative sport with Fort Cherry High School as the host team.

Experiential Learning Projects Provide Real World Application Using 21st Century Skills and Knowledge South Fayette High School has expanded its 2011- 2012 Experiential Learning Projects (formerly known as Project Based Learning Initiatives) to include three international corporate partnerships. In September 2011 students met with All-Clad engineers and executives to discuss two production line problems for projects. The students, led by faculty advisor Mr. Brian Garlick, were given 10 weeks to research and come up with their suggestions for solutions using 21st Century Skills. On December 14, 2011, 19 students presented their research and recommendations to All-Clad executives, engineers, marketing, human resources and plant employees. The team included student advisors, Jess Barton, Ben Dobies, Ryan Eberle, Dan Leger, Anthony and Jonathan Walasik and first year team members Tim Bernhardt, Allison Brown, Sarah Hertzler, Ben Kenawell, Radhir Kothuri, Gwen Kunkel, Matt Leger, Brooke Ley, Brennan McCann, Corey Muschar, Varun Thangavelu, Jimmy White and Jackie Witwicki. This was the fourth year for the All-Clad/ South Fayette High School partnership and once again the management of the company was thoroughly impressed with the research, solutions, amount of time, energy and enthusiasm the students gave to their projects through this extra-curricular project. LANxess Corporation in Robinson Township is partnering with South Fayette on a real time, environmental focused project. The South Fayette LANxess student team met with LANxess executives in their corporate headquarters in December 2011 and was given the parameters of the project and a deadline of 11 weeks to present their findings and recommendations. The student team includes P.J. Black, Parth Bhatia, Megan Byham, Jessica Fisher, Robbie Kountz, Brett Ley, Miranda Tedford, Varun Thangavelu, 10 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette

Anthony and Jonathan Walasik. Once again the student team will be using 21st Century Skills to complete their research and provide solutions during this extra-curricular project. The team will travel to LANxess Corp. on March, 26, 2012 to present their findings. South Fayette High School’s Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) Club under the advisement of Brandon Flannery and Shawn McArdle partnered with Siemens Corporation’s, Building Technologies Division (BTD) on “The Ideal Candidate Project,” i.e., the workforce of the future from both the standpoint of the company and employees of the future. The students met with Siemen’s engineers, technicians, sales professionals and finance department representatives to gather information to use for their “Partnership with Business” competition at the state level. The FBLA/Siemens team members are Hunter Austin, Nikita Bokil, Joelle Darby, Carolyn Drozynski, Ryan Eberle, Aaron Fonner, Aditya Muralidharan and Alie Reid. The South Fayette School Board honored the student teams and their parents during the January 24 board meeting. Team members were announced and representatives from each of the project teams fielded questions from the board as they elaborated on the teamwork, problem solving, research and solutions necessary to complete the real time experiences.


South Fayette High School Wins Sportsmanship Award The South Fayette High School was awarded the WPIAL Sportsmanship Award for the 2010-2011 school year. South Fayette was one of four WPIAL schools to receive the recognition at the annual WPIAL Championship games held at Heinz Field. Throughout the 2010-2011 school year, administrators, teachers, students and student athletes stressed good sportsmanship on and off the field. Team captains and student leaders were encouraged to lead by example and worked closely with the administration to perform and cheer in a manner that is reflective of the high expectations of the South Fayette Township School District. The students willingly and enthusiastically accepted this challenge and responded with outstanding support of our programs. In addition, the Lions performed admirably on the field with several teams qualifying for the WPIAL and PIAA playoffs, along with the WPIAL Boys Basketball final, and a WPIAL Championship and PIAA Finals appearance in football. The sportsmanship award was established as a goal for the high school by

Principal Scott Milburn, Athletic Director Joe Farkas and Superintendent Dr. Bille Rondinelli. This is the first time since the 2000-2001 school year that South Fayette has been recognized.

Accepting the award on behalf of the school district were Assistant High School Principal Aaron Skrbin, Seniors Stephanie Slater (Volleyball), Kevin Vock (Soccer), and Superintendent Dr. Bille Rondinelli.

Future Business Leaders of America Competition

to determine the reasons for this mismatch, as well as solutions to fix the problem. This presentation will take place on April 2 at Siemens. Based on this project, FBLA members have earned a Top 10 ranking in the state for the “Partnership with Business” competition. Students will present their findings to a panel of judges at The South Fayette Future Business the State Leadership Conference in an Leaders of America (FBLA) is having attempt to earn a national ranking for (Up front)  Ryan Eberle, Aaron Fonner, Nikita Bokil, Carolyn a stellar year. Every year, students this partnership. Drozynski; (Directly in front of Siemens sign)  Joelle Darby, Alie compete in a variety of categories During the holiday season, the Reid, Aditya Muralidharan, Hunter Austin including accounting, marketing, FBLA organized the fourth annual computer programming, job interview, Stuff-A-Bus toy drive. A school bus and much more. Students spent was donated and decorated by the September through December transportation staff of South Fayette studying their specific subject in and placed in front of the campus. On order to compete at the Regional December 15, 2011, FBLA Advisors Leadership Conference that was held Brandon Flannery and Shawn in December at Keystone Oaks High McArdle, along with senior FBLA School. The Regional Conference members Carolyn Drozynski, Aditya consisted of four schools: Bishop Muralidharan, Hunter Austin and junior Canevin, Keystone Oaks, West FBLA members Joelle Darby, Alie Reid, Allegheny, and South Fayette. South and Aaron Fonner, accompanied the Fayette was well represented with bus full of toys to the Martin Luther 40 members competing. Of the 40 King Elementary School on the North competing members, 26 qualified Side. This school was struggling to Mr. Shawn McArdle, Alie Reid, Joelle Darby, Carolyn Drozynski, for the state competition! collect toys for their students, and SF Aaron Fonner (front), Hunter Austin (back), Aditya Muralidharan Students will attend the State FBLA was able to donate 500 toys to and Mr. Brandon Flannery Leadership Conference in Hershey, their cause. The remaining toys were PA April 15-18. Students will spend the days competing with other FBLA donated at the Pittsburgh Toys-For-Tots donation center in the Strip District. members from all over the state, attending workshops, and networking A total of 1,850 toys were collected this year. Given the efforts of this toy with representatives from colleges and universities. drive over the years, the Stuff-A-Bus Toy Drive was selected as Top 10 This year, for the first time, FBLA students have partnered with a local in the state for the “Community Service Project” competition. Students business. FBLA members are working with Siemens to solve a mismatch will present to a panel of judges at the State Leadership Conference in an problem between students and the labor force. Siemens has identified attempt to earn a national ranking for this service project. FBLA would like that students are often lacking qualifications required for job openings. to thank the South Fayette community for their continuing support of this FBLA members are researching and preparing a presentation for Siemens toy drive. South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 11


South Fayette School District

Circle of Friends Volunteer

South Fayette High School’s Circle of Friends volunteered at the 17th Annual Three Rivers Dash for Down Syndrome held October 15 at Hartwood Acres. More than 2,100 people attended the event. This is the 14th year South Fayette has participated, assisting with crafts,

games, and face painting and helping with food and raffle sales. The Dash, sponsored by the Down Syndrome Association of Pittsburgh, was formerly known as the Down Syndrome Buddy Walk.

m s i r e e t n u Visoonlthe

Rise

at South Fayette School District Members of the Middle School Lion Hearts Club and of the newly formed High School Volunteer Club took part in a Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service in partnership with Pittsburgh Cares. A team of sixteen students spent the day at Hosanna House in Wilkinsburg painting rooms, emptying storage areas and cleaning hundreds of items for re-stocking. The Hosanna House, Inc. is a multi-purpose community center serving over 35,000 people a year. Their 12 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette

mission is to provide opportunities that will empower families and individuals to discover, acknowledge and develop their maximum potential physically, spiritually and economically. The students were led by Club Advisors Mrs. Conchetta Bell and Mrs. Julie Martin; Assistant Superintendent Dr. Michael Loughead, Mr. Alex Hobbs, and Ms. Maureen Pedzwater who gave up their day off from school to volunteer to make a difference. The impact of the day


of service for all of the students was very rewarding. Upon completion of their physical labors, the students were invited to add their creative talents to one of three murals of their choice with a message based on Dr. King’s philosophy. These murals will be hung within the center as a remembrance of this day of caring and sharing. The following students participated in the MLK Day of Service: Middle School: Camille Bonaccorsi, Morgan Cook, Samantha Doleno, Mitchell Dunay, Allyson Fontana, Samantha Ford, Marissa France, Olivia Goerdt, Riley Supan, Claudia Yates, and Courtney Yates. High School: Sidney Becker, Bridget Fabila, Jessica Hannah, Shannon Holley, and Miranda Tedford. Any student interested in volunteering at the middle school should contact Mrs. Conchetta Bell: cbell@southfayette.org. Any student interested in volunteering at the high school should contact Mrs. Julie Martin: martin@southfayette.org. South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 13


South Fayette School District

Green and White turns Pink in

“Score for the Cure” events

South Fayette Foundation for Excellence sponsored its second annual Pink Out Celebration this year to support the Dr. Mary Ravita Scholarship Fund. This year’s celebrations raised over $4,500 which enables the foundation to award two $1,000.00 and two $500.00 scholarships to the SF class of 2012. Also a portion of the fundraising was donated to Relay for Life. Once

14 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette

again the entire South Fayette School District Family came together to support the events by purchasing and wearing the pink “Score for the Cure” t-shirts. The following teams took part in supporting the fundraiser during their matches and games: Cross Country, Girl’s Volleyball, Girl’s Soccer, Football, Band and Cheerleaders.


South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 15


South Fayette School District

THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT: HAT:

Computational Thinking K-12 T

here’s an App for that! You can be certain that behind every App, there is a successful App designer; or in South Fayette’s case, twenty-six Android App designers. Under the direction of Jim Roberts, retired Teaching Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon, students are learning computer programming in a compelling way. They are building a prototype of a simple video game by using the Java based Processing Language, developed at MIT Media Lab. This language was developed for people interested in creating images, animations, and other interactive events, and is used especially by visual artists and designers to create prototypes of their projects. This language lends itself well for engaging students in computer programming which is one of the primary goals of this program. The App Lab is a continuation of an initiative that began last year as a gift from Winchester Thurston’s “City as Our Campus” project.

1. High School Students: Jack Previte, Mark Babatunde and Varun Thangavelu

1

2. High School Students: Michael McCartney, Alyssa Jessloski, and Instructor Jim Roberts 3. Middle School Students: Eshan Kadakia, Hailey Black and Nina Autry 4. Middle School Students: Eshan Andrew Knez, Zach DiGiacomo and John Barrett 5. High School Students: Pai Liu, Merline Paul and Christy Abraham 16 724.942.0940 to advertise

After learning about South Fayette’s focus on technology innovation and embedding computational thinking projects into the K-12 curriculum, Winchester Thurston selected the district as a partner through a grant that they were awarded. Fifteen students in grades 9 11 applied to be Android App Designers and traveled to Winchester Thurston once a week for five weeks, where Dave Nassar, Programming Teacher, taught students to make an App for the Droid. Students were supported along the way by software engineers from Google; the Director of Technology and Innovation, South Fayette School District, Aileen Owens; and teachers Sharon Perry and Maureen Sirc. The initiative was a phenomenal success and as a result the partnership strengthened. This year in an effort to expand the collaborative, Winchester Thurston provided outreach to the Barack Obama Academy and South Fayette School

South Fayette

District partnered with Quaker Valley School District. All four schools met at Google for their first class, and after a tour of the work place they met with software engineers in a question and answer session. Students posed questions of the engineers to learn more about the career path and day-to-day life at Google. For the next six sessions the Android App Designers embarked on the newly revised curriculum created by Dave Nassar and Jim Roberts, and successfully created a video game prototype which they turned into an App. Twenty-six South Fayette students met with Mr. Roberts from 2:10 –


2

3

3:30pm and twelve Quaker Valley students traveled to South Fayette to work with Mr. Roberts from 3:30 – 5:00pm each week. A team of South Fayette students from last year’s App Lab acted as Student Mentors for both South Fayette and Quaker Valley School District. The success of the program was due in a large part to the support provided by the Student Mentor Team including: Ben Kenawell, Jack Previte, Radhir Kothuri, Vaurn Thangavelu, and Merline Paul. South Fayette’s Business Technology Teacher, Sharon Perry, guided the project by gathering student input and valuable feedback to the instructors providing a true collaborative experience.

