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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/6/11 9:13 AM Page C1

FALL 2011

hartiers Valley

Woodville Plantation

SERVING THE RESIDENTS OF BRIDGEVILLE, COLLIER, HEIDELBERG AND SCOTT


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Thank you, Pittsburgh. At UPMC Health Plan, we don’t set out to win awards. We simply focus on doing what’s right for our members. Like providing them with access to world-renowned UPMC doctors and hospitals as well as outstanding community hospitals and physicians. Giving them the tools and programs they need to live a healthy lifestyle. And offering them a personal Health Care Concierge and online chat capabilities to answer all of their questions. So when J.D. Power and Associates ranked us Highest in Member Satisfaction among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania, we don’t see it as adding another award to the trophy case. We see it as doing our jobs.To learn more visit upmchealthplan.com.

“Highest Member Satisfaction Among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania” UPMC Health Plan received the highest numerical score among commercial health plans in Pennsylvania in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 U.S. Member Health Insurance Plan StudySM . Study based on 33,039 total member responses, measuring 11 plans in the Pennsylvania-Delaware Region (excludes Medicare and Medicaid). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of members surveyed December 2010-January 2011. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.


         

Thank you, Pittsburgh. At UPMC Health Plan, we don’t set out to win awards. We simply focus on doing what’s right for our members. Like providing them with access to world-renowned UPMC doctors and hospitals as well as outstanding community hospitals and physicians. Giving them the tools and programs they need to live a healthy lifestyle. And offering them a personal Health Care Concierge and online chat capabilities to answer all of their questions. So when J.D. Power and Associates ranked us Highest in Member Satisfaction among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania, we don’t see it as adding another award to the trophy case. We see it as doing our jobs.To learn more visit upmchealthplan.com.

“Highest Member Satisfaction Among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania” UPMC Health Plan received the highest numerical score among commercial health plans in Pennsylvania in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 U.S. Member Health Insurance Plan StudySM . Study based on 33,039 total member responses, measuring 11 plans in the Pennsylvania-Delaware Region (excludes Medicare and Medicaid). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of members surveyed December 2010-January 2011. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.


         

Thank you, Pittsburgh. At UPMC Health Plan, we don’t set out to win awards. We simply focus on doing what’s right for our members. Like providing them with access to world-renowned UPMC doctors and hospitals as well as outstanding community hospitals and physicians. Giving them the tools and programs they need to live a healthy lifestyle. And offering them a personal Health Care Concierge and online chat capabilities to answer all of their questions. So when J.D. Power and Associates ranked us Highest in Member Satisfaction among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania, we don’t see it as adding another award to the trophy case. We see it as doing our jobs.To learn more visit upmchealthplan.com.

“Highest Member Satisfaction Among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania” UPMC Health Plan received the highest numerical score among commercial health plans in Pennsylvania in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 U.S. Member Health Insurance Plan StudySM . Study based on 33,039 total member responses, measuring 11 plans in the Pennsylvania-Delaware Region (excludes Medicare and Medicaid). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of members surveyed December 2010-January 2011. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.


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hartiers Valley FALL 2011

Welcome to the Fall issue of Chartiers Valley Magazine. As the summer winds down, and the kids get ready to go back to school, I sincerely hope that you and your family had some time to get away from it all and relax. It seems that these days, parents driving the family taxi, and kids with their sports/lessons/parties rarely get a chance to enjoy the slow pace of an ever more elusive “lazy summer.” Ask yourself – when was the last time everyone ate together around a family table? When did everyone gather to play a board game? Does anyone remember board games? If your answer was “That one night that the power went out,” then you might be trapped in the 21st Century jail of hyper-life. (I made that term up, but I can do that – I’m the publisher.) I’m not an old guy, unless you ask my kids, but I think that life should be simpler. Moms, dads, brothers, sisters, should all try to spend some time with each other as a family more than that one night when the power goes out. Family time is an important part of being a community. And every community should value quality time with their families – it’s how we teach our children values, etiquette, and more importantly, how to participate in a family structure so they can pass on to their kids what you worked so hard to build. Recently, I saw a commercial where a father shut off the main power to the house so that the family could enjoy dinner together and blamed the outage on a thunderstorm. The Xboxes were dead. The Facebook was closed. The kids came downstairs in disillusionment to ask what happened. While the commercial was pushing some tasty dinner product, the message was more palatable – you have to make family time. I would take that message one step further – you have to make family time a priority. I hope that it’s one of yours.  Have a great Fall!

Wayne Dollard

FROM THE EDITOR While my boss waxes poetic about family time, I’d like to address something along a similar line – neighbors, or your family outside of your family. My wife and I recently bought a house and moved from the one-bedroom condo that I had lived in for nearly 10 years. While it was good for a bachelor, it quickly became small for a married couple looking to start a family. During those years in the condo, I shared a building with nine other neighbors, most of whom were friendly and good-natured people like Don who lived across the hall from me. Don enjoyed going to the high school football games on Friday nights, watching the races at the racetrack in Imperial and fishing. More often than not, he would bring over a couple of extra fillets that I would season up and devour. He had a nephew that re-shafted golf clubs as a hobby and gladly delivered my broken clubs to him for repair at a more than reasonable price. Then there were some cranky people who just looked out for themselves. They would gawk from their windows into the parking lot to see who was walking by or what was going on, convinced that they were up to no good; would complain about everything from the height of the grass to the paint job on somebody’s car; and really never knew what it was to be part of a community where other people also had a voice and an opinion. Sure, Don would complain if the stock market was down or the price of gas was up, but he never complained that someone left their holiday decorations up a few days longer than everyone else or that the community dues were going up because natural gas was rising and landscapers won’t work for free. He knew how to be a neighbor, and I appreciate that. Now we have new neighbors. All of which are friendly and what every new couple hopes for when they move into a new neighborhood. We hope that we can be the same to them. Because in the end, I didn’t consider Don just a neighbor, I considered him a friend and friends are what neighbors can eventually turn into if you let it. Don asked us when we were selling our condo to sell it to a “pretty, young blonde.” I couldn’t come through for him, but Don – I’m still looking for you, buddy. Don’t lose hope! Mark Berton

IN CHARTIERS VALLEY is a community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Chartiers Valley area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. PUBLISHER

Wayne Dollard M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

Marybeth Jeffries marybeth@incommunitymagazines.com R E G I O N A L E D I TO R

Mark Berton mark@incommunitymagazines.com O F F I C E M A N AG E R

Leo Vighetti leo@incommunitymagazines.com WRITERS

Pamela Palongue GRAPHIC DESIGN

Cassie Brkich Anna Buzzelli Sharon Cobb Susie Doak

Jan McEvoy Joe Milne Gail Murray Tamara Tylenda

A DV E RT I S I N G S A L E S

Derek Bayer Brian Daley Gina D’Alicandro Tina Dollard Rose Estes John Gartley Jason Huffman Lori Jeffries Rita Lengvarsky Connie McDaniel

Brian McKee Tamara Myers Gabriel Negri Robert Ojeda Annette Petrone Vincent Sabatini Michael Silvert RJ Vighetti Nikki CapezioWatson

P H OTO G R A P H E R S

Brad Lauer Gary Yon This magazine is carrier route mailed to all district households and businesses. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Copyright 2011. CORRESPONDENCE All inquiries, comments and press releases should be directed to: IN Community Magazines Attn: Editorial 603 East McMurray Road McMurray, PA 15317 Ph: 724.942.0940 Fax: 724.942.0968

Fall content deadline:11/11/11 www.incommunitymagazines.com

PS – If you have an exceptional neighbor you think we should profile, drop me a line at mark@incommunitymagazines.com. There are more Don’s out there who deserve to be recognized.

2 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.


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Contents Chartiers Valley | FALL 2011 |

6

28 COMMUNITY INTEREST

|

Chartiers Valley School District Collier Township

|

18

37 |

6

13

Bridgeville Public Library

|

Celebrating the Official Grand Opening | 28

Real Estate

|

Fall Landscaping Ideas | 30 FEATURES

|

Raceway Predecessor Applies For Historic Status

|

Circus and Raceway Connection could Lead to Historic Marker | 18

Woodville Hosts Whiskey Rebellion Weekend Heartland Homes | 32 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic

|

22

Superbowl Star Hosts Celebrity Gala in Support of UPMC | 37 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

|

Beinhauer Family Services Sports Clips

|

|

25

27

Chyten Educational Services

|

39

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

|

Investment Policy After Debt Crisis Henry Wealth Management | 21 Premier Home Designs What’s Hot in the Kitchen | 34 Fitness Fanatics | 36 Bridgeville Animal Clinic | 40

ON THE COVER

|

Woodville “Whiskey Rebellion” Weekend Visitors witnessed historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 3


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4 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:26 AM Page 5

2011/2012 PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES NOW AVAILABLE.

Sponsor an upcoming Chamber program or event for increased visibility and company recognition. Sponsorship levels are available to fit every business budget!

2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS HELEN WYLIE, President Development Dimensions International, Inc.

RICHARD A. KASMER, Vice President

SAVE THE DATE

Kasmer Engineering & Surveying

Sip and Stroll

GEORGE MACINO, Treasurer G & S Signs

A Tasting of International Wines & Elegant Edibles

October 13, 2011

PAUL BONOSKY, Corporate Secretary Achieva/Parc-Way Industries

LISA BAK Horizon Hospitality/Homewood Suites

Live Music, Gourmet Cuisine, Wines, Cash Bar

KELLY HANNA

ALL WELCOME!

KEYGroup

A portion of the proceeds benefit the Chamber Foundation Education and Outreach Programs.

MARCY REID SECON Corporation

MATT SERAKOWSKI Township of Upper St. Clair

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

ED SICKMUND

Join us for these and other upcoming programs sponsored by the South West Communities Chamber of Commerce

MyWay Mobile Storage

STEPHEN M. TABONE

2011 September October December

Beaconsfield Financial Services

Lunch With Your Legislators

KAREN ZATTA-MARTIN

37th Annual Celebration

Blanc Printing Company

Annual Holiday Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood (Always a Sellout!)

EMERALD VANBUSKIRK, Executive Director

2012 January March April

BARBARA M. ZINGER, Administrative Assistant

2012 Economic Forecast Luncheon Community Outlook 2012 – Lunch with Your Municipal Managers

Please visit our website at

Annual Staff Appreciation Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood

Visit our Website www.swccoc.org “Calendar of Events” or call 412-221-4100 for details, additional program listings and sponsorship opportunities. Non-Members Always Welcome!

www.swccoc.org

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 5


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chartiers valley school district You’re invited to experience

International fiddlers perform at Chartiers Valley HS September 25, 2011 Barrage is a high-octane fiddle-fest that features an international, multi-talented cast performing an eclectic mix of music, song and dance. The cast of Barrage features: six violinists/vocalists, one drummer, one bass player, and a guitarist. These shows are part of the Barrage Educational Outreach Program to inspire and excite young string players (and future string players) particularly in the school system. Barrage performances offer up a diverse fusion of cultures, musical styles and incredible performance vitality. The music of Barrage continues to evolve - combining contemporary world music influences, layered vocal arrangements and pulsating modern beats and rhythms. The cast delivers the show with amazing energy and musical virtuosity that will take your breath away.

Order Barrage Tickets:

Since its creation in Calgary, Canada in 1996, Barrage has been featured many times at events worldwide having played for many Presidents, Prime Ministers and Princes. Barrage has also had their television productions aired on several international TV networks including the PBS network in the USA, the BBC in the UK and CBC in Canada and has performed live shows in New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, China, Canada, Finland, Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Poland, Germany, Norway, Monaco, the USA and the UK.

Type

number of tickets

cost/ ticket

total

Adult

___________@ $15.00 = _______

Please Print:

chartiers valley school district

Name____________________________________

Student/Senior ______@ $10.00 = _______

Address__________________________________ Phone____________________________________

Grand Total = _____ Paid by check # _______

Please return this order form and a check or cash to Paid by cash _______ Chartiers Valley High School Attn: Sally Shollenberger 50 Thoms Run Road Bridgeville, PA 15017 by Monday, September 19. Make checks payable to CVOJBB. We will call you to confirm your order and hold tickets at the will-call desk the day of the performance.

PUBLIC NOTICE EXCLUSIVE COMPETITIVE FOOD VENDING CONTRACT The Board of School Directors of the Chartiers Valley School District is considering entering into an Exclusive Competitive Food Vending Contract with The Nutrition Group. Board action is scheduled on the proposed contract at the regularly-scheduled Board Meeting on October 25, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. The Meeting will be held at the District Assembly Room located at the District Administrative Offices at 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15220. The Public School Code (24 P.S. § 5-504.1) provides that the School

6 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS UNIQUE MUSICAL GROUP, CHECK OUT THEIR WEBSITE AT WWW.BARRAGE.ORG. BARRAGE WILL BE APPEARING AT THE CHARTIERS VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 50 THOMS RUN ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M. TICKETS: $15.00 ADULTS AND $10.00 STUDENTS/SENIORS

District “shall not enter into an exclusive competitive food or beverage contract unless the board of school directors provides reasonable public notice or holds a public hearing about the contract.” If any member of the public desires to comment on the proposed food vending contract with The Nutrition Group, public comment will be received by the School Board at their October 25, 2011 Meeting prior to Board action on the contract. To provide public comment, you should attend the October 25, 2011 Board Meeting, request the opportunity to speak during the public comment portion of the meeting and your comments will be received. If you have any questions regarding the proposed food vending contract or the process to provide public comment, you may contact School Board Secretary, Nicholas D. Morelli at telephone number 412-429-2204 or by e-mail to nmorelli@cvsd.net.


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chartiers valley school district Student Accident Insurance The Chartiers Valley Board of School Directors has voted to approve a Voluntary Student Accident Insurance Coverage program for the 2011-2012 school year. This insurance coverage is provided for students whose families do not have medical coverage or have medical coverage with a high deductible. Students who are injured at school are typically not covered by the school district’s liability insurance policy. Therefore, the family is financially responsible for all medical costs incurred. The Chartiers Valley School District realizes that spiraling health care costs have forced many families to choose health insurance programs with significant deductibles. To help minimize the financial burden of high deductibles or nonexistent medical coverage for district students, CVSD offers Student Accident Insurance Protection through Ace American Insurance Company – as administered by American Management Advisors - at a nominal fee. Two options are available: 24-hour coverage for $98.00 annually; or school-hours-only coverage for $27.00 annually. If you are interested in exploring Student Accident Insurance Protection in greater detail, contract your child’s building principal or visit the business office page of district’s web site (www.cvsd.net) and click on the link for Student Accident Insurance under Content.

Plans are well underway in the CV School District to create the Chartiers Valley Educational Foundation. The Foundation is a notfor-profit tax exempt entity designed to provide financial support for special initiatives in the district grades K-12. Examples of these endeavors could be scholarships, mini-grants for special classroom projects, sponsorship of speakers or seminars or any other specific activity that will enhance student education. Once a student or a teacher has submitted an application for funds, an independent panel will review each application and select a recipient. Several months ago our superintendent, Dr. White, asked the School Board for the names of people who may be interested in serving on the Foundation Board. The current members include Patti Figorski, Missy Holland, Russ Grunebach, Ken LaSota, and Julie Murphy. At the June meeting, Patti Figorski and Missy Holland were elected President and Vice President respectively. Pam Poletti serves as the liaison to the School Board and is not a voting member of the Foundation. While this project is in its infancy stages, by-laws have been established and the application for not-for-profit status has been completed. In September the Foundation will begin to solicit funds and disseminate information on the application process for both students and faculty. If you are interested in making a contribution the Foundation, please contact Dr. White’s office at 412-429-2202 for details.

Board of Directors Beth McIntyre, President - 412.429.9242 Debra Rice, Vice President - 412.722.8021 Jeff Choura - 412.221.7704 Patti Figorski - 412.279.9030 Patricia Frey - 412.279.1439 Bridget Kelly - 412.319.7934 Herb Ohliger - 412.759.0682 Mary Lou Petronsky - 412.221.7492 Pam Poletti - 412.429.8717

Central Administration

Brian White, Ed.D Superintendent Yvonne Hawkins, Ed.D Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum Scott Seltzer Asst. Superintendent for School Leadership Nicholas D. Morelli Director of Finance and Support Operations/Board Secretary Robert Gold Director of Facilities Arthur Turner Asst. Director of Facilities Lynne Dunnick Director of Student Services Michael Mazzeo Director of Transportation Please direct news items or questions to the public relations office at 412.429.2234. Your input is greatly appreciated! Questions regarding taxes should be directed to your municipality: Bridgeville, 412.221.6055; Collier, 412.276.5277; Heidelberg, 412.276.5413; Scott, 412.276.5302. Delinquent tax questions should be directed to Maiello, Brungo and Maiello at 412.242.9615. The Board will hold Workshop and Regular meetings on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at 7 p.m. in the District Assembly Room at the Administrative Offices, 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220. The Board may take action or conduct business for any particular or general purpose at any of these meetings. Additional special or committee meetings will be called and advertised as needed. It is the policy of Chartiers Valley School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, marital or parental status, national origin, age, or handicap in its educational and vocational programs, activities or employment as required by Title IX, Section 504 and Title VI.

chartiers valley school district

Creation of Foundation in progress

Published by the Chartiers Valley School District for the residents of Bridgeville Borough, Collier Township, Heidelberg Borough and Scott Township.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 7


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Real Estate Tax Millage Rates

chartiers valley school district

SCHOOL DISTRICT

TAX MILLAGE RATE

Wilkinsburg Borough Brentwood Borough Northgate Clairton City East Allegheny Mt. Lebanon Deer Lakes South Park Woodland Hills Shaler Area Sto-Rox South Fayette Twp. Penn Hills Bethel Park Highlands Carlynton Cornell Steel Valley Riverview Upper St. Clair Twp. Elizabeth Forward Allegheny Valley Baldwin-Whitehall West Mifflin Area Plum Borough Keystone Oaks West Allegheny Pine-Richland Moon Area Fox Chapel Area Duquesne City West Jefferson Hills Gateway Hampton Township Quaker Valley Avonworth North Hills CHARTIERS VALLEY North Allegheny Montour South Allegheny McKeesport Area

35.000 28.270 27.600 27.600 27.540 26.630 26.250 25.990 25.650 25.630 25.000 24.880 24.810 24.560 24.41 24.150 24.110 24.070 24.050 23.770 23.760 23.460 23.400 22.992 22.200 22.030 22.000 21.908 21.300 21.260 21.100 21.080 21.020 20.880 20.700 20.000 19.910 19.880 19.740 18.900 18.110 16.710

AVERAGE

23.388

8 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

Veterans Day Invitation All area veterans are invited to attend Chartiers Valley High School’s 8th Annual Veterans Day Flag Raising Ceremony and Luncheon on Friday, November 11. The school’s entire student body and faculty will gather at the flag pole in front of the building at 10:10 a.m. to honor veterans in attendance. Veterans are asked to arrive at the school by 9:50 a.m. Parking spots will be reserved near the site of the ceremony. For additional information or to confirm attendance, veterans may contact the public relations office at 412-429-2234.

CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT Summary of Finance-Revenues and Expenditures 2011-12 Budget REVENUES 6000 Local Sources 7000 State Sources 8000 Federal Sources

$ $ $

38,866,394 10,295,882 680,000

TOTAL REVENUES

$

49,842,276

EXPENDITURES Regular Education Special Education Vocational Education Other Instruction Non-Pupil Pupil Personnel Instructional Staff Administration Pupil Health Business Office Facility Operations Transportation Central Office Other Services-AIU Student Services Community Services Building Improvements Financing & Reserves

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

19,749,501 5,556,242 652,825 183,799 25,000 1,561,469 1,200,864 3,931,435 252,916 644,682 5,334,735 4,037,985 42,100 135,000 1,575,723 33,000 25,000 4,900,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

49,842,276


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:26 AM Page 9

Chartiers Valley School District Calendar 2011-2012

July 11 Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

August 11 Su M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

Tu 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

Th 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

Sa 6 13 20 27

September 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24

October 11

November 11 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

F 2 9 16 23 30

3rd - March 22 4th - June 5

Snow Make-Up: #1 - Feb. 17 #2 - June 6 #3 - June 7 #4 - June 8 Board Approved: 3-22-11

December 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

End of Report Period: 1st.-Oct. 28 2nd - Jan. 13

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

Teachers' Inservice Day - No Students No Students at Certain Grade Levels - Act 80 2 Hour Delay for Students - Act 80 Teacher Meetings 1/2 Student Day

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24 31

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

February 12 Su M Tu W Th F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29

Sa 4 11 18 25

March 12 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

April 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

May 12 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24 31

June 12

New Teachers' Induction - No Students

No School

January 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

chartiers valley school district

Su M Tu W Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

AUGUST 17-19 New Teachers' Induction 22-24 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 25 FIRST STUDENT DAY 25-31 Kindergarten only-1/2 day-Act 80 SEPTEMBER 5 LABOR DAY – No School 28 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings OCTOBER 10 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students 31 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students NOVEMBER 8 District Conference Day-Act 80 – No Students 24-28 THANKSGIVING RECESS – No School DECEMBER 13 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 23-30 WINTER RECESS – No School JANUARY 2 WINTER RECESS – No School 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day-Teachers’ Inservice-No Students FEBRUARY 6 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 17 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 20 PRESIDENTS’ DAY – No School MARCH 2 District Conference Day - Act 80-No Students 23 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students APRIL 4 No school for Gr. K-5 only-Act 80-Parent Conferences 5-9 SPRING RECESS –No School MAY 18 SCHOOL PICNIC-No School 21 Two Hr. Delay for all Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 22 No School Grades 6-12 only-Act 80 28 MEMORIAL DAY Observed-No School JUNE 5 LAST STUDENT DAY-1/2 day 6 Teachers’ Inservice Day 7 Teachers' Inservice Day 7 Graduation 8 Teachers' Inservice Day

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 9


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NOTICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES AND PROGRAMS CHILD FIND AND ANNUAL NOTICE TO PARENTS In compliance with state and federal law, the district will provide to each protected handicapped student without discrimination or cost to the student or family, those related aids, services or accommodations which are needed to provide equal opportunity to participate in and obtain the benefits of the school program and extracurricular activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student’s abilities. In order to qualify as a protected handicapped student the child must be of school age with a physical or mental disability, which substantially limits or prohibits participation in or access to an aspect of the school program. These services and protections for “protected handicapped students” are distinct from those applicable to all eligible or exceptional students enrolled (or seeking enrollment) in special education programs. For further information on the evaluation procedures and provision of services to protected handicapped students or eligible students, contact: Lynne M. Dunnick, M.Ed. Chartiers Valley School District Director of Student Services 2030 Swallow Hill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Phone 412.429.2638 Fax: 412.429.2286 The school district, along with other public agencies in the Commonwealth, must establish and implement procedures to identify, locate and evaluate all children who need special education programs and services because of the child’s disability. This notice is to help find these children, offer assistance to parents and describe the parent’s rights with regard to confidentiality of information that will be obtained during the process. The school district shall also conduct awareness activities to inform the public of gifted education services and programs and the manner by which to request these services and programs. The content of this notice has been written in English. If a person does not understand any of this notice, he or she should contact the school district (see contacts) and request an explanation.

chartiers valley school district

IDENTIFICATION ACTIVITY Child Find refers to activities undertaken by public education agencies to identify, locate, and evaluate children residing in the State, including children attending private schools, who are suspected of having disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disability, and determine the child’s need for special education and related services. The purpose is to locate these children so that a free appropriate public education (FAPE) can be made available. The types of disabilities, that if found to cause a child to need services are: Autism, deafblindness, deafness, emotional disturbance, hearing impairment, mental retardation, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment due to chronic or acute health problems, specific learning disabilities (speech or language), traumatic brain injury and visual impairment including blindness, in the case of a child that is of preschool age developmental delay. Screening activities are also conducted to determine student need for gifted support services. The school district provides educational services for all eligible students either through district- operated classes, contracts with Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3, or approved private schools. Classes providing Learning Support, Life-Skills Support, Emotional Support, Physical Support, Multiple Disabilities Support, and Autistic Support are available for students at beginning school age through age 21, if necessary. Additional services include hearing, vision, and speech and language support. Students found to meet eligibility criteria as "mentally gifted" may receive services through district's Gifted Support programs. Each school district is required to annually provide notice describing the identification activities and the procedures followed to ensure confidentiality of personally identifiable information. This notice is intended to meet this requirement. Identification activities are performed to find a child who is suspected as having a disability that would interfere with his or her learning unless special education programs and services are made available. Children suspected of

10 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

being "mentally gifted" who need specially designed instruction not ordinarily provided in the regular education program also go through screening activities. The activities include: Review of group data, conduct hearing and vision screening, assessment of student’s academic functioning, observation of the student displaying difficulty in behavior and determining the student’s response to attempted remediation. Input from parents is also an information source for identification. After a child is identified as a suspected child with a disability, he or she is evaluated, but is not evaluated before parents give permission for their child to be evaluated. The school district will follow procedures outlined in the special education regulations (Chapter 14) for determining eligibility and need for special education services. Chapter 16 regulations will be followed to determine eligibility and need for Gifted Support services. CONFIDENTIALITY (CFR 300.127) If after screening, a disability is suspected, upon your permission, your child will be evaluated. Written records of the results are called an education record, which are directly related to your child and are maintained by the school districts. These records are personally identifiable to your child. Personally identifiable information includes the child’s name, the name of the child’s parents or other family member, the address of the child or their family, a personal identifier such as social security number, a list of characteristics that would make the child’s identity easily traceable or other information that would make the child’s identity easily traceable. The school district will gather information regarding your child’s physical, mental, emotional and health functioning through testing and assessment, observation of your child, as well as through review of any records made available to the school district through your physician and other providers of services such as day care agencies. The school district protects the confidentiality of personally identifiable information by one school official being responsible for ensuring the confidentiality of the records, training being provided to all persons using the information, and maintaining for public inspection a current list of employee’s names and positions who may have access to the information. The school district will inform you when this information is no longer needed to provide educational services to your child and will destroy the information at designated intervals, except general information such as your child’s name, address, phone number, grades, attendance record and classes attended, grade level completed, may be maintained without time limitation. As the parent of the child you have a number of rights regarding the confidentiality of your child’s records. The right to inspect and review any education records related to your child are collected, maintained, or used by the school district. The school district will comply with a request for you to review the records without unnecessary delay before any meetings regarding planning for your child’s special education program (called an IEP meeting). Should you and your school district disagree about your child’s special education supports and services and a due process hearing is requested, the school district will furnish you with the opportunity to inspect and review your child’s records, within 30 days. You have the right to an explanation and interpretations of the records, to be provided copies of the records if failure to provide the copies would effectively prevent you from exercising your right to inspect and review the records, and the right to have a representative inspect and review the records. This review is conducted with the assistance of an appropriate school district staff member. Upon your request, the school district will provide you a list of the types and location of education records collected, maintained, or used by the agency. Additionally, the school district will charge a fee for copies of records made in response to your request except, it will not charge a fee if doing so will prevent you from inspecting and reviewing your child’s records. A current list of reasonable fees relative to records request is available in the district’s central office. The district will not charge a fee to search or retrieve information. You have the right to request in writing the amendment of your child’s education records that you believe are inaccurate or misleading, or violate the privacy or other rights of your child. The school district will decide whether to amend the records within 45 school days of receipt of your request. If the school district refuses to amend the records you will be notified of the refusal and your right to a hearing. You will be given at that time, additional


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:26 AM Page 11

information regarding the hearing procedures. Upon written request, the district will schedule and provide written notice of the hearing to challenge information in your child’s education files. Parent consent is required before personally identifiable information contained in your child’s education records is disclosed to anyone other that officials of the school district collecting or using the information for purposes of identification of your child, locating your child and evaluating your child or for any other purpose of making available a free appropriate public education to your child. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Additionally, the school district, upon request, discloses records without consent to officials of another school district in which your child seeks or intends to enroll. A parent may file a written complaint with the Pennsylvania Department of Education at the address below alleging that the rights described in this notice were not provided. Pennsylvania Department of Education Bureau of Special Education Division of Compliance 333 Market Street Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333 The Department of Education will investigate the matter, issue a report of findings and necessary corrective action within 60 days. The Department will take necessary action to ensure compliance is achieved. Complaints alleging failures of the school district with regard to confidentiality of personally identifiable information may also be filed with: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 The school districts listed above will provide ongoing screening services. If you wish to learn more, have questions, or believe your child may need to be identified, please contact your local school district contact. EARLY INTERVENTION IDENTIFICATION

POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF WEAKNESSES IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL DOMAIN AREAS AND OTHER RISK FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY (Requirement of Section 14.212(b)) A developmental delay is determined by the results of a developmental evaluation. The results of one or more domain areas (adaptive, personal-social, communication, motor or cognitive) have to show at least a 25% delay or a score of 1.5 standard deviations below the mean (Standard Score of 77 or below). The delay results in the need for specially designed intervention/instruction (SDI) in order to participate in typical activities and routines. Children with a developmental delay may show weaknesses in the following areas: Adaptive – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty dressing/undressing; using utensils to eat, removing shoes without assistance, distinguishing between nonfood/food substances, or have difficulty with toileting needs. One may have difficulty moving independently

OTHER FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY Developmental disabilities are birth defects related to a problem with how a body part or body system works. They may also be known as functional birth defects. Many of these conditions affect multiple body parts or systems. Researchers have identified thousands of different birth defects. Birth defects can have a variety of causes, such as: Genetic problems caused when one or more genes doesn’t work properly or part of a gene is missing, Problems with chromosomes, such as having an extra chromosome or missing part of a chromosome. Environmental factors that the expectant mother is exposed to during pregnancy, such as Rubella or German measles or if she uses drugs or alcohol during pregnancy. FACTORS CONSIDERED WHEN DETERMINING MENTAL GIFTEDNESS 1. The child performs a year or more above grade achievement level in one or more subjects as measured by a nationally normed and validated achievement test. 2. The child demonstrates rates of acquisition/retention of content and skills reflecting gifted ability. 3. The child demonstrates achievement, performance, or expertise in one or more academic areas as evidenced by products, portfolios or research, as well as criterion-referenced team judgment. 4. The child demonstrates early and measured use of high level thinking skills, academic creativity, leadership skills, intense academic interest, communication skills, foreign language aptitude, or technology expertise. 5. The child demonstrates that intervening factors such as English as a second language, disabilities, gender or race bias, or socio/cultural deprivation are masking gifted abilities.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 11

chartiers valley school district

In Pennsylvania, a child between three years of age and the school district’s age to begin school who has a developmental delay or one or more of the physical or mental conditions listed above, will be identified as an “eligible young child.” The parents of these children have the same rights described above. The Pennsylvania Department of Education is responsible for providing programs and services to eligible young children under Act 212 of 1990, the Early Intervention Services System Act. Screening for preschool children is available through the DART Program operated by Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3. To schedule an appointment for screening call the AIU at 412.394.5987. For additional information, contact the school district.

around the house, understanding that hot is dangerous, putting away toys when asked, indicating an illness or ailment to an adult, or demonstrating caution and avoiding common dangers. Personal-Social – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty responding positively to adult praise, rewards or promise of rewards; greeting familiar adults spontaneously, enjoying simple stories read aloud, helping with simple household tasks, initiating social interaction with familiar adults, expressing affection/liking for peers, playing cooperatively with peers, stating first name, last name, age, or whether he is a male/female; using objects in make-believe play, using ‘I’ or ‘me’ to refer to himself, or recognizing facial expressions of common emotions. Communication - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty following 2-step verbal commands, associating spoken words with pictures, recalling events from a story presented orally; engaging in extended and meaningful nonverbal exchanges with others, using words to get his needs met, responding to ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions appropriately, or asking ‘wh’ questions. Motor - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty running without falling, kicking a ball without falling, walking up and down steps alternating feet without assistance, walking backward, imitating the bilateral movements of an adult, pointing with his index finger independent of the thumb and other fingers, scribbling linear and/or circular patterns spontaneously, using the pads of fingertips to grasp a pencil, holding a paper with one hand while drawing or writing with the other hand, fastening clothing without assistance, cutting with scissors, copying a circle, or imitating vertical and horizontal markings. Cognitive - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty attending to one activity for 3 or more minutes, reciting memorized lines from songs or TV shows, showing interest in age-appropriate books, matching/naming colors, responding to one and one more, giving three objects on request, matching shapes, identifying objects by their use, identifying items by size, identifying colors of familiar objects not in view, or identifying simple objects by touch.


