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blooming s ummer Yard-lovers should not apply crab grass control if they plan to re-seed the lawn, because crab grass control will kill a lawn.

Mulching, Pruning & Fertilizing In spring, homeowners also should start to fertilize their lawns with a fertilizer of high potassium content, for healthy root development. This should be done in early May, Girty said. Girty and Viglio both recommend using the widely popular fertilizer Milorganite. It’s an organic fertilizer with a high potassium content (for root development), and a lot of nitrogen for good green color. Girty said it’s crucial to fertilize new lawns and lawns comprised of freshly installed sod. “They’ll check out without the help,” he said. In preparation for the bursts of seasonal color that happen in Spring, homeowners should pay attention to their flowerbeds, which may look bedraggled from winter. usually, Viglio edges flowerbeds for his clients in springtime. It’s one way that he works to clean up the contours of yards. he also mulches flowerbeds at that time, because his clients prefer that he do so and because spreading a fresh layer of mulch over the beds brings back the color in those beds and spruces up planting areas. Mulching also controls the weeds in the flowerbeds and helps to retain moisture. Standard mulch is double-shredded hardwood bark, and usually goes for $15-$25 per yard, picked up. Triple-shredded mulch runs $18$30 or more per yard. Dyed mulch costs even more, but since it is chunkier, it retains its color and can last two or three years. Dugan shies from the brighter-colored mulches. “Anything in the outdoors should be subtle,” he said. Trees and shrubs in the yard should be inspected for damage, with dead growth and “dieback” parts of the plant removed. roses, which are pruned in fall, also are pruned in spring because they usually have winter dieback. That pruning will ensure that the bush grows properly and looks good as it’s blooming. With rhododendrons, azaleas and other spring-blooming broadleaf perennial bushes, there is a six-week window after blooming during which these plants can be cut back. Pruning these bushes later will result in decreased blooms later in the yard, or worse yet—no blossoms at all. “You can’t see the flower buds, but you’re cutting them off,” Dugan said. Spring 2010 | IN Fox Chapel Area |

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IN Fox Chapel Area Spring 2010  

IN Fox Chapel Area Spring 2010

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