O

n November 1, 2011, United States Senator for Pennsylvania Robert Casey spoke at Pittsburgh Public Schools’ Science and Technology Academy to promote the Computer Science Education Act that he recently introduced in the Senate. Mr. Casey explained that “fewer than 40,000 people graduated with bachelor’s degrees in computer science in 2009, but approximately 140,000 jobs are projected each year between 2008 and 2018”. Alarmingly, he noted that “the availability of introductory high school computer science courses has decreased by 17 percent since 2005, and the number of Advanced Placement computer science courses has dropped by 33 percent”. Computational thinking is considered the new literacy and is critical to our global needs

4

as a society. The App Lab is just one example of the computational thinking strand being developed by the Director of Technology and Innovation at South Fayette School District. It is important to begin engaging students in computer science at an early age. That is why this year fifth, sixth, and seventh grade students in Diane Lally’s Art classes learned the concepts of computer programming in a creative and meaningful way, as they made interactive cartoons and fairy tales using Scratch, an introductory programming software developed by MIT Media Lab. Students use blocks of code to animate cartoons while being introduced to computer programming concepts such as sequence, loops, parallelisms, events, conditionals, operators and data. Although it may appear quite complicated, you will realize that after speaking with sixth graders, in fact it is great fun. Hailey Black explains, “You can customize it however you want and make the characters do anything. This gives you more freedom to imagine.” Eshan Kadakia says, “You can do whatever you want and if you don’t have a sound you want you can record it yourself. If something is not in the library you can create it yourself with a picture you draw or by using your own sound. And it helps your imagination because you can make your own characters. I downloaded it at home and I try to make different kinds of stories to show to my friends.” Offering a word of advice to budding programmers, Nina Autry notes, “The scripts are kind of hard to create at first but it gets easier as you go through it.

5

Never give up on any animation that you make because it doesn’t matter what you make, it matters that you like it.” All three students have downloaded the free software at home and are busily making cartoons to entertain their friends.

I

n another extension of computational thinking, Frank Kruth, Middle School Technology Teacher, Sean Paul Richman, Middle School Teacher, and Aileen Owens are hosting an after-school video gamemaking course for seventh and eighth graders as a pilot project with Zulama. The Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University has partnered with Zulama, an online learning academy to teach game-creation technology to high school students. As part of this pilot program two instructors from the Entertainment Technology Center are working with Mr. Kruth’s girls STEAM Team and a boys team to create video games using Game Maker software. Zulama has generously allowed access to their software this semester to evaluate the abilities of middle school students. What has become apparent right away is that students quickly become the experts as they begin programming. One Monday when teachers from the ETC were not available to lead the class Mr. Kruth, Ms. Owens, and Mr. Richman relied on one of their resident experts; seventh grader Sam Cohen. Sam had immediately started building video games in Scratch during art class and joined the afterschool game-making course. He mastered Game Maker immediately and became a student mentor problem-solving and guiding the students and adults through their projects. Under the leadership of Superintendent Dr. Bille Rondinelli, the district’s vision for experiential learning and creative problem solving, Assistant Superintendent Dr. Michael Loughead’s curriculum design initiatives, and the guidance of Middle School Principal Dave Deramo and his teaching staff; our students are inspired learners. As a result, it’s very possible that the next Steve Jobs may be getting his start at South Fayette School District. Time will tell.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 17


South Fayette Township

Golf Lessons

Through the South Fayette Township Department of Parks & Recreation Four PGA Certified Professionals will teach beginners about golf safety, terminology, equipment etiquette along with instruction in the short game (putting, chipping and pitching) and the full swing. Practice range balls are included. All lessons given at Hickory Heights Golf Club * Space is Limited Resident Rate: $60.00

Non-Resident: $70.00

JUNE 12-14 Years 9-11 Years

Mon-Fri Mon-Fri

9:30-10:30am 10:30-11:30am

11 11

12 12

13 13

14 14

15 15

JULY 12-14 Years 9-11 Years

Mon-Fri Mon-Fri

9:30-10:30am 10:30-11:30am

16 16

17 17

18 18

19 19

20 20

AUGUST 12-14 Years 9-11 Years

Mon-Fri Mon-Fri

9:30-10:30am 10:30-11:30am

13 13

14 14

15 15

16 16

17 17

*All sessions require a minimum of five students

2012 Golf Registration Name___________________________________________________________ Age____________ Address_________________________________________________________________________ E-Mail___________________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________________________State______Zip_______ Parent Signature_______________________________________ Phone # (____)_______________

No refunds after start of the program • For More Information Contact: 412.221.8700 or jmales@sftwp.com

18 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette


TREVESKYN PARK

COMMUNITY GARDEN Guidelines and Rules • I will pay a fee of $25 Resident $30 Non• I will pay a fee of $25 Resident $30 NonResident to help cover garden expenses. Resident to help cover garden expenses. ($25.00 Security Deposit) ($25.00 Security Deposit) • I will have something planted in the garden • I will have something planted in the garden by (June 4, 2012) and keep it planted all by (June 4, 2012) and keep it planted all summer long. summer long. • If I must abandon my plot for any reason, I will • If I must abandon my plot for any reason, I will notify the Township. notify the Township. • I will keep weeds at a minimum and maintain • I will keep weeds at a minimum and maintain the areas immediately surrounding my plot. the areas immediately surrounding my plot. • If my plot becomes unkempt, I understand I will • If my plot becomes unkempt, I understand I will be given 1 week’s notice to clean it up. At that be given 1 week’s notice to clean it up. At that time, it will be re-assigned or tilled in. time, it will be re-assigned or tilled in. • I will keep trash and litter out of the plot, as well • I will keep trash and litter out of the plot, as well as from adjacent pathways and fences. as from adjacent pathways and fences. • I will participate in the fall cleanup of the garden. • I will participate in the fall cleanup of the garden. • I will plant tall crops where they will not shade • I will plant tall crops where they will not shade neighboring plots. neighboring plots. • I will pick only my own crops unless given • I will pick only my own crops unless given permission by another plot user. permission by another plot user.

• I will not use fertilizers, insecticides or weed • I will not use fertilizers, insecticides or weed repellents in the organic section. repellents in the organic section. • I understand that I am not guaranteed the same • I understand that I am not guaranteed the same plot every year. . plot every year. . • I will not bring pets to the garden. • I will not bring pets to the garden. • All fencing, border material, stakes, cages and • All fencing, border material, stakes, cages and non-biodegradable material will be removed by non-biodegradable material will be removed by November 1. November 1. • I understand that neither South Fayette • I understand that neither South Fayette Township nor the garden group is responsible Township nor the garden group is responsible for my actions. for my actions. • I understand that neither the garden group • I understand that neither the garden group nor owners of the land are responsible for nor owners of the land are responsible for my actions. my actions. I THEREFORE AGREE TO HOLD HARMLESS SOUTH I THEREFORE AGREE TO HOLD HARMLESS SOUTH FAYETTE TOWNSHIP FOR ANY LIABILITY, DAMAGE, FAYETTE TOWNSHIP FOR ANY LIABILITY, DAMAGE, LOSS OR CLAIM THAT OCCURS IN CONNECTION LOSS OR CLAIM THAT OCCURS IN CONNECTION WITH USE OF THE GARDEN BY ME OR ANY OF WITH USE OF THE GARDEN BY ME OR ANY OF MY GUESTS. MY GUESTS.

Name___________________________________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________________________ City_________________________________________________________State______Zip_______ E-Mail___________________________________________________________________________ Phone # (____)____________________________________________________________________ Signature________________________________________________________Plot #____________

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 19


South Fayette Township

South Fayette Soccer Summer Camp Programs 2012 June 25-29 • El Rancho Field

Directed by UK Soccer professional English coaches, the objective of our Youth soccer camp is to provide the player the opportunity to have fun while learning the fundamental techniques necessary to play the game. The program is focused at individual skill development with a technical curriculum that is specific to age and ability. 9:00AM-1:00PM $135 per resident player $145.00 non-resident player Includes UK Camp ball, T-Shirt and Written Evaluation

UK SOCCER NIPPERS CAMP ( AGES 5 & 6 ONLY )

The Nippers camp is a non-competitive program designed for kids to have fun with the ball while the UK Soccer professional English coaches are teaching and enhancing their soccer skills. The sessions will not only introduce and develop basic techniques but are devised to nurture a love of the game. The program is specific to age and ability 10:00AM-12:00 Noon $90 per player $100.00 per non-resident player Includes UK Camp ball, T-Shirt, Medal and Written Evaluation

To Register Complete attached form, enclose check made out to South Fayette Township and mail to: UK Soccer Registration South Fayette Township Department of Parks & Recreation 515 Millers Run Road Morgan, PA 15064

UK SOCCER SQUIRTS CAMP ( AGES 3 & 4 ONLY )

The Squirts camp is an introductory program designed for kids to have fun with the ball while introducing them to the game of soccer. The program is coached by UK Soccer professional English coaches and is specific to age and ability 9:00AM-10:00AM $65 per player $75.00 per nonresident player Includes UK Camp ball, T-Shirt, Medal and Written Evaluation

love of the game e h t !! ut o b a t’s

I

UK SOCCER RECREATIONAL / YOUTH SOCCER CAMP ( AGES 7 - 15 )

Player Name__________________________________________________________________ Age _______

Youth _______

Nipper _______

Squirt _______

Home Address_________________________________________________________________ City______________________________________________________State______Zip_______ Home Phone # (____)______________________ Cell Phone # (____)_____________________ Emergency Contact_____________________________________________________________ E-Mail______________________________________________________________________ I have listed on the reverse side of this form any known medical condition(s) and Physicianprescribed medication(s) of the above named player, attest the player is medically insured and should player be injured, that emergency medical treatment and any necessary transport to a medical facility is authorized in my absence. Parent/Guardian Signature______________________________________________________ Date____________ REFUNDS NOT ISSUED AFTER START OF PROGRAM

20 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette


ette Township S y a F h t u ummer Playground Program So AM SESSION – 9:00 -11:30 - cost $5.00 ■ PM session – 12:30 - 3:00 - cost $5.00 BOTH sessions – 9:00 - 3:00 - cost $10. WEEK

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6

DATE

LOCATION

June 25, 27, 29 July 2,5 July 9, 11, 13 July 16, 18, 20 July 23, 25, 26 July 30, Aug 1, 3

Morgan Park No Program Wednesday or Friday Morgan Park No Program Friday Fairview Park

Applications available at www.south-fayette.pa.us in May

ing Present the

Breakfast with the h t Sou te Fayet

Easter Bunny and Egg Hunt

Saturday, March 31st at Rain or TS N U H G EG Shine L FOR AOLUPS South Fayette High School AGE GR 9:30-11:00 a.m. – Breakfast with the Easter Bunny ($5.00) S O T O H 11:00 a.m. – Egg Hunt Kick-Off (Free) TAKE TPH THE WI TER Egg hunts will be divided into age groups, from tots thru age 10. EAS Y Where: South Fayette High School Food Court BUNN and Amphitheater (Court Yard) OF Dress appropriately for outdoor activities. Bring your basket AND LOADSnd FUN REMEMBER: a non-perishable food item for donation to the Bridgeville Food Bank! a CANDY For Information contact 412-221-8700 or jmales@sftwp.com