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:26 AM Page 12

12 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:26 AM Page 13

collier township crier 2418 Hilltop Road • Presto, PA 15142 412.279.2525 • www.colliertownship.net

reMinder to residents

Collier Township welcomes the new Township Manager Sal Sirabella and the new Codes Enforcement/Zoning Officer Tom Plietz.

Residents can submit their email address to the township so that they could be informed of special meetings or happenings taking place in the Township.

2011 Fall curBside leaF pick-up • October 3 to December 16, 2011. Dates are approximate and subject to change depending on weather. • Leaves must be raked curbside or to the edge of residency. • Pick-up will be via the Township’s “Leaf-Vac” along residential streets only. •Leaves may be bagged. Use brown leaf & garden bags only – no plastic. After December 16, 2011, all leaves must be bagged with leaf bags (not plastic bags).

Friends oF collier parks & recreation We are looking for volunteers just like you to help make Collier parks safe, fun places for enjoying time with your family. FRIENDS is the new, non-profit organization developed to handle fundraising activities for Collier Parks & Recreation initiatives. We cannot do it without your help! We welcome a diverse group of individuals and talents. If you are interested, please contact membership chairman Barb Riedel at 412-279-8747 or email at abriedl@verizon.net.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER is in need of Volunteers In order to keep the membership fee to a minimum, we are asking for volunteers to help man and manage the facility. Duties will be greeting guests and checking-in members I. D. Hours will be M-F, 8am-11am and 4pm-8pm. Saturday 8am-5pm and closed on Sunday. The Fitness Center is located on Porter Way off of Private Lobaugh Street from Nike Site Road. The facility has various strength training equipment, and a number of fitness machines, bikes, treadmills, etc. There are also ladies and men's showers and a sauna available for your use. For information or to sign-up to volunteer call: Bob Caun, Parks & Recreation Director, 412- 279-2525, Ext. 125 or bcaun@colliertwp.net. Hope to see you there enjoying yourself soon.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER MEMbERShIP FEE INDIVIDUAL 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP RESIDENT $60.00 NON-RESIDENT $85.00 FAMILY 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP (3 or more persons in family) Nobody under 14 without an adult. Absolutely nobody under 12 years old. RESIDENT $140.00 NON-RESIDENT $180.00

and tiMes: township Meeting dates

Board Parks and Recreation Month at 6:30 PM of y Fourth Tuesda Each Planning Commission y of Each Month at 7:00 PM First & Third Thursda

$3.00 $5.00

township directory & Municipal Building hours: ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES: (412) 279-2525 8AM to 4:30PM – Mon., Tues., Thurs. 8AM to 7PM Wed., 8AM to NOON Fri. Codes/Zoning Office:

(412) 279-9998

Tax Office:

(412) 276-5277

Public Works:

(412) 279-8828

Police Station:

(412) 276-5051

Municipal Authority:

(412) 279-4941

Emergency:

911

Collier Township Website: www.colliertownship.net

collier township crier

(Workshop/Agenda) Board of CommissionersEach Month at 7:00 PM Last Wednesday of (Regular/Business) Board of Commissioners of Each Month at 7:00 PM Second Wednesday ion (As Needed) Civil Service Commiss nth at 7:00 PM First Tuesday of Each Mo (As Needed) Zoning Hearing Board ch Month at 7:00 PM Ea of y sda Third Tue

NON-MEMbERS - PER VISIT RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 13


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upcoMing township events the puMpkins March on! Since 2000, the Night Walk on the Panhandle Trail has been a Halloween tradition in Collier Township. This year the festivities begin at 7 PM on Saturday, October 22nd. The Rennerdale Youth Group will carve more than 100 pumpkins donated by Beccari’s Farm Market, Thoms Run Road. Collier Girl Scouts will set out and light the jack o’ lanterns along a half-mile stretch of the Trail from the bridge near the Walkers Mill trailhead to the Sunnyside entrance. Bonfires light the night and hot chocolate and sweet cider are distributed by Collier Friends of the Panhandle Trail. A costumed volunteer will delight the kids with stories near the Quarry bonfire. This year’s treat bags for children aged 11 and under will be distributed at the Quarry. Also new this year, children was well as adults are encouraged to wear costumes and parade on the Quarry stage. Parking is available in the Public Works yard at 110 Noblestown Road. The event is free but donations are welcomed! For updates, got to www.panhandletrail.org.

rennerdale vFd Fire prevention day coMing in septeMBer

rennerdale vFd halloween parade saturday, octoBer 30, 2011

● For all ages including organization & school field trips. ● Free refreshments & station tours. ● Please come visit us and our duck pond. For more information, see our website at www.rennerdalevfd.com.

Line up is 12:30 pm at Webb Field. Parade starts at 1 pm. Every child in costume receives a treat bag plus prizes. Cookies and drinks will be served. Chartiers Valley Band will be in the parade. Any questions, call John Kripp at 412-276-4252.

presto vFd “all you can eat” pancake BreakFast and open house 8aM – 1pM • sunday, octoBer 16th

collier township crier

All you can eat pancake breakfast including your choice of pancakes, bacon, sausage, eggs and beverages. The sixth annual Open house & Membership Drive will have demonstrations, exhibits and prize giveaways. Presto VFD is located at 5228 Thoms Run Road with ample parking across the street. For more information, please call the station at 412-221-5677 or visit the website at www.prestovfd.org.

t s e f r e b o t k O

14 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

The Friends of Collier invites all to their First Annual Oktoberfest that will be held Friday, September 30th from 6:00 – 10:00 PM and Saturday, October 1st from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM at the newly acquired Charles E. Kelly Support Facility located at the former Army base off of Nike Site Road. Come with friends and family and enjoy nightly performances by local bands, tasty foods, desserts, beer and great entertainment for the kids. Vendors are needed, if you are interested in participating, please contact Janet Wank at 412.279.9998 or jwank@colliertwp.net.


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:27 AM Page 15

2011 hall oF FlaMe golF outing at the cluB at nevillewood

police telephone nuMBers:

The Kirwan Heights VFD, Presto VFD and the Rennerdale VFD once again thank the Hall of Flame Golf Committee for their efforts in holding the fifth successful Hall of Flame Golf Outing. Through their efforts and with the strong financial support of Collier residents, businesses and neighboring businesses, the Golf event once again raised more than $40,000.00. These funds are shared equally by each Fire Company to help cover the rising costs of personal protection gear and necessary fire and emergency equipment. The raffle winners were: Charlotte Davis (1st); Mal Bruce (2nd) and Dave Clemens (3rd). Next years golf outing will be in July, 2012.

NON-EMERGENCY: 412-279-6911: This is the main number used to contact the Collier Township Police. When you call this number and specify that you need Collier Police, they will contact the on-duty officers and send them to the correct location or inform them to return your call. This number is the MOST effective way for a resident or business owner to reach the police.

rennerdale up church golF outing The First United Presbyterian Church of Rennerdale is hosting its 7th annual Golf Outing on Saturday, September 10, 2011 at Fort Cherry Golf Club. Cost is $80 which includes 18 holes of golf, cart, refreshment at the turn and dinner. All proceeds go to our Christian Education and youth program. If interested in participating, please call the church at 412-276-2268 or e-mail lisaandjimmason@comcast.net.

collier township Municipal authority news

OFFICE: 412-276-5051: This number is for leaving a message for a specific officer in their voicemail. This will be listened to when the officer is on duty next. This number may also be used for general questions. SOLICITATION: Anyone who goes door to door to advertise their business or products, even by placing a flyer, is a solicitor. They need a permit for this. There are rules as to when and where they are allowed. Solicitors are not allowed where there are signs up such as Cloverleaf Estates, Nevillewood, Nevilleside, and Summit Ridge. They are not allowed at houses with no soliciting signs or who are on the no soliciting list. If someone comes to your door they need a permit and their ID. When in doubt, call 412-279-6911. ALARMS: Any resident or business with an alarm system needs an alarm permit. Resident alarms cost $50, business alarms cost $65. This is a one-time fee. You can have three free false alarms in a calendar year, after that they cost $25/each.

allegheny county consent order status CTMA continues to provide the necessary main sewer line inspection, maintenance and repair as required under the Allegheny County Health Department Consent Order which affects all municipalities in Allegheny County. Under the Consent Order, no surface water may enter the sanitary sewer system and individual property owners must make certain that they have disconnected any roof leader or stairwell or driveway drain that is connected into the sanitary sewer system. Property owners must make certain that their house air vent and house cleanout are exposed to grade for necessary maintenance in order to have the sewer system function properly and be available should a dye test pf the property be requested. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 15

collier township crier

This spring CTMA accepted from the contractor the sanitary sewer lines installed to serve 19 properties located along Baldwin Rd. East and West. The project cost was $542,696.15 and was constructed with the cooperation of the property owners that were served by this project. Sewer lines have been designed to serve properties along the opposite of Baldwin Rd., and McMichael Rd., Baldwin Rd, Scotts Run Rd. and portions of Ridge Rd. to McMichael Rd. This project has been substantially delayed due to the refusal of a number of property owners to grant the required right-of-ways needed to construct the project. Without the cooperation of all property owners in providing the necessary right-of-ways, projects of this type are delayed indefinitely and, in some cases, are abandoned. CTMA had applied for a PA H2O Grant for the entire project. The Commonwealth of PA notified CTMA that the project could not be founded at this time. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

EMERGENCY: 9-1-1


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kirwan heights Fire/eMs oFFers autuMn saFety tips For the collier township coMMunity ChIMNEY AND FURNACES Chimney maintenance is vital to your family’s safety. • Have your chimney inspected and cleaned on a regular basis. • When possible, burn seasoned woods (dryness of the wood is more important than hard wood versus soft wood). • Smaller, hotter fires will burn more completely and produce less smoke than larger fires. • Do not burn cardboard boxes or trash, as they can spark a chimney fire. • Install stovepipe thermometers, which help monitor flue temperatures where wood stoves are in use, then adjust burning practices as needed.

TRICK OR TREAT SAFETY Don’t get caught up in the holiday spirit —make sure your children trick-or-treat safely. • Rather than buying a mask, use makeup to decorate children. That way, they can see more easily. • If your kids go trick-or-treating after dusk, make sure they have a flashlight and are wearing retro reflective material. • Dress children in warm, light colored clothing so that they may be easily seen when crossing the street. • Do not purchase Halloween costumes and other items which are not marked “Flameproof” or “Flame-Retardant”. • Remind children to skip houses that are not well-lit. • Check candy before allowing kids to eat it. • Avoid tricks that could cause bodily injury, destroy property, or cause a fire.

when it rains, it drains

collier township crier

WhAT IS STORM WATER? Storm Water is water from precipitation that flows across the ground & pavement when it rains or when snow & ice melt. The water seeps into the ground or drains into what we call storm sewers. These are the drains you see at street corners or at low points on the sides of streets. Collectively, the draining water is call storm water runoff.

FALL CLEAN-UP Yard work does not end simply because summer is over. Here are some safety tips for tackling autumn tasks around home. • When lifting heavy bags of mulch, use a wheelbarrow when possible, and remember to lift with your legs, not with your back. • Be careful when pruning. Pruning from a ladder is especially dangerous. • To avoid blisters when doing yard work, wear gloves. • If you are doing a lot of raking, try an ergonomic rake, which can be found at most hardware stores and garden centers.

along the way empty into our waters, too, because storm water does not get treated. • Pet wastes left on the ground get carried away by storm water, contributing harmful bacteria, parasites & viruses to our water. • Vehicles drip fluids (oil, grease, gasoline, antifreeze, brake fluids, etc.) onto paved areas where storm water runoff carries them through our storm drains & into our water. • Chemicals used to grow & maintain beautiful lawns & gardens, if not used properly, can run off into the storm drains when it rains or

WhY IS STORM WATER “GOOD RaIN GONE WRONG?” Storm water becomes a problem when it picks up debris, chemicals, dirt, and other pollutants as it flows or when it causes flooding & erosion of stream banks. Storm water travels through a system of pipes & roadside ditches that make up storm sewer systems. It eventually flows directly to a lake, river, stream, wetland or coastal water. All of the pollutants storm water carries 16 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

bACK TO SChOOL SAFETY Parents must do some homework to keep their kids healthy and safe. Don’t let safety “fall” by the wayside. • Walk and ride to school safely. Obey traffic lights and signals, walk only in crosswalks, and listen to the crossing guard. • If your kids bike to school, be sure they wear a helmet. • If possible, always walk your child to the bus stop and pick them up as well. • Keep backpacks light – a child’s backpack should only be 5 to 10 percent of his or her body weight, according to the American Chiropractic Association. • A backpack with wheels is easy to maneuver and reduces back stress. If your child does choose to wear a backpack, utilize both straps. Slinging the backpack over once shoulder may cause spinal curvature.

Chartiers Valley

when we water our lawns & gardens. • Waste from chemicals & materials used in construction can wash into the storm sewer system when it rains. Soil that erodes from construction sites causes environmental degradation, including harming fish & shellfish populations that are important for recreation & our economy. This information was supplied by Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. For more information go to www.dep.state.pa.us.


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:27 AM Page 17

Chestnut street neighbors Celebrate 27th annual you thought block parties were a thing of the past, think again! Chestnut Street in Bridgeville has been holding an annual block party for the past 27 years. Each year, neighbors close off the street and party until 11 p.m. Children play games in the street, including bobbing for bubble gum in pie pans filled with whipped cream, find the prize in a pile of hay, and football, of course. A sheet is decorated every year, commemorating the event, and while organizers said there have been a couple of years when the party wasn’t held, those years are few and far between. Even and odd numbered houses take turns between bringing appetizers and desserts and hotdogs, hamburgers and chicken are grilled on the street. The group even set up a screen to project the Steelers preseason game against Atlanta, and a stage where neighbors can demonstrate their talents which ranged from a vocal and kazoo rendition of Harry Woods’ 1927 classic “Side By Side,” rock and roll standards like “Johnny B. Goode,” and a family blowing on the slide trombones and trumpet. 

If

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High School Senior Portraits Mention This Ad For A 20% Discount

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 17


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:28 AM Page 18

Raceway predecessor Applies for

Historic Status For raceway  Sports Arena Site

 If you

S U C CIR

18 724.942.0940 to advertise |

West Allegheny

are a fan of the Imperial Raceway, it’s probably no surprise to you that much of Imperial’s amenities came from the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena. What may surprise you is that the tiny Borough of Heidelberg has applied for historic status for the site. The application was denied once because it was submitted based on its history of racing. The borough researched the matter further and found that the raceway wasn’t just known for the excitement that later found itself at Imperial. The Heidelberg Raceway was the site of the final 1956 Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus under the big top, documented in national outlets like the New York Times and Life Magazine. It was a ½-mile racetrack that hosted four NASCAR races and where Richard Perry’s father, Lee Perry won his first NASCAR race. It was also home to countless boxing matches, soccer games, fairs and circuses. Now, Heidelberg Manager Joe Kauer wants Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena to be recognized for the history it’s provided the region since during its brief, 25-year lifespan. “We submitted for one of those roadside historical markers. The state kicked our application back saying we needed more than just four NASCAR races to declare it historical,” Kauer said. “They said, ‘What’s there of national historical significance,’ so we researched it, and it was the final act of the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Circus under the tent.”


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According to Heidelberg Borough’s application with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, the track was opened on Memorial Day, 1948, and was intended to be a home for horse racing, which did not become legal until years later. In addition to the main ½mile asphalt track, it also had a ¼-mile dirt track, seating for 15,000 fans, and free parking for 8,000 cars. After its closing in 1973, the site was razed and became home to “Raceway Plaza,” which has been a commercial staple for the South Hills for decades. Home to major anchor department chains such as Hills, Ames and now Wal-Mart, the site also has a Shop ‘N Save, McDonalds and Long John Silvers. “You would never guess that all this history just happened right down the street,” Kauer said. “This marker will remind people, so people don’t just think of it as a Wal-Mart or a Shop ‘N Save. People don’t even call it Raceway Plaza anymore. It was all Heidelberg people that ran it and worked it. Ike Wright, the original owner of Wright’s Seafood Inn, built it. Ed Witzberger bought it and he was our mayor here for years.” Today, much of the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena is still being utilized at the Pittsburgh Motor Speedway in Imperial. Heidelberg Raceway was ahead of its time among racing venues, with an electric scoreboard and air-conditioned press box, thanks to Witzberger’s vision. However, the impressive attributes of the race track succumbed to the political climate of the times, when after the track did not open for the 1974 season under a lease agreement, Witzberger cited the energy crises of the 1970s as cause for

not renewing the lease. And while the track lives on on numerous racing internet forums and discussion boards, it was the final circus performance that really brought about the end of an era for a lot of people in the region. Gene Czambel of Collier was one of those people. “It was a Monday night and I was 13 years old. It was very exciting. You knew they were coming to town,” he said. “It would take them a couple days to set up. They’d come in on the railroad. The elephants would walk down the street, carrying all that stuff, it was awesome. Normally, it lasted all week, but after this last performance, they just said that was it.” Czambel said he remembers lion tamers guiding lions through hoops, all kinds of acrobats and performers and, of course, the side show. “They had the side show and they had this guy, who was the tallest guy in the world. He was 8-foot, 2 inches tall and you’d pay the admission and go behind the curtain to see him,” Czambel said. “I got to shake this guy’s hand and they gave you a pamphlet telling you all about him.” Kauer said the borough will know in September whether or not the application was accepted. After that, will come a period of fundraising to raise the $2,500 for the marker.

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Investment Policy in Light of Post-Debt Crisis What will the impact to investors be due to this most recent crisis? By Daniel L. Henry, CLU On August 2nd, President Obama quickly signed the Budget Control Act (Senate 365 as amended) after passage by the Senate 74 to 26. The House passed its version one day earlier by a vote of 269 to 161. The new law raises the debt limit to avoid a projected August 2 default and creates a bipartisan joint select committee on deficit reduction. (source: Yahoo Finance) We try not to be overtly political in this magazine as well as towards our clients, realizing that each person has their own unique views and beliefs. Yet we feel compelled to offer our perspective on these most recent debates as well as our perception as to its effects on the stock market. Without having to preface each point with, ‘in our opinion”, please know that these eight points are, “our opinions”: 1. The markets have rallied nearly 90% off the lows of March, 2009. Volatility and even corrections (defined as a 10% drop) are inevitable. (source: Yahoo Finance) 2. There is little concern that the US can’t pay its bills. This was a political event, not a financial one. 3. The professionals at Henry Wealth Management believe in building investment portfolios with via a “passive investment strategy”. The bedrock of this belief system is to globally allocate assets in a proper stock-to-bond ratio, based on one’s goals, time frames and propensities to risk. Once the allocation is chosen, unless there is a bona fide change to a person’s goals, we need to stay invested! 4. It is an easy decision to get out of the markets- fear is a compelling driver to help pull that lever. It is not knowing or frankly, having the courage to get back in at the right time that kills returns. The 90% run up mentioned in point 1 assumes that investors were “in” at the bottom, not “back in” at some point along the ascent. 5. The current sell-off and market drop seems to be overdone and overly dramatic, driven by politically-charged fears and fueled by nonstop media coverage. Investors won’t be satisfied for any length of time sitting in low yielding treasuries. I wonder if those who bailed out will get back in after things “calm down” (good luck defining that) and after stock prices rise to ensure that their exit and re-entrance only serves to lock in losses. 6. Pundits can’t have it both ways. The two recent and massive “Keynesian” stimulus spending packages, dubbed “Quantitative Easing 1 and 2” seemingly have not helped our economy. Others now say that cutting spending will hurt the economy. Well, which is it? For us, we allocate assets** for long-term purposes and thus, despite short-term polar opposite rhetoric or actions, do not want to be derailed in our approach. Footnote: The Budget Control Act does not actually cut spending- it only reduces the amount of scheduled annual increases. 7. On a positive note; We do like the fact that an emerging voice in our nation’s capital appears to be supportive of a shrinking government and true spending reductions. Credit card usage and balances by consumers is certainly trending downward.* Our government needs to follow suit. We believe this will help our economy and financial markets over the long-run. 8. On a positive note, #2; Talk of a balanced budget amendment is

nearing a fever-pitch. Hopefully term limits for Congress will not be far behind. These two items could help immeasurably! It’s all about incentives, which present members of Congress do not have. Many seemingly vote to keep their jobs and cater to their largest donors. Taking away lifetime jobs and forcing them to live with a balanced budget may allow them to do the right things for the right reasons without the repercussion of a re-election loss. Again, we see this as helpful for our economy and financial markets. Dan Henry, CLU, is the Vice President of Henry Wealth Management, LLC, an independent financial services firm located at 1370 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA. He offers Securities through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. This article was co-authored with Phil Henry, ChFC, CFS, the firms President. Phil offers Securities and InvestmentAdvisory Services through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. NFP Securities, Inc. is not affiliated with Henry Wealth Management, LLC. Dan may be reached at 412-838-0200 or through email at Dan@HenryWealth.com. The firm’s website is www.HenryWealth.com. The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those held by NFP Securities, Inc. This is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendation. NFP Securities, Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice. Using diversification as part of your investment strategy neither assures nor guarantees better performance and cannot protect against loss of principal due to changing market conditions. Past Performance does not guarantee future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a popular indicator of the stock market based on the average closing prices of 30 active U.S. stocks representative of the overall economy.

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:47 AM Page 22

Woodville Plantation hosts

weekend isitors got to step back in time at Woodville Plantation in July, as the living history museum presented a special event to commemorate the Whiskey Rebellion - historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794. The weekend also featured a walking lecture titled, “The Events of 1794.” Soldiers of the Fourth Sub-Legion as they returned to Bower Hill discussed and re-created the fateful events of the Whiskey Rebellion, as they occurred in July of 1794. The unique event will included an encampment along the “Tom the Tinker Trail.” Participants experienced camp life with cooking demonstrations, musket firings and tactical demonstrations. A history walk starting at the PA State Historical Marker on Bower Hill near Kane Regional Center and ending at the Scrubgrass Run Trailhead covered topics such as the Battle of Bower Hill, the soldiers that participated in the battle and the Whiskey Rebellion. On Whiskey Rebellion Day, the troops of the Fourth Sub-

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The Whiskey Rebellion began when farmers rebelled against a tax on whiskey, which was a primary source of their income, that left no room for farmers to profit from their labor. The dispute reached a flashpoint in July of 1794, when mobs ransacked Pittsburgh and a federal marshal in Allegheny County was attacked. President George Washington raised a militia of 13,000 troops and personally led them to squash the insurrection. After all the dust had settled, those few who were arrested were later pardoned by Washington.

Legion made camp at Woodville Plantation, marched and drilled. Guests were able to experience 18th century military camp life, see tactical demonstrations, musket firing, marching and ceremonial drills. Soldiers discussed what camp life was like in the army of 1794. Visitors also learned 18th century cooking techniques as Woodville’s cooks prepared dinner for the encamped troops. Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, go to Woodville’s website at www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412.221.0348.

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BeinhauerFamily Services IF YOU DON’T KNOW THE BEINHAUER NAME, YOU MUST BE NEW TO THE COMMUNITY. Beinhauer Funeral Homes have been part of the community since 1860, with six generations of the family, nurturing and growing their business, along with operating the second oldest active crematory in the United States. The Beinhauer family strives to be a part of the communities they serve. “The family business is important to all of us, and there’s a great deal of heritage and legacy that has been established by past generations. We’re making impressions and building relationships today within our communities, continuing a legacy of heritage and trust,” says Rick Beinhauer, the company’s leader and a fifth generation family member. Beinhauer is proud to have the sixth generation currently active in the family business with Scott Beinhauer, licensed funeral director. The Beinhauer family serves five communities in the South Hills—Peters Township, Bethel Park, Bridgeville, Dormont/Mt. Lebanon, and Canonsburg. Their locations are family-friendly, providing children’s rooms, cafés where food and beverages can be served, and a community room where dinners and luncheons can be scheduled.

“We have a lot of service based groups that meet in our community room. A church group meets at the Peters Township location every Sunday at 10 a.m.,” says Scott Beinhauer. The decision to open up the community room to groups was twofold: One, it gave the funeral home a place for large groups to assemble or hold ceremonies; second, it was a way to give back to the community that has supported them over the decades. “We wanted to make available a space that anyone in the community could use; for example, educational seminars and continuing education courses for nurses, seniors, caregivers, hospices, and veterans, to mention a few. An annual memorial service is held in the community room for any family that wishes to attend. In Bridgeville, we have a digital resource sign that not only informs the community about funeral service information, but also other community events, such as programs at the library, Rotary functions, community day, church fairs, and other newsworthy information. Our community

the options they can in-house with their own staff. “We’re in the business of helping families create an event or service that is an extension of their loved one’s life—something that provides a meaningful experience for the family and the community,” says Scott Beinhauer. Some of those personal touches include an interactive website, personalized DVD videos, and webcasting of funerals, which, through the use of a password protected website, can give those with physical considerations or travel limitations the ability to attend a loved one’s funeral service over the Internet. “There are a lot of little things that are done for funerals. People create photo collages that chronicle their loved one’s life, or bring in personal items that represent one’s hobbies or lifestyles. You have the year of birth and the year of death, and then you have the dash in the middle. We focus on the dash—everything in the middle that that person has done for their family and community. We help the family celebrate and honor the life that was lived,” says Scott Beinhauer. The Beinhauer family also manages Woodruff Memorial Park Cemetery, located on Route 19 in North Strabane Township. The newly constructed Community Mausoleum offers magnificent crypt entombment as well as extensive cremation niches, including bronze and beveled glass and a beautiful indoor chapel. Adjacent to the human cemetery, Peaceful Pastures provides a final resting place for pets of any kind, including the area’s only pet funeral and cremation center, which houses its own crematory. For more information on Beinhauer Family Funeral Homes and their cemetery and cremation options, call 724.969.0200 or visit them at www.beinhauer.com.

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:29 AM Page 28

Bridgeville Public Library celebrates

g n i n e p O d n a Gr

T

he official Grand Opening of the Bridgeville Public Library, the culmination of 10 years of planning toward the vision to create a center for lifelong learning and a destination where everyone can go to connect, explore, discover, and grow, was celebrated on June 12, at the new location at 505 McMillen Street (off Dewey Avenue). Local representatives were on hand to share their thoughts on the landmark day, including U.S. Congressman Tim Murphy; The Office of State Senator John Pippy; 45th District Representative Nick Kotik; Allegheny County District 4 Representative Michael Finnerty, Bridgeville Mayor Donald Dolde, who will serve as master of ceremonies; and Fr. Jason Del Vitto, St. George Antiochian Church delivered the invocation. They were joined by Allegheny County Library Association Executive Director, Marilyn Jenkins, local leaders and Joyce Heinrich, event chairman. The ceremonies included the formal dedication of a flag pole, donated by board president, Nino Petrocelli, Sr., in memory of his mother, Alberina Petrocelli, conducted by American Legion Post #54 and Boy Scout Troop #2. Vocalist Hannah Drake and South Fayette Middle School ensemble provided patriotic-themed musical accompaniment. “We are writing a new chapter in a 49-year journey, made possible by the flow of resources from the Bill and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust,” said Donna Taylor, library director. To acknowledge the McDivitt’s gift to the community and their generosity in perpetuity, the Bridgeville Public Library Board of Trustees voted to dedicate the Bill & Grace McDivitt Center for Lifelong Learning in an unveiling ceremony. A response of gratitude and appreciation was given by Martha Mihalyi Fitzmier of Decatur, GA, friend of the McDivitts and daughter of fellow

28 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

founder, Betty Mihalyi. She was joined by granddaughter Katie Fitzmier of Madison, WI. The ceremony and reflection honored all six founders and their families, including Louisa Bergstrom, Grace McDivitt, Betty Mihalyi, Betty Mincemoyer, Sylvia Saperstein & Betty Sutton who incorporated the Bridgeville Public Library on June 21, 1962. The official ribbon cutting by all dignitaries and board members at the entrance opened the doors for those attending to enjoy refreshments, including three cakes donated by South Fayette Shop ‘n Save. Drawings were held for Mylan Golf Classic tickets, BPL tee shirts sporting the new library logo, and more. The board of trustees took a leap-of-faith to proceed with construction of the new 7800 square foot space by leveraging a $500,000 Keystone Grant from the PA Recreation, Park and Conversation Fund for Libraries. That state funding source is now unavailable. development function was established to generate the funds needed to compliment the William and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust proceeds, which were tapped for the dollar-for-dollar match required to qualify for the maximum Keystone grant. The combined $2.2 million from the Keystone Grant and the McDivitt Charitable Trust is one-third of what is needed for the sustainability of the library for generations to come. The Once-in-a-Lifetime Campaign for the Bridgeville Public Library is designed to generate gifts and endowment for the balance of $4.2 million over the next four years. Launch of the comprehensive campaign is under the direction of Lawna Blankenship, the development officer hired to facilitate outreach to

A

Chartiers Valley

a wide range of

prospective philanthropic resources, including corporations, foundations, families, businesses, individuals and friends. “One of the things that make great institutions is transition,” said Blankenship, who plans to meet the community and share the amazing story, the vision and great successes, already being experienced. he new library is a destination for all age groups, many underserved because of lack of space. A walking trail planned for the green space that surrounds the library building will compliment myriad wellness programs already in evidence. Programming has increased by 550 percent and program attendance by 869 percent in the first quarter of this year versus the same period in 2010. The library had to open at 11 a.m. to allow for children’s story time programs in the iconic train depot and caboose. Now, patrons are waiting for the doors to open at 9 a.m.

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:29 AM Page 29

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:30 AM Page 30

REAL ESTATE

C h a rt ie r s Va l l e y

IN Community Magazines proudly announces a comprehensive look at the Chartiers Valley real estate market. In this section, you’ll find interesting information about creating beautiful spaces to live in, and other interesting facts about your community. F E AT U R E S T O R Y

FALL LANDSCAPING IDEAS When the dog days of summer are behind us and that first crisp snap of fall is in the air, energy seems to make a rebound and even the animals seems livelier, more alert. During this time, there’s nothing more wonderful than taking advantage of those last days of warmth to get outside and enjoy the outdoors by doing a little yard work. This is a great time to rake up all those leaves on the ground. But don’t just throw them into a trash bag to be hauled away. Leaves are great for composting and may have as much as three times the amount of minerals as fertilizer. They need to be shredded to be easier to work with, but this is easily accomplished by running a mower back and forth a few times over a pile of leaves. Also, be sure to add a little nitrogen to your compost pile with the leaves.

If your summer flowers have faded, be sure to trim back dead leaves and blooms and add some fall flowers for some more vibrant color. Mums and sunflowers can be purchased in pots to accent any garden with a fall palette, but don’t forget purple as a great contrasting color to oranges, yellows and sienna. Some fall flowers with purple accents are pansies, purple coneflowers, asters and mums. All of these will grow well in zone 6. For some green accent, you might try growing some arugula in a pot or self-watering container. This spicy, leafy plant has long been popular in France and Italy and actually grows better in the fall than in the summer. The leaves will add zest to your salads and other fall dishes. Although the planting time for arugula is in the spring, seedlings can be purchased and transplanted, however they also do well if left in containers or pots.

Helping Families Make the Right Move!