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 21


South Fayette Township

2012 SPRING TENNIS AT MORGAN PARK

8 - WEEK SPRING TENNIS SESSION: APRIL 16, 2012 – JUNE 10, 2012 JUNIOR PROGRAMS PEE WEE CLINICS/QUICKSTART (Ages 5-6) Monday (5:15 - 6:00) Focus on developing hand/eye coordination, basic stroke instruction and FUN, FUN, FUN! Residents: 1 x week @ $10/week ($80/session) Non Residents: 1 x week @ $12/week ($96/session) JUNIOR BEGINNER CLINICS (Ages 7 – 12) Monday (4:15 – 5:15) Stress correct form, basic rules and court etiquette, fun drills and games Residents: 1 x week @ $15/week ($120/session) Non Residents: 1 x week @ $17/week ($136/session) JUNIOR ADVANCED BEGINNER CLINICS (Ages 9-14) Monday (6:00 – 7:00) Introduce more advanced drills with an emphasis on fine tuning tennis strokes through games galore! Residents: 1 x week @ $15/week ($120/session) Non Residents: 1 x week @ $17/week ($136/session) HIGH PERFORMANCE TENNIS ACADEMY (Ages 10 – 17) Wednesday (6:00 – 7:30) Incorporates advanced stroke analysis, footwork, strategy, drills, games and match play. This is a competitive training for players participating in U.S.T.A tournaments. Must have approval from Kent or current AMD ranking to participate. HIGH PERFORMANCE QUICKSTART (Ages 7-10) Wednesday (4:30 – 6:00) Incorporates advanced stroke analysis, footwork, strategy, drills, games and match play. This is competitive training for players participating in U.S.T.A tournaments. Must have approval from Kent or current AMD ranking to participate. Residents: 1 x week @ $20/week ($160/session) Non Residents: 1 x week @ $22/week ($176/session)

***PRIVATE LESSONS FOR JUNIORS & ADULTS*** Individuals participating in the High Performance clinics or players looking to qualify for the High Performance clinics are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the Private tennis lessons being offered in order to maximize individual tennis development. 1 Hour w/ Kent Johnson, USPTA/PTR - $60 ½ Hour w/ Kent Johnson, USPTA/PTR - $30

22 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette


Operated by:

ADULT PROGRAMS ADULT ADVANCED BEGINNER CLINICS Wednesday (7:30 – 9:00 pm) A fun and social introduction to tennis that focuses on basic stroke instruction, developing correct form and learning rules and court etiquette. Residents: 1 x week @ $20/week ($160/session) Non Residents: 1 x week @ $22/week ($176/session) ADULT ADVANCED CLINICS Monday (7:00 – 8:30 pm) Incorporates advanced stroke development, footwork, spin, strategy, drills and games. Get ready to sweat! Residents: 1 x week @ $20/week ($160/session) Non Residents: 1 x week @ $22/week ($176/session) Kent Johnson is a USPTA P1/PTR Tennis Professional, a distinction in which only 3% of tennis professional’s worldwide can claim. Kent has trained and developed some of the top tennis players in the United States with many of his former students accepting full tennis scholarships to college. The Kent Johnson Tennis Academy is dedicated to training players of all ages and abilities and employs the latest training methods for maximum results in both group and private tennis lessons. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced player, our top notch instruction will help the residents of South Fayette Township play better tennis and have more fun on the court, all while increasing confidence, health and enjoyment of the game.

SOUTH FAYETTE REGISTRATION FORM Name ___________________________________ Age________

Please Circle: Junior

- or -

Adult

Street Address _________________________________________

Session _______________________

City, State & Zip ________________________________________

Level ________________________

Telephone # ___________________________________________

Days _________________________

E-mail _______________________________________________

Times ________________________

By signing, I hereby for myself, my heirs, executors, and administrators, waive and release any and all my rights and claims for damages I may have against South Fayette Parks & Recreation Department, Kent Johnson Tennis Academy, the area schools, their agents, representatives, or successors for any and all injuries that might be suffered by myself or my child in the program. In case of emergency, it is our procedure to call 911. If necessary, they dispatch an ambulance to respond to the emergency. Parents/guardians/ family will be immediately notified as soon as is practical (usually prior to emergency assistance.) I understand that the program provides no medical coverage for participants. Participant/Parent Signature______________________________________

Date_______________________

Make checks payable to: South Fayette Parks & Recreation Please mail checks to: Kent Johnson Tennis Academy 830 Wheatland Circle Bridgeville, Pennsylvania 15017

412.200.0144 kentjohnson@myway.com www. kentjohnsontennisacademy.com

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 23


South Fayette Township

yoga ADULT

CLASSES

When: Tuesday & Thursdays Time:

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Place: Middle School LGI Room Price: $10.00 per session Join Heather Black for an introduction to yoga for weight loss. Classes are designed for all levels of ability. You will need a yoga mat and one firm blanket.

For more information call 412.319.7441.

Name___________________________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________________________ City_______________________________________ St___________ Zip____________ Signature________________________________ Phone(_______)__________________ No refunds after start of the program

24 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette


South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 25


26 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette


INdustry Insight

Sedation Dentistry O ften times a trip to the dentist can be overwhelming and lead to avoidance of routine care. Approximately 30% of dental patients avoid dental care due to fear. Unfortunately, this can lead to a small problem growing into a larger problem, requiring even more treatment. So what is the fearful patient to do? It is best to avoid desperation being the driving force for finally receiving care. Fortunately there is a great option for patients who have put off dental care due to fear. Sedation Dentistry is a safe treatment method that allows many patients to receive the dental care they have been avoiding. Sedation Dentistry is a type of treatment where sedatives are given to the patient to induce relaxation so dental work can be comfortably completed. There are various types of dental sedation ranging from very light sedation to deep sedation (general anesthesia). These can be achieved using oral sedatives, muscular injection, inhalation, and intravenously (IV). 80% of patients can be comfortably and safely treated with mild

sedation. This is not true “sleep dentistry,” which is typically done in a hospital. For severely phobic patients, “sleep dentistry” may be the only option. With mild sedation, patients may be so relaxed that they drift to sleep during the dental treatment, but they are not being “put to sleep.” Even with mild sedation, it is important that the dental office monitor sedated patients throughout the entire procedure with state of the art equipment to ensure the safest possible treatment. This mild sedation can often be done with a combinational of nitrous oxide (laughing gas) and oral sedative medication. With this technique, the majority of patients are so relaxed that they can comfortably undergo most dental procedures. The patient simply takes a pill the night before and another pill an hour prior to treatment while relaxing comfortably in the dental chair listening to music or watching television. Most patients are thrilled with how well the treatment goes and would gladly go through the procedure again.

Benefits: • very safe • fearful patients can get the care they need • elective cosmetic procedures can be comfortably done • more work can be completed in fewer visits • little to no memory of the procedure

Dr. Rairigh

Participate in a cancer research study What if we could personally participate in research that might help determine factors that cause or prevent cancer? What if our involvement, and that research, ultimately leads to the elimination of cancer as a major health problem for this and future generations? What if we could make it so just one family never has to hear the words “you have cancer”?

Residents of the community have an unprecedented opportunity to participate in cancer research this year. Enrollment for the American Cancer Society’s third Cancer Prevention Study will be taking place at the Relay for Life of Mt. Lebanon on Saturday, June 9th, from 1:00 p.m. to 5 p.m., at the Mt. Lebanon High School Stadium. The site is one of only two in Western Pennsylvania to sign up for the study. Individuals between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer and are willing to make a long-term commitment to the study are encouraged to sign up. Those who choose to enroll will complete a brief initial questionnaire and provide a waist measurement and a small blood sample. Participants will periodically be sent a follow-up questionnaire for the next 20 to 30 years.

For more information, visit: www.cancer.org/cps3; email: cps3@cancer.org; or call toll-free 1.888.604.5888.

Often patients who have been neglecting treatment feel overwhelmed with where to start. The most important thing is to move toward a healthier smile. The first step is to schedule a consult with the sedation dentist to address your concerns and review your medical history and current medications. After this review, the dentist will recommend the necessary X-rays and do a complete examination to develop a treatment plan to prioritize and phase the treatment to suit the patient’s individual needs and achieve their desired result. Finally, the dentist will determine the level of sedation you will require to have the treatment comfortably completed. Sedation Dentistry can be a great and safe option for patients to achieve the beautiful and healthy smiles they deserve. By taking the process one step at a time the fears can be overcome and patients can finally reach optimum oral health.

This Industry Insight was written by Dr. Daniel Rairigh. Dr. Daniel Rairigh practices at Advanced Dental Solutions of Pittsburgh on Fort Couch Road. He received his degree from West Virginia University School of Dentistry. Dr. Rairigh is a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and the Academy of General Dentistry. He is trained in Sedation Dentistry by DOCS Education. He is also a certified Invisalign provider and is certified in MDI placement. Dr. Rairigh is also an accomplished artist who has won numerous awards for his artwork. You can learn more about Dr. Rairigh or send him an email if you have article suggestions at www.pittsburghissmiling.com.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 27


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SPRING 2012

Health and Wellness News You Can Use

Let’s Get Physical

What can a daily dose of moderate physical activity do for you? Plenty! As you get older, regular exercise is a key to staying strong, energetic, and healthy. To learn more about the link between fitness and aging, turn to page 3.

© 2012 UPMC

What’s Inside page 2

Need Quick, Convenient Care? Head to UPMC Mercy’s South Side Walk-in Clinic

page 3

Fit at Any Age

page 4

Surviving Allergies: What You Can Do Putting Ergonomics to Work for You

page 5

Brightening Lives With Light

page 6

A Walk to Remember

page 7

A Lasting Legacy of Caring


Need Quick, Convenient Care?

Head to UPMC Mercy’s South SideWalk-in Clinic Open days, evenings, and weekends, it’s the solution of choice for busy patients As a single, working mother of two, Joanne Krapp feels fortunate to have the UPMC Mercy South Side Walk-in Primary Care Clinic available close by. She doesn’t have a car, but the clinic is just a 10-minute bus ride from her Carrick home. “It’s so convenient. You don’t need an appointment, and you’re in and out in no time,” says Joanne. “They treat you like you’re the first patient of the day, no matter what time you go.” Joanne first went to the clinic two years ago when she woke up with a burning rash all over her body. Diagnosed with multiple skin allergies — including sensitivity to various metals — she now takes precautions but periodically experiences allergic reactions. She’s been to the clinic for treatment about a half dozen times in two years.

A board-certified physician is on site at all times, along with nurses and other highly trained staff. Patients of all ages are accepted at the clinic, and walk-ins are welcome. Parking is free and plentiful.

A neighbor you can count on Kelly Sassaman, administrator of UPMC Mercy’s South Side Outpatient Center, says the clinic provides x-rays, sutures, blood work and screening, physical exams, and vaccinations, plus immediate care for such conditions as: • Colds and flu • Sore throats and earaches • Minor cuts and scrapes • Minor broken bones • Sprains and strains The clinic also serves as a primary care provider. Staff can refer patients to specialists, and they can provide a fast track to emergency services at UPMC Mercy, a Level 1 trauma center, she adds.

“I’m often treated by the same people when I go there. For someone like me who has a fear of hospitals, that’s important because it makes me feel very comfortable,” she says.

“We’re not an emergency room, but we handle many conditions,” explains Ms. Sassaman. “We’re meeting the needs of the community. Our neighbors don’t have to cross the river, deal with traffic or parking, or wait in an emergency room for treatment of minor injuries or illness. We can do that here.”

The Walk-in Clinic, located on the second floor of the UPMC Mercy South Side Outpatient Center at 2000 Mary St., is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

Joanne hopes she won’t have to return for treatment anytime soon. “But, if I do, I know I’ll be in good hands,” she says.

Quality care in a comfortable setting

Pain Management and More In addition to the Walk-in Primary Care Clinic, the UPMC Mercy South Side Outpatient Center offers a comprehensive range of outpatient services. The convenient, one-stop location also provides everyday care ranging from EKGs and laboratory work to same-day surgery, as well as pain management services. At the center’s Pain Clinic, specialists work with patients to diagnose the source of chronic pain, and then reduce it using interventional treatments. Specially trained surgeons perform procedures, including injections and radiofrequency ablation.

2

UPMC.com/Today

“We provide excellent care, and it’s so convenient for our patients. Most people are treated within a half hour,” says Jacqueline Belton, director of the Pain Clinic. The Pain Clinic, located on the ground floor of the outpatient center, is open weekdays from 1 to 5 p.m. To learn more about the UPMC Mercy South Side Outpatient Center and all the services available, visit UPMC.com and click on Hospitals and Facilities.


Fit atAnyAge Comedian George Burns — who lived to be 100 — often advised his audience to “Look to the future, because that’s where you’ll spend the rest of your life.” Vonda Wright, MD — a practicing orthopaedic surgeon at the UPMC Center for Sports Medicine and a nationally recognized author of several books on active aging and fitness — thinks that’s sound advice. “Nothing is more natural than aging,” she says. “Adults over 40 today are redefining what it means to age. They’re looking ahead — and doing what it takes to stay fit and vital. “With just 30 minutes of daily exercise, you can minimize your risk for 35 common illnesses — including high blood pressure, stroke, and diabetes,” says Dr. Wright, who also directs the center’s Performance and Research Initiative for Masters Athletes (PRIMA®), which focuses on maximizing the performance of both elite and recreational athletes over age 40.

Staying fit as you age “As we enter our 40s and 50s, we’re just starting to hit our stride, with the potential for many years of wonderful living ahead of us. A well-balanced exercise plan is a key to maintaining that quality of life as we grow older,” she maintains.

Many say that 50 is the new 30 as today’s mature adults enjoy more active, fitter, and healthier lives than any other generation.

“There’s no age or activity level to prevent any older adult from being active,” explains Dr. Wright. In fact, studies of 90-year-old men doing resistance training on a daily basis showed improvements in their strength and functioning.

Getting started

Starting — and sticking with — a fitness plan initially can be hard, says Dr. Wright. “The first step is to make exercise a part of your daily routine. Schedule it on your calendar, like an appointment,” she advises. “Don’t be a weekend warrior. Instead, try to maintain a moderate activity level throughout the week, and increase your exercise level gradually to reduce your chance of overuse or injury.” She tells her patients to FACE the future with a balanced, total body workout designed to achieve maximum benefits while avoiding injury:

F — Flexibility with daily stretching exercises A — Aerobic cardiovascular exercises every other day, using interval-style training Carry a load (or strength train) to build and maintain muscles in your arms, C — legs, and core (stomach, back, and abdomen) E — Equilibrium and balance through simple exercises like standing on one foot “Whenever possible, mix up activities like running, swimming, cycling, or rowing,” encourages Dr. Wright. “Cross training helps promote total fitness while reducing the chance for injury. Most of all, take that first step!” To learn more about UPMC’s PRIMA program for mature athletes, call 412-432-3651 or visit UPMC.com/SportsMedicine. You’ll find PRIMA listed under Performance in the Our Services section.

Should you see a doctor first? You’re 50 years old and a pack-a-day smoker. You also have high blood pressure, and you haven’t exercised since Ronald Reagan was president. Should you see your doctor before hitting the local gym? “Regular exercise is the best gift you can give yourself. But it’s important to use common sense when getting started,” says Lance Brunton, MD, an orthopaedic surgeon at UPMC Mercy who sees patients at the UPMC Center for Sports Medicine. If you’re in generally good health and starting off with light to moderate physical activity, an extensive medical workup probably isn’t necessary. “But if you’ve been diagnosed with any medical condition, have been sedentary for some time, or are at risk for potential heart problems, it’s essential to talk to your doctor,” advises Dr. Brunton. “Working together, you and your doctor can create the right exercise plan based on your age, physical condition, family history, and other key factors.” If you’re over the age of 40, visit UPMC.com/Today to take the American College of Sports Medicine’s Physical Activity Readiness Self-Exam.

1-800-533-UPMC

3


Health Tips from UPMC Health Plan

Surviving Allergies:

What You Can Do If you dread the approach of spring and the arrival of allergy season, here are a few ways to reduce your sniffling, sneezing, and itchy eyes

What to do If you take medication to control your symptoms, start treatment early — before your seasonal allergies flare up, says BJ Ferguson, MD, director of the Division of Sino-Nasal Disorders and Allergy at UPMC, and a professor of otolaryngology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. In western Pennsylvania, tree pollen starts flying around by the end of February or in early March, when it warms up enough for trees to begin budding.

Medications to take Dr. Ferguson recommends starting with an over-thecounter (OTC) medication, preferably a non-sedating antihistamine. She cautions that some products can be sedating or even result in extreme drowsiness that can impair driving. Be sure to read the accompanying instructions or ask your pharmacist about side effects. OTC decongestants can relieve nasal congestion but should only be used on a short-term basis, Dr. Ferguson says. Decongestants can cause significant side effects, such as insomnia, agitation, heart palpitations, and a rise in blood pressure. A saline nasal wash also can help relieve congestion.

When to see a doctor “If you are getting no relief and it is impairing your quality of life, you should see a doctor about more effective alternatives and testing,” says Dr. Ferguson. • A doctor can prescribe medications that can provide effective relief from chronic congestion. • Allergy testing can determine precisely what you are or aren’t allergic to. A new sublingual immunotherapy administered under the tongue is just as effective as allergy shots, and with fewer side effects, says Dr. Ferguson. • Your doctor also can determine if your nasal blockage is caused by inflammation or nasal polyps, a deviated septum, enlarged adenoids, or an infection.

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UPMC.com/Today

Putting Ergonomics to Work for You At home and on the job, ergonomics can help you avoid injury and discomfort — and even increase your productivity The goal of ergonomics is to make our places of work as safe, comfortable, and efficient as possible. But let’s not limit its uses to our day jobs! According to the physical therapists at UPMC Mercy, many of the aches and pains people experience can be attributed to ergonomic issues like poor posture, excessive repetitive movement, or improper lifting techniques. They advise applying basic ergonomic principles at work, home, or play to help avoid injury and perform at your best. • Use the right equipment. Make sure the tool fits the job and your body, whether you’re sitting at a desk, vacuuming, riding a bike, or swinging a golf club. • Work at the right height for you. A too-low computer chair or a too-high kitchen counter can wreak havoc on your neck, back, and shoulders. • Avoid contact stress. Wear gloves or use tools designed to reduce pressure on soft tissue to avoid blisters and other skin damage. • Keep items within easy reach. Extend your arms out on each side. Picture an imaginary arc in front of you from left to right. Place the tools or supplies you use most often within that area. • Avoid repetitive movements and working long periods in one position. Alternate tasks and change your body position regularly. Stretch every 20 to 30 minutes. Visit UPMC.com/Today where you can find more ergonomic tips to use at work and at home.


Brightening Lives with Light

Light therapy is proving to be an effective treatment for bipolar depression and other mood disorders Michele Twyman of Penn Hills always dreaded the approach of winter and the holidays. As the days shortened, she grew increasingly tired, sleepy, and depressed. All she wanted to do was crawl into bed — and stay there. “I didn’t enjoy anything — from decorating to shopping. I never felt like celebrating,” says Ms. Twyman, who has a bipolar disorder and has battled depression for more than 30 years. But last Christmas was different. For the first time in years, she decorated, shopped, and made wreaths and centerpieces. “I enjoy the holidays again. I realize now how much I missed being happy about life’s little things,” she says.

New treatment shows bright promise

People with bipolar depression are especially sensitive to changes in outdoor ambient light and the seasons, she explains. The onset of fall and winter can trigger symptoms similar to seasonal affective disorder (SAD), including fatigue, sluggishness, daytime sleepiness, carb cravings, loss of interest, and inability to experience pleasure. Individuals with bipolar depression also may have suicidal thoughts.

How and why it works

“There are few effective treatments for bipolar depression. That’s why we’re exploring novel approaches such as light therapy.” — Dorothy Sit, MD

Ms. Twyman credits her new outlook to an artificial light box provided by Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic (WPIC) of UPMC. Every afternoon, she sits in bright light for about a half hour while reading or planning appointments and activities. It took just a few weeks to feel the effects. She now wakes up feeling more rested and relaxed. She’s also better able to care for her 95-year-old father. “There are few effective treatments for bipolar depression. That’s why we’re exploring novel approaches such as light therapy,” says Dorothy Sit, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, and a researcher at WPIC who is leading an ongoing study in the use of light therapy for treatment of bipolar depression. “Most patients feel better within two weeks of starting it, and continue to improve for up to eight weeks.” According to Dr. Sit, treatment is inexpensive and effective. Patients with seasonal depression require 30 to 60 minutes of daily light therapy while patients with non-seasonal depression need 45 to 60 minutes.

Light therapy replaces lost sunlight exposure and resets the body’s internal clock, or circadian rhythms — important for everyone’s general health, mood, and thinking. That’s why light therapy also can help patients with jet lag, shift workers, and people with sleep disorders.

While light therapy is generally safe, patients with bipolar depression also must be on a mood stabilizer or they’ll be at risk for manic episodes, says Dr. Sit. Other possible side effects include headaches, eyestrain, irritation, agitation, and insomnia. These symptoms normally disappear following adjustments in the time and length of treatment.

Light therapy tips • Check with your doctor or mental health professional to see if light therapy is a good option for you. • Follow your doctor’s advice concerning any special precautions you need to take. • Use light therapy only with guidance from your doctor or mental health provider to minimize possible side effects and maximize benefits. Visit UPMC.com/Today for more information on bipolar depression and the light therapy study. To participate in the study, call 1-800-436-2461. For information on light boxes, visit the Center for Environmental Therapeutics website at cet.org.

1-800-533-UPMC

5


AWalk to Remember UPMC Rehabilitation Institute helps make a seemingly impossible wedding dream come true

Megan Dow was an athletic, carefree 27-year-old with so much to look forward to — from her upcoming wedding to a new house and barn. But a freak ATV accident on Memorial Day 2010 changed her life in an instant, leaving her paralyzed from the waist down. It took a week for Megan to realize her broken neck and back wouldn’t be a quick fix and another six months to acknowledge that her paralysis might have permanent effects. Despite the diagnosis, the Negley, Ohio, resident was determined to walk down the aisle on her wedding day 16 months later. “What means more to a girl than walking down the aisle at her wedding?” asks Megan, who became engaged just weeks before the accident.

Regaining the life she lost Initially, she couldn’t sit up without help and wore braces to support her back, neck, and legs. “I went from doing everything to not being able to brush my teeth; from being able to throw a bale of hay to not being able to pick up a gallon of milk,” Megan says. An avid outdoorswoman, Megan longed to return to her activities, including horseback riding, camping, volunteering as a 4H Club adviser, and working as an interior designer. “I absolutely loved the life I had before the accident. I had to work to bring these things back into my life,” she says.

6

UPMC.com/Today

At the UPMC Rehabilitation Institute’s spinal cord injury unit at UPMC Mercy, Megan’s team of specialists put her to work four hours a day, six days a week in an intensive rehabilitation program. Luckily, she had use of her quadriceps, which allowed her to walk with the help of braces and a walker. Slowly, she relearned everyday skills like dressing herself and walking. She also learned new skills, such as transferring to a shower chair from her wheelchair, and did exercises to build her strength. Megan vowed she’d walk without the walker by that Christmas (a goal she met by Thanksgiving) and down the aisle without a cane. A few weeks before her wedding, Megan donned her gown and practiced walking in the gym with her physical therapist.

Walking happily into the future On her wedding day — Oct. 1, 2011 — Megan did walk down the aisle. Among the guests were her UPMC doctor, physical therapist, and occupational therapist. “They’re a huge part of my life and the reason I’m where I am today. They had to be there!” exclaims Megan. “I’m so grateful to everyone at the Rehabilitation Institute. They gave me the tools I needed, and they encouraged and steered me in the right direction.”

Megan and Eric Dow walked down the aisle after exchanging marriage vows on Oct. 1, 2011.

Megan and her husband Eric honeymooned in Cancún, Mexico, where they snorkeled, swam, kayaked, and even explored some ancient ruins. Today, while she still uses a wheelchair and cane, Megan is thankful she can walk up to two hours with just leg braces. She’s also driving again, riding horses, camping, and doing other activities. “It was a miracle. I’m so grateful I can still do what I used to do — I just do them differently,” Megan says. To learn more about UPMC Rehabilitation Institute and its services, visit UPMC.com/RehabInstitute. You’ll also find a link to Megan’s story and those of other patients who’ve benefited from the institute’s specialized care.


A Lasting Legacy of Caring It was 165 years ago that a small band of Irish nuns pioneered the ministry of Catholic health care in Pittsburgh — a spirit of compassionate care that is alive today at UPMC Mercy Catholic health care has a long and rich tradition in the United States, providing care to medically underserved, diverse, and poor communities. In Pittsburgh, that tradition took shape in the work of seven Sisters of Mercy who first came from Ireland in 1843 to care for the poor and sick. In 1847, those remarkable women built the Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh, the first Catholic hospital in Pittsburgh. Today, at UPMC Mercy — the last Catholic hospital in Pittsburgh — their legacy of giving reverent, compassionate care of the highest quality to all patients is flourishing. To Sisters of Mercy, their fourth vow — caring for the poor, sick, and uneducated — is as sacred as the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. “Scripture provides the model we follow,” explains Phyllis Grasser, vice president of mission effectiveness and spiritual care at UPMC Mercy. “The healing ministry of Christ included a commitment to the poor and vulnerable.”