Nevillewood Office: 412.276.5000, Ext. 210 Direct: 412.276.5878 TimDowneyJr@howardhanna.com www.howardhanna.com • www.TimDowneyJr.com

Even if you’re not particularly good at growing plants and flowers, there are many ways to accent your lawn and garden with minimal effort and maintenance. Brightly colored pumpkins placed around pathways and steps give a whimsical touch to decorating. Avoid placing them in direct sunlight and directly on the ground and your pumpkin may well last for two to three months in the cool fall climate. Other low-maintenance decorations for fall are corn stalks and bales of hay. Hay bales also provide extra seating in outdoor areas. Summer may be over but your yard can still be a bright, cheerful place full of beautiful, living things. - by Pamela Palongue

sure you check out Buying? Make IN Chartiers Valley magazine before you make your next move. Selling? Looking?

Tim Downey, Jr. Realtor Chartiers Valley Sales & Relocation Specialist

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:30 AM Page 31

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Chartiers Valley


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Don’t miss your final opportunity to live in

Neville Manor in Collier Township! Neville Manor has only three opportunities remaining in this low maintenance living 2-cul-de-sac community. It features luxurious townhomes and carriage homes with access to the community clubhouse and pool. Located just minutes from I-79, the Pittsburgh International Airport and Downtown Pittsburgh and close to great shopping at Robinson Mall, Settler’s Ridge, and more! Neville Manor offers the lifestyle you deserve, for a price you can afford!

Want more information Call Jodie, our New Home Specialist – 412-512-6671

As Western Pennsylvania’s premier stone masonry contractor we are committed to serving our residential and commercial clients by providing high quality, reliable and consistent results at competitive rates. Our showroom is located at 3464 Babcock Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237. For additional information please call (412) 596-2114 or visit us online at www.stoneageinc.net. Andersen windows use natural wood to create a timeless combination of beauty and durability – plus All Andersen windows feature the Perma-Shield system, which protects the window’s exterior beautifully for decades. Never settle on your home builder or the window they use! Dow Building Solutions has a 60+ year legacy of providing innovative insulation and air sealing solutions such as STYROFOAM SIS™ Brand Structural Insulated Sheathing and GREAT STUFF™ Insulating Foam Sealants to home owners that help

to reduce energy costs and effectively seal a home’s building envelope from wind, rain and moisture. Heartland Homes is creating homes with the whole building envelope in mind that are not only well-built, but are actively saving money for the homeowners every month Since 1873, Kohler has been improving people’s lives with exceptional products, including kitchen and bath fixtures, faucets and accessories, furniture, cabinetry, and tile and stone. As a global leader, Kohler offers its customers world-class products to create a complete design solution. For information, ideas or inspiration, visit www.KOHLER.com.

Rex Glass & Mirror Co has been serving Greater Pittsburgh since 1958. As a family owned and operated business, we strive to provide customer service and quality craftsmanship that exceed the expectations of our customers. We design, fabricate, and install high quality residential and commercial glass products. For nearly 100 years, the Whirlpool brand has helped people all over the world find better ways to take care of household tasks. We want our customers to live cleaner, more organized, less busy and more flavorful lives through our appliances. So every Whirlpool® product is born of our decades of experience creating incredibly useful features.

Precision Stone Products is engaged in the production and distribution of premium grade architectural synthetic stone products and accessories resembling natural stone to the finest detail. Our full product line is backed by a 50 year limited warranty. Call (724) 282-2022 for more information or visit us online at www.pspstone.com. Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 33 www.LoveHeartland.com


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:30 AM Page 34

INdustry

What's

hot Kitchen

IN THE

As we zoom into the fall season, many people are planning their home remodeling projects. Of course, the kitchen is the most important room of your home. It is the most important room not just because of the tremendous amount of time homeowners spend in it, but because of the value that a new and updated kitchen will add to your home.Here are some things for consideration when you are planning your kitchen remodeling project.

The Kitchen & Great Room Plus Technology Open floor plans continue to be desirable in new home design and remodeling. Flat screen TV s, internet for laptops and docking stations for portable music devices allow the cook to view recipes online, email and listen to favorite music while working in the kitchen. A clever designer can allow for these items by including smartly designed storage niches or family message centers helps to incorporate technology into the design of the room.

The "Gourmet" Kitchen Because of our challenging economy, more and more families is opting to cook at home instead of ordering out. The ever growing popularity of

Insight cooking shows and the Food Network has sparked an interest for creating exciting new recipes. Cooking parties complete with wine tasting are all the rage. Cabinets, countertops and appliance manufactures have all stepped onto this bandwagon and there are numerous options for anything a "chef' could desire.

The "Green" Kitchen The green movement continues to increase in popularity.There is a growing trend with homeowners taking responsibility for what they have in their homes. Even more than just buying appliances and lighting that is more energy eďŹƒcient than ever, the emphasis is on sustainability. Many cabinet companies not only use eco- friendly product in the manufacture of their products,but also re plant forest areas that are used for harvesting for the production of cabinets. Quartz countertops are often made from recycled materials. Many of the quartz products on the market today have the appearance of stone without the required upkeep. The kitchen continues to be the nucleus of the home. At the end of a long day,it remains the area of the home where the family gathers. Whether it be for cooking a meal together, sitting down for a family dinner, just grabbing a quick bite on the way to soccer practice, or just to talk about the activities of the day, it is the place of gathering. A well planned and organized kitchen will make the moments spend there more pleasurable. This INdustry INsight was written by Laura Reid Riggin of Premier Home Design Center. Laura has been designing kitchens and baths for 26 years. She has worked in new construction and remodeling. Her designs have been featured in trade magazines, television and FANtastic Kitchens Magazine. This spring, she was a semi-finalist in the Asko kitchen design competition at the National Kitchen and Bath Show in Chicago. Premier Home Design Center is conveniently located at Collier Town Square, 1597 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA 15017. To setup an appointment or a consultation, please call 412.276.5650 or E-mail premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net or visit our website: www.premierhomedesigncenter.com.

Chartiers Valley’s Kitchen & Bath Design Center

In this economy, an investment in your home is one of the safest safest investments you can make. Whether you plan to live in your home long term or are planning to sell your home within the next 5 years, a new kitchen and bath can offer a 30% return on your investment. Premier Home Design Center offers expertise and products designed to fit your budget. Call Premier now for for an excellent return on your biggest investment. %%FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU 34 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:30 AM Page 35

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Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 35


11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:30 AM Page 36

Fall H

into Fitness by Falling in Love with your Gym

ealth clubs can be intimidating. Gym equipment can be overwhelming, especially when you have no idea how to use it. Gym clothing, gym etiquette and hard core gym enthusiasts can sometimes make it difficult to actually fall in love with your gym. I have been in the fitness industry for over 20 years and even when I am out of my realm or in a different city, I find it difficult popping into another gym and feeling comfortable. I think to myself, “Geez, if I feel uneasy walking into unfamiliar territory, I can’t imagine how someone feels that is completely new to the whole gym scene.” I moved to Pittsburgh 24 years ago. I absolutely loved the gym that I had left before moving and it took me a very long time to find one here that I could love as much. It was strange, because certainly there were plenty of gyms in the area that offered the exact same amenities that I was used to, but I still struggled. It didn’t take long to realize that the problem was simple; I missed my “gym buddies.” We would meet there after work

almost every night. It was familiar, it was comfortable and most of all it was a blast. Grabbing a friend to workout with is probably one of the easiest ways to calm the nerves and help you fall in love with your gym. Quality time spent together strengthening your friendship as you strengthen your muscles. If you can’t convince a friend to exercise with you, there are other things that you can do to achieve those “love” feelings. For one, you need to realize that the majority of people that frequent the gym are people just like you – just regular folks. Hold your head high and walk through those front doors. Get on a consistent schedule and you’ll start noticing the same people there

most of the time. You’ll soon feel like part of that tribe; people who are all trying to reach the same goal - physical fitness and a love for it. Most gyms offer a wide variety of group fitness classes. You can vary your weekly schedule and never get bored. Again, hold your head high and walk right into the group fitness room. Sure, there may be those one or two individuals that have a “spot” in the class and you’ll want to stay out of their way; but in my experience I find people in general warm and welcoming. Most members haven’t forgotten that they were once that new kid in class too. If you have a busy life (and seriously, who doesn’t?) think of your gym as your haven. Don’t look at it like working out; look at it as de-stressing. Your gym is your own personal retreat. It is crucial time that you have set aside for yourself. Adopt the attitude that fitness is fun and make it a priority. What’s not to love about that? The health benefits of regular exercise cannot be overlooked. Joining a gym is the easy part. Staying consistent and sticking with your program are the hard parts. But if you’re in love with your gym, there will be nothing that keeps you from “falling” into fitness. This INdustry INsight was written by Lisa Troyer. Lisa has been in the fitness industry for more than 17 years and is the owner of Fitness Fanatics in the Great Southern Shopping Center. She currently holds four nationally recognized fitness and personal training certifications and can be reached at 412.220.4190, ext. 3 or at fitnessfanatics@verizon.net. Check out www.fitnessfanaticsinc.com for more great fitness tips.

36 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:30 AM Page 37

The 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic Sponsor and Athlete Gala was recently held at the East Club Lounge at Heinz Field. Part of The Andy Russell Celebrity Golf Classic at The Club at Nevillewood, the event has raised over $5 million in past years for meaningful causes such as Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Free Care Fund, UPMC Cancer Institute and the Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. The gala provided sponsors with the thrilling opportunity of mingling with their favorite former Steeler Super Stars, including Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner, over cocktails and a sumptuous dinner. Live and silent auction items, including a one week stay at the Russell’s Colorado ranch, Steelers vs. Browns tickets and unique sports memorabilia, were also offered to the guests. The music of Souled Out added excitement to the evening at the atmospheric East Club Lounge. “We wanted to give back to the community and there are many good causes,” said Mr. Russell, when asked about the Golf Classic and Gala. “Our event is one of the oldest traditions in Pittsburgh and it’s because of everyone supporting us here tonight.” This year the event benefited the UPMC Department of Urology; providing advanced research, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Pioneer in the field of urology, Joel Nelson, M.D., a Frederic N. Schwentker Professor and Andy and Cindy Russell

Continued on page 38

Superbowl star hosts celebrity gala in support of UPMC 1. Denise Brown 2. Karen and Fritz M. Heinemann, President and CEO of Economics Pennsylvania 3. Stacey Schwartz, Vanessa Binnie, Rich Inman, Rosemary Mendel, Linda Gasper, Bea Whitehead 4. Former Steelers, Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner and Joan Mullins and Becky Wagner

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Continued from page 37 Chairman of the Department of Urology gave an inspirational speech at the gala. Some of the donations were also allocated for The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. Established in 1999, the foundation funds health care and human services. It contains a diverse list

of charities including Economics Pennsylvania, an organization that educates students to become responsible and beneficial members of society by teaching them the value of saving and spending wisely. C. Andrew Russell Laboratory for Head and Neck Cancer Research, The Leukemia Society and countless other charitable organizations are also part of the foundation.

Gina O’Malley, Special Events Coordinator at Medical and Health Sciences Foundation of the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC helped to plan and execute the event this year. “Andy is amazing. He dedicates so much time, effort and enthusiasm to this event and to his foundation”, said Ms. O’Malley.

If you would like to find out more about The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation, or purchase books authored by Mr. Russell where all of the proceeds go to charity, please visit andyrussell.org.

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5. Louise Koleman, Susan Musgrave, Barbara Card 6. Mike Mackin of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Rebecca Mackin 7. Renee Magill, Volunteer and Lori Spisak of UPMC 8. Christy Hegedus, Glen Edwards and Rochelle Steffenauer 9. Mark Windel of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Camille Galmarini 10. Carol Semple Thompson, Colleen Ley 11. Jenny Szmed 12. Souled Out 13. Victoria Berdnik and David Karcher of Platinum Sponsor, Lamar Advertising and Dolores Karcher 14. J.R. Wilbur, Issac Curtis, Myron Pottios

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:31 AM Page 39

Find your

academic groove

at Chyten + AEducational Services

High school students, it’s time to plan your backto-school strategy and hit the ground running!! Call Chyten to get you ahead with the school curriculum leaving you time on your schedule to balance educational achievements with finding yourself through sports, drama, crew, tennis, etc. In addition to getting you an academic head start, Chyten can help you get the edge needed to prepare for the College applications, standardized tests like SAT, ACT, ISEE. Manjri Gupta, the Owner-Director of Chyten South Hills Center, said “Chyten stands apart by providing an exclusive study material and curriculum taught by certified Masters or Ph.D educators. We integrate everything the student needs towards higher education. Our programs include books, materials, diagnostic tests, question banks and test-taking strategies that are available exclusively only to our students. Our curriculum team constantly researches and keeps up on the changes taking place in education and college admissions to ensure our methodologies are current and effective.” “We bring the most qualified tutors, curriculum, accountability, feedback loop and results driven processes to our sessions. The systems we have put in place ensure results students seek for themselves. Helping students find success in college is our focus,” Gupta said. “We offer private, semi private and small-group classes with no more

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than ten students in a class. Our format ensure dynamic discussion between students and educators allowing them to know how each student is performing,” Gupta said. “All of the work takes place at our education center, a state-of-the-art facility with individual tutoring rooms. Our methods have had a tremendous track record of success. We have successfully delivered an average of 274 points gain on SAT scores, and 4 to 7 point gain on ACT scores. Several of our students have achieved near perfect scores. In addition going from C to A, or A to A+ is something that we strive for and deliver.” “Great grades and standardized scores are only part of the equation. Securing college admission of choice needs careful planning and well thought out strategy. Chyten provides desired levels of college counseling that helps student balance academics, desired college life with the intended career path in mind,” Gupta said. “College application process is time consuming and expensive. Without proper guidance lot of good money and time go to waste. Last thing you want to do is change your major or college because you did not think through it and did not like what you selected. We plan the college application process for students, achieving college selection process steadily and consistently with your intended career and life choices in mind.” For more information on Chyten, and what its professional tutors can do for your student, go to: www.chyten.com or call 412.833.6060. Chyten is centrally located on Washington Road across from South Hills Village and is minutes away from all Chartiers Valley residents.

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11 Fall Chartiers Valley_09McKeesport_winter 9/2/11 11:31 AM Page 40

East meets

West inVeterinary

Exciting new developments in veterinary medicine and services are evolving in animal clinics and hospitals all over the world. The goal is to integrate principles of both eastern and western medicine in an artful combination, or alone, to tailor the treatment needs specifically and most importantly safely, to the individual patient. At Bridgeville Animal Hospital in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, they’ve been integrating alternative medicine and treatments into their protocols for over a year now, expanding their treatment options as they learn more and are then able to provide more treatment modalities for their patients. Started as Bethel Park Animal Hospital in November of 2000, construction forced a move to another facility in May of 2006, which is larger, warm and inviting. There are 3 full time veterinarians on staff, as well as a caring and compassionate staff. Here’s a little bit about the doctors and their interests:

Medicine

Dr. Joanna Rubin, VMD is founder and owner of the practice. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine in 1997. Dr. Rubin’s interests are broad, enjoying all aspects of small animal medicine and soft tissue surgery, with a special interest (and love for,) the senior and geriatric patients. Dr. Carolyn brown, DVM is a 2004 graduate of Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Brown has contributed the greatest portion of interest and study in alternative medicine. She recently studied veterinary acupuncture at International Veterinary Acupuncture Society and passed her initial exams. Her certification is expected later this summer. Her knowledge of acupuncture and increasing knowledge of herbal remedies adds the crucial piece of eastern medicine that as a team of doctors, will access to best help the patient. Dr. Michael Meneo, VMD is a 2009 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Meneo brings to the practice, some very valuable skills and interests. In addition to traditional small animal medicine and surgery, he’s quite knowledgeable and skilled in some orthopedic procedures that the clinic used to refer to specialty hospitals, including but not limited to anterior or cranial cruciate repair and patellar luxation repair. In short, Bridgeville Animal Hospital is now proud to offer traditional medicine and surgery, along with these emerging treatment modalities: digital radiography, Laser therapy, cutting laser surgery, veterinary acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and orthopedic surgical procedures. The veterinary hospital is excited to continue to evolve and add other treatment and diagnostic options in the future. This industry insight was written by Dr. Joanna Rubin, VMD. She is the President of the Bridgeville Animal Hospital. Dr. Rubin graduated in 1997 from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. The Bridgeville Animal Hospital is located at 420 Bower Hill Rd. Bridgeville, PA 15017. Call for appointments: 412.220.9400.

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B USINESS D IRECTORY

Sweet Bites Cookies for any event! 412.889.3823 www.bestsweetbites.com

A D V E RT I S E H E R E ! Call 724.942.0940 sales@incommunitymagazines.com


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hartiers Valley FALL 2011

Welcome to the Fall issue of Chartiers Valley Magazine. As the summer winds down, and the kids get ready to go back to school, I sincerely hope that you and your family had some time to get away from it all and relax. It seems that these days, parents driving the family taxi, and kids with their sports/lessons/parties rarely get a chance to enjoy the slow pace of an ever more elusive “lazy summer.” Ask yourself – when was the last time everyone ate together around a family table? When did everyone gather to play a board game? Does anyone remember board games? If your answer was “That one night that the power went out,” then you might be trapped in the 21st Century jail of hyper-life. (I made that term up, but I can do that – I’m the publisher.) I’m not an old guy, unless you ask my kids, but I think that life should be simpler. Moms, dads, brothers, sisters, should all try to spend some time with each other as a family more than that one night when the power goes out. Family time is an important part of being a community. And every community should value quality time with their families – it’s how we teach our children values, etiquette, and more importantly, how to participate in a family structure so they can pass on to their kids what you worked so hard to build. Recently, I saw a commercial where a father shut off the main power to the house so that the family could enjoy dinner together and blamed the outage on a thunderstorm. The Xboxes were dead. The Facebook was closed. The kids came downstairs in disillusionment to ask what happened. While the commercial was pushing some tasty dinner product, the message was more palatable – you have to make family time. I would take that message one step further – you have to make family time a priority. I hope that it’s one of yours.  Have a great Fall!

Wayne Dollard

FROM THE EDITOR While my boss waxes poetic about family time, I’d like to address something along a similar line – neighbors, or your family outside of your family. My wife and I recently bought a house and moved from the one-bedroom condo that I had lived in for nearly 10 years. While it was good for a bachelor, it quickly became small for a married couple looking to start a family. During those years in the condo, I shared a building with nine other neighbors, most of whom were friendly and good-natured people like Don who lived across the hall from me. Don enjoyed going to the high school football games on Friday nights, watching the races at the racetrack in Imperial and fishing. More often than not, he would bring over a couple of extra fillets that I would season up and devour. He had a nephew that re-shafted golf clubs as a hobby and gladly delivered my broken clubs to him for repair at a more than reasonable price. Then there were some cranky people who just looked out for themselves. They would gawk from their windows into the parking lot to see who was walking by or what was going on, convinced that they were up to no good; would complain about everything from the height of the grass to the paint job on somebody’s car; and really never knew what it was to be part of a community where other people also had a voice and an opinion. Sure, Don would complain if the stock market was down or the price of gas was up, but he never complained that someone left their holiday decorations up a few days longer than everyone else or that the community dues were going up because natural gas was rising and landscapers won’t work for free. He knew how to be a neighbor, and I appreciate that. Now we have new neighbors. All of which are friendly and what every new couple hopes for when they move into a new neighborhood. We hope that we can be the same to them. Because in the end, I didn’t consider Don just a neighbor, I considered him a friend and friends are what neighbors can eventually turn into if you let it. Don asked us when we were selling our condo to sell it to a “pretty, young blonde.” I couldn’t come through for him, but Don – I’m still looking for you, buddy. Don’t lose hope! Mark Berton

IN CHARTIERS VALLEY is a community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Chartiers Valley area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. PUBLISHER

Wayne Dollard M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

Marybeth Jeffries marybeth@incommunitymagazines.com R E G I O N A L E D I TO R

Mark Berton mark@incommunitymagazines.com O F F I C E M A N AG E R

Leo Vighetti leo@incommunitymagazines.com WRITERS

Pamela Palongue GRAPHIC DESIGN

Cassie Brkich Anna Buzzelli Sharon Cobb Susie Doak

Jan McEvoy Joe Milne Gail Murray Tamara Tylenda

A DV E RT I S I N G S A L E S

Derek Bayer Brian Daley Gina D’Alicandro Tina Dollard Rose Estes John Gartley Jason Huffman Lori Jeffries Rita Lengvarsky Connie McDaniel

Brian McKee Tamara Myers Gabriel Negri Robert Ojeda Annette Petrone Vincent Sabatini Michael Silvert RJ Vighetti Nikki CapezioWatson

P H OTO G R A P H E R S

Brad Lauer Gary Yon This magazine is carrier route mailed to all district households and businesses. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Copyright 2011. CORRESPONDENCE All inquiries, comments and press releases should be directed to: IN Community Magazines Attn: Editorial 603 East McMurray Road McMurray, PA 15317 Ph: 724.942.0940 Fax: 724.942.0968

Fall content deadline:11/11/11 www.incommunitymagazines.com

PS – If you have an exceptional neighbor you think we should profile, drop me a line at mark@incommunitymagazines.com. There are more Don’s out there who deserve to be recognized.

2 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.




Contents Chartiers Valley | FALL 2011 |

6

28 COMMUNITY INTEREST

|

Chartiers Valley School District Collier Township

|

18

37 |

6

13

Bridgeville Public Library

|

Celebrating the Official Grand Opening | 28

Real Estate

|

Fall Landscaping Ideas | 30 FEATURES

|

Raceway Predecessor Applies For Historic Status

|

Circus and Raceway Connection could Lead to Historic Marker | 18

Woodville Hosts Whiskey Rebellion Weekend Heartland Homes | 32 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic

|

22

Superbowl Star Hosts Celebrity Gala in Support of UPMC | 37 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

|

Beinhauer Family Services Sports Clips

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25

27

Chyten Educational Services

|

39

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

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Investment Policy After Debt Crisis Henry Wealth Management | 21 Premier Home Designs What’s Hot in the Kitchen | 34 Fitness Fanatics | 36 Bridgeville Animal Clinic | 40

ON THE COVER

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Woodville “Whiskey Rebellion” Weekend Visitors witnessed historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 3


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4 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley




2011/2012 PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES NOW AVAILABLE.

Sponsor an upcoming Chamber program or event for increased visibility and company recognition. Sponsorship levels are available to fit every business budget!

2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS HELEN WYLIE, President Development Dimensions International, Inc.

RICHARD A. KASMER, Vice President

SAVE THE DATE

Kasmer Engineering & Surveying

Sip and Stroll

GEORGE MACINO, Treasurer G & S Signs

A Tasting of International Wines & Elegant Edibles

October 13, 2011

PAUL BONOSKY, Corporate Secretary Achieva/Parc-Way Industries

LISA BAK Horizon Hospitality/Homewood Suites

Live Music, Gourmet Cuisine, Wines, Cash Bar

KELLY HANNA

ALL WELCOME!

KEYGroup

A portion of the proceeds benefit the Chamber Foundation Education and Outreach Programs.

MARCY REID SECON Corporation

MATT SERAKOWSKI Township of Upper St. Clair

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

ED SICKMUND

Join us for these and other upcoming programs sponsored by the South West Communities Chamber of Commerce

MyWay Mobile Storage

STEPHEN M. TABONE

2011 September October December

Beaconsfield Financial Services

Lunch With Your Legislators

KAREN ZATTA-MARTIN

37th Annual Celebration

Blanc Printing Company

Annual Holiday Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood (Always a Sellout!)

EMERALD VANBUSKIRK, Executive Director

2012 January March April

BARBARA M. ZINGER, Administrative Assistant

2012 Economic Forecast Luncheon Community Outlook 2012 – Lunch with Your Municipal Managers

Please visit our website at

Annual Staff Appreciation Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood

Visit our Website www.swccoc.org “Calendar of Events” or call 412-221-4100 for details, additional program listings and sponsorship opportunities. Non-Members Always Welcome!

www.swccoc.org

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 5


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  You’re invited to experience

International fiddlers perform at Chartiers Valley HS September 25, 2011 Barrage is a high-octane fiddle-fest that features an international, multi-talented cast performing an eclectic mix of music, song and dance. The cast of Barrage features: six violinists/vocalists, one drummer, one bass player, and a guitarist. These shows are part of the Barrage Educational Outreach Program to inspire and excite young string players (and future string players) particularly in the school system. Barrage performances offer up a diverse fusion of cultures, musical styles and incredible performance vitality. The music of Barrage continues to evolve - com bining contemporary world music influences, layered vocal arrangements and pulsating modern beats and rhythms. The cast delivers the show with amazing energy and musical virtuosity that will take your breath away.

Order Barrage Tickets:

Since its creation in Calgary, Canada in 1996, Barrage has been featured many times at events worldwide having played for many Presidents, Prime Ministers and Princes. Barrage has also had their television productions aired on several international TV networks including the PBS network in the USA, the BBC in the UK and CBC in Canada and has performed live shows in New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, China, Canada, Finland, Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Poland, Germany, Norway, Monaco, the USA and the UK.

Type

number of tickets

cost/ ticket

total

Adult

___________@ $15.00 = _______

Please Print:

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Name____________________________________

Student/Senior ______@ $10.00 = _______

Address__________________________________ Phone____________________________________

Grand Total = _____ Paid by check # _______

Please return this order form and a check or cash to Paid by cash _______ Chartiers Valley High School Attn: Sally Shollenberger 50 Thoms Run Road Bridgeville, PA 15017 by Monday, September 19. Make checks payable to CVOJBB. We will call you to confirm your order and hold tickets at the will-call desk the day of the performance.

PUBLIC NOTICE EXCLUSIVE COMPETITIVE FOOD VENDING CONTRACT The Board of School Directors of the Chartiers Valley School District is considering entering into an Exclusive Competitive Food Vending Contract with The Nutrition Group. Board action is scheduled on the proposed contract at the regularly-scheduled Board Meeting on October 25, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. The Meeting will be held at the District Assembly Room located at the District Administrative Offices at 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15220. The Public School Code (24 P.S. § 5-504.1) provides that the School

6 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS UNIQUE MUSICAL GROUP, CHECK OUT THEIR WEBSITE AT WWW.BARRAGE.ORG. BARRAGE WILL BE APPEARING AT THE CHARTIERS VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 50 THOMS RUN ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M. TICKETS: $15.00 ADULTS AND $10.00 STUDENTS/SENIORS

District “shall not enter into an exclusive competitive food or beverage contract unless the board of school directors provides reasonable public notice or holds a public hearing about the contract.” If any member of the public desires to comment on the proposed food vending contract with The Nutrition Group, public comment will be received by the School Board at their October 25, 2011 Meeting prior to Board action on the contract. To provide public comment, you should attend the October 25, 2011 Board Meeting, request the opportunity to speak during the public comment portion of the meeting and your comments will be received. If you have any questions regarding the proposed food vending contract or the process to provide public comment, you may contact School Board Secretary, Nicholas D. Morelli at telephone number 412-429-2204 or by e-mail to nmorelli@cvsd.net.




   Student Accident Insurance The Chartiers Valley Board of School Directors has voted to approve a Voluntary Student Accident Insurance Coverage program for the 2011-2012 school year. This insurance coverage is provided for students whose families do not have medical coverage or have medical coverage with a high deductible. Students who are injured at school are typically not covered by the school district’s liability insurance polic y. Therefore, the family is financially responsible for all medical costs incurred. The Chartiers Valley School District realizes that spiraling health care costs have forced many families to choose health insurance programs with significant deductibles. To help minimize the financial burden of high deductibles or nonexistent medical coverage for district students, CVSD offers Student Accident Insurance Protect ion through Ace American Insurance Company – as administered by American Management Advisors - at a nominal fee. Two options are available: 24-hour coverage for $98.00 annually; or school-hours-only coverage for $27.00 annually. If you are interested in exploring Student Accident Insurance Protection in greater detail, contract your child’s building principal or visit the business office page of district’ s web site (www.cvsd.net) and click on the link for Student Accident Insurance under Content.

                      

Board of Directors Beth McIntyre, President - 412.429.9242 Debra Rice, Vice President - 412.722.8021 Jeff Choura - 412.221.7704 Patti Figorski - 412.279.9030 Patricia Frey - 412.279.1439 Bridget Kelly - 412.319.7934 Herb Ohliger - 412.759.0682 Mary Lou Petronsky - 412.221.7492 Pam Poletti - 412.429.8717

Central Administration

Brian White, Ed.D Superintendent Yvonne Hawkins, Ed.D Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum Scott Seltzer Asst. Superintendent for School Leadership Nicholas D. Morelli Director of Finance and Support Operations/Board Secretary Robert Gold Director of Facilities Arthur Turner Asst. Director of Facilities Lynne Dunnick Director of Student Services Michael Mazzeo Director of Transportation Please direct news items or questions to the public relations office at 412.429.2234. Your input is greatly appreciated! Questions regarding taxes should be directed to your municipality: Bridgeville, 412.221.6055; Collier, 412.276.5277; Heidelberg, 412.276.5413; Scott, 412.276.5302. Delinquent tax questions should be directed to Maiello, Brungo and Maiello at 412.242.9615. The Board will hold Workshop and Regular meetings on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at 7 p.m. in the District Assembly Room at the Administrative Offices, 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220. The Board may take action or conduct business for any particular or general purpose at any of these meetings. Additional special or committee meetings will be called and advertised as needed. It is the policy of Chartiers Valley School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, marital or parental status, national origin, age, or handicap in its educational and vocational programs, activities or employment as required by Title IX, Section 504 and Title VI.

 

Creation of Foundation in progress

Published by the Chartiers Valley School District for the residents of Bridgeville Borough, Collier Township, Heidelberg Borough and Scott Township.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 7




Real Estate Tax Millage Rates

 

SCHOOL DISTRICT

TAX MILLAGE RATE

Wilkinsburg Borough Brentwood Borough Northgate Clairton City East Allegheny Mt. Lebanon Deer Lakes South Park Woodland Hills Shaler Area Sto-Rox South Fayette Twp. Penn Hills Bethel Park Highlands Carlynton Cornell Steel Valley Riverview Upper St. Clair Twp. Elizabeth Forward Allegheny Valley Baldwin-Whitehall West Mifflin Area Plum Borough Keystone Oaks West Allegheny Pine-Richland Moon Area Fox Chapel Area Duquesne City West Jefferson Hills Gateway Hampton Township Quaker Valley Avonworth North Hills CHARTIERS VALLEY North Allegheny Montour South Allegheny McKeesport Area

35.000 28.270 27.600 27.600 27.540 26.630 26.250 25.990 25.650 25.630 25.000 24.880 24.810 24.560 24.41 24.150 24.110 24.070 24.050 23.770 23.760 23.460 23.400 22.992 22.200 22.030 22.000 21.908 21.300 21.260 21.100 21.080 21.020 20.880 20.700 20.000 19.910 19.880 19.740 18.900 18.110 16.710

AVERAGE

23.388

8 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

Veterans Day Invitation All area veterans are invited to attend Chartiers Valley High School’s 8th Annual Veterans Day Flag Raising Ceremony and Luncheon on Friday, November 11. The school’s entire student body and faculty will gather at the flag pole in front of the building at 10:10 a.m. to honor veterans in attendance. Veterans are asked to arrive at the school by 9:50 a.m. Parking spots will be reserved near the site of the ceremony. For additional information or to confirm attendance, veterans may contact the public relations office at 412-429-2234.

CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT Summary of Finance-Revenues and Expenditures 2011-12 Budget REVENUES 6000 Local Sources 7000 State Sources 8000 Federal Sources

$ $ $

38,866,394 10,295,882 680,000

TOTAL REVENUES

$

49,842,276

EXPENDITURES Regular Education Special Education Vocational Education Other Instruction Non-Pupil Pupil Personnel Instructional Staff Administration Pupil Health Business Office Facility Operations Transportation Central Office Other Services-AIU Student Services Community Services Building Improvements Financing & Reserves

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

19,749,501 5,556,242 652,825 183,799 25,000 1,561,469 1,200,864 3,931,435 252,916 644,682 5,334,735 4,037,985 42,100 135,000 1,575,723 33,000 25,000 4,900,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

49,842,276




Chartiers Valley School District Calendar 2011-2012

July 11 Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

August 11 Su M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

Tu 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

Th 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

Sa 6 13 20 27

September 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24

October 11

November 11 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

F 2 9 16 23 30

3rd - March 22 4th - June 5

Snow Make-Up: #1 - Feb. 17 #2 - June 6 #3 - June 7 #4 - June 8 Board Approved: 3-22-11

December 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

End of Report Period: 1st.-Oct. 28 2nd - Jan. 13

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24 31

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

February 12 Su M Tu W Th F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29

Sa 4 11 18 25

March 12 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

April 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

May 12 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24 31

June 12

New Teachers' Induction - No Students Teachers' Inservice Day - No Students No Students at Certain Grade Levels - Act 80 2 Hour Delay for Students - Act 80 Teacher Meetings No School

January 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

1/2 Student Day

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 9

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Su M Tu W Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

AUGUST 17-19 New Teachers' Induction 22-24 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 25 FIRST STUDENT DAY 25-31 Kindergarten only-1/2 day-Act 80 SEPTEMBER 5 LABOR DAY – No School 28 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings OCTOBER 10 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students 31 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students NOVEMBER 8 District Conference Day-Act 80 – No Students 24-28 THANKSGIVING RECESS – No School DECEMBER 13 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 23-30 WINTER RECESS – No School JANUARY 2 WINTER RECESS – No School 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day-Teachers’ Inservice-No Students FEBRUARY 6 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 17 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 20 PRESIDENTS’ DAY – No School MARCH 2 District Conference Day - Act 80-No Students 23 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students APRIL 4 No school for Gr. K-5 only-Act 80-Parent Conferences 5-9 SPRING RECESS –No School MAY 18 SCHOOL PICNIC-No School 21 Two Hr. Delay for all Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 22 No School Grades 6-12 only-Act 80 28 MEMORIAL DAY Observed-No School JUNE 5 LAST STUDENT DAY-1/2 day 6 Teachers’ Inservice Day 7 Teachers' Inservice Day 7 Graduation 8 Teachers' Inservice Day


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NOTICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES AND PROGRAMS CHILD FIND AND ANNUAL NOTICE TO PARENTS In compliance with state and federal law, the district will provide to each protected handicapped student without discrimination or cost to the student or family, those related aids, services or accommodations which are needed to provide equal opportunity to participate in and obtain the benefits of the school program and extracurricular activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student’s abilities. In order to qualify as a protected handicapped student the child must be of school age with a physical or mental disability, which substantially limits or prohibits participation in or access to an aspect of the school program. These services and protections for “protected handicapped students” are distinct from those applicable to all eligible or except ional students enrolled (or seeking enrollment) in special education programs. For further information on the evaluation procedures and provision of services to protected handicapped students or eligible students, contact: Lynne M. Dunnick, M.Ed. Chartiers Valley School District Director of Student Services 2030 Swallow Hill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Phone 412.429.2638 Fax: 412.429.2286 The school distric t, along with other public agencies in the Commonwealth, must establish and implement procedures to identify, locate and evaluate all children who need special education programs and services because of the child’s disability. This notice is to help find these children, offer assistance to parents and describe the parent’s rights with regard to confidentiality of information that will be obtained during t he process. The school district shall also conduct awareness activities to inform the public of gifted education services and programs and the manner by which to request these services and programs. The content of this notice has been written in English. If a person does not understand any of this notice, he or she should contact the school district (see contacts) and request an explanation.

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IDENTIFICATION ACTIVITY Child Find refers to activities undertaken by public education agencies to identify, locate, and evaluate children residing in the State, including children attending private schools, who are suspected of having disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disability, and determine the child’s need for special education and related services. The purpose is to locate these children so that a free appropriate public education (FAPE) can be made available. The types of disabilities, that if found to cause a child to need services are: Autism, deafblindness, deafness, emotional disturbance, hearing impairment, mental retardation, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment due to chronic or acute health problems, specific learning disabilities (speech or language ), traumatic brain injury and visual impairment including blindness, in the case of a child that is of preschool age developmental delay. Screening activities are also conducted to determine student need for gifted support services. The school district provides educational services for all eligible students either through district- operated classes, contracts with Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3, or approved private schools. Classes providing Learning Support, Life-Skills Support, Emotional Support, Physical Support, Multiple Disabilities Support, and Autistic Support are available for students at beginning school age through age 21, if necessary. Additional services include hearing, vision, and speech and language support. Students found to meet eligibility criteria as "mentally gifted" may receive services through district's Gifted Support programs. Each school district is required to annually provide notice describing the identification activities and the procedures followed to ensure confidentiality of personally identifiable information. This notice is intended to meet this requirement. Identification activities are performed to find a child who is suspected as having a disability that would interfere with his or her learning unless special education programs and services are made available. Children suspected of

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being "mentally gifted" who need specially designed instruction not ordinarily provided in the regular education program also go through screening activities. The activities include: Review of group data, conduct hearing and vision screening, assessment of student’s academic functioning, observation of the student displaying difficulty in behavior and determining the student’s response to attempted remediation. Input from parents is also an information source for identification. After a child is identified as a suspected child with a disability, he or she is evaluated, but is not evaluated before parents give permission for their child to be evaluated. The school district will follow procedur es outlined in the special education regulations (Chapter 14) for determining eligibility and need for special education services. Chapter 16 regulations will be followed to determine eligibility and need for Gifted Support services. CONFIDENTIALITY (CFR 300.127) If after screening, a disability is suspected, upon your permission, your child will be evaluated. Written records of the results are called an education record, which are directly related to your child and are maintained by the school districts. These records are personally identifiable to your child. Personally identifiable information includes the child’s name, the name of the child’s parents or other family member, the address of the child or their family, a personal identifier such as social security number, a list of characteristics that w ould make the child’s identity easily traceable or other information that would make the child’s identity easily traceable. The school district will gather information regarding your child’s physical, mental, emotional and health functioning through testing and assessment, observation of your child, as well as through review of any records made available to the school district through your physician an d other providers of services such as day care agencies. The school district protects the confidentiality of personally identifiable information by one school official being responsible for ensuring the confidentiality of the records, training being provided to all persons using the information, and maintaining for public inspection a current list of employee’s names and positions who may have access to the i nformation. The school district will inform you when this information is no longer needed to provide educational services to your child and will destroy the information at designated intervals, except general information such as your child’s name, address, phone number, grades, attendance record and classes attended, grade level completed, may be maintained without time limitation. As the parent of the ch ild you have a number of rights regarding the confidentiality of your child’s records. The right to inspect and review any education records related to your child are collected, maintained, or used by the school district. The school district will comply with a request for you to review the records without unnecessary delay before any meetings regarding planning for your child’s special education program (called an IEP meeting). Should you and your school district disagree about your child’s special education supports and services and a due process hearing is requested, the school district will furnish you with the opportunity to inspect and review your child’s records, within 30 days. You have the right to an explanation and interpretations of the records, to be provided copies of the records if fail ure to provide the copies would effectively prevent you from exercising your right to inspect and review the records, and the right to have a representative inspect and review the records. This review is conducted with the assistance of an appropriate school district staff member. Upon your request, the school district will provide you a list of the types and location of education records collected, main tained, or used by the agency. Additionally, the school district will charge a fee for copies of records made in response to your request except, it will not charge a fee if doing so will prevent you from inspecting and reviewing your child’s records. A current list of reasonable fees relative to records request is available in the district’s central office. The district will not charge a fee to search o r retrieve information. You have the right to request in writing the amendment of your child’s education records that you believe are inaccurate or misleading, or violate the privacy or other rights of your child. The school district will decide whether to amend the records within 45 school days of receipt of your request. If the school district refuses to amend the records you will be notified of the refusal and your right to a hearing. You will be given at that time, additional




information regarding the hearing procedures. Upon written request, the district will schedule and provide written notice of the hearing to challenge information in your child’s education files. Parent consent is required before personally identifiable information contained in your child’s education records is disclosed to anyone other that officials of the school district c ollecting or using the information for purposes of identification of your child, locating your child and evaluating your child or for any other purpose of making available a free appropriate public education to your child. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Additionally, the school district, upon request, discloses records without consent to officials of another school district in which your child seeks or intends to enroll. A parent may file a written complaint with the Pennsylvania Department of Education at the address below alleging that the rights described in this notice were not provided. Pennsylvania Department of Education Bureau of Special Education Division of Complia nce 333 Market Street Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333 The Department of Education will investigate the matter, issue a report of findings and necessary corrective action within 60 days. The Department will take necessary action to ensure compliance is achieved. Complaints alleging failures of the school district with regard to confidentiality of personally identifiable information may also be filed with: Family Poli cy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 The school districts listed above will provide ongoing screening services. If you wish to learn more, have questions, or believe your child may need to be identified, please contact your local school district contact. EARLY INTERVENTION IDENTIFICATION

POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF WEAKNESSES IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL DOMAIN AREAS AND OTHER RISK FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY (Requirement of Section 14.212(b)) A developmental delay is determined by the results of a developmental evaluation. The results of one or more domain areas (adaptive, personal-social, communication, motor or cognitive) have to show at least a 25% delay or a score of 1.5 standard deviations below the mean (Standard Score of 77 or below). The delay results in the need for specially designed intervention/instruction (SDI) in order to participate in typical activities and routines. Children with a developmental delay may show weaknesses in the following areas: Adaptive – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty dressing/undressing; using utensils to eat, removing shoes without assistance, distinguishing between nonfood/food substances, or have difficulty with toileting needs. One may have difficulty moving independently

OTHER FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY Developmental disabilities are birt h defects related to a problem with how a body part or body system works. They may also be known as functional birth defects. Many of these conditions affect multiple body parts or systems. Researchers have identified thousands of different birth defects. Birth defects can have a variety of causes, such as: Genetic problems caused when one or more genes doesn’t work properly or part of a gene is missing, Problems with chromosomes, such as having an extra chromosome or missing part of a chromosome. Environmental factors that the expectant mother is exposed to during pregnancy, such as Rubella or German measles or if she uses drugs or alcohol during pregnancy. FACTORS CONSIDERED WHEN DETERMINING MENTAL GIFTEDNESS 1. The child performs a year or more above grade achievement level in one or more subjec ts as measured by a nationally normed and validated achievement test. 2. The child demonstrates rates of acquisition/retention of content and skills reflecting gifted ability. 3. The child demonstrates achievement, performance, or expertise in one or more academic areas as evidenced by products, portfolios or research, as well as criterion-referenced team judgment. 4. The child demonstrates early and measu red use of high level thinking skills, academic creativity, leadership skills, intense academic interest, communication skills, foreign language aptitude, or technology expertise. 5. The child demonstrates that intervening factors such as English as a second language, disabilities, gender or race bias, or socio/cultural deprivation are masking gifted abilities.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 11

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In Pennsylvania, a child between three years of age and the s chool district’s age to begin school who has a developmental delay or one or more of the physical or mental conditions listed above, will be identified as an “eligible young child.” The parents of these children have the same rights described above. The Pennsylvania Department of Education is responsible for providing programs and services to eligible young children under Act 212 of 1990, the Early Interve ntion Services System Act. Screening for preschool children is available through the DART Program operated by Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3. To schedule an appointment for screening call the AIU at 412.394.5987. For additional information, contact the school district.

around the house, understanding that hot is dangerous, putting away toys when asked, indicating an illness or ailment to an adult, or demonstrating caution and avoiding common dangers. Personal-Social – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty responding positively to adult praise, rewards or promise of rewards; greeting familiar adul ts spontaneously, enjoying simple stories read aloud, helping with simple household tasks, initiating social interaction with familiar adults, expressing affection/liking for peers, playing cooperatively with peers, stating first name, last name, age, or whether he is a male/female; using objects in make-believe play, using ‘I’ or ‘me’ to refer to himself, or recognizing facial expressions of common emot ions. Communication - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty following 2-step verbal commands, associating spoken words with pictures, recalling events from a story presented orally; engaging in extended and meaningful nonverbal exchanges with others, using words to get his needs met, responding to ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions appropriately, or asking ‘wh’ questions. Motor - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty running without falling, kicking a ball without falling, walking up and down steps alternating feet without assistance, walking backward, imitating the bilateral movements of an adult, pointing with his index finger independent of the thumb and other fingers, scribbling linear and/or circular patterns spontaneously, using t he pads of fingertips to grasp a pencil, holding a paper with one hand while drawing or writing with the other hand, fastening clothing without assistance, cutting with scissors, copying a circle, or imitating vertical and horizontal markings. Cognitive - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty attending to one activity for 3 or more minutes, reciting memorized lines fro m songs or TV shows, showing interest in age-appropriate books, matching/naming colors, responding to one and one more, giving three objects on request, matching shapes, identifying objects by their use, identifying items by size, identifying colors of familiar objects not in view, or identifying simple objects by touch.


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

    

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Collier Township welcomes the new Township Manager Sal Sirabella and the new Codes Enforcement/Zoning Officer Tom Plietz.

Residents can submit their email address to the township so that they could be informed of special meetings or happenings taking place in the Township.

 • October 3 to December 16, 2011. Dates are approximate and subject to change depending on weather. • Leaves must be raked curbside or to the edge of residency. • Pick-up will be via the Township’s “Leaf-Vac” along residential streets only. •Leaves may be bagged. Use brown leaf & garden bags only – no plastic. After December 16, 2011, all leaves must be bagged with leaf bags (not plastic bags).

 We are looking for volunteers just like you to help make Collier parks safe, fun places for enjoying time with your family. FRIENDS is the new, non-profit organization developed to handle fundraising activities for Collier Parks & Recreation initiatives. We cannot do it without your help! We welcome a diverse group of individuals and talents. If you are interested, please contact membership chairman Barb Riedel at 412-279-8747 or email at abriedl@verizon.net.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER is in need of Volunteers In order to keep the membership fee to a minimum, we are asking for volunteers to help man and manage the facility. Duties will be greeting guests and checking-in members I. D. Hours will be M-F, 8am-11am and 4pm-8pm. Saturday 8am-5pm and closed on Sunday. The Fitness Center is located on Porter Way off of Private Lobaugh Street from Nike Site Road. The facility has various strength training equipment, and a number of fitness machines, bikes, treadmills, etc. There are also ladies and men's showers and a sauna available for your use. For information or to sign-up to volunteer call: Bob Caun, Parks & Recreation Director, 412- 279-2525, Ext. 125 or bcaun@colliertwp.net. Hope to see you there enjoying yourself soon.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER MEMbERShIP FEE INDIVIDUAL 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP RESIDENT $60.00 NON-RESIDENT $85.00 FAMILY 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP (3 or more persons in family) Nobody under 14 without an adult. Absolutely nobody under 12 years old. RESIDENT $140.00 NON-RESIDENT $180.00

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Board Parks and Recreation Month at 6:30 PM of y Fourth Tuesda Each Planning Commission y of Each Month at 7:00 PM First & Third Thursda

$3.00 $5.00

  ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES: (412) 279-2525 8AM to 4:30PM – Mon., Tues., Thurs. 8AM to 7PM Wed., 8AM to NOON Fri. Codes/Zoning Office:

(412) 279-9998

Tax Office:

(412) 276-5277

Public Works:

(412) 279-8828

Police Station:

(412) 276-5051

Municipal Authority:

(412) 279-4941

Emergency:

911

Collier Township Website: www.colliertownship.net

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(Workshop/Agenda) Board of CommissionersEach Month at 7:00 PM Last Wednesday of (Regular/Business) Board of Commissioners of Each Month at 7:00 PM Second Wednesday ion (As Needed) Civil Service Commiss nth at 7:00 PM First Tuesday of Each Mo (As Needed) Zoning Hearing Board ch Month at 7:00 PM Ea of y sda Third Tue

NON-MEMbERS - PER VISIT RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT

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   Since 2000, the Night Walk on the Panhandle Trail has been a Halloween tradition in Collier Township. This year the festivities begin at 7 PM on Saturday, October 22nd. The Rennerdale Youth Group will carve more than 100 pumpkins donated by Beccari’s Farm Market, Thoms Run Road. Collier Girl Scouts will set out and light the jack o’ lanterns along a half-mile stretch of the Trail from the bridge near the Walkers Mill trailhead to the Sunnyside entrance. Bonfires light the night and hot chocolate and sweet cider are distributed by Collier Friends of the Panhandle Trail. A costumed volunteer will delight the kids with stories near the Quarry bonfire. This year’s treat bags for children aged 11 and under will be distributed at the Quarry. Also new this year, children was well as adults are encouraged to wear costumes and parade on the Quarry stage. Parking is available in the Public Works yard at 110 Noblestown Road. The event is free but donations are welcomed! For updates, got to www.panhandletrail.org.

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● For all ages including organization & school field trips. ● Free refreshments & station tours. ● Please come visit us and our duck pond. For more information, see our website at www.rennerdalevfd.com.

Line up is 12:30 pm at Webb Field. Parade starts at 1 pm. Every child in costume receives a treat bag plus prizes. Cookies and drinks will be served. Chartiers Valley Band will be in the parade. Any questions, call John Kripp at 412-276-4252.

   

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All you can eat pancake breakfast including your choice of pancakes, bacon, sausage, eggs and beverages. The sixth annual Open house & Membership Drive will have demonstrations, exhibits and prize giveaways. Presto VFD is located at 5228 Thoms Run Road with ample parking across the street. For more information, please call the station at 412-221-5677 or visit the website at www.prestovfd.org.

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Chartiers Valley

The Friends of Collier invites all to their First Annual Oktoberfest that will be held Friday, September 30th from 6:00 – 10:00 PM and Saturday, October 1st from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM at the newly acquired Charles E. Kelly Support Facility located at the former Army base off of Nike Site Road. Come with friends and family and enjoy nightly performances by local bands, tasty foods, desserts, beer and great entertainment for the kids. Vendors are needed, if you are interested in participating, please contact Janet Wank at 412.279.9998 or jwank@colliertwp.net.




   

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The Kirwan Heights VFD, Presto VFD and the Rennerdale VFD once again thank the Hall of Flame Golf Committee for their efforts in holding the fifth successful Hall of Flame Golf Outing. Through their efforts and with the strong financial support of Collier residents, businesses and neighboring businesses, the Golf event once again raised more than $40,000.00. These funds are shared equally by each Fire Company to help cover the rising costs of personal protection gear and necessary fire and emergency equipment. The raffle winners were: Charlotte Davis (1st); Mal Bruce (2nd) and Dave Clemens (3rd). Next years golf outing will be in July, 2012.

NON-EMERGENCY: 412-279-6911: This is the main number used to contact the Collier Township Police. When you call this number and specify that you need Collier Police, they will contact the on-duty officers and send them to the correct location or inform them to return your call. This number is the MOST effective way for a resident or business owner to reach the police.

 The First United Presbyterian Church of Rennerdale is hosting its 7th annual Golf Outing on Saturday, September 10, 2011 at Fort Cherry Golf Club. Cost is $80 which includes 18 holes of golf, cart, refreshment at the turn and dinner. All proceeds go to our Christian Education and youth program. If interested in participating, please call the church at 412-276-2268 or e-mail lisaandjimmason@comcast.net.

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OFFICE: 412-276-5051: This number is for leaving a message for a specific officer in their voicemail. This will be listened to when the officer is on duty next. This number may also be used for general questions. SOLICITATION: Anyone who goes door to door to advertise their business or products, even by placing a flyer, is a solicitor. They need a permit for this. There are rules as to when and where they are allowed. Solicitors are not allowed where there are signs up such as Cloverleaf Estates, Nevillewood, Nevilleside, and Summit Ridge. They are not allowed at houses with no soliciting signs or who are on the no soliciting list. If someone comes to your door they need a permit and their ID. When in doubt, call 412-279-6911. ALARMS: Any resident or business with an alarm system needs an alarm permit. Resident alarms cost $50, business alarms cost $65. This is a one-time fee. You can have three free false alarms in a calendar year, after that they cost $25/each.

 CTMA continues to provide the necessary main sewer line inspection, maintenance and repair as required under the Allegheny County Health Department Consent Order which affects all municipalities in Allegheny County. Under the Consent Order, no surface water may enter the sanitary sewer system and individual property owners must make certain that they have disconnected any roof leader or stairwell or driveway drain that is connected into the sanitary sewer system. Property owners must make certain that their house air vent and house cleanout are exposed to grade for necessary maintenance in order to have the sewer system function properly and be available should a dye test pf the property be requested. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 15

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This spring CTMA accepted from the contractor the sanitary sewer lines installed to serve 19 properties located along Baldwin Rd. East and West. The project cost was $542,696.15 and was constructed with the cooperation of the property owners that were served by this project. Sewer lines have been designed to serve properties along the opposite of Baldwin Rd., and McMichael Rd., Baldwin Rd, Scotts Run Rd. and portions of Ridge Rd. to McMichael Rd. This project has been substantially delayed due to the refusal of a number of property owners to grant the required right-of-ways needed to construct the project. Without the cooperation of all property owners in providing the necessary right-of-ways, projects of this type are delayed indefinitely and, in some cases, are abandoned. CTMA had applied for a PA H2O Grant for the entire project. The Commonwealth of PA notified CTMA that the project could not be founded at this time. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

EMERGENCY: 9-1-1




   ChIMNEY AND FURNACES Chimney maintenance is vital to your family’s safety. • Have your chimney inspected and cleaned on a regular basis. • When possible, burn seasoned woods (dryness of the wood is more important than hard wood versus soft wood). • Smaller, hotter fires will burn more completely and produce less smoke than larger fires. • Do not burn cardboard boxes or trash, as they can spark a chimney fire. • Install stovepipe thermometers, which help monitor flue temperatures where wood stoves are in use, then adjust burning practices as needed.

TRICK OR TREAT SAFETY Don’t get caught up in the holiday spirit —make sure your children trick-or-treat safely. • Rather than buying a mask, use makeup to decorate children. That way, they can see more easily. • If your kids go trick-or-treating after dusk, make sure they have a flashlight and are wearing retro reflective material. • Dress children in warm, light colored clothing so that they may be easily seen when crossing the street. • Do not purchase Halloween costumes and other items which are not marked “Flameproof” or “Flame-Retardant”. • Remind children to skip houses that are not well-lit. • Check candy before allowing kids to eat it. • Avoid tricks that could cause bodily injury, destroy property, or cause a fire.

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WhAT IS STORM WATER? Storm Water is water from precipitation that flows across the ground & pavement when it rains or when snow & ice melt. The water seeps into the ground or drains into what we call storm sewers. These are the drains you see at street corners or at low points on the sides of streets. Collectively, the draining water is call storm water runoff.

FALL CLEAN-UP Yard work does not end simply because summer is over. Here are some safety tips for tackling autumn tasks around home. • When lifting heavy bags of mulch, use a wheelbarrow when possible, and remember to lift with your legs, not with your back. • Be careful when pruning. Pruning from a ladder is especially dangerous. • To avoid blisters when doing yard work, wear gloves. • If you are doing a lot of raking, try an ergonomic rake, which can be found at most hardware stores and garden centers.

along the way empty into our waters, too, because storm water does not get treated. • Pet wastes left on the ground get carried away by storm water, contributing harmful bacteria, parasites & viruses to our water. • Vehicles drip fluids (oil, grease, gasoline, antifreeze, brake fluids, etc.) onto paved areas where storm water runoff carries them through our storm drains & into our water. • Chemicals used to grow & maintain beautiful lawns & gardens, if not used properly, can run off into the storm drains when it rains or

WhY IS STORM WATER “GOOD RaIN GONE WRONG?” Storm water becomes a problem when it picks up debris, chemicals, dirt, and other pollutants as it flows or when it causes flooding & erosion of stream banks. Storm water travels through a system of pipes & roadside ditches that make up storm sewer systems. It eventually flows directly to a lake, river, stream, wetland or coastal water. All of the pollutants storm water carries 16 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

bACK TO SChOOL SAFETY Parents must do some homework to keep their kids healthy and safe. Don’t let safety “fall” by the wayside. • Walk and ride to school safely. Obey traffic lights and signals, walk only in crosswalks, and listen to the crossing guard. • If your kids bike to school, be sure they wear a helmet. • If possible, always walk your child to the bus stop and pick them up as well. • Keep backpacks light – a child’s backpack should only be 5 to 10 percent of his or her body weight, according to the American Chiropractic Association. • A backpack with wheels is easy to maneuver and reduces back stress. If your child does choose to wear a backpack, utilize both straps. Slinging the backpack over once shoulder may cause spinal curvature.

Chartiers Valley

when we water our lawns & gardens. • Waste from chemicals & materials used in construction can wash into the storm sewer system when it rains. Soil that erodes from construction sites causes environmental degradation, including harming fish & shellfish populations that are important for recreation & our economy. This information was supplied by Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. For more information go to www.dep.state.pa.us.




  you thought block parties were a thing of the past, think again! Chestnut Street in Bridgeville has been holding an annual block party for the past 27 years. Each year, neighbors close off the street and party until 11 p.m. Children play games in the street, including bobbing for bubble gum in pie pans filled with whipped cream, find the prize in a pile of hay, and football, of course. A sheet is decorated every year, commemorating the event, and while organizers said there have been a couple of years when the party wasn’t held, those years are few and far between. Even and odd numbered houses take turns between bringing appetizers and desserts and hotdogs, hamburgers and chicken are grilled on the street. The group even set up a screen to project the Steelers preseason game against Atlanta, and a stage w here neighbors can demonstrate their talents which ranged from a vocal and kazoo rendition of Harry Woods’ 1927 classic “Side By Side,” rock and roll standards like “Johnny B. Goode,” and a family blowing on the slide trombones and trumpet. 

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

Raceway predecessor Applies for

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West Allegheny

are a fan of the Imperial Raceway, it’s probably no surprise to you that much of Imperial’s amenities came from the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena. What may surprise you is that the tiny Borough of Heidelberg has applied for historic status for the site. The application was denied once because it was submitted based on its history of racing. The borough researched the matter further and found that the raceway wasn’t just known for the excitement that later found itself at Imperial. The Heidelberg Raceway was the site of the final 1956 Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus under the big top, documented in national outlets like the New York Times and Life Magazine. It was a ½-mile racetrack that hosted four NASCAR races and where Richard Perry’s father, Lee Perry won his first NASCAR race. It was also home to countless boxing matches, soccer games, fairs and circuses. Now, Heidelberg Manager Joe Kauer wants Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena to be recognized for the history it’s provided the region since during its brief, 25-year lifespan. “We submitted for one of those roadside historical markers. The state kicked our application back saying we needed more than just four NASCAR races to declare it historical,” Kauer said. “They said, ‘What’s there of national historical significance,’ so we researched it, and it was the final act of the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Circus under the tent.”


  

According to Heidelberg Borough’s application with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, the track was opened on Memorial Day, 1948, and was intended to be a home for horse racing, which did not become legal until years later. In addition to the main ½mile asphalt track, it also had a ¼-mile dirt track, seating for 15,000 fans, and free parking for 8,000 cars. After its closing in 1973, the site was razed and became home to “Raceway Plaza,” which has been a commercial staple for the South Hills for decades. Home to major anchor department chains such as Hills, Ames and now Wal-Mart, the site also has a Shop ‘N Save, McDonalds and Long John Silvers. “You would never guess that all this history just happened right down the street,” Kauer said. “This marker will remind people, so people don’t just think of it as a Wal-Mart or a Shop ‘N Save. People don’t even call it Raceway Plaza anymore. It was all Heidelberg people that ran it and worked it. Ike Wright, the original owner of Wright’s Seafood Inn, built it. Ed Witzberger bought it and he was our mayor here for years.” Today, much of the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena is still being utilized at the Pittsburgh Motor Speedway in Imperial. Heidelberg Raceway was ahead of its time among racing venues, with an electric scoreboard and air-conditioned press box, thanks to Witzberger’s vision. However, the impressive attributes of the race track succumbed to the political climate of the times, when after the track did not open for the 1974 season under a lease agreement, Witzberger cited the energy crises of the 1970s as cause for

not renewing the lease. And while the track lives on on numerous racing internet forums and discussion boards, it was the final circus performance that really brought about the end of an era for a lot of people in the region. Gene Czambel of Collier was one of those people. “It was a Monday night and I was 13 years old. It was very exciting. You knew they were coming to town,” he said. “It would take them a couple days to set up. They’d come in on the railroad. The elephants would walk down the street, carrying all that stuff, it was awesome. Normally, it lasted all week, but after this last performance, they just said that was it.” Czambel said he remembers lion tamers guiding lions through hoops, all kinds of acrobats and performers and, of course, the side show. “They had the side show and they had this guy, who was the tallest guy in the world. He was 8-foot, 2 inches tall and you’d pay the admission and go behind the curtain to see him,” Czambel said. “I got to shake this guy’s hand and they gave you a pamphlet telling you all about him.” Kauer said the borough will know in September whether or not the application was accepted. After that, will come a period of fundraising to raise the $2,500 for the marker.

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

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Chartiers Valley




  What will the impact to investors be due to this most recent crisis? By Daniel L. Henry, CLU On August 2nd, President Obama quickly signed the Budget Control Act (Senate 365 as amended) after passage by the Senate 74 to 26. The House passed its version one day earlier by a vote of 269 to 161. The new law raises the debt limit to avoid a projected August 2 default and creates a bipartisan joint select committee on deficit reduction. (source: Yahoo Finance) We try not to be over tly political in this magazine as well as towards our clients, realizing that each person has their own unique views and beliefs. Yet we feel compelled to offer our perspective on these most recent debates as well as our perception as to its effects on the stock market. Without having to preface each point with, ‘in our opinion”, please know that these eight points are, “our opinions”: 1. The markets have rallied nearly 90% off the lows of March, 2009. Volatility and even corrections (defined as a 10% drop) are inevitable. (source: Yahoo Finance) 2. There is little concern that the US can’t pay its bills. This was a political event, not a financial one. 3. The professionals at Henry Wealth Management believe in building investment portfolios with via a “passive investment strategy”. The bedrock of this belief system is to globally allocate assets in a proper stock-to-bond ratio, based on one’s goals, time frames and propensities to risk. Once the allocation is chosen, unless there is a bona fide change to a person’s goals, we need to stay invested! 4. It is an easy decision to get out of the markets- fear is a compelling driver to help pull that lever. It is not knowing or frankly, having the courage to ge t back in at the right time that kills returns. The 90% run up mentioned in point 1 assumes that investors were “in” at the bottom, not “back in” at some point along the ascent. 5. The current sell-off and market drop seems to be overdone and overly dramatic, driven by politically-charged fears and fueled by nonstop media coverage. Investors won’t be satisfied for any length of time sitting in low yielding treasuries. I wonder if those who bailed out will get back in after things “calm down” (good luck defining that) and after stock prices rise to ensure that their exit and re-entrance only serves to lock in losses. 6. Pundits can’t have it both ways. The two recent and massive “Keynesian” stimulus spending packages, dubbed “Quantitative Easing 1 and 2” seemingly have not helped our economy. Others now say that cutting spending will hurt the economy. Well, which is it? For us, we allocate assets** for long-term purposes and thus, despite short-term polar opposite rhetoric or actions, do not want to be derailed in our approach. Footnote: The Budget Control Act does not actually cut spending- it only reduces the amount of scheduled annual increases. 7. On a positive note; We do like the fact that an emerging voice in our nation’s capital appears to be supportive of a shrinking government and true spending reductions. Credit card usage and balances by consumers is certainly trending downward.* Our government needs to follow suit. We believe this will help our economy and financial markets over the long-run. 8. On a positive note, #2; Talk of a balanced budget amendment is

nearing a fever-pitch. Hopefully term limits for Congress will not be far behind. These two items could help immeasurably! It’s all about incentives, which present members of Congress do not have. Many seemingly vote to keep their jobs and cater to their largest donors. Taking away lifetime jobs and forcing them to live with a balanced budget may allow them to do the right things for the right reasons without the repercussion of a re-ele ction loss. Again, we see this as helpful for our economy and financial markets. Dan Henry, CLU, is the Vice President of Henry Wealth Management, LLC, an independent financial services firm located at 1370 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA. He offers Securities through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. This article was co-authored with Phil Henry, ChFC, CFS, the firms President. Phil offers Securities and InvestmentAdvisory Services through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. NFP Securities, Inc. is not affiliated with Henry Wealth Management, LLC. Dan may be reached at 412-838-0200 or through email at Dan@HenryWealth.com. The firm’s website is www.HenryWealth.com. The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those held by NFP Securities, Inc. This is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendation. NFP Securities, Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice. Using diversification as part of your investment strategy neither assures nor guarantees better performance and cannot protect against loss of principal due to changing market conditions. Past Performance does not guarantee future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a popular indicator of the stock market based on the average closing prices of 30 active U.S. stocks representative of the overall economy.