Securing our mission and identity When the Sisters of Mercy began seeking a partner to help secure the hospital’s future, preserving its faith-based mission of care was of vital concern. In 2008, Mercy Hospital merged with UPMC under an agreement that assured that the hospital would retain its Catholic identity and ethics. That agreement was one of the first of its kind in the United States between a Catholic hospital and a secular health system, and has since become a model for others. Partnering with UPMC also put the struggling hospital on solid financial ground and enabled it to upgrade facilities and bring in new specialized programs and advanced technologies, says Ms. Grasser. UPMC Mercy will continue to provide the best and most advanced medical care to the region’s underserved and most vulnerable populations.

“The executive team is very supportive of the mission, and they’ve encouraged us to strengthen UPMC Mercy’s Catholic tradition,” adds Ms. Grasser.

The mission in action Mercy has always been respected for the important role it has played in the lives of people throughout western Pennsylvania. For nearly 170 years, people have trusted the sisters to care for them with respect, regardless of social status or ability to pay. That has not changed, says Ms. Grasser. Since merging with UPMC, the hospital’s charity care has doubled. While some sisters remain actively involved at UPMC Mercy, the staff is comprised mainly of lay people. Although the lay staff come from a variety of religious traditions, they have a deep understanding of and commitment to the hospital’s faith-based mission. With the support and encouragement of the sisters and the Diocese of Pittsburgh, Ms. Grasser is helping to build a generation of lay leaders to carry Mercy’s mission and values into the future. To do that, she and her staff regularly host lay leadership training programs, as well as seminars for all employees that focus on the hospital’s Catholic identity. “The qualities of trust, teamwork, forgiveness, and generosity are at the core of who we are and what we do as people and as care providers,” explains Ms. Grasser. “They bind us to each other and to our patients.” “The mission, vision, and values of Mercy have not changed. Providing quality medical care with respect and reverence for all people is our responsibility — and our legacy,” says Ms. Grasser.

1-800-533-UPMC

7


UPMC Mercy

1400 Locust St. Pittsburgh, PA 15219

UPMC Today is published quarterly to provide you with health and wellness information and classes and events available at UPMC. This publication is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice or replace a physician’s medical assessment. Always consult first with your physician about anything related to your personal health.

Follow UPMC Mercy on Facebook.

Community Open House April 19 5 to 7 p.m.

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South Fayette


South Fayette Municipal Authority Finds New Home Starting at the beginning of the year, the South Fayette Municipal Authority has called 900 Presto-Sygan Road home. Spokesperson Rebecca Sray said the location previous housed the field offices, but the entire 8-employee authority team has moved in. “We had the field personnel down here and the manager was going back and forth and he had an office here and one at the old facility,” she said. “It makes more sense to us to consolidate or resources in one location, it provides us with a more efficient operation and allows us to concentrate solely on our mission to provide the residents of South Fayette sanitary sewer service.” The hours of operation at the new building are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Manager Mark Brooks said the move is important for the community to know about because Penn-American Water will be discontinuing billing services in October and that duty will fall to South Fayette Municipal Authority.

South Fayette High School performs

Annie Get Your Gun The musical Annie Get Your Gun is a wild, wild west “show-within- a– show,” which tells the legendary love story of sharp shooters Annie Oakley and Frank Butler. Along with a funny and entertaining script is the amazing score of Irving Berlin. Timeless songs such as “There’s No Business Like Show Business,” and “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better” will have the audience tapping their feet and singing along with the cast. Annie get your gun will score a bull’s eye with audience members of all ages! SUNDAY, MARCH 25 AT 2:30 PM Prior to this performance, senior citizens may purchase a lunch for $5.00 in the high school commons. Lunch will be served

The South Fayette Township Municipal Authority was formed in 1968 to provide sanitary sewer systems to the residents. There are currently over 110 miles of sanitary sewer lines with 4 pumping stations, providing service to over 5,000 residents and approximately 180 commercial customers. This represents about 95% of the current township population, only 60% of the land area is presently served by public sewers.

between 12:30 p.m.- 2:00 p.m. Menu includes lasagne, roast beef, rolls/butter, tossed salad, apple sauce, cherry pie and a beverage. South Fayette senior citizens also will receive free admission to the musical for Sunday, March 25- 2:30 p.m. performance. Neighboring senior citizens will receive a discount show ticket of $5.00. (Please RSVP to Tiffany Vetter at (412) 221-4542, ext. 407 by Wednesday, March 21.)   FRIDAY, MARCH 30 AT 7:30 P.M. SATURDAY, MARCH 31 AT 7:30 P.M. SUNDAY, APRIL 1 AT 7:30 P.M.   ALL SEATS RESERVED ADULTS- $ 10.00 SENIOR CITIZENS (03/30, 03/31. 4/01) STUDENTS/CHILDREN- $7.00 HIGH SCHOOL BOX OFFICE HOURS: Wed. March 7: Thurs. March 8: Sat. March 10: Wed. March 14:

2:00-4:00 p.m. 7:00 -9:00 p.m. 9:00 am-12 p.m. 2:00-4:00 p.m.

Thurs. March 15: Mon. March 19: Wed. March 21: Thurs. March 22:

7:00 -9:00 p.m. 2:00-4:00 p.m. 2:00-4:00 p.m. 7:00-9:00 p.m.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 37


St. Anthony’s Parish

Makes Way for New South Fayette Development

By Mark Berton From its first mass in June of 1915, until its closure in 1994, St. Anthony’s Parish’s history has been a long testament to the dedication of Lithuanians in the South Fayette and Bridgeville area. Now, to make way for development of the Star City property and its outlaying parcels, St. Anthony’s is being torn down. Vacant for quite some time, St. Anthony’s ceased services under its own name when it was combined with St. Agatha’s on the other side of Chartiers Creek under the name of Holy Child Parish. The two churches operated independently under the common name, but St. Anthony’s doors were eventually closed for good. On the property stood the church building, the rectory, which was built in 1918, an event hall which also served as CCD for parish youth, and two shrines – one to Our Lady of Fatima and one to St. Anthony. The former was constructed between the church and the rectory in 1956 at a cost of $8,000 and was spearheaded by St. Anthony’s longest-serving administrator, Rev. Alexander Ziubrys, who was known to all parishioners as Father Alexander. Ziubrys was a Lithuanian Franciscan who arrived at St. Anthony’s in November of 1949, along with several compatriots, to save the church from

Rev. Alexander Ziubrys

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abandonment due to the failing health of Rev. Aloysius Jurgutis who had presided over the church since 1920. Ziubrys’ first challenge was to eliminate the church’s $12,500 worth of debt, which he did by 1953. Next, he set sights on building the shrine, with its Palla marble statues from Pietra Santa, Italy. By 1959, Ziubrys had constructed the parish hall at a cost of $48,000, purchased an organ for the church at a cost of $3,800, and acquired new pews, floors and a furnace. In 1960, however, all of that prosperity was challenged by the coming of Interstate 79, which threatened the property. Highway planners sought to bisect the church property. Ziubrys sought approval from Bishop John Wright to fight the development and save the church for its 142 families. After a protracted struggle, Ziubrys won out for the parish, and the configuration of the highway seen today was the result. A renovation project in the 1970s resulted in a rededication on June 20, 1972 and the erection of the church’s second shrine inside the bell tower just outside the front doors of the church, where a marble replica of Michelangelo’s Pieta was housed. St. Anthony’s Bazaar, also implemented under Ziubry’s watch, grew famous in the community with the smell of potato pancakes and confectionaries, small games of chance, bingo and lots of activities for the kids. On October 28, 1984, the church’s shrine to St. Anthony was dedicated at the far end of the parking lot. While St. Anthony’s grew and prospered, the Lithuanian Franciscan Fathers who first brought Ziubrys to the parish dwindled, and by 1989, they could no longer maintain the parish, and the Diocese of Pittsburgh assigned priests to staff the church. On June 10, 1990, the parish celebrated its 75th anniversary. Today, its shrines and grounds are gone, but parts of St. Anthony will live on as long as there is a Diocese of Pittsburgh.


Photos Courtesy Diocese of Pittsburgh and Mark Berton

Ken White, Director of the Office for Archives and Records for the Diocese of Pittsburgh said that new parishes, such as Holy Child, which was formed by merging St. Anthony and St. Agatha, usually get first choice on the instruments and equipment of the former parish. “Generally, things like chalices and that, they go to the new parish,” he said. “They have the first call at it. If they don’t need all that, it’s made available for other parishes. Anything sacred in there, and it depends on what the use of the building will be, so if it the building is sold, sacred items would be taken out of there.” Jane Steele in the Diocese’s Office of Property Planning and Development, said that other parts of the parish are salvaged as well. “We have some items that are housed and cared for. We have some new churches and they might need a new station of the cross. We’ve used some windows and put them into the seminary. It depends on the needs of the Diocese,” she said. “We don’t sell things. They’re not available to the public at large. It’s against Canon Law to sell anything like that.” Steele said that Diocese officials examine the church prior to its closing to take stock of sacred items. “When the church has been walked through, all religious items are to be removed - alters, tabernacles, crucifixes, stations, everything,” she said.

Continued on page 40

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 39


Raise Up Thy Voices For Change “God doesn’t play dice with the world.” That was how Albert Einstein summed up his take on the emerging science of quantum physics. However, in other contexts, the affirmation that a supreme being has such laser-like focus reassures us, as failing mortals, that the tragedies and misfortunes that befall us are all part of a greater plan that we aren’t privy to just yet. The phrase inculcates in us that everything has purpose. Every change, even when we might have great sorrow, anger and tears along the way, will be for the better. Meaningful change, by those terms, must be bittersweet. One might lose one’s job, only to find one later that pays more with better coworkers. One might be blessed with the birth of a child, only to see that child leave home 18 short years later and fend for themselves in the world. So, when it comes to the demolition of St. Anthony’s Parish, I, too, feel bittersweet. On the one hand, I am happy to see an eyesore property being reinvented as the new South Fayette Community Center, and the outlaying businesses that property supports. Growing up, I knew that property as my church, surrounded by a Texaco and a square box called Mulach Steel. Later Mulach became Star City, and today, Star City will be the new home to South Fayette. On the other hand, as I drive past St. Anthony’s, I remember my first communion there. I remember serving as an alterboy at the right hand of Father Alexander, whose Lithuanian accent was almost as thick as his glasses. I remember Father Robert, who also served there before his transfer to some lucky parish in Maine. So many Sundays were spent at 8:30 mass, lighting candles, ringing bells and making sure the microphones were turned on. Weddings, baptisms, midnight masses all transpired on my watch.

St. Anthony’s was a place where I made some good friends, and a place where good families came together. The annual church bazaar was legendary – at least to me, recalling it as a little kid would – with wading pools filled with lucky yellow plastic ducks, sandboxes with buried treasures, pierogies and sausages, and games of chance. Many of those people are now part of Holy Child Parish on the other side of Chartiers Creek and life goes on for this spiritual family. The combined parishes resulted in stronger numbers and growth for the church. New memories are being made in this building, which was once St. Agatha’s in name. Those of us fortunate enough to remember St. Anthony’s, who knew the creaks of their pews, and left their dollars under the votive candles on the tables in the middle of the church, we’ll always have our memories of this place, until we too are called forth. “God doesn’t place dice with the world.” This was always meant to be before the first stone was set. And we know not what is yet to come, but it will mean change for us, and it will be for the better.

Continued from page 39 “In the end, it’s just a shell of a building. Old liturgical items, old chalices, we’ll collect and those are housed. If it’s something beyond repair, they are disposed of in the proper fashion. You just can’t throw them in the garbage.” Other items, such as the church’s organ are not considered holy items, and could be sold, she said, most commonly to other Christian institutions such as the Anglicans. But no matter how well off its relics are treated, for long-time parishioners like Julia Symsek, the fact that St. Anthony’s is being torn down is a bitter pill to swallow. “I think it’s terrible that they’re tearing it down,” she said. “I can’t believe it. We went to that church for 50 years or more. I think I joined in my 20s. We have a lot of memories from down there. I worked down there in the kitchen for all the bazaars. We had banquets. It was a nice church.” 40 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette

St. Anthony Firsts First baptism: Mary Juska, July 25, 1965 First wedding: Anthony Knabikas and Antoinette Pavoliute First funeral: Joseph Zvirblys, age 2 ½ First confirmations: July 13, 1919 First outdoor mass: June 13, 1989 One vocation: Rev. Jerome Fern, O.F.M., ordained June 14, 1963 Source: Diocese of Pittsburgh


South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 41


South Fayette High School Circle of Friends Club Hosts

mardi gras dance for Those Who Deserve the Best

By Kathy Rudolph

S

ometimes young adults with special needs have a hard time fitting in at mainstream dances and activities and need a venue to have fun, make friends and be accepted. Helen Cardillo, a South Fayette High School paraeducator, helped to fill this void by hosting the annual Circle of Friends Mardi Gras Dance at South Fayette (S.F.) High School. With the help of 30 S.F. High School Circle of Friends club members, faculty and community volunteers, the dance included pizza, snacks, beads, masks and prizes for every guest. The Mardi Gras-themed dance floor was also hopping with the best current music from I.M. Entertainment and the talented dance moves of 200 young people. Cardillo has been organizing the Mardi Gras Dance for around 10 years. She came up with the idea after taking her daughter, Tara, to different social events. “We would take our daughter to dances, but there would be people there from age 18 to people into their 60s and 70s,” said Cardillo. “There was a need for something for kids her age.” To make the dance successful, which costs approximately $2,500, monetary contributions, prizes and gift cards from businesses in the community are donated. There is also a sports raffle at the dance and a

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districtwide Penny Challenge which is held each spring. “Besides my current club members, I also have past club members who are now married or in college who return to help out, as well as a dedicated group of staff members from school (current and retired),” said Cardillo. “A few of my fellow paraeducators have been a huge help and also a friend (who will remain nameless so he doesn’t get swamped with requests) comes through for us every year and gets us a really nice prize from the Steelers for our raffle which was a Mike Wallce signed football this year.” There was also a generous donation this year from a special South Fayette neighbor: Pittsburgh Penguin Deryk Engelland. “Deryk Engelland went above and beyond with his donation of his autographed Penguins hockey stick and then signed our hockey stick that we purchased,” Cardillo said. “It was such a nice surprise.” The laughs, smiles and excellent dance moves made all of the hard work worth it. “These kids appreciate it so much, look forward to it and have such a great time,” said Cardillo. “They make me feel so good and give me so much in return.” To learn more about the Mardi Gras Dance and how you can help, please contact Helen Cardillo at cardillo@southfayette.org.

1. Music provided by I.M.Entertainment 2. Jenny and Jessica 3. Sandy Fiumara, Volunteer and S.F. Middle School Nurse and Doris Krobot, Mom and Volunteer 4. Jennifer White and Alissa Barry 5. Fernando Kauffman with Jessie Hannah, volunteer 6. Helen Cardillo, Mardi Gras Dance Organizer with Lexy Quinn and Alec Lucus, volunteers 7. Bridget Rossi and Jenna Beatty 8. Helen Cardillo, Mardi Gras Dance Organizer and daughter, Tara 9. Barb dancing with Max Shahen of PA Connecting Communities

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South Fayette


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South Fayette resident organizes

athletic equipment drive for Haiti

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hrough its youth sporting associations, South Fayette ensures that children in the community have the opportunity to build character and have fun through playing organized sports. The community expanded that opportunity to children in Haiti, thanks to the vision of one grandfather. Ron Miller, who has four grandchildren in South Fayette that participate in youth sports programs, has a special connection to Haiti. For the last 10+ years he has supported an orphaned Haitian boy who is now a young man (Wislet Clairlus) with his education, housing and general well-being. Ron is also a trustee of the Brother’s Brother Foundation (BBF) - a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to promote international health and education, through efficient and effective distribution and provision of donated medical, educational, architectural and other resources. BBF was recently ranked in the top 100 of American’s largest nonprofits by “The Non-Profit Times,” the leading business publication for non-profit management. It also tied for the most efficient among the 200 largest charities in the country, according to Forbes Magazine. After the devastating earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, the needs of the survivors in that country have been tremendous and children have been particularly affected. Through regular communications, Wislet has been able to share with Ron the impact of the destruction on both his life and Haitian life in general. To that end, BBF, Food for the Poor

Marie Clarac “tent” school. 44 724.942.0940 to advertise

South Fayette

Ron Miller and Wislet Clairlus

(FFTP) and the Connecticut Association of Schools (CAS) (students raised more than $160,000 in some cases, one penny at a time), have been working together to build three schools in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In addition to helping finance the construction of these schools, work is also being done to help equip and supply them. To help with this effort, Ron, along with his daughter and son-in-law, Jamie and Bob Sharp, enlisted the South Fayette community - through the youth sporting associations - to improve the lives of Haitian children by providing the schools with athletic equipment. For several months Jamie and Bob collected gently used baseball gloves (21), bats (57), balls (118), basketballs (24), soccer balls (39), etc. (47), from South Fayette athletes and their parents that the Haitian children would be able to enjoy during their free time at school. In early November, Ron traveled to Haiti with members of BBF, FFTP and CAS. The primary purpose of the trip was to view the three school reconstruction projects that the organizations have been


Haitian Children all attend class in uniforms.

If you are interested in supporting BBF’s efforts in Haiti, please donate through Brother’s Brother Foundation at www.brothersbrother.org, or by calling 412-321-3160 or sending donations to: 1200 Galveston Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15233-1604.

funding as well as several hospitals that BBF and FFTP were working jointly to help support. When they arrived, they went directly to the site of the Georges Marc School where they participated in a ground breaking ceremony for the construction of the new school building. The next stop was the Jean Marie Guilloux School, for which the reconstruction is already completed. Nowhere were the challenges of education in Haiti more evident than at the final and third site of their school visits – the Marie Clarac school. Here, teachers and students hold classes every day in tents while they await approvals and permits for the reconstruction of their school. Despite the devastation throughout the city, the order, cleanliness and dedication of the students at the schools was remarkable. For Ron, the trip was far more than just an opportunity to see the impact of support for Haitian education, it was his first chance to finally meet Wislet in person. He was able to spend a lot of time with Wislet, who accompanied the group on several of their outings, including a trip to Rachel’s Village and boat ride. Despite living on an island nation for his entire life, it was Wislet’s first time on a boat! Wislet is an educated,

Haitian school children enjoy donated soccer equipment

well-mannered young man with tremendous potential in a country that lacks opportunity. Rachel Wheeler is an 11 year old girl from Lighthouse Point, Florida who has raised more than $170,000 to build 27 houses for displaced Haitian families. In this village they are taught to raise crops and fish with the hope that they will become self sufficient. Thanks to the efforts of the South Fayette community, Ron took with him to Haiti the warm regards and heart-felt support of a truly blessed community. Luke Hingson, President of BBF stated, “Thanks to the support of so many and with the help of FFTP and CAS, school children in Haiti will have the chance to learn for many years to come.”

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 45


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How to buy

auto insurance If

you are like most people the terms 100/300, full or limited tort, comp & collision deductibles sound like a foreign language. That’s particularly true when they are used in the context of auto insurance. The purpose of this article is to help you understand these terms and to help you answer the questions we all should be asking when determining which auto insurance to buy. There is certainly no shortage of questions regarding which auto insurance to buy: which agent should I choose, which company is best for me, how are they at paying claims, etc. These are all important questions, but whichever agent or company you choose, there are three primary questions that need answers. Those are: 1. What Liability limits do I need? 2. Should I choose Full or Limited Tort coverage? 3. What Comprehensive & Collision deductibles should I choose? Liability Limits The question concerning Liability limits is listed first because it is by far the most important of the three. This decision determines how much your insurance company will pay when you are held responsible for injuries or damages to other people or their property while driving. Typically these limits are stated in terms like $100,000/$300,000/$100,000. The first of these numbers is the amount the insurance company will pay for injuries you cause to each of the other parties involved in the accident. The second number is the most the company will pay for all injuries to other parties, regardless of the number of people injured, and the third is the amount the company will pay for damages to other people’s property. The purpose of this coverage is to keep you from having to pay for other people’s injuries or damages out of your existing assets. So the questions then become: what amount of injuries or damages am I likely to cause and what amount of assets am I trying to protect. The answers to these questions will vary with individual circumstance, but anyone who has recently visited an emergency room with an injured or sick loved one can tell you that expenses mount up quick. We recommend limits of at least $100,000/$300,000/$100,000, with strong consideration for $250,000/$500,000/$100,000. The additional premium for the higher limits is typically relatively small. If the additional premium is of concern you can choose higher Comprehensive & Collision deductibles and use the reduction in these premiums to pay for the higher Liability limits. Thus our catchphrase of “Don’t let a bad day become a bad lifetime.” In other words, better a few more dollars out of pocket now rather than having to liquidate assets because you didn’t have enough insurance to cover all of the injuries or damages.

Deductible Levels Comprehensive coverage pays for, with a few exceptions, any damage to your vehicle other than Collision. The deductibles you choose for Comprehensive & Collision coverage are a function of two things: 1) the highest deductible that would not cause you unacceptable stress on your monthly budget and, 2) how much premium you would save by going to a higher deductible. In the first instance, no one wants to have to pay the deductible in the event of an accident, but the additional premium for a lower deductible is a guaranteed expense whereas the deductible is an expense only if you have an accident. In the second instance, if you can save $100 in premium by raising your deductible from $250 to $500, you will be better off financially unless you have more than one accident over a three year period. You would save $300 in premiums over three years, but only pay $250 if you only have one accident in that three year period. Combining the answers to these three questions with the advice of a personal agent who knows you & your community will allow you to spend your insurance dollars wisely.

Full or Limited Tort Full Tort simply means your right to sue another party for injuries, loss of income, and pain & suffering when you’re involved in an accident is unrestricted. Limited Tort means that you voluntarily surrender or limit your right to sue for pain & suffering (sometimes referred to as non-monetary damages). Opinions on which to choose vary and the decision is ultimately up to each individual, but the important thing to know is that Limited Tort can significantly reduce premiums. This INdustry INsight was written by Scot Teachout, an exclusive agent of Farmers Insurance. Teachout Insurance Agency helps individuals, families and business owners in the South Hills and Greater Pittsburgh protect the things they have worked a lifetime to accumulate. Scot has been serving the insurance needs of his clients for more than thirty years. Contact him at 412-735-8135 or jteachout@farmersagent.com.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 47


South Fayette Township Library 515 Millers Run Rd. / P.O. Box 436 Morgan, PA 15064 412.257.8660 www.southfayettelibrary.org Monday – Thursday: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Friday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday: CLOSED

THROUGH APRIL 5 Share the Wealth - 50/50 Raffle. Support the South Fayette Township Library by purchasing a 50/50 Raffle Ticket. Proceeds will be used to support the operation of the library. Raffle tickets are 1 for $1.00 or 6 for $5.00 and can be purchased at the service desk. There will be 2 prize winners chosen and the winners can choose cash or a gas card. Sponsored by the South Fayette Township Friends of the Library. Raffle will end on April 5, 2012.

THROuGH MAy 7 Children’s Choice Awards. Children in Grades 4-6 can check out some of the best books of 2011, then vote for their favorite at http://www. rcsclubhouse.org/. Copies of the top 8 books are available for checkout at the voting display. This program is sponsored by the Allegheny County Library Association and the Allegheny Intermediate Unit. Look for more Children’s Choice Award activities at the South Fayette Middle School.

THROUGH MAY 31 Online Book Review Contest. Kids and teens in South Fayette can now share book reviews with friends and classmates on the library’s new Online Book Review website. Kids in grades 1-12 can read any book they like, then post their review. Each month, the best review in

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each grade category will be published in the Bridgeville Area News. Start sharing reviews today at http://goo.gl/ DwvoI.