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     

1370 W A S H I N G T O N P I K E , S U I T E 403 | B R I D G E V I L L E , PA 15017 P H O N E : 412-838-0200 | W W W .H E N R Y W E A LT H . C O M Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 21


  

Woodville Plantation hosts

weekend isitors got to step back in time at Woodville Plantation in July, as the living history museum presented a special event to commemorate the Whiskey Rebellion - historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794. The weekend also featured a walking lecture titled, “The Events of 1794.” Soldiers of the Fourth Sub-Legion as they returned to Bower Hill discussed and re-created the fateful events of the Whiskey Rebellion, as they occurred in July of 1794. The unique event will included an encampment along the “Tom the Tinker Trail.” Participants experienced camp life with cooking demonstrations, musket firings and tactical demonstrations. A history walk starting at the PA State Historical Marker on Bower Hill near Kane Regional Center and ending at the Scrubgrass Run Trailhead covered topics such as the Battle of Bower Hill, the soldiers that participated in the battle and the Whiskey Rebellion. On Whiskey Rebellion Day, the troops of the Fourth Sub-

V

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Chartiers Valley


  

The Whiskey Rebellion began when farmers rebelled against a tax on whiskey, which was a primary source of their income, that left no room for farmers to profit from their labor. The dispute reached a flashpoint in July of 1794, when mobs ransacked Pittsburgh and a federal marshal in Allegheny County was attacked. President George Washington raised a militia of 13,000 troops and personally led them to squash the insurrection. After all the dust had settled, those few who were arrested were later pardoned by Washington.

Legion made camp at Woodville Plantation, marched and drilled. Guests were able to experience 18th century military camp life, see tactical demonstrations, musket firing, marching and ceremonial drills. Soldiers discussed what camp life was like in the army of 1794. Visitors also learned 18th century cooking techniques as Woodville’s cooks prepared dinner for the encamped troops. Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, go to Woodville’s website at www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412.221.0348.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 23




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Chartiers Valley




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• CALL TODAY FORhas DETAILS Outreach program provided us the • Family Owned & Operated since 1860 opportunity to grow and our • Personalized “Celebration of Life Services” at thestrengthen area’s guaranteed lowest cost relationships within community.” • Only Beinhauer can provide complete Cremation Services usingthe our own Crematory operated by license • Cemetery Services at Woodruff MemorialBeinhauers Park and can newpersonalize Community Mausoleum~Free Veterans services for

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BeinhauerFamily Services

“We have a lot of service based groups that meet in our community room. A church group meets at the Peters Township location every IF YOU DON’T KNOW THE BEINHAUER NAME, Sunday at 10 a.m.,” says Scott Beinhauer. YOU MUST BE NEW TO THE COMMUNITY. The decision to open up the community Beinhauer Funeral Homes have been part room to groups was of the community since 1860, with six twofold: One, it generations of the family, nurturing and gave the funeral growing their business, along with operating home a place for the second oldest active crematory in the large groups to United States. The Beinhauer family strives to assemble or hold be a part of the communities they serve. ceremonies; “The family business is important to all of second, it was a us, and there’s a great deal of heritage and way to give back to legacy that has been established by past the community that generations. We’re making impressions and has supported them building relationships today within our over the decades. communities, continuing a legacy of heritage “We wanted to and trust,” says Rick Beinhauer, the company’s make available a leader and a fifth generation family member. space that anyone in the community could use; Beinhauer is proud to have the sixth generation for example, educational seminars and currently active in the family business with continuing education courses for nurses, Scott Beinhauer, licensed funeral director. seniors, caregivers, hospices, and veterans, to The Beinhauer family serves five mention a few. An annual memorial service is communities in the South Hills—Peters held in the community room for any family Township, Bethel Park, Bridgeville, that wishes to attend. In Bridgeville, we have a Dormont/Mt. Lebanon, and Canonsburg. digital resource sign that not only informs the Their locations are family-friendly, providing community about funeral service information, children’s rooms, cafés where food and but also other community events, such as beverages can be served, and a community programs at the library, Rotary functions, room where dinners and luncheons can be community day, church fairs, and other scheduled. newsworthy information. Our community

the options they can in-house with their own staff. “We’re in the business of helping families create an event or service that is an extension of their loved one’s life—something that provides a meaningful experience for the family and the community,” says Scott Beinhauer. Some of those personal touches include an interactive website, personalized DVD videos, and webcasting of funerals, which, through the use of a password protected website, can give those with physical considerations or travel limitations the ability to attend a loved one’s funeral service over the Internet. “There are a lot of little things that are done for funerals. People create photo collages that chronicle their loved one’s life, or bring in personal items that represent one’s hobbies or lifestyles. You have the year of birth and the year of death, and then you have the dash in the middle. We focus on the dash—everything in the middle that that person has done for their family and community. We help the family celebrate and honor the life that was lived,” says Scott Beinhauer. The Beinhauer family also manages Woodruff Memorial Park Cemetery, located on Route 19 in North Strabane Township. The newly constructed Community Mausoleum offers magnificent crypt entombment as well as extensive cremation niches, including bronze and beveled glass and a beautiful indoor chapel. Adjacent to the human cemetery, Peaceful Pastures provides a final resting place for pets of any kind, including the area’s only pet funeral and cremation center, which houses its own crematory. For more information on Beinhauer Family Funeral Homes and their cemetery and cremation options, call 724.969.0200 or visit them at www.beinhauer.com.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 25




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Chartiers Valley




Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 27




Bridgeville Public Library celebrates

           

T

he official Grand Opening of the Bridgeville Public Library, the culmination of 10 years of planning toward the vision to create a center for lifelong learning and a destination where everyone can go to connect, explore, discover, and grow, was celebrated on June 12, at the new location at 505 McMillen Street (off Dewey Avenue). Local representatives were on hand to share their thoughts on the landmark day, including U.S. Congressman Tim Murphy; The Office of State Senator John Pippy; 45th District Representative Nick Kotik; Allegheny County District 4 Representative Michael Finnerty, Bridgeville Mayor Donald Dolde, who will serve as master of ceremonies; and Fr. Jason Del Vitto, St. George Antiochian Church delivered the invocation. They were joined by Allegheny County Library Association Executive Director, Marilyn J enkins, local leaders and Joyce Heinrich, event chairman. The ceremonies included the formal dedication of a flag pole, donated by board president, Nino Petrocelli, Sr., in memory of his mother, Alberina Petrocelli, conducted by American Legion Post #54 and Boy Scout Troop #2. Vocalist Hannah Drake and South Fayette Middle School ensemble provided patriotic-themed musical accompaniment. “We are writing a new chap ter in a 49-year journey, made possible by the flow of resources from the Bill and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust,” said Donna Taylor, library director. To acknowledge the McDivitt’s gift to the community and their generosity in perpetuity, the Bridgeville Public Library Board of Trustees voted to dedicate the Bill & Grace McDivitt Center for Lifelong Learning in an unveiling ceremony. A response of gratitude and appreciation was given by Martha Mihalyi Fitzmier of Decatur, GA, friend of the McDivitts and daughter of fellow

28 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

founder, Betty Mihalyi. She was joined by granddaughter Katie Fitzmier of Madison, WI. The ceremony and reflection honored all six founders and their families, including Louisa Bergstrom, Grace McDivitt, Betty Mihalyi, Betty Mincemoyer, Sylvia Saperstein & Betty Sutton who incorporated the Bridgeville Publ ic Library on June 21, 1962. The official ribbon cutting by all dignitaries and board members at the entrance opened the doors for those attending to enjoy refreshments, including three cakes donated by South Fayette Shop ‘n Save. Drawings were held for Mylan Golf Classic tickets, BPL tee shirts sporting the new library logo, and more. The board of trustees took a leap-of-faith to proceed with construction of the new 7800 square foot space by leveraging a $500,000 Keystone Grant from the PA Recreation, Park and Conversation Fund for Libraries. That state funding source is now unavailable. development function was established to generate the funds needed to compliment the William and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust proceeds, which were tapped for the dollar-for-dollar match required to qualify for the maximum Keystone grant. The combined $2.2 million from the Keystone Grant and the McDivitt Charitable Trust is one-third of what is needed for the sustainability of the library for generations to come. The Once-in-a-Lifetime Campaign for the Bridgeville Public Library is designed to generate gifts and endowment for the balance of $4.2 million over the next four years. Launch of the comprehensive campaign is under the direction of Lawna Blankenship, the development officer hired to facilitate outreach to

A

Chartiers Valley

a wide range of

prospective philanthropic resources, including corporations, foundations, families, businesses, individuals and friends. “One of the things that make great institutions is transition,” said Blankenship, who plans to meet the community and share the amazing story, the vision and great successes, already being experienc ed. he new library is a destination for all age groups, many underserved because of lack of space. A walking trail planned for the green space that surrounds the library building will compliment myriad wellness programs already in evidence. Programming has increased by 550 percent and program attendance by 869 percent in the first quarter of this year versus the same period in 2010. The library had to open at 11 a.m. to allow for children’s story time programs in the iconic train depot and caboose. Now, patrons are waiting for the doors to open at 9 a.m.

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BUILDING MEN OF FAITH, SCHOLARSHIP AND SERVICE.                 

 

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

REAL ESTATE

C h a rt ie r s Va l l e y

IN Community Magazines proudly announces a comprehensive look at the Chartiers Valley real estate market. In this section, you’ll find interesting information about creating beautiful spaces to live in, and other interesting facts about your community. F E AT U R E S T O R Y

FALL LANDSCAPING IDEAS When the dog days of summer are behind us and that first crisp snap of fall is in the air, energy seems to make a rebound and even the animals seems livelier, more alert. During this time, there’s nothing more wonderful than taking advantage of those last days of warmth to get outside and enjoy the outdoors by doing a little yard work. This is a great time to rake up all those leaves on the ground. But don’t just throw them into a trash bag to be hauled away. Leaves are great for composting and may have as much as three times the amount of minerals as fertilizer. They need to be shredded to be easier to work with, but this is easily accomplished by running a mower back and forth a few times over a pile of leaves. Also, be sure to add a little nitrogen to your compost pile with the leaves.

If your summer flowers have faded, be sure to trim back dead leaves and blooms and add some fall flowers for some more vibrant color. Mums and sunflowers can be purchased in pots to accent any garden with a fall palette, but don’t forget purple as a great contrasting color to oranges, yellows and sienna. Some fall flowers with purple accents are pansies, purple coneflowers, asters and mums. All of these will grow well in zone 6. For some green accent, you might try growing some arugula in a pot or self-watering container. This spicy, leafy plant has long been popular in France and Italy and actually grows better in the fall than in the summer. The leaves will add zest to your salads and other fall dishes. Although the planting time for arugula is in the spring, seedlings can be purchased and transplanted, however they also do well if left in containers or pots.

Helping Families Make the Right Move!

Nevillewood Office: 412.276.5000, Ext. 210 Direct: 412.276.5878 TimDowneyJr@howardhanna.com www.howardhanna.com • www.TimDowneyJr.com

Even if you’re not particularly good at growing plants and flowers, there are many ways to accent your lawn and garden with minimal effort and maintenance. Brightly colored pumpkins placed around pathways and steps give a whimsical touch to decorating. Avoid placing them in direct sunlight and directly on the ground and your pumpkin may well last for two to three months in the cool fall climate. Other low-maintenance decorations for fall are corn stalks and bales of hay. Hay bales also provide extra seating in outdoor areas. Summer may be over but your yard can still be a bright, cheerful place full of beautiful, living things. - by Pamela Palongue

sure you check out Buying? Make IN Chartiers Valley magazine before you make your next move. Selling? Looking?

Tim Downey, Jr. Realtor Chartiers Valley Sales & Relocation Specialist

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

I’ve worked in Chartiers Valley for many years.

412.221.2248 724.745.7422 www.colemanmitchell.com info@colemanmitchell.com

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Don’t miss your final opportunity to live in

Neville Manor in Collier Township! Neville Manor has only three opportunities remaining in this low maintenance living 2-cul-de-sac community. It features luxurious townhomes and carriage homes with access to the community clubhouse and pool. Located just minutes from I-79, the Pittsburgh International Airport and Downtown Pittsburgh and close to great shopping at Robinson Mall, Settler’s Ridge, and more! Neville Manor offers the lifestyle you deserve, for a price you can afford!

Want more information Call Jodie, our New Home Specialist – 412-512-6671

As Western Pennsylvania’s premier stone masonry contractor we are committed to serving our residential and commercial clients by providing high quality, reliable and consistent results at competitive rates. Our showroom is located at 3464 Babcock Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237. For additional information please call (412) 596-2114 or visit us online at www.stoneageinc.net. Andersen windows use natural wood to create a timeless combination of beauty and durability – plus All Andersen windows feature the Perma-Shield system, which protects the window’s exterior beautifully for decades. Never settle on your home builder or the window they use! Dow Building Solutions has a 60+ year legacy of providing innovative insulation and air sealing solutions such as STYROFOAM SIS™ Brand Structural Insulated Sheathing and GREAT STUFF™ Insulating Foam Sealants to home owners that help

to reduce energy costs and effectively seal a home’s building envelope from wind, rain and moisture. Heartland Homes is creating homes with the whole building envelope in mind that are not only well-built, but are actively saving money for the homeowners every month Since 1873, Kohler has been improving people’s lives with exceptional products, including kitchen and bath fixtures, faucets and accessories, furniture, cabinetry, and tile and stone. As a global leader, Kohler offers its customers world-class products to create a complete design solution. For information, ideas or inspiration, visit www.KOHLER.com.

Rex Glass & Mirror Co has been serving Greater Pittsburgh since 1958. As a family owned and operated business, we strive to provide customer service and quality craftsmanship that exceed the expectations of our customers. We design, fabricate, and install high quality residential and commercial glass products. For nearly 100 years, the Whirlpool brand has helped people all over the world find better ways to take care of household tasks. We want our customers to live cleaner, more organized, less busy and more flavorful lives through our appliances. So every Whirlpool® product is born of our decades of experience creating incredibly useful features.

Precision Stone Products is engaged in the production and distribution of premium grade architectural synthetic stone products and accessories resembling natural stone to the finest detail. Our full product line is backed by a 50 year limited warranty. Call (724) 282-2022 for more information or visit us online at www.pspstone.com. Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 33 www.LoveHeartland.com


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What's

hot Kitchen

IN THE

As we zoom into the fall season, many people are planning their home remodeling projects. Of course, the kitchen is the most important room of your home. It is the most important room not just because of the tremendous amount of time homeowners spend in it, but because of the value that a new and updated kitchen will add to your home.Here are some things for consideration when you are planning your kitc hen remodeling project.

The Kitchen & Great Room Plus Technology Open floor plans continue to be desirable in new home design and remodeling. Flat screen TV s, internet for laptops and docking stations for portable music devices allow the cook to view recipes online, email and listen to favorite music while working in the kitchen. A clever designer can allow for these items by including smartly designe d storage niches or family message centers helps to incorporate technology into the design of the room.

The "Gourmet" Kitchen Because of our challenging economy, more and more families is opting to cook at home instead of ordering out. The ever growing popularity of

cooking shows and the Food Network has sparked an interest for creating exciting new recipes. Cooking parties complete with wine tasting are all the rage. Cabinets, countertops and appliance manufactures have all stepped onto this bandwagon and there are numerous options for anything a "chef' could desire.

The "Green" Kitchen The green movement continues to increase in popularity.There is a growing trend with homeowners taking responsibility for what they have in their homes. Even more than just buying appliances and lighting that is more energy eďŹƒcient than ever, the emphasis is on sustainability. Many cabinet companies not only use eco- friendly product in the manufacture of their products,but also re plant forest areas that are used for harvesting for the production of cabinets. Quartz countertops are often made from recycled materials. Many of the quartz products on the market today have the appearance of stone without the required upkeep . The kitchen continues to be the nucleus of the home. At the end of a long day,it remains the area of the home where the family gathers. Whether it be for cooking a meal together, sitting down for a family dinner, just grabbing a quick bite on the way to soccer practice, or just to talk about the activities of the day, it is the place of gathering. A well planned and organized kitchen will make the momen ts spend there more pleasurable. This INdustry INsight was written by Laura Reid Riggin of Premier Home Design Center. Laura has been designing kitchens and baths for 26 years. She has worked in new construction and remodeling. Her designs have been featured in trade magazines, television and FANtastic Kitchens Magazine. This spring, she was a semi-finalist in the Asko kitchen design competition at the National Kitchen and Bath Show in Chicago. Premier Home Design Center is conveniently located at Collier Town Square, 1597 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA 15017. To setup an appointment or a consultation, please call 412.276.5650 or E-mail premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net or visit our website: www.premierhomedesigncenter.com.

Chartiers Valley’s Kitchen & Bath Design Center

In this economy, an investment in your home is one of the safest safest investments you can make. Whether you plan to live in your home long term or are planning to sell your home within the next 5 years, a new kitchen and bath can offer a 30% return on your investment. Premier Home Design Center offers expertise and products designed to fit your budget. Call Premier now for for an excellent return on your biggest investment. %%FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU 34 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

$PMMJFS5PXO4RVBSF 8BTIJOHUPO1JLF #SJEHFWJMMF 1"t email: premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net w w w.premierhomedesigncenter er.c .com


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Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 35


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  

ealth clubs can be intimidating. Gym equipment can be overwhelming, especially when you have no idea how to use it. Gym clothing, gym etiquette and hard core gym enthusiasts can sometimes make it difficult to actually fall in love with your gym. I have been in the fitness industry for over 20 years and even when I am out of my realm or in a different city, I find it difficult popping into another gym and feeling co mfortable. I think to myself, “Geez, if I feel uneasy walking into unfamiliar territory, I can’t imagine how someone feels that is completely new to the whole gym scene.” I moved to Pittsburgh 24 years ago. I absolutely loved the gym that I had left before moving and it took me a very long time to find one here that I could love as much. It was strange, because certainly there were plenty of gyms in the area that offered the exact same amenities that I was used to, but I still struggled. It didn’t take long to realize that the problem was simple; I missed my “gym buddies.” We would meet there after work

almost every night. It was familiar, it was comfortable and most of all it was a blast. Grabbing a friend to workout with is probably one of the easiest ways to calm the nerves and help you fall in love with your gym. Quality time spent together strengthening your friendship as you strengthen your muscles. If you can’t convince a friend to exercise with you, there are other things that you can do to achieve those “love” feelings. For one, you need to realize that the majority of people that frequent the gym are people just like you – just regular folks. Hold your head high and walk through those front doors. Get on a consistent schedule and you’ll start noticing the same people there

most of the time. You’ll soon feel like part of that tribe; people who are all trying to reach the same goal - physical fitness and a love for it. Most gyms offer a wide variety of group fitness classes. You can vary your weekly schedule and never get bored. Again, hold your head high and walk right into the group fitness room. Sure, there ma y be those one or two individuals that have a “spot” in the class and you’ll want to stay out of their way; but in my experience I find people in general warm and welcoming. Most members haven’t forgotten that they were once that new kid in class too. If you have a busy life (and seriously, who doesn’t?) think of your gym as your haven. Don’t look at it like working out; look at it as de-stressing. Your gym is your own personal retreat. It is crucial time that you have set aside for yourself. Adopt the attitude that fitness is fun and make it a priority. What’s not to love about that? The health benefits of regular exercise cannot be overlooked. Joining a gym is the easy part. Staying consistent and sticking with your program are the hard parts. But if you’re in love with your gym, there will be nothing that keep s you from “falling” into fitness. This INdustry INsight was written by Lisa Troyer. Lisa has been in the fitness industry for more than 17 years and is the owner of Fitness Fanatics in the Great Southern Shopping Center. She currently holds four nationally recognized fitness and personal training certifications and can be reached at 412.220.4190, ext. 3 or at fitnessfanatics@verizon.net. Check out www.fitnessfanaticsinc.com for more great fitness tips.

36 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

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The 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic Sponsor and Athlete Gala was recently held at the East Club Lounge at Heinz Field. Part of The Andy Russell Celebrity Golf Classic at The Club at Nevillewood, the event has raised over $5 million in past years for meaningful causes such as Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Free Care Fund, UPMC Cancer Institute and the Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. The gala provided sponsors with the thrilling opportunity of mingling with their favorite former Steeler Super Stars, including Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner, over cocktails and a sumptuous dinner. Live and silent auction items, including a one week stay at the Russell’s Colorado ranch, Steelers vs. Browns tickets and unique sports memorabilia, were also offered to the guests. The music of Souled Out adde d excitement to the evening at the atmospheric East Club Lounge. “We wanted to give back to the community and there are many good causes,” said Mr. Russell, when asked about the Golf Classic and Gala. “Our event is one of the oldest traditions in Pittsburgh and it’s because of everyone supporting us here tonight.” This year the event benefited the UPMC Department of Urology; providing advanced research, diag nosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Pioneer in the field of urology, Joel Nelson, M.D., a Frederic N. Schwentker Professor and Andy and Cindy Russell

Continued on page 38

Superbowl star hosts celebrity gala in support of UPMC 1. Denise Brown 2. Karen and Fritz M. Heinemann, President and CEO of Economics Pennsylvania 3. Stacey Schwartz, Vanessa Binnie, Rich Inman, Rosemary Mendel, Linda Gasper, Bea Whitehead 4. Former Steelers, Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner and Joan Mullins and Becky Wagner

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Continued from page 37 Chairman of the Department of Urology gave an inspirational speech at the gala. Some of the donations were also allocated for The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. Established in 1999, the foundation funds health care and human services. It contains a diverse list

of charities including Economics Pennsylvania, an organization that educates students to become responsible and beneficial members of society b y teaching them the value of saving and spending wisely. C. Andrew Russell Laboratory for Head and Neck Cancer Research, The Leukemia Society and countless other charitable organizations are also part of the foundation.

Gina O’Malley, Special Events Coordinator at Medical and Health Sciences Foundation of the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC helped to plan and execute the event this year. “Andy is amazing . He dedicates so much time, effort and enthusiasm to this event and to his foundation”, said Ms. O’Malley.

If you would like to find out more about The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation, or purchase books authored by Mr. Russell where all of the proceeds go to charity, please visit andyrussell.org.

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5. Louise Koleman, Susan Musgrave, Barbara Card 6. Mike Mackin of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Rebecca Mackin 7. Renee Magill, Volunteer and Lori Spisak of UPMC 8. Christy Hegedus, Glen Edwards and Rochelle Steffenauer 9. Mark Windel of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Camille Galmarini 10. Carol Semple Thompson, Colleen Ley 11. Jenny Szmed 12. Souled Out 13. Victoria Berdnik and David Karcher of Platinum Sponsor, Lamar Advertising and Dolores Karcher 14. J.R. Wilbur, Issac Curtis, Myron Pottios

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

academic groove

   

High school students, it’s time to plan your backto-school strategy and hit the ground running!! Call Chyten to get you ahead with the school curriculum leaving you time on your schedule to balance educational achievements with finding yourself through sports, drama, crew, tennis, etc. In addition to getting you an academic head start, Chyten can help you get the edge needed to prepare for the College applications, standardized tests like SAT, ACT, ISEE. Manjri Gupta, the Owner-Director of Chyten South Hills Center, said “Chyten stands apart by providing an exclusive study material and curriculum taught by certified Masters or Ph.D educators. We integrate everything the student needs towards higher education. Our programs include books, materials, diagnostic tests, question banks and test-taking strat egies that are available exclusively only to our students. Our curriculum team constantly researches and keeps up on the changes taking place in education and college admissions to ensure our methodologies are current and effective.” “We bring the most qualified tutors, curriculum, accountability, feedback loop and results driven processes to our sessions. The systems we have put in place ensure results st udents seek for themselves. Helping students find success in college is our focus,” Gupta said. “We offer private, semi private and small-group classes with no more

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than ten students in a class. Our format ensure dynamic discussion between students and educators allowing them to know how each student is performing,” Gupta said. “All of the work takes place at our education center, a state-of-the-art faci lity with individual tutoring rooms. Our methods have had a tremendous track record of success. We have successfully delivered an average of 274 points gain on SAT scores, and 4 to 7 point gain on ACT scores. Several of our students have achieved near perfect scores. In addition going from C to A, or A to A+ is something that we strive for and deliver.” “Great grades and standardized scores are only par t of the equation. Securing college admission of choice needs careful planning and well thought out strategy. Chyten provides desired levels of college counseling that helps student balance academics, desired college life with the intended career path in mind,” Gupta said. “College application process is time consuming and expensive. Without proper guidance lot of good money and time go to waste. Last t hing you want to do is change your major or college because you did not think through it and did not like what you selected. We plan the college application process for students, achieving college selection process steadily and consistently with your intended career and life choices in mind.” For more information on Chyten, and what its professional tutors can do for your student, go to: www.chyten.com or call 412.833.6060. Chyten is centrally located on Washington Road across from South Hills Village and is minutes away from all Chartiers Valley residents.

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East meets

West inVeterinary

Exciting new developments in veterinary medicine and services are evolving in animal clinics and hospitals all over the world. The goal is to integrate principles of both eastern and western medicine in an artful combination, or alone, to tailor the treatment needs specifically and most importantly safely, to the individual patient. At Bridgeville Animal Hospital in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, they’ve been in tegrating alternative medicine and treatments into their protocols for over a year now, expanding their treatment options as they learn more and are then able to provide more treatment modalities for their patients. Started as Bethel Park Animal Hospital in November of 2000, construction forced a move to another facility in May of 2006, which is larger, warm and inviting. There are 3 full time veterinar ians on staff, as well as a caring and compassionate staff. Here’s a little bit about the doctors and their interests:

Medicine

Dr. Joanna Rubin, VMD is founder and owner of the practice. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine in 1997. Dr. Rubin’s interests are broad, enjoying all aspects of small animal medicine and soft tissue surgery, with a special interest (and love for,) the senior and geriatric patients. Dr. Carolyn brown, DVM is a 2004 graduate of Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Brown has contributed the greatest portion of interest and study in alternative medicine. She recently studied veterinary acupuncture at International Veterinary Acupuncture Society and passed her initial exams. Her certification is expected later this summe r. Her knowledge of acupuncture and increasing knowledge of herbal remedies adds the crucial piece of eastern medicine that as a team of doctors, will access to best help the patient. Dr. Michael Meneo, VMD is a 2009 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Meneo brings to the practice, some very valuable skills and interests. In addition to traditional small anim al medicine and surgery, he’s quite knowledgeable and skilled in some orthopedic procedures that the clinic used to refer to specialty hospitals, including but not limited to anterior or cranial cruciate repair and patellar luxation repair. In short, Bridgeville Animal Hospital is now proud to offer traditional medicine and surgery, along with these emerging treatment modalities: digital radiography, Las er therapy, cutting laser surgery, veterinary acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and orthopedic surgical procedures. The veterinary hospital is excited to continue to evolve and add other treatment and diagnostic options in the future.             

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Thank you, Pittsburgh. At UPMC Health Plan, we don’t set out to win awards. We simply focus on doing what’s right for our members. Like providing them with access to world-renowned UPMC doctors and hospitals as well as outstanding community hospitals and physicians. Giving them the tools and programs they need to live a healthy lifestyle. And offering them a personal Health Care Concierge and online chat capabilities to answer all of their questions. So when J.D. Power and Associates ranked us Highest in Member Satisfaction among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania, we don’t see it as adding another award to the trophy case. We see it as doing our jobs.To learn more visit upmchealthplan.com.

“Highest Member Satisfaction Among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania” UPMC Health Plan received the highest numerical score among commercial health plans in Pennsylvania in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 U.S. Member Health Insurance Plan StudySM . Study based on 33,039 total member responses, measuring 11 plans in the Pennsylvania-Delaware Region (excludes Medicare and Medicaid). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of members surveyed December 2010-January 2011. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.


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hartiers Valley FALL 2011

Welcome to the Fall issue of Chartiers Valley Magazine. As the summer winds down, and the kids get ready to go back to school, I sincerely hope that you and your family had some time to get away from it all and relax. It seems that these days, parents driving the family taxi, and kids with their sports/lessons/parties rarely get a chance to enjoy the slow pace of an ever more elusive “lazy summer.” Ask yourself – when was the last time everyone ate together around a family table? When did everyone gather to play a board game? Does anyone remember board games? If your answer was “That one night that the power went out,” then you might be trapped in the 21st Century jail of hyper-life. (I made that term up, but I can do that – I’m the publisher.) I’m not an old guy, unless you ask my kids, but I think that life should be simpler. Moms, dads, brothers, sisters, should all try to spend some time with each other as a family more than that one night when the power goes out. Family time is an important part of being a community. And every community should value quality time with their families – it’s how we teach our children values, etiquette, and more importantly, how to participate in a family structure so they can pass on to their kids what you worked so hard to build. Recently, I saw a commercial where a father shut off the main power to the house so that the family could enjoy dinner together and blamed the outage on a thunderstorm. The Xboxes were dead. The Facebook was closed. The kids came downstairs in disillusionment to ask what happened. While the commercial was pushing some tasty dinner product, the message was more palatable – you have to make family time. I would take that message one step further – you have to make family time a priority. I hope that it’s one of yours.  Have a great Fall!

Wayne Dollard

FROM THE EDITOR While my boss waxes poetic about family time, I’d like to address something along a similar line – neighbors, or your family outside of your family. My wife and I recently bought a house and moved from the one-bedroom condo that I had lived in for nearly 10 years. While it was good for a bachelor, it quickly became small for a married couple looking to start a family. During those years in the condo, I shared a building with nine other neighbors, most of whom were friendly and good-natured people like Don who lived across the hall from me. Don enjoyed going to the high school football games on Friday nights, watching the races at the racetrack in Imperial and fishing. More often than not, he would bring over a couple of extra fillets that I would season up and devour. He had a nephew that re-shafted golf clubs as a hobby and gladly delivered my broken clubs to him for repair at a more than reasonable price. Then there were some cranky people who just looked out for themselves. They would gawk from their windows into the parking lot to see who was walking by or what was going on, convinced that they were up to no good; would complain about everything from the height of the grass to the paint job on somebody’s car; and really never knew what it was to be part of a community where other people also had a voice and an opinion. Sure, Don would complain if the stock market was down or the price of gas was up, but he never complained that someone left their holiday decorations up a few days longer than everyone else or that the community dues were going up because natural gas was rising and landscapers won’t work for free. He knew how to be a neighbor, and I appreciate that. Now we have new neighbors. All of which are friendly and what every new couple hopes for when they move into a new neighborhood. We hope that we can be the same to them. Because in the end, I didn’t consider Don just a neighbor, I considered him a friend and friends are what neighbors can eventually turn into if you let it. Don asked us when we were selling our condo to sell it to a “pretty, young blonde.” I couldn’t come through for him, but Don – I’m still looking for you, buddy. Don’t lose hope! Mark Berton

IN CHARTIERS VALLEY is a community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Chartiers Valley area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. PUBLISHER

Wayne Dollard M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

Marybeth Jeffries marybeth@incommunitymagazines.com R E G I O N A L E D I TO R

Mark Berton mark@incommunitymagazines.com O F F I C E M A N AG E R

Leo Vighetti leo@incommunitymagazines.com WRITERS

Pamela Palongue GRAPHIC DESIGN

Cassie Brkich Anna Buzzelli Sharon Cobb Susie Doak

Jan McEvoy Joe Milne Gail Murray Tamara Tylenda

A DV E RT I S I N G S A L E S

Derek Bayer Brian Daley Gina D’Alicandro Tina Dollard Rose Estes John Gartley Jason Huffman Lori Jeffries Rita Lengvarsky Connie McDaniel

Brian McKee Tamara Myers Gabriel Negri Robert Ojeda Annette Petrone Vincent Sabatini Michael Silvert RJ Vighetti Nikki CapezioWatson

P H OTO G R A P H E R S

Brad Lauer Gary Yon This magazine is carrier route mailed to all district households and businesses. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Copyright 2011. CORRESPONDENCE All inquiries, comments and press releases should be directed to: IN Community Magazines Attn: Editorial 603 East McMurray Road McMurray, PA 15317 Ph: 724.942.0940 Fax: 724.942.0968

Fall content deadline:11/11/11 www.incommunitymagazines.com

PS – If you have an exceptional neighbor you think we should profile, drop me a line at mark@incommunitymagazines.com. There are more Don’s out there who deserve to be recognized.