MARCH 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 10:30-11:30 a.m. Preschool Science. Now only $5 per class due to a generous donation from the Friends of the Library. For ages 2-6 years with care-givers. Make the most of your child’s natural instinct to explore and understand their surroundings. All classes have fun and gooey, hands-on science experiments. The instructor shares a book relevant to the class theme. A snack is also provided. Reduced rates are available for prepayments and families with more than one child. To register for all 6 classes, call 412-257-8660. Registration is required.

FRIDAYS, MARCH 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 10:30-11:00 a.m. Tales ‘n Tunes Story Time. For ages 3-5 years with caregivers. We sing songs (with motions), read stories and enjoy ageappropriate art activities. This high-energy program develops language, math, motor and social skills. No registration is required.

SATURDAYS, MARCH 3, 10, 17 & 24 Noon-1:00 p.m. Saturday session added due to popular demand.

MONDAYS, MARCH 5, 12, 19 & 26. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Chess Club. No class on March 31. For children in grades K-8. Beginners and experienced players are welcome. Players receive half-an-hour of play and half-an-hour of strategy instruction from instructor Eric Berthoud. A tournament for both Saturday and Monday sessions will Annual chess tournament winner Swathi Senthil. Other winners were Andy Morneweck, be held on Saturday, April 28 from 1-3 p.m. Nihanth Kotte and Nidhi Vedati. Participants must have attended at least 4 Students: For Parents of Kids sessions between March 3 and Teens. This class will help and April 14 to be eligible parents learn to help their for the Saturday afternoon children be more successful tournament. To register for in school through simple Saturday or Monday sessions, organizing techniques. We will call 412.257.8660. Registration review the 10 most successful is required, as space is limited. steps to organizing your

TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS, MARCH 6, 7, 13, 14, 20, 21, 27 & 28 10:30-11:00 a.m. Mother Goose Story Time. For little ones from birth-3 years and their caregivers. We sing songs, perform finger plays, read books and enjoy flannel board stories. This gentle program develops early language, motor and social skills. No registration is required.

WeDNesDAys, MARCH 7, 14, 21 & 28 6:30-7:30 p.m. E-Reader Dropin Help Sessions. Need help using your new holiday toy? Library staff will be available to guide users in using library resources on e-readers or smart phones. Support available for all e-reader types including Kindles, Nooks, and iPads. Please bring your laptop as well. Call 412-257-8660 for more information.

SATURDAY, MARCH 10 10:30-11:30 a.m. Organizing

South Fayette

student, from how to structure their time to supporting them as they reach their goals.

THURSDAY, MARCH 15 6:30-7:30 p.m. Magic Tree House Club. Mary Pope Osborne’s Magic Tree House series inspires crafts, readings, science experiments, film clips and other adventures for children with a 2nd to 4th grade reading level. This month’s adventures are inspired by Osborne’s Civil War on Sunday. The club meets the 3rd Thursday of each month during the school year. Go to http://www. southfayettelibrary.org, or call 412.257.8660 to register or request books.

TUESDAY, MARCH 20 12:00-1:00 p.m. PALS Book Club. Bring a brown bag lunch and join PALS members for a spirited discussion of Olive A. Burns’ Cold Sassy Tree. Book selections are popular titles recommended by club members and Barnes & Noble Booksellers. This program is


SOUTH FAYETTE EVENTS SOUTH FAYETTE MENS 35 AND OLDER SOFTBALL LEAGUE Opening day is fast approaching and application are being accepted. For more information on the league go to www.sfsoftball35.com.

co-sponsored by the Allegheny County Library Association. Registration is requested, but not required. To register, click on Events at http://www. southfayettelibrary.org or call 412.257.8660. Sign out your book at the beginning of March at the library checkout desk.

MONDAY, MARCH 26 6:30-7:30 p.m. Adult Book Club. Every 4th Monday, book club members have a lively discussion and suggest their favorite books for upcoming sessions. This month’s selection is My Antonia by Willa Cather. Registration is requested, but not required. Go to http:// www.southfayettelibrary. org, or call 412.257.8660 to register or request books.

TuesDAy, MARCH 27 6:30-7:30 p.m. Magic Dragon Club. For children in Grades K-4. Young artists and poets share their favorite artwork and poetry from previous issues of Magic Dragon magazine, then work on their own creations! At the end of the four-month session, students will select their best work and submit it for publication

HICKORY HEIGHTS POOL Bonds are available to join the Hickory Heights Pool for summer of 2012, membership is open to all. Check out www. hickoryheightspool.com for more information on this family friendly pool!

in Magic Dragon magazine. Copies are available at the library, or subscribe at www. magicdragonmagazine.com.

YOUNG WRITERS PROGRAM FOR GRADES 6-8 The Young Writers Program is a fun, no-cost writing program where middle school teens (grades 6-8) who share a passion for writing explore their craft. Teens write novels and scripts, share word-count goals and achievements, and

brainstorm with other writers via online message boards. Brittany Ketter, a seasoned NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) and ScriptFrenzy veteran, guides teens through the Young Writers Program. Participants learn about inciting incidents, character building, plot making, dialogue and also work to improve writing skills, grammar and formatting of novels. Please email Brittany at ketterb@einetwork.net for information on upcoming

online, in-library and Skype sessions.

WRITERS UNLEASHED! HIGH SCHOOL WRITING PROGRAM Writers Unleashed! is a Young Writers Program directed by Brittany Ketter and designed for high school teens who share a passion for writing. At Writers Unleashed! participants learn the art of storytelling, sharpen their writing skills and learn how to create inciting incidents, build strong characters, craft plots and work through dialogue. Participants also write a novel and, if desired, are taken through the publishing process. Please email Brittany at ketterb@einetwork.net for information on upcoming online, in-library and Skype sessions.

BECOME A FRIEND OF THE LIBRARY The Friends of the South Fayette Township Library Group is looking for members. If you’re interested in library advocacy and helping the library provide quality materials and programming, come join us. Pressed for time? You can help a little or a lot, depending on your schedule. Call Friends President, Lois Levi at 412.969.1396. South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 49


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South Fayette


Business Spotlight

HOME DESIGN EXPERTISE

EXPERIENCED NC REMODELING MOD LING AND NEW CONSTRUCTION DESIGN THAT MEETS YOUR NEEDS

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while with an eye on costs. Reid Riggin acknowledges that “people are doing a lot more multitasking today” and that indeed lends itself to designing kitchens and bathrooms that accommodate busy lifestyles.  “Bathrooms can be as expensive to remodel as kitchens” she said, but working with a qualified designer can be the best step you take when considering either.  “Trends come and go” the two acknowledged, but in general terms they help to open up space and use better products and more cost efficient solutions. “We’re very cost conscious with our clients and want them to be happy with our designs at a price they can afford,” Reid Riggin said.  “When the project is completed, our customers are thrilled with their choices.”  The impression that you will receive when you meet Laura and Mary Ann will be the same as when you leave.  For more information, contact Premier Home Design Center at 412-276-5650, or go to www.premierhomedesigncenter.com, to view some of their designs.

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Savor great cuisine We offer a diverse menu of entrees and homemade pastries under the direction of our Professional Chefs.

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our first impression of Laura Reid Riggin and Mary Ann Snyder is that these two women know the home design industry.  They pride themselves on meeting the needs of their customers without breaking the pocketbook.  In fact, Premier Home Design offers style and design that fits all pocketbooks.  Collectively they design kitchens and bathrooms for new homes as well as for existing homes. Premier Home Design Center specializes in home design and remodeling, with particular emphasis on kitchens and bathrooms.  “It’s a process” said Mary Ann, who along with Laura spend countless hours talking with their customers about their wants and needs and making sure the “mechanics” work to fit those needs. Laura and Mary Ann bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to their craft.  Part of that knowledge is presenting designs and products so homeowners can get the most enjoyment out of their homes, and that is where Premier excels.  They know what will work and what can’t and both are certified Interior designers.  “The process is not just conceptual” says Mary Ann.  “It starts as a process, almost an interview to determine the lifestyle and needs of their customers.”  From there it is hands-on combined with the knowledge that these women have of products and design, all the

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CREATING BEAUTIFUL HEALTHY SMILES

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Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics For Children and Adults

Boni Orthodontics is pleased to announce the opening of their newest location at 995 Beaver Grade Road, Moon Township. Traditional Braces, Invisalign & Clear Ceramic Braces available Flexible Hours, Affordable Payment Plans, Most Insurances Accepted FREE CONSULTS • NOW ACCEPTING THE CHIP PROGRAM

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South Fayette


RESIDENT PROFILE

South Fayette Resident Celebrates 100th Birthday

Congratulations to Frances Cardillo, who turned 100 years old on March 3. A native of Cambria County, Cardillo married her husband, Ignatius, in 1931. The couple raised three children, who raised eight grandchildren. Those eight grandchildren raised 12 great-grandchildren, and Cardillo has had the good fortune to see those great-grandchildren raise 10 great-great-grandchildren. Ignatius passed away in 1994. They were married for more than 60 years. Cardillo is now part of an exclusive club of centenarians in the United States estimated to have just over 70,000 members. Worldwide, there are an estimated 450,000 people who have lived to 100.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 53


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Peters Place

Serving Up Excellence for Nearly 30 Years

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ometimes a restaurant has been around for so long, it becomes an institution, and that’s exactly what happened in the case of Peters Place. Started by brothers Bill and Mike Peters more than 25 years ago, Peters Place is a destination restaurant known for its fresh, unique recipes and calm, warm atmosphere. “We’ve always offered good food at a reasonable price,” said Mike Peters. “That’s why we’re still here. We make all our food from scratch with no canned or frozen desserts.” The restaurant’s menu is so good, Peters Place has carved out a niche as the place to go for wedding receptions. “We do more than 50 weddings a year and can hold anywhere from 30 to 300 people in our banquet rooms,” Peters said. “Our wedding packages start at $29.95 per person and include a complete dinner, 4-hour open bar, champagne toasts and custom wedding cake.” If you have your own hall, Peters Place does offsite catering as well. But for everyday lunch and dinner, you can’t go wrong at Peters Place. Open seven days a week at 11 a.m., patrons can get a typical lunch entrée for around $8, and a dinner entrée for around $18. Menu items range from their famous Orange Glazed Salmon, Virginia Spots, Seafood Bisque and Chocolate Mousse Pie, to seasonal favorites such as wintertime Maple Glazed Salmon, Pretzel Crusted Trout, Black and Blue Scallops, and Chicken Ravioli Asiago. “We also do daily specials,” Peters said. “We typically have six lunch specials and six dinner specials every day.” We had the opportunity to sample the Orange Glazed Salmon, which arrived at the table a feast to the eyes as well as the palate. Visually, the pink salmon covered in a thick layer of orange marmalade, was served with a side of fresh, crisp green beans and a strawberry garnish. The salmon was moist, supple and perfectly done. The glaze complemented the salmon and the

green beans for a savory, fruity mix that recalls the fresh bounties of the fall farmers’ markets. To say our chocolate mousse was decadent would be cliché, but very apropos. Fluffy and thick at the same time, the mousse was sweet, but not too sweet, and covered with a blanket of whipped cream streaming with chocolate sauce. This is a dessert that merits a trip to Peters Place on its own. Peters Place and their experienced chefs never hesitate to take on a challenge. So if you like your meal prepared a certain way, just ask and they’ll do their best to accommodate your needs and flavors to your liking. No challenge is too great for their more than 70 years of combined culinary experience. Peters Place is conveniently located at 1199 Washington Pike, just off the I-79 exit before the Great Southern Shopping Center. With plenty of on-site parking, you and your party will never want for a space. The kitchen closes at 9 p.m. weeknights, 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 8 p.m. on Sundays. Peters Place also does off-site catering for showers, anniversaries, corporate events and more. For more information, go to www.Petersplacerestaurant.net, where you can view banquet room design plans, wedding menus and more. Or you can call 412.221.5000 to make reservations, although they are not required. Mt. Lebanon South Fayette || Spring Spring2012 2012||incommunitymagazines.com incommunitymagazines.com 3755


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ecotourism W

Travelling Green Is Easier Than You Think

e all love our vacations when we can get them. But while travelling may mean leaving town for a dream destination, it also means baggage and one the pitfalls that come with it – waste. From “travel-sized” tubes of toothpaste and shampoo bottles to disposable razors and eating utensils, travelers often plan to return home with less than they take in order to make room for souvenirs or to simply lighten their loads., With a little planning, however, one can achieve the same goal while putting less of a burden on the environment. For starters, many discount stores sell empty plastic flip-top containers that are perfect for shampoos and conditioners. Instead of purchasing travel size versions of your favorite products, just get a few of these containers and fill them from products already in your bathroom. Rather than packing disposable razors, consider purchasing an electric razor for travel. Even after years of use, a quality electric razor that’s been properly maintained will still deliver a close shave. If you’re travelling to a major city or tourist destination, public transportation will almost certainly be available. Just like at home, traveling by bus is the most environmentally n o ti a rm fo friendly way of getting around if For more in rism, or u you can’t walk the distance. Most on ecoto cation a v l a port authorities in destination n traditio ll a c , g in n cities have routes to all major n pla vel ra T rs e iv R tourist attractions already in e Thre .5341, 0 6 .2 4 2 7 t a place. If you need a car, many y toda . or visit wwwl.com. major rental companies have ave added flex fuel and electric threeriverstr hybrids to their fleets.