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Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.


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Contents Chartiers Valley | FALL 2011 |

6

28 COMMUNITY INTEREST

|

Chartiers Valley School District Collier Township

|

18

37 |

6

13

Bridgeville Public Library

|

Celebrating the Official Grand Opening | 28

Real Estate

|

Fall Landscaping Ideas | 30 FEATURES

|

Raceway Predecessor Applies For Historic Status

|

Circus and Raceway Connection could Lead to Historic Marker | 18

Woodville Hosts Whiskey Rebellion Weekend Heartland Homes | 32 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic

|

22

Superbowl Star Hosts Celebrity Gala in Support of UPMC | 37 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

|

Beinhauer Family Services Sports Clips

|

|

25

27

Chyten Educational Services

|

39

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

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Investment Policy After Debt Crisis Henry Wealth Management | 21 Premier Home Designs What’s Hot in the Kitchen | 34 Fitness Fanatics | 36 Bridgeville Animal Clinic | 40

ON THE COVER

|

Woodville “Whiskey Rebellion” Weekend Visitors witnessed historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 3


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2011/2012 PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES NOW AVAILABLE.

Sponsor an upcoming Chamber program or event for increased visibility and company recognition. Sponsorship levels are available to fit every business budget!

2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS HELEN WYLIE, President Development Dimensions International, Inc.

RICHARD A. KASMER, Vice President

SAVE THE DATE

Kasmer Engineering & Surveying

Sip and Stroll

GEORGE MACINO, Treasurer G & S Signs

A Tasting of International Wines & Elegant Edibles

October 13, 2011

PAUL BONOSKY, Corporate Secretary Achieva/Parc-Way Industries

LISA BAK Horizon Hospitality/Homewood Suites

Live Music, Gourmet Cuisine, Wines, Cash Bar

KELLY HANNA

ALL WELCOME!

KEYGroup

A portion of the proceeds benefit the Chamber Foundation Education and Outreach Programs.

MARCY REID SECON Corporation

MATT SERAKOWSKI Township of Upper St. Clair

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

ED SICKMUND

Join us for these and other upcoming programs sponsored by the South West Communities Chamber of Commerce

MyWay Mobile Storage

STEPHEN M. TABONE

2011 September October December

Beaconsfield Financial Services

Lunch With Your Legislators

KAREN ZATTA-MARTIN

37th Annual Celebration

Blanc Printing Company

Annual Holiday Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood (Always a Sellout!)

EMERALD VANBUSKIRK, Executive Director

2012 January March April

BARBARA M. ZINGER, Administrative Assistant

2012 Economic Forecast Luncheon Community Outlook 2012 – Lunch with Your Municipal Managers

Please visit our website at

Annual Staff Appreciation Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood

Visit our Website www.swccoc.org “Calendar of Events” or call 412-221-4100 for details, additional program listings and sponsorship opportunities. Non-Members Always Welcome!

www.swccoc.org

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 5


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  You’re invited to experience

International fiddlers perform at Chartiers Valley HS September 25, 2011 Barrage is a high-octane fiddle-fest that features an international, multi-talented cast performing an eclectic mix of music, song and dance. The cast of Barrage features: six violinists/vocalists, one drummer, one bass player, and a guitarist. These shows are part of the Barrage Educational Outreach Program to inspire and excite young string players (and future string players) particularly in the school system. Barrage performances offer up a diverse fusion of cultures, musical styles and incredible performance vitality. The music of Barrage continues to evolve - com bining contemporary world music influences, layered vocal arrangements and pulsating modern beats and rhythms. The cast delivers the show with amazing energy and musical virtuosity that will take your breath away.

Order Barrage Tickets:

Since its creation in Calgary, Canada in 1996, Barrage has been featured many times at events worldwide having played for many Presidents, Prime Ministers and Princes. Barrage has also had their television productions aired on several international TV networks including the PBS network in the USA, the BBC in the UK and CBC in Canada and has performed live shows in New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, China, Canada, Finland, Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Poland, Germany, Norway, Monaco, the USA and the UK.

Type

number of tickets

cost/ ticket

total

Adult

___________@ $15.00 = _______

Please Print:

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Name____________________________________

Student/Senior ______@ $10.00 = _______

Address__________________________________ Phone____________________________________

Grand Total = _____ Paid by check # _______

Please return this order form and a check or cash to Paid by cash _______ Chartiers Valley High School Attn: Sally Shollenberger 50 Thoms Run Road Bridgeville, PA 15017 by Monday, September 19. Make checks payable to CVOJBB. We will call you to confirm your order and hold tickets at the will-call desk the day of the performance.

PUBLIC NOTICE EXCLUSIVE COMPETITIVE FOOD VENDING CONTRACT The Board of School Directors of the Chartiers Valley School District is considering entering into an Exclusive Competitive Food Vending Contract with The Nutrition Group. Board action is scheduled on the proposed contract at the regularly-scheduled Board Meeting on October 25, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. The Meeting will be held at the District Assembly Room located at the District Administrative Offices at 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15220. The Public School Code (24 P.S. § 5-504.1) provides that the School

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Chartiers Valley

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS UNIQUE MUSICAL GROUP, CHECK OUT THEIR WEBSITE AT WWW.BARRAGE.ORG. BARRAGE WILL BE APPEARING AT THE CHARTIERS VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 50 THOMS RUN ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M. TICKETS: $15.00 ADULTS AND $10.00 STUDENTS/SENIORS

District “shall not enter into an exclusive competitive food or beverage contract unless the board of school directors provides reasonable public notice or holds a public hearing about the contract.” If any member of the public desires to comment on the proposed food vending contract with The Nutrition Group, public comment will be received by the School Board at their October 25, 2011 Meeting prior to Board action on the contract. To provide public comment, you should attend the October 25, 2011 Board Meeting, request the opportunity to speak during the public comment portion of the meeting and your comments will be received. If you have any questions regarding the proposed food vending contract or the process to provide public comment, you may contact School Board Secretary, Nicholas D. Morelli at telephone number 412-429-2204 or by e-mail to nmorelli@cvsd.net.


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   Student Accident Insurance The Chartiers Valley Board of School Directors has voted to approve a Voluntary Student Accident Insurance Coverage program for the 2011-2012 school year. This insurance coverage is provided for students whose families do not have medical coverage or have medical coverage with a high deductible. Students who are injured at school are typically not covered by the school district’s liability insurance polic y. Therefore, the family is financially responsible for all medical costs incurred. The Chartiers Valley School District realizes that spiraling health care costs have forced many families to choose health insurance programs with significant deductibles. To help minimize the financial burden of high deductibles or nonexistent medical coverage for district students, CVSD offers Student Accident Insurance Protect ion through Ace American Insurance Company – as administered by American Management Advisors - at a nominal fee. Two options are available: 24-hour coverage for $98.00 annually; or school-hours-only coverage for $27.00 annually. If you are interested in exploring Student Accident Insurance Protection in greater detail, contract your child’s building principal or visit the business office page of district’ s web site (www.cvsd.net) and click on the link for Student Accident Insurance under Content.

                ���      

Board of Directors Beth McIntyre, President - 412.429.9242 Debra Rice, Vice President - 412.722.8021 Jeff Choura - 412.221.7704 Patti Figorski - 412.279.9030 Patricia Frey - 412.279.1439 Bridget Kelly - 412.319.7934 Herb Ohliger - 412.759.0682 Mary Lou Petronsky - 412.221.7492 Pam Poletti - 412.429.8717

Central Administration

Brian White, Ed.D Superintendent Yvonne Hawkins, Ed.D Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum Scott Seltzer Asst. Superintendent for School Leadership Nicholas D. Morelli Director of Finance and Support Operations/Board Secretary Robert Gold Director of Facilities Arthur Turner Asst. Director of Facilities Lynne Dunnick Director of Student Services Michael Mazzeo Director of Transportation Please direct news items or questions to the public relations office at 412.429.2234. Your input is greatly appreciated! Questions regarding taxes should be directed to your municipality: Bridgeville, 412.221.6055; Collier, 412.276.5277; Heidelberg, 412.276.5413; Scott, 412.276.5302. Delinquent tax questions should be directed to Maiello, Brungo and Maiello at 412.242.9615. The Board will hold Workshop and Regular meetings on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at 7 p.m. in the District Assembly Room at the Administrative Offices, 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220. The Board may take action or conduct business for any particular or general purpose at any of these meetings. Additional special or committee meetings will be called and advertised as needed. It is the policy of Chartiers Valley School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, marital or parental status, national origin, age, or handicap in its educational and vocational programs, activities or employment as required by Title IX, Section 504 and Title VI.

 

Creation of Foundation in progress

Published by the Chartiers Valley School District for the residents of Bridgeville Borough, Collier Township, Heidelberg Borough and Scott Township.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 7




Real Estate Tax Millage Rates

 

SCHOOL DISTRICT

TAX MILLAGE RATE

Wilkinsburg Borough Brentwood Borough Northgate Clairton City East Allegheny Mt. Lebanon Deer Lakes South Park Woodland Hills Shaler Area Sto-Rox South Fayette Twp. Penn Hills Bethel Park Highlands Carlynton Cornell Steel Valley Riverview Upper St. Clair Twp. Elizabeth Forward Allegheny Valley Baldwin-Whitehall West Mifflin Area Plum Borough Keystone Oaks West Allegheny Pine-Richland Moon Area Fox Chapel Area Duquesne City West Jefferson Hills Gateway Hampton Township Quaker Valley Avonworth North Hills CHARTIERS VALLEY North Allegheny Montour South Allegheny McKeesport Area

35.000 28.270 27.600 27.600 27.540 26.630 26.250 25.990 25.650 25.630 25.000 24.880 24.810 24.560 24.41 24.150 24.110 24.070 24.050 23.770 23.760 23.460 23.400 22.992 22.200 22.030 22.000 21.908 21.300 21.260 21.100 21.080 21.020 20.880 20.700 20.000 19.910 19.880 19.740 18.900 18.110 16.710

AVERAGE

23.388

8 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

Veterans Day Invitation All area veterans are invited to attend Chartiers Valley High School’s 8th Annual Veterans Day Flag Raising Ceremony and Luncheon on Friday, November 11. The school’s entire student body and faculty will gather at the flag pole in front of the building at 10:10 a.m. to honor veterans in attendance. Veterans are asked to arrive at the school by 9:50 a.m. Parking spots will be reserved near the site of the ceremony. For additional information or to confirm attendance, veterans may contact the public relations office at 412-429-2234.

CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT Summary of Finance-Revenues and Expenditures 2011-12 Budget REVENUES 6000 Local Sources 7000 State Sources 8000 Federal Sources

$ $ $

38,866,394 10,295,882 680,000

TOTAL REVENUES

$

49,842,276

EXPENDITURES Regular Education Special Education Vocational Education Other Instruction Non-Pupil Pupil Personnel Instructional Staff Administration Pupil Health Business Office Facility Operations Transportation Central Office Other Services-AIU Student Services Community Services Building Improvements Financing & Reserves

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

19,749,501 5,556,242 652,825 183,799 25,000 1,561,469 1,200,864 3,931,435 252,916 644,682 5,334,735 4,037,985 42,100 135,000 1,575,723 33,000 25,000 4,900,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

49,842,276




Chartiers Valley School District Calendar 2011-2012

July 11 Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

August 11 Su M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

Tu 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

Th 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

Sa 6 13 20 27

September 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24

October 11

November 11 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

F 2 9 16 23 30

3rd - March 22 4th - June 5

Snow Make-Up: #1 - Feb. 17 #2 - June 6 #3 - June 7 #4 - June 8 Board Approved: 3-22-11

December 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

End of Report Period: 1st.-Oct. 28 2nd - Jan. 13

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24 31

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

February 12 Su M Tu W Th F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29

Sa 4 11 18 25

March 12 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

April 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

May 12 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24 31

June 12

New Teachers' Induction - No Students Teachers' Inservice Day - No Students No Students at Certain Grade Levels - Act 80 2 Hour Delay for Students - Act 80 Teacher Meetings No School

January 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

1/2 Student Day

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 9

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Su M Tu W Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

AUGUST 17-19 New Teachers' Induction 22-24 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 25 FIRST STUDENT DAY 25-31 Kindergarten only-1/2 day-Act 80 SEPTEMBER 5 LABOR DAY – No School 28 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings OCTOBER 10 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students 31 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students NOVEMBER 8 District Conference Day-Act 80 – No Students 24-28 THANKSGIVING RECESS – No School DECEMBER 13 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 23-30 WINTER RECESS – No School JANUARY 2 WINTER RECESS – No School 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day-Teachers’ Inservice-No Students FEBRUARY 6 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 17 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 20 PRESIDENTS’ DAY – No School MARCH 2 District Conference Day - Act 80-No Students 23 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students APRIL 4 No school for Gr. K-5 only-Act 80-Parent Conferences 5-9 SPRING RECESS –No School MAY 18 SCHOOL PICNIC-No School 21 Two Hr. Delay for all Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 22 No School Grades 6-12 only-Act 80 28 MEMORIAL DAY Observed-No School JUNE 5 LAST STUDENT DAY-1/2 day 6 Teachers’ Inservice Day 7 Teachers' Inservice Day 7 Graduation 8 Teachers' Inservice Day


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NOTICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES AND PROGRAMS CHILD FIND AND ANNUAL NOTICE TO PARENTS In compliance with state and federal law, the district will provide to each protected handicapped student without discrimination or cost to the student or family, those related aids, services or accommodations which are needed to provide equal opportunity to participate in and obtain the benefits of the school program and extracurricular activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student’s abilities. In order to qualify as a protected handicapped student the child must be of school age with a physical or mental disability, which substantially limits or prohibits participation in or access to an aspect of the school program. These services and protections for “protected handicapped students” are distinct from those applicable to all eligible or except ional students enrolled (or seeking enrollment) in special education programs. For further information on the evaluation procedures and provision of services to protected handicapped students or eligible students, contact: Lynne M. Dunnick, M.Ed. Chartiers Valley School District Director of Student Services 2030 Swallow Hill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Phone 412.429.2638 Fax: 412.429.2286 The school distric t, along with other public agencies in the Commonwealth, must establish and implement procedures to identify, locate and evaluate all children who need special education programs and services because of the child’s disability. This notice is to help find these children, offer assistance to parents and describe the parent’s rights with regard to confidentiality of information that will be obtained during t he process. The school district shall also conduct awareness activities to inform the public of gifted education services and programs and the manner by which to request these services and programs. The content of this notice has been written in English. If a person does not understand any of this notice, he or she should contact the school district (see contacts) and request an explanation.

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IDENTIFICATION ACTIVITY Child Find refers to activities undertaken by public education agencies to identify, locate, and evaluate children residing in the State, including children attending private schools, who are suspected of having disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disability, and determine the child’s need for special education and related services. The purpose is to locate these children so that a free appropriate public education (FAPE) can be made available. The types of disabilities, that if found to cause a child to need services are: Autism, deafblindness, deafness, emotional disturbance, hearing impairment, mental retardation, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment due to chronic or acute health problems, specific learning disabilities (speech or language ), traumatic brain injury and visual impairment including blindness, in the case of a child that is of preschool age developmental delay. Screening activities are also conducted to determine student need for gifted support services. The school district provides educational services for all eligible students either through district- operated classes, contracts with Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3, or approved private schools. Classes providing Learning Support, Life-Skills Support, Emotional Support, Physical Support, Multiple Disabilities Support, and Autistic Support are available for students at beginning school age through age 21, if necessary. Additional services include hearing, vision, and speech and language support. Students found to meet eligibility criteria as "mentally gifted" may receive services through district's Gifted Support programs. Each school district is required to annually provide notice describing the identification activities and the procedures followed to ensure confidentiality of personally identifiable information. This notice is intended to meet this requirement. Identification activities are performed to find a child who is suspected as having a disability that would interfere with his or her learning unless special education programs and services are made available. Children suspected of

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being "mentally gifted" who need specially designed instruction not ordinarily provided in the regular education program also go through screening activities. The activities include: Review of group data, conduct hearing and vision screening, assessment of student’s academic functioning, observation of the student displaying difficulty in behavior and determining the student’s response to attempted remediation. Input from parents is also an information source for identification. After a child is identified as a suspected child with a disability, he or she is evaluated, but is not evaluated before parents give permission for their child to be evaluated. The school district will follow procedur es outlined in the special education regulations (Chapter 14) for determining eligibility and need for special education services. Chapter 16 regulations will be followed to determine eligibility and need for Gifted Support services. CONFIDENTIALITY (CFR 300.127) If after screening, a disability is suspected, upon your permission, your child will be evaluated. Written records of the results are called an education record, which are directly related to your child and are maintained by the school districts. These records are personally identifiable to your child. Personally identifiable information includes the child’s name, the name of the child’s parents or other family member, the address of the child or their family, a personal identifier such as social security number, a list of characteristics that w ould make the child’s identity easily traceable or other information that would make the child’s identity easily traceable. The school district will gather information regarding your child’s physical, mental, emotional and health functioning through testing and assessment, observation of your child, as well as through review of any records made available to the school district through your physician an d other providers of services such as day care agencies. The school district protects the confidentiality of personally identifiable information by one school official being responsible for ensuring the confidentiality of the records, training being provided to all persons using the information, and maintaining for public inspection a current list of employee’s names and positions who may have access to the i nformation. The school district will inform you when this information is no longer needed to provide educational services to your child and will destroy the information at designated intervals, except general information such as your child’s name, address, phone number, grades, attendance record and classes attended, grade level completed, may be maintained without time limitation. As the parent of the ch ild you have a number of rights regarding the confidentiality of your child’s records. The right to inspect and review any education records related to your child are collected, maintained, or used by the school district. The school district will comply with a request for you to review the records without unnecessary delay before any meetings regarding planning for your child’s special education program (called an IEP meeting). Should you and your school district disagree about your child’s special education supports and services and a due process hearing is requested, the school district will furnish you with the opportunity to inspect and review your child’s records, within 30 days. You have the right to an explanation and interpretations of the records, to be provided copies of the records if fail ure to provide the copies would effectively prevent you from exercising your right to inspect and review the records, and the right to have a representative inspect and review the records. This review is conducted with the assistance of an appropriate school district staff member. Upon your request, the school district will provide you a list of the types and location of education records collected, main tained, or used by the agency. Additionally, the school district will charge a fee for copies of records made in response to your request except, it will not charge a fee if doing so will prevent you from inspecting and reviewing your child’s records. A current list of reasonable fees relative to records request is available in the district’s central office. The district will not charge a fee to search o r retrieve information. You have the right to request in writing the amendment of your child’s education records that you believe are inaccurate or misleading, or violate the privacy or other rights of your child. The school district will decide whether to amend the records within 45 school days of receipt of your request. If the school district refuses to amend the records you will be notified of the refusal and your right to a hearing. You will be given at that time, additional




information regarding the hearing procedures. Upon written request, the district will schedule and provide written notice of the hearing to challenge information in your child’s education files. Parent consent is required before personally identifiable information contained in your child’s education records is disclosed to anyone other that officials of the school district c ollecting or using the information for purposes of identification of your child, locating your child and evaluating your child or for any other purpose of making available a free appropriate public education to your child. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Additionally, the school district, upon request, discloses records without consent to officials of another school district in which your child seeks or intends to enroll. A parent may file a written complaint with the Pennsylvania Department of Education at the address below alleging that the rights described in this notice were not provided. Pennsylvania Department of Education Bureau of Special Education Division of Complia nce 333 Market Street Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333 The Department of Education will investigate the matter, issue a report of findings and necessary corrective action within 60 days. The Department will take necessary action to ensure compliance is achieved. Complaints alleging failures of the school district with regard to confidentiality of personally identifiable information may also be filed with: Family Poli cy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 The school districts listed above will provide ongoing screening services. If you wish to learn more, have questions, or believe your child may need to be identified, please contact your local school district contact. EARLY INTERVENTION IDENTIFICATION

POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF WEAKNESSES IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL DOMAIN AREAS AND OTHER RISK FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY (Requirement of Section 14.212(b)) A developmental delay is determined by the results of a developmental evaluation. The results of one or more domain areas (adaptive, personal-social, communication, motor or cognitive) have to show at least a 25% delay or a score of 1.5 standard deviations below the mean (Standard Score of 77 or below). The delay results in the need for specially designed intervention/instruction (SDI) in order to participate in typical activities and routines. Children with a developmental delay may show weaknesses in the following areas: Adaptive – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty dressing/undressing; using utensils to eat, removing shoes without assistance, distinguishing between nonfood/food substances, or have difficulty with toileting needs. One may have difficulty moving independently

OTHER FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY Developmental disabilities are birt h defects related to a problem with how a body part or body system works. They may also be known as functional birth defects. Many of these conditions affect multiple body parts or systems. Researchers have identified thousands of different birth defects. Birth defects can have a variety of causes, such as: Genetic problems caused when one or more genes doesn’t work properly or part of a gene is missing, Problems with chromosomes, such as having an extra chromosome or missing part of a chromosome. Environmental factors that the expectant mother is exposed to during pregnancy, such as Rubella or German measles or if she uses drugs or alcohol during pregnancy. FACTORS CONSIDERED WHEN DETERMINING MENTAL GIFTEDNESS 1. The child performs a year or more above grade achievement level in one or more subjec ts as measured by a nationally normed and validated achievement test. 2. The child demonstrates rates of acquisition/retention of content and skills reflecting gifted ability. 3. The child demonstrates achievement, performance, or expertise in one or more academic areas as evidenced by products, portfolios or research, as well as criterion-referenced team judgment. 4. The child demonstrates early and measu red use of high level thinking skills, academic creativity, leadership skills, intense academic interest, communication skills, foreign language aptitude, or technology expertise. 5. The child demonstrates that intervening factors such as English as a second language, disabilities, gender or race bias, or socio/cultural deprivation are masking gifted abilities.

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In Pennsylvania, a child between three years of age and the s chool district’s age to begin school who has a developmental delay or one or more of the physical or mental conditions listed above, will be identified as an “eligible young child.” The parents of these children have the same rights described above. The Pennsylvania Department of Education is responsible for providing programs and services to eligible young children under Act 212 of 1990, the Early Interve ntion Services System Act. Screening for preschool children is available through the DART Program operated by Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3. To schedule an appointment for screening call the AIU at 412.394.5987. For additional information, contact the school district.

around the house, understanding that hot is dangerous, putting away toys when asked, indicating an illness or ailment to an adult, or demonstrating caution and avoiding common dangers. Personal-Social – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty responding positively to adult praise, rewards or promise of rewards; greeting familiar adul ts spontaneously, enjoying simple stories read aloud, helping with simple household tasks, initiating social interaction with familiar adults, expressing affection/liking for peers, playing cooperatively with peers, stating first name, last name, age, or whether he is a male/female; using objects in make-believe play, using ‘I’ or ‘me’ to refer to himself, or recognizing facial expressions of common emot ions. Communication - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty following 2-step verbal commands, associating spoken words with pictures, recalling events from a story presented orally; engaging in extended and meaningful nonverbal exchanges with others, using words to get his needs met, responding to ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions appropriately, or asking ‘wh’ questions. Motor - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty running without falling, kicking a ball without falling, walking up and down steps alternating feet without assistance, walking backward, imitating the bilateral movements of an adult, pointing with his index finger independent of the thumb and other fingers, scribbling linear and/or circular patterns spontaneously, using t he pads of fingertips to grasp a pencil, holding a paper with one hand while drawing or writing with the other hand, fastening clothing without assistance, cutting with scissors, copying a circle, or imitating vertical and horizontal markings. Cognitive - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty attending to one activity for 3 or more minutes, reciting memorized lines fro m songs or TV shows, showing interest in age-appropriate books, matching/naming colors, responding to one and one more, giving three objects on request, matching shapes, identifying objects by their use, identifying items by size, identifying colors of familiar objects not in view, or identifying simple objects by touch.


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

    

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Collier Township welcomes the new Township Manager Sal Sirabella and the new Codes Enforcement/Zoning Officer Tom Plietz.

Residents can submit their email address to the township so that they could be informed of special meetings or happenings taking place in the Township.

 • October 3 to December 16, 2011. Dates are approximate and subject to change depending on weather. • Leaves must be raked curbside or to the edge of residency. • Pick-up will be via the Township’s “Leaf-Vac” along residential streets only. •Leaves may be bagged. Use brown leaf & garden bags only – no plastic. After December 16, 2011, all leaves must be bagged with leaf bags (not plastic bags).

 We are looking for volunteers just like you to help make Collier parks safe, fun places for enjoying time with your family. FRIENDS is the new, non-profit organization developed to handle fundraising activities for Collier Parks & Recreation initiatives. We cannot do it without your help! We welcome a diverse group of individuals and talents. If you are interested, please contact membership chairman Barb Riedel at 412-279-8747 or email at abriedl@verizon.net.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER is in need of Volunteers In order to keep the membership fee to a minimum, we are asking for volunteers to help man and manage the facility. Duties will be greeting guests and checking-in members I. D. Hours will be M-F, 8am-11am and 4pm-8pm. Saturday 8am-5pm and closed on Sunday. The Fitness Center is located on Porter Way off of Private Lobaugh Street from Nike Site Road. The facility has various strength training equipment, and a number of fitness machines, bikes, treadmills, etc. There are also ladies and men's showers and a sauna available for your use. For information or to sign-up to volunteer call: Bob Caun, Parks & Recreation Director, 412- 279-2525, Ext. 125 or bcaun@colliertwp.net. Hope to see you there enjoying yourself soon.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER MEMbERShIP FEE INDIVIDUAL 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP RESIDENT $60.00 NON-RESIDENT $85.00 FAMILY 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP (3 or more persons in family) Nobody under 14 without an adult. Absolutely nobody under 12 years old. RESIDENT $140.00 NON-RESIDENT $180.00

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Board Parks and Recreation Month at 6:30 PM of y Fourth Tuesda Each Planning Commission y of Each Month at 7:00 PM First & Third Thursda

$3.00 $5.00

  ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES: (412) 279-2525 8AM to 4:30PM – Mon., Tues., Thurs. 8AM to 7PM Wed., 8AM to NOON Fri. Codes/Zoning Office:

(412) 279-9998

Tax Office:

(412) 276-5277

Public Works:

(412) 279-8828

Police Station:

(412) 276-5051

Municipal Authority:

(412) 279-4941

Emergency:

911

Collier Township Website: www.colliertownship.net

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(Workshop/Agenda) Board of CommissionersEach Month at 7:00 PM Last Wednesday of (Regular/Business) Board of Commissioners of Each Month at 7:00 PM Second Wednesday ion (As Needed) Civil Service Commiss nth at 7:00 PM First Tuesday of Each Mo (As Needed) Zoning Hearing Board ch Month at 7:00 PM Ea of y sda Third Tue

NON-MEMbERS - PER VISIT RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT

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   Since 2000, the Night Walk on the Panhandle Trail has been a Halloween tradition in Collier Township. This year the festivities begin at 7 PM on Saturday, October 22nd. The Rennerdale Youth Group will carve more than 100 pumpkins donated by Beccari’s Farm Market, Thoms Run Road. Collier Girl Scouts will set out and light the jack o’ lanterns along a half-mile stretch of the Trail from the bridge near the Walkers Mill trailhead to the Sunnyside entrance. Bonfires light the night and hot chocolate and sweet cider are distributed by Collier Friends of the Panhandle Trail. A costumed volunteer will delight the kids with stories near the Quarry bonfire. This year’s treat bags for children aged 11 and under will be distributed at the Quarry. Also new this year, children was well as adults are encouraged to wear costumes and parade on the Quarry stage. Parking is available in the Public Works yard at 110 Noblestown Road. The event is free but donations are welcomed! For updates, got to www.panhandletrail.org.

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● For all ages including organization & school field trips. ● Free refreshments & station tours. ● Please come visit us and our duck pond. For more information, see our website at www.rennerdalevfd.com.

Line up is 12:30 pm at Webb Field. Parade starts at 1 pm. Every child in costume receives a treat bag plus prizes. Cookies and drinks will be served. Chartiers Valley Band will be in the parade. Any questions, call John Kripp at 412-276-4252.

   

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All you can eat pancake breakfast including your choice of pancakes, bacon, sausage, eggs and beverages. The sixth annual Open house & Membership Drive will have demonstrations, exhibits and prize giveaways. Presto VFD is located at 5228 Thoms Run Road with ample parking across the street. For more information, please call the station at 412-221-5677 or visit the website at www.prestovfd.org.

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Chartiers Valley

The Friends of Collier invites all to their First Annual Oktoberfest that will be held Friday, September 30th from 6:00 – 10:00 PM and Saturday, October 1st from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM at the newly acquired Charles E. Kelly Support Facility located at the former Army base off of Nike Site Road. Come with friends and family and enjoy nightly performances by local bands, tasty foods, desserts, beer and great entertainment for the kids. Vendors are needed, if you are interested in participating, please contact Janet Wank at 412.279.9998 or jwank@colliertwp.net.




   

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The Kirwan Heights VFD, Presto VFD and the Rennerdale VFD once again thank the Hall of Flame Golf Committee for their efforts in holding the fifth successful Hall of Flame Golf Outing. Through their efforts and with the strong financial support of Collier residents, businesses and neighboring businesses, the Golf event once again raised more than $40,000.00. These funds are shared equally by each Fire Company to help cover the rising costs of personal protection gear and necessary fire and emergency equipment. The raffle winners were: Charlotte Davis (1st); Mal Bruce (2nd) and Dave Clemens (3rd). Next years golf outing will be in July, 2012.

NON-EMERGENCY: 412-279-6911: This is the main number used to contact the Collier Township Police. When you call this number and specify that you need Collier Police, they will contact the on-duty officers and send them to the correct location or inform them to return your call. This number is the MOST effective way for a resident or business owner to reach the police.

 The First United Presbyterian Church of Rennerdale is hosting its 7th annual Golf Outing on Saturday, September 10, 2011 at Fort Cherry Golf Club. Cost is $80 which includes 18 holes of golf, cart, refreshment at the turn and dinner. All proceeds go to our Christian Education and youth program. If interested in participating, please call the church at 412-276-2268 or e-mail lisaandjimmason@comcast.net.