Upon arriving plan a grocery stop. Buying from a grocery store for snacks and drinks is cheaper than eating every meal out. If you’re on the go, packing a few sandwiches can also save you time, avoiding long lines at lunch and dinner time. Your hotel room most likely will have a refrigerator; why not use it? The grocery store also will save you from the enormous mark-up on food items in hotel lobbies, restaurants and room service. Dining out can also be a vacation highlight – no need to eat every meal in the room! If you really want to be an eco-tourist, find local restaurants that reflect the culture of your destination. Local cuisine is part of the experience, so treat yourself, and avoid chainrestaurants until you’re back at home. Eating locally also has ecological advantages; smaller restaurants tend to take advantage of locally grown produce, meats and cheeses. By patronizing these mom-and-pop eateries, you’re not only helping to sustain “mom and pop,” you’re helping the local farmers as well. If you’ve chosen an exotic locale, chances are that there are ecotours available. These unique and exhilarating sojourns are planned around responsible tour routes to preserve the local ecology. They typically hire local employees and guides, and will engage local officials to plan operations to minimize negative impacts on the ecology and social structure. Another advantage to ecotours is that they oftentimes allow unprecedented access to the

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4

eco destinations to consider in

2012

local wildlife, so be sure have your camera ready. The last thing to know about ecotours is that they are educational. Many tours not only point out fauna and wildlife, but will inform you as to what you can do to keep your favorite destination pristine for generations to come. In the end, your vacation is your dream. Whether you’re more comfortable in a hotel room or in a tent in Madagascar, you always have options to minimize your impact during your stay. And by being a conscientious traveler, you also leave the locals with a better opinion of you and the United States as a whole. When it comes to tourism, you’re not just a visitor, you’re an ambassador.

Make 2012 your year to visit an ecofriendly destination with your family. Here are four places where green is good: 1

Oregon. This northwestern haven for all things green is possibly the most eco-conscious state in the nation. With more than 300 miles of stunning coastline preserved as public land, families can visit pristine beaches, bike in two-wheel-friendly cities like Portland and Eugene, and raft on wild and scenic rivers. You can also explore high deserts, farm and wine country and the Columbia River Gorge, all within one grand holiday.

3 Utah. Robert Redford is the eco-

minded force behind this mountain resort that provides a high-altitude lesson in good fun and environmental stewardship. Join guides for a snowshoe trek under the night sky in search of owls. By day, enjoy skiing, hiking, horseback riding, art projects and music. The resort operates on wind power, recycles its own glass and offers organic linens, amenities and vegetables. Carpoolers receive $5 off lift tickets for their energy-saving efforts.

Visit this exotic island to see 2the Borneo. world’s largest flower and to discover 4 St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. sparsely populated beaches, caves, lush jungles and an expansive list of endemic plant species. Trek through the virgin jungle to Mount Kinabalu and explore the Kinabatangang River region. Be on the lookout for wild boars, orangutans, macaques, elephants, kingfishers and proboscis monkeys. Stay in awardwinning eco-lodges featuring solar power, the harvest of rainwater and wildlife rehabilitation efforts.

Follow the underwater trail and enjoy one of the few fully protected marine areas in the world. Run by the National Park Service, the 176-acre island and surrounding coral reef ecosystem form Buck Island Reef National Monument, a nature lover’s paradise. Intensely colored fish and coral thrive in a turquoise sea, providing a visual treat for both novice and experienced snorkelers and divers. The preserve can be reached via half- and full-day charters.

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Finding a “Tom Brady-like” Investment Manager Are there similarities to fantasy football and attempts to ‘beat the market’? By Philip C. Henry

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re you a fantasy football fan? This virtual competition enables one to create a team by compiling star players from varying teams. Trades may be made during the season to attempt to bolster ones roster and improve their standings. A critical aspect in fantasy football is to select players that should do well, before they do! I have never indulged in this harmless activity for the simple fact that I cannot bring myself to select and then root for any player whose good performance could undermine my beloved Steelers. For example, I have followed with much interest in 2011, the success of Denver’s polarizing quarterback (QB), Tim Tebow. (Please know, Steeler Nation, that my admiration for Tebow was put on hold during the recent 1-8-12 Steelers playoff loss…to the Broncos!) Most fantasy footballers would have loved to draft all-pro Peyton Manning, QB of the Indianapolis Colts, for their 2011 roster. Yet who could have predicted that a neck injury would sideline him for the entire season, unfortunately, wrecking their fantasy team! Finally to Tom Brady of the New England Patriots (there is an investment principle forthcoming). Up to the 2011 season, he has led his team to three Super Bowl championships thus far, which is the most of any current QB. Surely you would want him as your signal caller for your fantasy team, right? Can fantasy football relate at all to investing? Sure it can, since I believe many investors competitively attempt to “beat the market” using asset managers touting good past performance, with the belief that said managers will continue to do well going forward. Yet the odds seemingly are stacked against the investor choosing an investment manager to generate higher returns through active management (i.e. frequent buying and selling) compared to simply and passively investing into the overall, broad-based markets. In my opinion, fantasy footballers, like fantasy investors, often choose “Tom Brady-like” managers, with past performance that has exceeded market returns for some time period. Yet if and when that manager does not perform well going forward, many fantasy investors shout “boo” and look to replace their once revered manager! To be fair, there will be active money managers who deliver above market performance. The problem is, you cannot predict, nor is there a guarantee, that their ‘winning streak’ will continue on into the future. Statistics show that in any given year, upwards of 2/3 of active managers do not outperform the passive, index benchmarks that they are measured against.* To rely on your ability, much like the fantasy footballer, to select and maneuver among active money managers, thinking that you can consistently “beat the market”, instead of simply pursuing an asset allocation1-based strategy and passive management, which attempts to closely track market returns, then in my opinion, you must also believe: • That financial markets are not efficient and stocks are often mispriced. • That successful, active stock managers exist and will continue to demonstrate their superiority in terms of identifying mispriced stocks and timely buying underpriced and selling overpriced ones. • That you are able to identify these Tom Brady-like managers and/or discover future stars in advance, while also knowing when to trade them. Since the odds are against selecting and switching managers optimally, we adhere to the belief that the foundation and majority of one’s portfolio should

be allocated via a passive, diversified1, long-term strategy. That’s our reality, which we wholeheartedly believe, trumps fantasy! (Please note of course, that this article is intended for general information only. For specific investment advice tailored to your individual situation, I recommend that you consult your financial, legal or tax advisor). Source: Symmetry, Active vs. Passive Study, 5-17-11 1

Using asset allocation and diversification as part of your investment strategy neither assures nor guarantees

better performance and cannot protect against loss of principal due to changing market conditions. Phil Henry, ChFC, CFS, is the President of Henry Wealth Management, LLC, an independent financial services firm located at 1370 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA. He offers Securities and Investment-Advisory Services through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. This article was co-authored with Dan Henry, CLU, the firms Vice President. Dan offers Securities through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/ SIPC. NFP Securities, Inc. is not affiliated with Henry Wealth Management, LLC. Phil may be reached at 412-838-0200 or through email at Phil@HenryWealth.com. The firm’s website is www.HenryWealth.com. The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those held by NFP Securities, Inc. This is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendation. NFP Securities, Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice. Using diversification as part of your investment strategy neither assures nor guarantees better performance and cannot protect against loss of principal due to changing market conditions. Past Performance does not guarantee future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a popular indicator of the stock market based on the average closing prices of 30 active U.S. stocks representative of the overall economy.

South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 61


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“THERE ARE ONLY TWO OPTIONS REGARDING COMMITMENT. YOU’RE EITHER IN OR OUT. THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS LIFE IN BETWEEN.” PAT RILEY

Shared-Time

Personal Training Couples Who Train Together, Maintain Together

By Lisa Troyer Life is busy. It’s challenging enough to carve away time to spend with your significant other, let alone to make time for exercise. Why not kill 2 birds with one stone? Why not make the quality time that you spend with each other doing something that will make you feel healthy, fit and energized? Sharing time with a trainer, via couple’s personal training, could enrich and make your relationship stronger. Exercising together is a fantastic way to enjoy some extra time together and will put you both on the path to a healthier lifestyle. The buddy-system is nothing new to a successful exercise program. Your odds of staying committed to your program increase significantly. And when the buddy-system includes a personal trainer, the odds of being 100% successful are huge. You are now accountable to 2 people. Once you are committed to a couple’s personal training program, establishing fitness as a shared priority becomes a common goal. Whether you’re already active or completely new to exercise, your trainer will develop an exercise program specific for each individual’s needs. Even though you are working out together, a good trainer will tailor the workout appropriately for both of you. Whatever is going on in your life would be taken into account to create a realistic and sustainable plan to ultimately achieve your goals. Research shows that for better or for worse, in sickness and in health – the person that you share your life with has a huge influence on the lifestyle you lead. You will definitely experience an enriched relationship when you support one another’s fitness efforts. Because you are exercising side by side, you will gain a whole new insight into each other’s strengths and weaknesses and you will learn how to offer support. Working out together will increase more than just your fitness levels. You will experience a higher level of relationship satisfaction. You will have something new to talk about, laugh about and to This INdustry INsight was written by Lisa Troyer. Lisa has been in the fitness industry for more than 17 years and is the owner of Fitness Fanatics in the Great Southern Shopping Center. She currently holds four nationally recognized fitness and personal training certifications and can be reached at 412.220.4190, ext. 3 or at fitnessfanatics@verizon.net. Check out www.fitnessfanaticsinc.com for more great fitness tips.

take pride in…together. I certainly do not profess to be a relationship guru in any sense, but I speak from experience from the many couples that I am fortunate enough to work with in my own business. Most of them are quite the competitors, which elevates the fire in their cores and challenges them to push themselves even harder than they would if they were working out on their own. Share this wonderful experience.… reconnect, improve your body image, your mood and your love life. Best of all, “shared-time” training won’t put a complete strain

on your budget as most facilities offer special rates. Certainly a fraction of the cost of a therapist…ha!

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South Fayette | Spring 2012 | incommunitymagazines.com 63


Statewide Roadside Cleanup Planned, Volunteers Needed

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ennDOT is seeking volunteers for this year’s Great American Cleanup of Pennsylvania, which begins March 1 and runs through May 31. “Cleanup events like this have been a great success in improving the quality of life for Pennsylvanians by creating

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cleaner roadsides and communities,” said Secretary Barry Schoch. “Many dedicated residents return year after year to show their support, and I encourage more Pennsylvanians to show pride in our state through these great opportunities.” Interested volunteers can find a listing of cleanup events, resources for organizing a cleanup group and other

information at www.gacofpa.org. Many of PennDOT’s 7,100 Adopt-AHighway groups, who collect trash yearround, also join in this event. Visit www. dot.state.pa.us and click on “PennDOT near you” for the phone number of the nearest PennDOT District Office to sign up for Adopt-A-Highway. Last year, more than 159,000 volunteers collected 7 million pounds

of trash from 13,140 miles of roads, trails and shorelines during the Great American Cleanup of Pennsylvania. Additionally, PennDOT’s Adopt-AHighway volunteers picked up more than 3.5 million pounds of trash along more than 10,000 miles of roadway during the cleanup event last year. PennDOT provides gloves, trash bags and safety vests to cleanup volunteers.

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