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OFFICE: 412-276-5051: This number is for leaving a message for a specific officer in their voicemail. This will be listened to when the officer is on duty next. This number may also be used for general questions. SOLICITATION: Anyone who goes door to door to advertise their business or products, even by placing a flyer, is a solicitor. They need a permit for this. There are rules as to when and where they are allowed. Solicitors are not allowed where there are signs up such as Cloverleaf Estates, Nevillewood, Nevilleside, and Summit Ridge. They are not allowed at houses with no soliciting signs or who are on the no soliciting list. If someone comes to your door they need a permit and their ID. When in doubt, call 412-279-6911. ALARMS: Any resident or business with an alarm system needs an alarm permit. Resident alarms cost $50, business alarms cost $65. This is a one-time fee. You can have three free false alarms in a calendar year, after that they cost $25/each.

 CTMA continues to provide the necessary main sewer line inspection, maintenance and repair as required under the Allegheny County Health Department Consent Order which affects all municipalities in Allegheny County. Under the Consent Order, no surface water may enter the sanitary sewer system and individual property owners must make certain that they have disconnected any roof leader or stairwell or driveway drain that is connected into the sanitary sewer system. Property owners must make certain that their house air vent and house cleanout are exposed to grade for necessary maintenance in order to have the sewer system function properly and be available should a dye test pf the property be requested. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 15

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This spring CTMA accepted from the contractor the sanitary sewer lines installed to serve 19 properties located along Baldwin Rd. East and West. The project cost was $542,696.15 and was constructed with the cooperation of the property owners that were served by this project. Sewer lines have been designed to serve properties along the opposite of Baldwin Rd., and McMichael Rd., Baldwin Rd, Scotts Run Rd. and portions of Ridge Rd. to McMichael Rd. This project has been substantially delayed due to the refusal of a number of property owners to grant the required right-of-ways needed to construct the project. Without the cooperation of all property owners in providing the necessary right-of-ways, projects of this type are delayed indefinitely and, in some cases, are abandoned. CTMA had applied for a PA H2O Grant for the entire project. The Commonwealth of PA notified CTMA that the project could not be founded at this time. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

EMERGENCY: 9-1-1




   ChIMNEY AND FURNACES Chimney maintenance is vital to your family’s safety. • Have your chimney inspected and cleaned on a regular basis. • When possible, burn seasoned woods (dryness of the wood is more important than hard wood versus soft wood). • Smaller, hotter fires will burn more completely and produce less smoke than larger fires. • Do not burn cardboard boxes or trash, as they can spark a chimney fire. • Install stovepipe thermometers, which help monitor flue temperatures where wood stoves are in use, then adjust burning practices as needed.

TRICK OR TREAT SAFETY Don’t get caught up in the holiday spirit —make sure your children trick-or-treat safely. • Rather than buying a mask, use makeup to decorate children. That way, they can see more easily. • If your kids go trick-or-treating after dusk, make sure they have a flashlight and are wearing retro reflective material. • Dress children in warm, light colored clothing so that they may be easily seen when crossing the street. • Do not purchase Halloween costumes and other items which are not marked “Flameproof” or “Flame-Retardant”. • Remind children to skip houses that are not well-lit. • Check candy before allowing kids to eat it. • Avoid tricks that could cause bodily injury, destroy property, or cause a fire.

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WhAT IS STORM WATER? Storm Water is water from precipitation that flows across the ground & pavement when it rains or when snow & ice melt. The water seeps into the ground or drains into what we call storm sewers. These are the drains you see at street corners or at low points on the sides of streets. Collectively, the draining water is call storm water runoff.

FALL CLEAN-UP Yard work does not end simply because summer is over. Here are some safety tips for tackling autumn tasks around home. • When lifting heavy bags of mulch, use a wheelbarrow when possible, and remember to lift with your legs, not with your back. • Be careful when pruning. Pruning from a ladder is especially dangerous. • To avoid blisters when doing yard work, wear gloves. • If you are doing a lot of raking, try an ergonomic rake, which can be found at most hardware stores and garden centers.

along the way empty into our waters, too, because storm water does not get treated. • Pet wastes left on the ground get carried away by storm water, contributing harmful bacteria, parasites & viruses to our water. • Vehicles drip fluids (oil, grease, gasoline, antifreeze, brake fluids, etc.) onto paved areas where storm water runoff carries them through our storm drains & into our water. • Chemicals used to grow & maintain beautiful lawns & gardens, if not used properly, can run off into the storm drains when it rains or

WhY IS STORM WATER “GOOD RaIN GONE WRONG?” Storm water becomes a problem when it picks up debris, chemicals, dirt, and other pollutants as it flows or when it causes flooding & erosion of stream banks. Storm water travels through a system of pipes & roadside ditches that make up storm sewer systems. It eventually flows directly to a lake, river, stream, wetland or coastal water. All of the pollutants storm water carries 16 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

bACK TO SChOOL SAFETY Parents must do some homework to keep their kids healthy and safe. Don’t let safety “fall” by the wayside. • Walk and ride to school safely. Obey traffic lights and signals, walk only in crosswalks, and listen to the crossing guard. • If your kids bike to school, be sure they wear a helmet. • If possible, always walk your child to the bus stop and pick them up as well. • Keep backpacks light – a child’s backpack should only be 5 to 10 percent of his or her body weight, according to the American Chiropractic Association. • A backpack with wheels is easy to maneuver and reduces back stress. If your child does choose to wear a backpack, utilize both straps. Slinging the backpack over once shoulder may cause spinal curvature.

Chartiers Valley

when we water our lawns & gardens. • Waste from chemicals & materials used in construction can wash into the storm sewer system when it rains. Soil that erodes from construction sites causes environmental degradation, including harming fish & shellfish populations that are important for recreation & our economy. This information was supplied by Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. For more information go to www.dep.state.pa.us.




  you thought block parties were a thing of the past, think again! Chestnut Street in Bridgeville has been holding an annual block party for the past 27 years. Each year, neighbors close off the street and party until 11 p.m. Children play games in the street, including bobbing for bubble gum in pie pans filled with whipped cream, find the prize in a pile of hay, and football, of course. A sheet is decorated every year, commemorating the event, and while organizers said there have been a couple of years when the party wasn’t held, those years are few and far between. Even and odd numbered houses take turns between bringing appetizers and desserts and hotdogs, hamburgers and chicken are grilled on the street. The group even set up a screen to project the Steelers preseason game against Atlanta, and a stage w here neighbors can demonstrate their talents which ranged from a vocal and kazoo rendition of Harry Woods’ 1927 classic “Side By Side,” rock and roll standards like “Johnny B. Goode,” and a family blowing on the slide trombones and trumpet. 

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

Raceway predecessor Applies for

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West Allegheny

are a fan of the Imperial Raceway, it’s probably no surprise to you that much of Imperial’s amenities came from the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena. What may surprise you is that the tiny Borough of Heidelberg has applied for historic status for the site. The application was denied once because it was submitted based on its history of racing. The borough researched the matter further and found that the raceway wasn’t just known for the excitement that later found itself at Imperial. The Heidelberg Raceway was the site of the final 1956 Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus under the big top, documented in national outlets like the New York Times and Life Magazine. It was a ½-mile racetrack that hosted four NASCAR races and where Richard Perry’s father, Lee Perry won his first NASCAR race. It was also home to countless boxing matches, soccer games, fairs and circuses. Now, Heidelberg Manager Joe Kauer wants Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena to be recognized for the history it’s provided the region since during its brief, 25-year lifespan. “We submitted for one of those roadside historical markers. The state kicked our application back saying we needed more than just four NASCAR races to declare it historical,” Kauer said. “They said, ‘What’s there of national historical significance,’ so we researched it, and it was the final act of the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Circus under the tent.”


  

According to Heidelberg Borough’s application with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, the track was opened on Memorial Day, 1948, and was intended to be a home for horse racing, which did not become legal until years later. In addition to the main ½mile asphalt track, it also had a ¼-mile dirt track, seating for 15,000 fans, and free parking for 8,000 cars. After its closing in 1973, the site was razed and became home to “Raceway Plaza,” which has been a commercial staple for the South Hills for decades. Home to major anchor department chains such as Hills, Ames and now Wal-Mart, the site also has a Shop ‘N Save, McDonalds and Long John Silvers. “You would never guess that all this history just happened right down the street,” Kauer said. “This marker will remind people, so people don’t just think of it as a Wal-Mart or a Shop ‘N Save. People don’t even call it Raceway Plaza anymore. It was all Heidelberg people that ran it and worked it. Ike Wright, the original owner of Wright’s Seafood Inn, built it. Ed Witzberger bought it and he was our mayor here for years.” Today, much of the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena is still being utilized at the Pittsburgh Motor Speedway in Imperial. Heidelberg Raceway was ahead of its time among racing venues, with an electric scoreboard and air-conditioned press box, thanks to Witzberger’s vision. However, the impressive attributes of the race track succumbed to the political climate of the times, when after the track did not open for the 1974 season under a lease agreement, Witzberger cited the energy crises of the 1970s as cause for

not renewing the lease. And while the track lives on on numerous racing internet forums and discussion boards, it was the final circus performance that really brought about the end of an era for a lot of people in the region. Gene Czambel of Collier was one of those people. “It was a Monday night and I was 13 years old. It was very exciting. You knew they were coming to town,” he said. “It would take them a couple days to set up. They’d come in on the railroad. The elephants would walk down the street, carrying all that stuff, it was awesome. Normally, it lasted all week, but after this last performance, they just said that was it.” Czambel said he remembers lion tamers guiding lions through hoops, all kinds of acrobats and performers and, of course, the side show. “They had the side show and they had this guy, who was the tallest guy in the world. He was 8-foot, 2 inches tall and you’d pay the admission and go behind the curtain to see him,” Czambel said. “I got to shake this guy’s hand and they gave you a pamphlet telling you all about him.” Kauer said the borough will know in September whether or not the application was accepted. After that, will come a period of fundraising to raise the $2,500 for the marker.

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

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Chartiers Valley




  What will the impact to investors be due to this most recent crisis? By Daniel L. Henry, CLU On August 2nd, President Obama quickly signed the Budget Control Act (Senate 365 as amended) after passage by the Senate 74 to 26. The House passed its version one day earlier by a vote of 269 to 161. The new law raises the debt limit to avoid a projected August 2 default and creates a bipartisan joint select committee on deficit reduction. (source: Yahoo Finance) We try not to be over tly political in this magazine as well as towards our clients, realizing that each person has their own unique views and beliefs. Yet we feel compelled to offer our perspective on these most recent debates as well as our perception as to its effects on the stock market. Without having to preface each point with, ‘in our opinion”, please know that these eight points are, “our opinions”: 1. The markets have rallied nearly 90% off the lows of March, 2009. Volatility and even corrections (defined as a 10% drop) are inevitable. (source: Yahoo Finance) 2. There is little concern that the US can’t pay its bills. This was a political event, not a financial one. 3. The professionals at Henry Wealth Management believe in building investment portfolios with via a “passive investment strategy”. The bedrock of this belief system is to globally allocate assets in a proper stock-to-bond ratio, based on one’s goals, time frames and propensities to risk. Once the allocation is chosen, unless there is a bona fide change to a person’s goals, we need to stay invested! 4. It is an easy decision to get out of the markets- fear is a compelling driver to help pull that lever. It is not knowing or frankly, having the courage to ge t back in at the right time that kills returns. The 90% run up mentioned in point 1 assumes that investors were “in” at the bottom, not “back in” at some point along the ascent. 5. The current sell-off and market drop seems to be overdone and overly dramatic, driven by politically-charged fears and fueled by nonstop media coverage. Investors won’t be satisfied for any length of time sitting in low yielding treasuries. I wonder if those who bailed out will get back in after things “calm down” (good luck defining that) and after stock prices rise to ensure that their exit and re-entrance only serves to lock in losses. 6. Pundits can’t have it both ways. The two recent and massive “Keynesian” stimulus spending packages, dubbed “Quantitative Easing 1 and 2” seemingly have not helped our economy. Others now say that cutting spending will hurt the economy. Well, which is it? For us, we allocate assets** for long-term purposes and thus, despite short-term polar opposite rhetoric or actions, do not want to be derailed in our approach. Footnote: The Budget Control Act does not actually cut spending- it only reduces the amount of scheduled annual increases. 7. On a positive note; We do like the fact that an emerging voice in our nation’s capital appears to be supportive of a shrinking government and true spending reductions. Credit card usage and balances by consumers is certainly trending downward.* Our government needs to follow suit. We believe this will help our economy and financial markets over the long-run. 8. On a positive note, #2; Talk of a balanced budget amendment is

nearing a fever-pitch. Hopefully term limits for Congress will not be far behind. These two items could help immeasurably! It’s all about incentives, which present members of Congress do not have. Many seemingly vote to keep their jobs and cater to their largest donors. Taking away lifetime jobs and forcing them to live with a balanced budget may allow them to do the right things for the right reasons without the repercussion of a re-ele ction loss. Again, we see this as helpful for our economy and financial markets. Dan Henry, CLU, is the Vice President of Henry Wealth Management, LLC, an independent financial services firm located at 1370 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA. He offers Securities through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. This article was co-authored with Phil Henry, ChFC, CFS, the firms President. Phil offers Securities and InvestmentAdvisory Services through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. NFP Securities, Inc. is not affiliated with Henry Wealth Management, LLC. Dan may be reached at 412-838-0200 or through email at Dan@HenryWealth.com. The firm’s website is www.HenryWealth.com. The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those held by NFP Securities, Inc. This is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendation. NFP Securities, Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice. Using diversification as part of your investment strategy neither assures nor guarantees better performance and cannot protect against loss of principal due to changing market conditions. Past Performance does not guarantee future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a popular indicator of the stock market based on the average closing prices of 30 active U.S. stocks representative of the overall economy.

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     

1370 W A S H I N G T O N P I K E , S U I T E 403 | B R I D G E V I L L E , PA 15017 P H O N E : 412-838-0200 | W W W .H E N R Y W E A LT H . C O M Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 21


  

Woodville Plantation hosts

weekend isitors got to step back in time at Woodville Plantation in July, as the living history museum presented a special event to commemorate the Whiskey Rebellion - historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794. The weekend also featured a walking lecture titled, “The Events of 1794.” Soldiers of the Fourth Sub-Legion as they returned to Bower Hill discussed and re-created the fateful events of the Whiskey Rebellion, as they occurred in July of 1794. The unique event will included an encampment along the “Tom the Tinker Trail.” Participants experienced camp life with cooking demonstrations, musket firings and tactical demonstrations. A history walk starting at the PA State Historical Marker on Bower Hill near Kane Regional Center and ending at the Scrubgrass Run Trailhead covered topics such as the Battle of Bower Hill, the soldiers that participated in the battle and the Whiskey Rebellion. On Whiskey Rebellion Day, the troops of the Fourth Sub-

V

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Chartiers Valley


  

The Whiskey Rebellion began when farmers rebelled against a tax on whiskey, which was a primary source of their income, that left no room for farmers to profit from their labor. The dispute reached a flashpoint in July of 1794, when mobs ransacked Pittsburgh and a federal marshal in Allegheny County was attacked. President George Washington raised a militia of 13,000 troops and personally led them to squash the insurrection. After all the dust had settled, those few who were arrested were later pardoned by Washington.

Legion made camp at Woodville Plantation, marched and drilled. Guests were able to experience 18th century military camp life, see tactical demonstrations, musket firing, marching and ceremonial drills. Soldiers discussed what camp life was like in the army of 1794. Visitors also learned 18th century cooking techniques as Woodville’s cooks prepared dinner for the encamped troops. Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, go to Woodville’s website at www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412.221.0348.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 23




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Chartiers Valley




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• CALL TODAY FORhas DETAILS Outreach program provided us the • Family Owned & Operated since 1860 opportunity to grow and our • Personalized “Celebration of Life Services” at thestrengthen area’s guaranteed lowest cost relationships within community.” • Only Beinhauer can provide complete Cremation Services usingthe our own Crematory operated by license • Cemetery Services at Woodruff MemorialBeinhauers Park and can newpersonalize Community Mausoleum~Free Veterans services for

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BeinhauerFamily Services

“We have a lot of service based groups that meet in our community room. A church group meets at the Peters Township location every IF YOU DON’T KNOW THE BEINHAUER NAME, Sunday at 10 a.m.,” says Scott Beinhauer. YOU MUST BE NEW TO THE COMMUNITY. The decision to open up the community Beinhauer Funeral Homes have been part room to groups was of the community since 1860, with six twofold: One, it generations of the family, nurturing and gave the funeral growing their business, along with operating home a place for the second oldest active crematory in the large groups to United States. The Beinhauer family strives to assemble or hold be a part of the communities they serve. ceremonies; “The family business is important to all of second, it was a us, and there’s a great deal of heritage and way to give back to legacy that has been established by past the community that generations. We’re making impressions and has supported them building relationships today within our over the decades. communities, continuing a legacy of heritage “We wanted to and trust,” says Rick Beinhauer, the company’s make available a leader and a fifth generation family member. space that anyone in the community could use; Beinhauer is proud to have the sixth generation for example, educational seminars and currently active in the family business with continuing education courses for nurses, Scott Beinhauer, licensed funeral director. seniors, caregivers, hospices, and veterans, to The Beinhauer family serves five mention a few. An annual memorial service is communities in the South Hills—Peters held in the community room for any family Township, Bethel Park, Bridgeville, that wishes to attend. In Bridgeville, we have a Dormont/Mt. Lebanon, and Canonsburg. digital resource sign that not only informs the Their locations are family-friendly, providing community about funeral service information, children’s rooms, cafés where food and but also other community events, such as beverages can be served, and a community programs at the library, Rotary functions, room where dinners and luncheons can be community day, church fairs, and other scheduled. newsworthy information. Our community

the options they can in-house with their own staff. “We’re in the business of helping families create an event or service that is an extension of their loved one’s life—something that provides a meaningful experience for the family and the community,” says Scott Beinhauer. Some of those personal touches include an interactive website, personalized DVD videos, and webcasting of funerals, which, through the use of a password protected website, can give those with physical considerations or travel limitations the ability to attend a loved one’s funeral service over the Internet. “There are a lot of little things that are done for funerals. People create photo collages that chronicle their loved one’s life, or bring in personal items that represent one’s hobbies or lifestyles. You have the year of birth and the year of death, and then you have the dash in the middle. We focus on the dash—everything in the middle that that person has done for their family and community. We help the family celebrate and honor the life that was lived,” says Scott Beinhauer. The Beinhauer family also manages Woodruff Memorial Park Cemetery, located on Route 19 in North Strabane Township. The newly constructed Community Mausoleum offers magnificent crypt entombment as well as extensive cremation niches, including bronze and beveled glass and a beautiful indoor chapel. Adjacent to the human cemetery, Peaceful Pastures provides a final resting place for pets of any kind, including the area’s only pet funeral and cremation center, which houses its own crematory. For more information on Beinhauer Family Funeral Homes and their cemetery and cremation options, call 724.969.0200 or visit them at www.beinhauer.com.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 25




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Chartiers Valley




Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 27




Bridgeville Public Library celebrates

           

T

he official Grand Opening of the Bridgeville Public Library, the culmination of 10 years of planning toward the vision to create a center for lifelong learning and a destination where everyone can go to connect, explore, discover, and grow, was celebrated on June 12, at the new location at 505 McMillen Street (off Dewey Avenue). Local representatives were on hand to share their thoughts on the landmark day, including U.S. Congressman Tim Murphy; The Office of State Senator John Pippy; 45th District Representative Nick Kotik; Allegheny County District 4 Representative Michael Finnerty, Bridgeville Mayor Donald Dolde, who will serve as master of ceremonies; and Fr. Jason Del Vitto, St. George Antiochian Church delivered the invocation. They were joined by Allegheny County Library Association Executive Director, Marilyn J enkins, local leaders and Joyce Heinrich, event chairman. The ceremonies included the formal dedication of a flag pole, donated by board president, Nino Petrocelli, Sr., in memory of his mother, Alberina Petrocelli, conducted by American Legion Post #54 and Boy Scout Troop #2. Vocalist Hannah Drake and South Fayette Middle School ensemble provided patriotic-themed musical accompaniment. “We are writing a new chap ter in a 49-year journey, made possible by the flow of resources from the Bill and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust,” said Donna Taylor, library director. To acknowledge the McDivitt’s gift to the community and their generosity in perpetuity, the Bridgeville Public Library Board of Trustees voted to dedicate the Bill & Grace McDivitt Center for Lifelong Learning in an unveiling ceremony. A response of gratitude and appreciation was given by Martha Mihalyi Fitzmier of Decatur, GA, friend of the McDivitts and daughter of fellow

28 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

founder, Betty Mihalyi. She was joined by granddaughter Katie Fitzmier of Madison, WI. The ceremony and reflection honored all six founders and their families, including Louisa Bergstrom, Grace McDivitt, Betty Mihalyi, Betty Mincemoyer, Sylvia Saperstein & Betty Sutton who incorporated the Bridgeville Publ ic Library on June 21, 1962. The official ribbon cutting by all dignitaries and board members at the entrance opened the doors for those attending to enjoy refreshments, including three cakes donated by South Fayette Shop ‘n Save. Drawings were held for Mylan Golf Classic tickets, BPL tee shirts sporting the new library logo, and more. The board of trustees took a leap-of-faith to proceed with construction of the new 7800 square foot space by leveraging a $500,000 Keystone Grant from the PA Recreation, Park and Conversation Fund for Libraries. That state funding source is now unavailable. development function was established to generate the funds needed to compliment the William and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust proceeds, which were tapped for the dollar-for-dollar match required to qualify for the maximum Keystone grant. The combined $2.2 million from the Keystone Grant and the McDivitt Charitable Trust is one-third of what is needed for the sustainability of the library for generations to come. The Once-in-a-Lifetime Campaign for the Bridgeville Public Library is designed to generate gifts and endowment for the balance of $4.2 million over the next four years. Launch of the comprehensive campaign is under the direction of Lawna Blankenship, the development officer hired to facilitate outreach to

A

Chartiers Valley

a wide range of

prospective philanthropic resources, including corporations, foundations, families, businesses, individuals and friends. “One of the things that make great institutions is transition,” said Blankenship, who plans to meet the community and share the amazing story, the vision and great successes, already being experienc ed. he new library is a destination for all age groups, many underserved because of lack of space. A walking trail planned for the green space that surrounds the library building will compliment myriad wellness programs already in evidence. Programming has increased by 550 percent and program attendance by 869 percent in the first quarter of this year versus the same period in 2010. The library had to open at 11 a.m. to allow for children’s story time programs in the iconic train depot and caboose. Now, patrons are waiting for the doors to open at 9 a.m.

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BUILDING MEN OF FAITH, SCHOLARSHIP AND SERVICE.                 

 

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

REAL ESTATE

C h a rt ie r s Va l l e y

IN Community Magazines proudly announces a comprehensive look at the Chartiers Valley real estate market. In this section, you’ll find interesting information about creating beautiful spaces to live in, and other interesting facts about your community. F E AT U R E S T O R Y

FALL LANDSCAPING IDEAS When the dog days of summer are behind us and that first crisp snap of fall is in the air, energy seems to make a rebound and even the animals seems livelier, more alert. During this time, there’s nothing more wonderful than taking advantage of those last days of warmth to get outside and enjoy the outdoors by doing a little yard work. This is a great time to rake up all those leaves on the ground. But don’t just throw them into a trash bag to be hauled away. Leaves are great for composting and may have as much as three times the amount of minerals as fertilizer. They need to be shredded to be easier to work with, but this is easily accomplished by running a mower back and forth a few times over a pile of leaves. Also, be sure to add a little nitrogen to your compost pile with the leaves.

If your summer flowers have faded, be sure to trim back dead leaves and blooms and add some fall flowers for some more vibrant color. Mums and sunflowers can be purchased in pots to accent any garden with a fall palette, but don’t forget purple as a great contrasting color to oranges, yellows and sienna. Some fall flowers with purple accents are pansies, purple coneflowers, asters and mums. All of these will grow well in zone 6. For some green accent, you might try growing some arugula in a pot or self-watering container. This spicy, leafy plant has long been popular in France and Italy and actually grows better in the fall than in the summer. The leaves will add zest to your salads and other fall dishes. Although the planting time for arugula is in the spring, seedlings can be purchased and transplanted, however they also do well if left in containers or pots.

Helping Families Make the Right Move!

Nevillewood Office: 412.276.5000, Ext. 210 Direct: 412.276.5878 TimDowneyJr@howardhanna.com www.howardhanna.com • www.TimDowneyJr.com

Even if you’re not particularly good at growing plants and flowers, there are many ways to accent your lawn and garden with minimal effort and maintenance. Brightly colored pumpkins placed around pathways and steps give a whimsical touch to decorating. Avoid placing them in direct sunlight and directly on the ground and your pumpkin may well last for two to three months in the cool fall climate. Other low-maintenance decorations for fall are corn stalks and bales of hay. Hay bales also provide extra seating in outdoor areas. Summer may be over but your yard can still be a bright, cheerful place full of beautiful, living things. - by Pamela Palongue

sure you check out Buying? Make IN Chartiers Valley magazine before you make your next move. Selling? Looking?

Tim Downey, Jr. Realtor Chartiers Valley Sales & Relocation Specialist

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

I’ve worked in Chartiers Valley for many years.

412.221.2248 724.745.7422 www.colemanmitchell.com info@colemanmitchell.com

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Don’t miss your final opportunity to live in

Neville Manor in Collier Township! Neville Manor has only three opportunities remaining in this low maintenance living 2-cul-de-sac community. It features luxurious townhomes and carriage homes with access to the community clubhouse and pool. Located just minutes from I-79, the Pittsburgh International Airport and Downtown Pittsburgh and close to great shopping at Robinson Mall, Settler’s Ridge, and more! Neville Manor offers the lifestyle you deserve, for a price you can afford!

Want more information Call Jodie, our New Home Specialist – 412-512-6671

As Western Pennsylvania’s premier stone masonry contractor we are committed to serving our residential and commercial clients by providing high quality, reliable and consistent results at competitive rates. Our showroom is located at 3464 Babcock Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237. For additional information please call (412) 596-2114 or visit us online at www.stoneageinc.net. Andersen windows use natural wood to create a timeless combination of beauty and durability – plus All Andersen windows feature the Perma-Shield system, which protects the window’s exterior beautifully for decades. Never settle on your home builder or the window they use! Dow Building Solutions has a 60+ year legacy of providing innovative insulation and air sealing solutions such as STYROFOAM SIS™ Brand Structural Insulated Sheathing and GREAT STUFF™ Insulating Foam Sealants to home owners that help

to reduce energy costs and effectively seal a home’s building envelope from wind, rain and moisture. Heartland Homes is creating homes with the whole building envelope in mind that are not only well-built, but are actively saving money for the homeowners every month Since 1873, Kohler has been improving people’s lives with exceptional products, including kitchen and bath fixtures, faucets and accessories, furniture, cabinetry, and tile and stone. As a global leader, Kohler offers its customers world-class products to create a complete design solution. For information, ideas or inspiration, visit www.KOHLER.com.

Rex Glass & Mirror Co has been serving Greater Pittsburgh since 1958. As a family owned and operated business, we strive to provide customer service and quality craftsmanship that exceed the expectations of our customers. We design, fabricate, and install high quality residential and commercial glass products. For nearly 100 years, the Whirlpool brand has helped people all over the world find better ways to take care of household tasks. We want our customers to live cleaner, more organized, less busy and more flavorful lives through our appliances. So every Whirlpool® product is born of our decades of experience creating incredibly useful features.

Precision Stone Products is engaged in the production and distribution of premium grade architectural synthetic stone products and accessories resembling natural stone to the finest detail. Our full product line is backed by a 50 year limited warranty. Call (724) 282-2022 for more information or visit us online at www.pspstone.com. Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 33 www.LoveHeartland.com


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What's

hot Kitchen

IN THE

As we zoom into the fall season, many people are planning their home remodeling projects. Of course, the kitchen is the most important room of your home. It is the most important room not just because of the tremendous amount of time homeowners spend in it, but because of the value that a new and updated kitchen will add to your home.Here are some things for consideration when you are planning your kitc hen remodeling project.

The Kitchen & Great Room Plus Technology Open floor plans continue to be desirable in new home design and remodeling. Flat screen TV s, internet for laptops and docking stations for portable music devices allow the cook to view recipes online, email and listen to favorite music while working in the kitchen. A clever designer can allow for these items by including smartly designe d storage niches or family message centers helps to incorporate technology into the design of the room.

The "Gourmet" Kitchen Because of our challenging economy, more and more families is opting to cook at home instead of ordering out. The ever growing popularity of

cooking shows and the Food Network has sparked an interest for creating exciting new recipes. Cooking parties complete with wine tasting are all the rage. Cabinets, countertops and appliance manufactures have all stepped onto this bandwagon and there are numerous options for anything a "chef' could desire.

The "Green" Kitchen The green movement continues to increase in popularity.There is a growing trend with homeowners taking responsibility for what they have in their homes. Even more than just buying appliances and lighting that is more energy eďŹƒcient than ever, the emphasis is on sustainability. Many cabinet companies not only use eco- friendly product in the manufacture of their products,but also re plant forest areas that are used for harvesting for the production of cabinets. Quartz countertops are often made from recycled materials. Many of the quartz products on the market today have the appearance of stone without the required upkeep . The kitchen continues to be the nucleus of the home. At the end of a long day,it remains the area of the home where the family gathers. Whether it be for cooking a meal together, sitting down for a family dinner, just grabbing a quick bite on the way to soccer practice, or just to talk about the activities of the day, it is the place of gathering. A well planned and organized kitchen will make the momen ts spend there more pleasurable. This INdustry INsight was written by Laura Reid Riggin of Premier Home Design Center. Laura has been designing kitchens and baths for 26 years. She has worked in new construction and remodeling. Her designs have been featured in trade magazines, television and FANtastic Kitchens Magazine. This spring, she was a semi-finalist in the Asko kitchen design competition at the National Kitchen and Bath Show in Chicago. Premier Home Design Center is conveniently located at Collier Town Square, 1597 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA 15017. To setup an appointment or a consultation, please call 412.276.5650 or E-mail premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net or visit our website: www.premierhomedesigncenter.com.

Chartiers Valley’s Kitchen & Bath Design Center

In this economy, an investment in your home is one of the safest safest investments you can make. Whether you plan to live in your home long term or are planning to sell your home within the next 5 years, a new kitchen and bath can offer a 30% return on your investment. Premier Home Design Center offers expertise and products designed to fit your budget. Call Premier now for for an excellent return on your biggest investment. %%FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU 34 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

$PMMJFS5PXO4RVBSF 8BTIJOHUPO1JLF #SJEHFWJMMF 1"t email: premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net w w w.premierhomedesigncenter er.c .com


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Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 35


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  

ealth clubs can be intimidating. Gym equipment can be overwhelming, especially when you have no idea how to use it. Gym clothing, gym etiquette and hard core gym enthusiasts can sometimes make it difficult to actually fall in love with your gym. I have been in the fitness industry for over 20 years and even when I am out of my realm or in a different city, I find it difficult popping into another gym and feeling co mfortable. I think to myself, “Geez, if I feel uneasy walking into unfamiliar territory, I can’t imagine how someone feels that is completely new to the whole gym scene.” I moved to Pittsburgh 24 years ago. I absolutely loved the gym that I had left before moving and it took me a very long time to find one here that I could love as much. It was strange, because certainly there were plenty of gyms in the area that offered the exact same amenities that I was used to, but I still struggled. It didn’t take long to realize that the problem was simple; I missed my “gym buddies.” We would meet there after work

almost every night. It was familiar, it was comfortable and most of all it was a blast. Grabbing a friend to workout with is probably one of the easiest ways to calm the nerves and help you fall in love with your gym. Quality time spent together strengthening your friendship as you strengthen your muscles. If you can’t convince a friend to exercise with you, there are other things that you can do to achieve those “love” feelings. For one, you need to realize that the majority of people that frequent the gym are people just like you – just regular folks. Hold your head high and walk through those front doors. Get on a consistent schedule and you’ll start noticing the same people there

most of the time. You’ll soon feel like part of that tribe; people who are all trying to reach the same goal - physical fitness and a love for it. Most gyms offer a wide variety of group fitness classes. You can vary your weekly schedule and never get bored. Again, hold your head high and walk right into the group fitness room. Sure, there ma y be those one or two individuals that have a “spot” in the class and you’ll want to stay out of their way; but in my experience I find people in general warm and welcoming. Most members haven’t forgotten that they were once that new kid in class too. If you have a busy life (and seriously, who doesn’t?) think of your gym as your haven. Don’t look at it like working out; look at it as de-stressing. Your gym is your own personal retreat. It is crucial time that you have set aside for yourself. Adopt the attitude that fitness is fun and make it a priority. What’s not to love about that? The health benefits of regular exercise cannot be overlooked. Joining a gym is the easy part. Staying consistent and sticking with your program are the hard parts. But if you’re in love with your gym, there will be nothing that keep s you from “falling” into fitness. This INdustry INsight was written by Lisa Troyer. Lisa has been in the fitness industry for more than 17 years and is the owner of Fitness Fanatics in the Great Southern Shopping Center. She currently holds four nationally recognized fitness and personal training certifications and can be reached at 412.220.4190, ext. 3 or at fitnessfanatics@verizon.net. Check out www.fitnessfanaticsinc.com for more great fitness tips.

36 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

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The 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic Sponsor and Athlete Gala was recently held at the East Club Lounge at Heinz Field. Part of The Andy Russell Celebrity Golf Classic at The Club at Nevillewood, the event has raised over $5 million in past years for meaningful causes such as Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Free Care Fund, UPMC Cancer Institute and the Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. The gala provided sponsors with the thrilling opportunity of mingling with their favorite former Steeler Super Stars, including Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner, over cocktails and a sumptuous dinner. Live and silent auction items, including a one week stay at the Russell’s Colorado ranch, Steelers vs. Browns tickets and unique sports memorabilia, were also offered to the guests. The music of Souled Out adde d excitement to the evening at the atmospheric East Club Lounge. “We wanted to give back to the community and there are many good causes,” said Mr. Russell, when asked about the Golf Classic and Gala. “Our event is one of the oldest traditions in Pittsburgh and it’s because of everyone supporting us here tonight.” This year the event benefited the UPMC Department of Urology; providing advanced research, diag nosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Pioneer in the field of urology, Joel Nelson, M.D., a Frederic N. Schwentker Professor and Andy and Cindy Russell

Continued on page 38

Superbowl star hosts celebrity gala in support of UPMC 1. Denise Brown 2. Karen and Fritz M. Heinemann, President and CEO of Economics Pennsylvania 3. Stacey Schwartz, Vanessa Binnie, Rich Inman, Rosemary Mendel, Linda Gasper, Bea Whitehead 4. Former Steelers, Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner and Joan Mullins and Becky Wagner

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Continued from page 37 Chairman of the Department of Urology gave an inspirational speech at the gala. Some of the donations were also allocated for The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. Established in 1999, the foundation funds health care and human services. It contains a diverse list

of charities including Economics Pennsylvania, an organization that educates students to become responsible and beneficial members of society b y teaching them the value of saving and spending wisely. C. Andrew Russell Laboratory for Head and Neck Cancer Research, The Leukemia Society and countless other charitable organizations are also part of the foundation.

Gina O’Malley, Special Events Coordinator at Medical and Health Sciences Foundation of the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC helped to plan and execute the event this year. “Andy is amazing . He dedicates so much time, effort and enthusiasm to this event and to his foundation”, said Ms. O’Malley.

If you would like to find out more about The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation, or purchase books authored by Mr. Russell where all of the proceeds go to charity, please visit andyrussell.org.

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5. Louise Koleman, Susan Musgrave, Barbara Card 6. Mike Mackin of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Rebecca Mackin 7. Renee Magill, Volunteer and Lori Spisak of UPMC 8. Christy Hegedus, Glen Edwards and Rochelle Steffenauer 9. Mark Windel of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Camille Galmarini 10. Carol Semple Thompson, Colleen Ley 11. Jenny Szmed 12. Souled Out 13. Victoria Berdnik and David Karcher of Platinum Sponsor, Lamar Advertising and Dolores Karcher 14. J.R. Wilbur, Issac Curtis, Myron Pottios

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

academic groove

   

High school students, it’s time to plan your backto-school strategy and hit the ground running!! Call Chyten to get you ahead with the school curriculum leaving you time on your schedule to balance educational achievements with finding yourself through sports, drama, crew, tennis, etc. In addition to getting you an academic head start, Chyten can help you get the edge needed to prepare for the College applications, standardized tests like SAT, ACT, ISEE. Manjri Gupta, the Owner-Director of Chyten South Hills Center, said “Chyten stands apart by providing an exclusive study material and curriculum taught by certified Masters or Ph.D educators. We integrate everything the student needs towards higher education. Our programs include books, materials, diagnostic tests, question banks and test-taking strat egies that are available exclusively only to our students. Our curriculum team constantly researches and keeps up on the changes taking place in education and college admissions to ensure our methodologies are current and effective.” “We bring the most qualified tutors, curriculum, accountability, feedback loop and results driven processes to our sessions. The systems we have put in place ensure results st udents seek for themselves. Helping students find success in college is our focus,” Gupta said. “We offer private, semi private and small-group classes with no more

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than ten students in a class. Our format ensure dynamic discussion between students and educators allowing them to know how each student is performing,” Gupta said. “All of the work takes place at our education center, a state-of-the-art faci lity with individual tutoring rooms. Our methods have had a tremendous track record of success. We have successfully delivered an average of 274 points gain on SAT scores, and 4 to 7 point gain on ACT scores. Several of our students have achieved near perfect scores. In addition going from C to A, or A to A+ is something that we strive for and deliver.” “Great grades and standardized scores are only par t of the equation. Securing college admission of choice needs careful planning and well thought out strategy. Chyten provides desired levels of college counseling that helps student balance academics, desired college life with the intended career path in mind,” Gupta said. “College application process is time consuming and expensive. Without proper guidance lot of good money and time go to waste. Last t hing you want to do is change your major or college because you did not think through it and did not like what you selected. We plan the college application process for students, achieving college selection process steadily and consistently with your intended career and life choices in mind.” For more information on Chyten, and what its professional tutors can do for your student, go to: www.chyten.com or call 412.833.6060. Chyten is centrally located on Washington Road across from South Hills Village and is minutes away from all Chartiers Valley residents.

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East meets

West inVeterinary

Exciting new developments in veterinary medicine and services are evolving in animal clinics and hospitals all over the world. The goal is to integrate principles of both eastern and western medicine in an artful combination, or alone, to tailor the treatment needs specifically and most importantly safely, to the individual patient. At Bridgeville Animal Hospital in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, they’ve been in tegrating alternative medicine and treatments into their protocols for over a year now, expanding their treatment options as they learn more and are then able to provide more treatment modalities for their patients. Started as Bethel Park Animal Hospital in November of 2000, construction forced a move to another facility in May of 2006, which is larger, warm and inviting. There are 3 full time veterinar ians on staff, as well as a caring and compassionate staff. Here’s a little bit about the doctors and their interests:

Medicine

Dr. Joanna Rubin, VMD is founder and owner of the practice. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine in 1997. Dr. Rubin’s interests are broad, enjoying all aspects of small animal medicine and soft tissue surgery, with a special interest (and love for,) the senior and geriatric patients. Dr. Carolyn brown, DVM is a 2004 graduate of Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Brown has contributed the greatest portion of interest and study in alternative medicine. She recently studied veterinary acupuncture at International Veterinary Acupuncture Society and passed her initial exams. Her certification is expected later this summe r. Her knowledge of acupuncture and increasing knowledge of herbal remedies adds the crucial piece of eastern medicine that as a team of doctors, will access to best help the patient. Dr. Michael Meneo, VMD is a 2009 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Meneo brings to the practice, some very valuable skills and interests. In addition to traditional small anim al medicine and surgery, he’s quite knowledgeable and skilled in some orthopedic procedures that the clinic used to refer to specialty hospitals, including but not limited to anterior or cranial cruciate repair and patellar luxation repair. In short, Bridgeville Animal Hospital is now proud to offer traditional medicine and surgery, along with these emerging treatment modalities: digital radiography, Las er therapy, cutting laser surgery, veterinary acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and orthopedic surgical procedures. The veterinary hospital is excited to continue to evolve and add other treatment and diagnostic options in the future.             

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hartiers Valley FALL 2011

Welcome to the Fall issue of Chartiers Valley Magazine. As the summer winds down, and the kids get ready to go back to school, I sincerely hope that you and your family had some time to get away from it all and relax. It seems that these days, parents driving the family taxi, and kids with their sports/lessons/parties rarely get a chance to enjoy the slow pace of an ever more elusive “lazy summer.” Ask yourself – when was the last time everyone ate together around a family table? When did everyone gather to play a board game? Does anyone remember board games? If your answer was “That one night that the power went out,” then you might be trapped in the 21st Century jail of hyper-life. (I made that term up, but I can do that – I’m the publisher.) I’m not an old guy, unless you ask my kids, but I think that life should be simpler. Moms, dads, brothers, sisters, should all try to spend some time with each other as a family more than that one night when the power goes out. Family time is an important part of being a community. And every community should value quality time with their families – it’s how we teach our children values, etiquette, and more importantly, how to participate in a family structure so they can pass on to their kids what you worked so hard to build. Recently, I saw a commercial where a father shut off the main power to the house so that the family could enjoy dinner together and blamed the outage on a thunderstorm. The Xboxes were dead. The Facebook was closed. The kids came downstairs in disillusionment to ask what happened. While the commercial was pushing some tasty dinner product, the message was more palatable – you have to make family time. I would take that message one step further – you have to make family time a priority. I hope that it’s one of yours.  Have a great Fall!

Wayne Dollard

FROM THE EDITOR While my boss waxes poetic about family time, I’d like to address something along a similar line – neighbors, or your family outside of your family. My wife and I recently bought a house and moved from the one-bedroom condo that I had lived in for nearly 10 years. While it was good for a bachelor, it quickly became small for a married couple looking to start a family. During those years in the condo, I shared a building with nine other neighbors, most of whom were friendly and good-natured people like Don who lived across the hall from me. Don enjoyed going to the high school football games on Friday nights, watching the races at the racetrack in Imperial and fishing. More often than not, he would bring over a couple of extra fillets that I would season up and devour. He had a nephew that re-shafted golf clubs as a hobby and gladly delivered my broken clubs to him for repair at a more than reasonable price. Then there were some cranky people who just looked out for themselves. They would gawk from their windows into the parking lot to see who was walking by or what was going on, convinced that they were up to no good; would complain about everything from the height of the grass to the paint job on somebody’s car; and really never knew what it was to be part of a community where other people also had a voice and an opinion. Sure, Don would complain if the stock market was down or the price of gas was up, but he never complained that someone left their holiday decorations up a few days longer than everyone else or that the community dues were going up because natural gas was rising and landscapers won’t work for free. He knew how to be a neighbor, and I appreciate that. Now we have new neighbors. All of which are friendly and what every new couple hopes for when they move into a new neighborhood. We hope that we can be the same to them. Because in the end, I didn’t consider Don just a neighbor, I considered him a friend and friends are what neighbors can eventually turn into if you let it. Don asked us when we were selling our condo to sell it to a “pretty, young blonde.” I couldn’t come through for him, but Don – I’m still looking for you, buddy. Don’t lose hope! Mark Berton

IN CHARTIERS VALLEY is a community publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Chartiers Valley area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. PUBLISHER

Wayne Dollard M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

Marybeth Jeffries marybeth@incommunitymagazines.com R E G I O N A L E D I TO R

Mark Berton mark@incommunitymagazines.com O F F I C E M A N AG E R

Leo Vighetti leo@incommunitymagazines.com WRITERS

Pamela Palongue GRAPHIC DESIGN

Cassie Brkich Anna Buzzelli Sharon Cobb Susie Doak

Jan McEvoy Joe Milne Gail Murray Tamara Tylenda

A DV E RT I S I N G S A L E S

Derek Bayer Brian Daley Gina D’Alicandro Tina Dollard Rose Estes John Gartley Jason Huffman Lori Jeffries Rita Lengvarsky Connie McDaniel

Brian McKee Tamara Myers Gabriel Negri Robert Ojeda Annette Petrone Vincent Sabatini Michael Silvert RJ Vighetti Nikki CapezioWatson

P H OTO G R A P H E R S

Brad Lauer Gary Yon This magazine is carrier route mailed to all district households and businesses. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Copyright 2011. CORRESPONDENCE All inquiries, comments and press releases should be directed to: IN Community Magazines Attn: Editorial 603 East McMurray Road McMurray, PA 15317 Ph: 724.942.0940 Fax: 724.942.0968

Fall content deadline:11/11/11 www.incommunitymagazines.com

PS – If you have an exceptional neighbor you think we should profile, drop me a line at mark@incommunitymagazines.com. There are more Don’s out there who deserve to be recognized.

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Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.


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Contents Chartiers Valley | FALL 2011 |

6

28 COMMUNITY INTEREST

|

Chartiers Valley School District Collier Township

|

18

37 |

6

13

Bridgeville Public Library

|

Celebrating the Official Grand Opening | 28

Real Estate

|

Fall Landscaping Ideas | 30 FEATURES

|

Raceway Predecessor Applies For Historic Status

|

Circus and Raceway Connection could Lead to Historic Marker | 18

Woodville Hosts Whiskey Rebellion Weekend Heartland Homes | 32 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic

|

22

Superbowl Star Hosts Celebrity Gala in Support of UPMC | 37 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

|

Beinhauer Family Services Sports Clips

|

|

25

27

Chyten Educational Services

|

39

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

|

Investment Policy After Debt Crisis Henry Wealth Management | 21 Premier Home Designs What’s Hot in the Kitchen | 34 Fitness Fanatics | 36 Bridgeville Animal Clinic | 40

ON THE COVER

|

Woodville “Whiskey Rebellion” Weekend Visitors witnessed historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 3


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Chartiers Valley




2011/2012 PROGRAM SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES NOW AVAILABLE.

Sponsor an upcoming Chamber program or event for increased visibility and company recognition. Sponsorship levels are available to fit every business budget!

2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS HELEN WYLIE, President Development Dimensions International, Inc.

RICHARD A. KASMER, Vice President

SAVE THE DATE

Kasmer Engineering & Surveying

Sip and Stroll

GEORGE MACINO, Treasurer G & S Signs

A Tasting of International Wines & Elegant Edibles

October 13, 2011

PAUL BONOSKY, Corporate Secretary Achieva/Parc-Way Industries

LISA BAK Horizon Hospitality/Homewood Suites

Live Music, Gourmet Cuisine, Wines, Cash Bar

KELLY HANNA

ALL WELCOME!

KEYGroup

A portion of the proceeds benefit the Chamber Foundation Education and Outreach Programs.

MARCY REID SECON Corporation

MATT SERAKOWSKI Township of Upper St. Clair

MARK YOUR CALENDAR

ED SICKMUND

Join us for these and other upcoming programs sponsored by the South West Communities Chamber of Commerce

MyWay Mobile Storage

STEPHEN M. TABONE

2011 September October December

Beaconsfield Financial Services

Lunch With Your Legislators

KAREN ZATTA-MARTIN

37th Annual Celebration

Blanc Printing Company

Annual Holiday Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood (Always a Sellout!)

EMERALD VANBUSKIRK, Executive Director

2012 January March April

BARBARA M. ZINGER, Administrative Assistant

2012 Economic Forecast Luncheon Community Outlook 2012 – Lunch with Your Municipal Managers

Please visit our website at

Annual Staff Appreciation Luncheon at The Club at Nevillewood

Visit our Website www.swccoc.org “Calendar of Events” or call 412-221-4100 for details, additional program listings and sponsorship opportunities. Non-Members Always Welcome!

www.swccoc.org

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 5




  You’re invited to experience

International fiddlers perform at Chartiers Valley HS September 25, 2011 Barrage is a high-octane fiddle-fest that features an international, multi-talented cast performing an eclectic mix of music, song and dance. The cast of Barrage features: six violinists/vocalists, one drummer, one bass player, and a guitarist. These shows are part of the Barrage Educational Outreach Program to inspire and excite young string players (and future string players) particularly in the school system. Barrage performances offer up a diverse fusion of cultures, musical styles and incredible performance vitality. The music of Barrage continues to evolve - com bining contemporary world music influences, layered vocal arrangements and pulsating modern beats and rhythms. The cast delivers the show with amazing energy and musical virtuosity that will take your breath away.

Order Barrage Tickets:

Since its creation in Calgary, Canada in 1996, Barrage has been featured many times at events worldwide having played for many Presidents, Prime Ministers and Princes. Barrage has also had their television productions aired on several international TV networks including the PBS network in the USA, the BBC in the UK and CBC in Canada and has performed live shows in New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, China, Canada, Finland, Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Poland, Germany, Norway, Monaco, the USA and the UK.

Type

number of tickets

cost/ ticket

total

Adult

___________@ $15.00 = _______

Please Print:

 

Name____________________________________

Student/Senior ______@ $10.00 = _______

Address__________________________________ Phone____________________________________

Grand Total = _____ Paid by check # _______

Please return this order form and a check or cash to Paid by cash _______ Chartiers Valley High School Attn: Sally Shollenberger 50 Thoms Run Road Bridgeville, PA 15017 by Monday, September 19. Make checks payable to CVOJBB. We will call you to confirm your order and hold tickets at the will-call desk the day of the performance.

PUBLIC NOTICE EXCLUSIVE COMPETITIVE FOOD VENDING CONTRACT The Board of School Directors of the Chartiers Valley School District is considering entering into an Exclusive Competitive Food Vending Contract with The Nutrition Group. Board action is scheduled on the proposed contract at the regularly-scheduled Board Meeting on October 25, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. The Meeting will be held at the District Assembly Room located at the District Administrative Offices at 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15220. The Public School Code (24 P.S. § 5-504.1) provides that the School

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IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS UNIQUE MUSICAL GROUP, CHECK OUT THEIR WEBSITE AT WWW.BARRAGE.ORG. BARRAGE WILL BE APPEARING AT THE CHARTIERS VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 50 THOMS RUN ROAD, BRIDGEVILLE, PA 15017 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M. TICKETS: $15.00 ADULTS AND $10.00 STUDENTS/SENIORS

District “shall not enter into an exclusive competitive food or beverage contract unless the board of school directors provides reasonable public notice or holds a public hearing about the contract.” If any member of the public desires to comment on the proposed food vending contract with The Nutrition Group, public comment will be received by the School Board at their October 25, 2011 Meeting prior to Board action on the contract. To provide public comment, you should attend the October 25, 2011 Board Meeting, request the opportunity to speak during the public comment portion of the meeting and your comments will be received. If you have any questions regarding the proposed food vending contract or the process to provide public comment, you may contact School Board Secretary, Nicholas D. Morelli at telephone number 412-429-2204 or by e-mail to nmorelli@cvsd.net.




   Student Accident Insurance The Chartiers Valley Board of School Directors has voted to approve a Voluntary Student Accident Insurance Coverage program for the 2011-2012 school year. This insurance coverage is provided for students whose families do not have medical coverage or have medical coverage with a high deductible. Students who are injured at school are typically not covered by the school district’s liability insurance polic y. Therefore, the family is financially responsible for all medical costs incurred. The Chartiers Valley School District realizes that spiraling health care costs have forced many families to choose health insurance programs with significant deductibles. To help minimize the financial burden of high deductibles or nonexistent medical coverage for district students, CVSD offers Student Accident Insurance Protect ion through Ace American Insurance Company – as administered by American Management Advisors - at a nominal fee. Two options are available: 24-hour coverage for $98.00 annually; or school-hours-only coverage for $27.00 annually. If you are interested in exploring Student Accident Insurance Protection in greater detail, contract your child’s building principal or visit the business office page of district’ s web site (www.cvsd.net) and click on the link for Student Accident Insurance under Content.

                      

Board of Directors Beth McIntyre, President - 412.429.9242 Debra Rice, Vice President - 412.722.8021 Jeff Choura - 412.221.7704 Patti Figorski - 412.279.9030 Patricia Frey - 412.279.1439 Bridget Kelly - 412.319.7934 Herb Ohliger - 412.759.0682 Mary Lou Petronsky - 412.221.7492 Pam Poletti - 412.429.8717

Central Administration

Brian White, Ed.D Superintendent Yvonne Hawkins, Ed.D Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum Scott Seltzer Asst. Superintendent for School Leadership Nicholas D. Morelli Director of Finance and Support Operations/Board Secretary Robert Gold Director of Facilities Arthur Turner Asst. Director of Facilities Lynne Dunnick Director of Student Services Michael Mazzeo Director of Transportation Please direct news items or questions to the public relations office at 412.429.2234. Your input is greatly appreciated! Questions regarding taxes should be directed to your municipality: Bridgeville, 412.221.6055; Collier, 412.276.5277; Heidelberg, 412.276.5413; Scott, 412.276.5302. Delinquent tax questions should be directed to Maiello, Brungo and Maiello at 412.242.9615. The Board will hold Workshop and Regular meetings on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at 7 p.m. in the District Assembly Room at the Administrative Offices, 2030 Swallow Hill Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15220. The Board may take action or conduct business for any particular or general purpose at any of these meetings. Additional special or committee meetings will be called and advertised as needed. It is the policy of Chartiers Valley School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, marital or parental status, national origin, age, or handicap in its educational and vocational programs, activities or employment as required by Title IX, Section 504 and Title VI.

 

Creation of Foundation in progress

Published by the Chartiers Valley School District for the residents of Bridgeville Borough, Collier Township, Heidelberg Borough and Scott Township.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 7




Real Estate Tax Millage Rates

 

SCHOOL DISTRICT

TAX MILLAGE RATE

Wilkinsburg Borough Brentwood Borough Northgate Clairton City East Allegheny Mt. Lebanon Deer Lakes South Park Woodland Hills Shaler Area Sto-Rox South Fayette Twp. Penn Hills Bethel Park Highlands Carlynton Cornell Steel Valley Riverview Upper St. Clair Twp. Elizabeth Forward Allegheny Valley Baldwin-Whitehall West Mifflin Area Plum Borough Keystone Oaks West Allegheny Pine-Richland Moon Area Fox Chapel Area Duquesne City West Jefferson Hills Gateway Hampton Township Quaker Valley Avonworth North Hills CHARTIERS VALLEY North Allegheny Montour South Allegheny McKeesport Area

35.000 28.270 27.600 27.600 27.540 26.630 26.250 25.990 25.650 25.630 25.000 24.880 24.810 24.560 24.41 24.150 24.110 24.070 24.050 23.770 23.760 23.460 23.400 22.992 22.200 22.030 22.000 21.908 21.300 21.260 21.100 21.080 21.020 20.880 20.700 20.000 19.910 19.880 19.740 18.900 18.110 16.710

AVERAGE

23.388

8 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

Veterans Day Invitation All area veterans are invited to attend Chartiers Valley High School’s 8th Annual Veterans Day Flag Raising Ceremony and Luncheon on Friday, November 11. The school’s entire student body and faculty will gather at the flag pole in front of the building at 10:10 a.m. to honor veterans in attendance. Veterans are asked to arrive at the school by 9:50 a.m. Parking spots will be reserved near the site of the ceremony. For additional information or to confirm attendance, veterans may contact the public relations office at 412-429-2234.

CHARTIERS VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT Summary of Finance-Revenues and Expenditures 2011-12 Budget REVENUES 6000 Local Sources 7000 State Sources 8000 Federal Sources

$ $ $

38,866,394 10,295,882 680,000

TOTAL REVENUES

$

49,842,276

EXPENDITURES Regular Education Special Education Vocational Education Other Instruction Non-Pupil Pupil Personnel Instructional Staff Administration Pupil Health Business Office Facility Operations Transportation Central Office Other Services-AIU Student Services Community Services Building Improvements Financing & Reserves

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

19,749,501 5,556,242 652,825 183,799 25,000 1,561,469 1,200,864 3,931,435 252,916 644,682 5,334,735 4,037,985 42,100 135,000 1,575,723 33,000 25,000 4,900,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

49,842,276




Chartiers Valley School District Calendar 2011-2012

July 11 Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

August 11 Su M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

Tu 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

Th 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

Sa 6 13 20 27

September 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24

October 11

November 11 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

F 2 9 16 23 30

3rd - March 22 4th - June 5

Snow Make-Up: #1 - Feb. 17 #2 - June 6 #3 - June 7 #4 - June 8 Board Approved: 3-22-11

December 11 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

End of Report Period: 1st.-Oct. 28 2nd - Jan. 13

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24 31

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

February 12 Su M Tu W Th F 1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29

Sa 4 11 18 25

March 12 Su M Tu W Th 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

Sa 3 10 17 24 31

F 6 13 20 27

Sa 7 14 21 28

F 4 11 18 25

Sa 5 12 19 26

Su M Tu W Th F 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 29

Sa 2 9 16 23 30

April 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

Tu 3 10 17 24

W 4 11 18 25

Th 5 12 19 26

May 12 Su M Tu 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

Th 3 10 17 24 31

June 12

New Teachers' Induction - No Students Teachers' Inservice Day - No Students No Students at Certain Grade Levels - Act 80 2 Hour Delay for Students - Act 80 Teacher Meetings No School

January 12 Su 1 8 15 22 29

1/2 Student Day

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 9

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Su M Tu W Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

AUGUST 17-19 New Teachers' Induction 22-24 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 25 FIRST STUDENT DAY 25-31 Kindergarten only-1/2 day-Act 80 SEPTEMBER 5 LABOR DAY – No School 28 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings OCTOBER 10 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students 31 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students NOVEMBER 8 District Conference Day-Act 80 – No Students 24-28 THANKSGIVING RECESS – No School DECEMBER 13 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 23-30 WINTER RECESS – No School JANUARY 2 WINTER RECESS – No School 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day-Teachers’ Inservice-No Students FEBRUARY 6 Two Hr. Delay for All Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 17 Teachers’ Inservice Day – No Students 20 PRESIDENTS’ DAY – No School MARCH 2 District Conference Day - Act 80-No Students 23 Teachers’ Inservice-No Students APRIL 4 No school for Gr. K-5 only-Act 80-Parent Conferences 5-9 SPRING RECESS –No School MAY 18 SCHOOL PICNIC-No School 21 Two Hr. Delay for all Students-Act 80-Teacher Meetings 22 No School Grades 6-12 only-Act 80 28 MEMORIAL DAY Observed-No School JUNE 5 LAST STUDENT DAY-1/2 day 6 Teachers’ Inservice Day 7 Teachers' Inservice Day 7 Graduation 8 Teachers' Inservice Day


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NOTICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES AND PROGRAMS CHILD FIND AND ANNUAL NOTICE TO PARENTS In compliance with state and federal law, the district will provide to each protected handicapped student without discrimination or cost to the student or family, those related aids, services or accommodations which are needed to provide equal opportunity to participate in and obtain the benefits of the school program and extracurricular activities to the maximum extent appropriate to the student’s abilities. In order to qualify as a protected handicapped student the child must be of school age with a physical or mental disability, which substantially limits or prohibits participation in or access to an aspect of the school program. These services and protections for “protected handicapped students” are distinct from those applicable to all eligible or except ional students enrolled (or seeking enrollment) in special education programs. For further information on the evaluation procedures and provision of services to protected handicapped students or eligible students, contact: Lynne M. Dunnick, M.Ed. Chartiers Valley School District Director of Student Services 2030 Swallow Hill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Phone 412.429.2638 Fax: 412.429.2286 The school distric t, along with other public agencies in the Commonwealth, must establish and implement procedures to identify, locate and evaluate all children who need special education programs and services because of the child’s disability. This notice is to help find these children, offer assistance to parents and describe the parent’s rights with regard to confidentiality of information that will be obtained during t he process. The school district shall also conduct awareness activities to inform the public of gifted education services and programs and the manner by which to request these services and programs. The content of this notice has been written in English. If a person does not understand any of this notice, he or she should contact the school district (see contacts) and request an explanation.

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IDENTIFICATION ACTIVITY Child Find refers to activities undertaken by public education agencies to identify, locate, and evaluate children residing in the State, including children attending private schools, who are suspected of having disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disability, and determine the child’s need for special education and related services. The purpose is to locate these children so that a free appropriate public education (FAPE) can be made available. The types of disabilities, that if found to cause a child to need services are: Autism, deafblindness, deafness, emotional disturbance, hearing impairment, mental retardation, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment due to chronic or acute health problems, specific learning disabilities (speech or language ), traumatic brain injury and visual impairment including blindness, in the case of a child that is of preschool age developmental delay. Screening activities are also conducted to determine student need for gifted support services. The school district provides educational services for all eligible students either through district- operated classes, contracts with Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3, or approved private schools. Classes providing Learning Support, Life-Skills Support, Emotional Support, Physical Support, Multiple Disabilities Support, and Autistic Support are available for students at beginning school age through age 21, if necessary. Additional services include hearing, vision, and speech and language support. Students found to meet eligibility criteria as "mentally gifted" may receive services through district's Gifted Support programs. Each school district is required to annually provide notice describing the identification activities and the procedures followed to ensure confidentiality of personally identifiable information. This notice is intended to meet this requirement. Identification activities are performed to find a child who is suspected as having a disability that would interfere with his or her learning unless special education programs and services are made available. Children suspected of

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being "mentally gifted" who need specially designed instruction not ordinarily provided in the regular education program also go through screening activities. The activities include: Review of group data, conduct hearing and vision screening, assessment of student’s academic functioning, observation of the student displaying difficulty in behavior and determining the student’s response to attempted remediation. Input from parents is also an information source for identification. After a child is identified as a suspected child with a disability, he or she is evaluated, but is not evaluated before parents give permission for their child to be evaluated. The school district will follow procedur es outlined in the special education regulations (Chapter 14) for determining eligibility and need for special education services. Chapter 16 regulations will be followed to determine eligibility and need for Gifted Support services. CONFIDENTIALITY (CFR 300.127) If after screening, a disability is suspected, upon your permission, your child will be evaluated. Written records of the results are called an education record, which are directly related to your child and are maintained by the school districts. These records are personally identifiable to your child. Personally identifiable information includes the child’s name, the name of the child’s parents or other family member, the address of the child or their family, a personal identifier such as social security number, a list of characteristics that w ould make the child’s identity easily traceable or other information that would make the child’s identity easily traceable. The school district will gather information regarding your child’s physical, mental, emotional and health functioning through testing and assessment, observation of your child, as well as through review of any records made available to the school district through your physician an d other providers of services such as day care agencies. The school district protects the confidentiality of personally identifiable information by one school official being responsible for ensuring the confidentiality of the records, training being provided to all persons using the information, and maintaining for public inspection a current list of employee’s names and positions who may have access to the i nformation. The school district will inform you when this information is no longer needed to provide educational services to your child and will destroy the information at designated intervals, except general information such as your child’s name, address, phone number, grades, attendance record and classes attended, grade level completed, may be maintained without time limitation. As the parent of the ch ild you have a number of rights regarding the confidentiality of your child’s records. The right to inspect and review any education records related to your child are collected, maintained, or used by the school district. The school district will comply with a request for you to review the records without unnecessary delay before any meetings regarding planning for your child’s special education program (called an IEP meeting). Should you and your school district disagree about your child’s special education supports and services and a due process hearing is requested, the school district will furnish you with the opportunity to inspect and review your child’s records, within 30 days. You have the right to an explanation and interpretations of the records, to be provided copies of the records if fail ure to provide the copies would effectively prevent you from exercising your right to inspect and review the records, and the right to have a representative inspect and review the records. This review is conducted with the assistance of an appropriate school district staff member. Upon your request, the school district will provide you a list of the types and location of education records collected, main tained, or used by the agency. Additionally, the school district will charge a fee for copies of records made in response to your request except, it will not charge a fee if doing so will prevent you from inspecting and reviewing your child’s records. A current list of reasonable fees relative to records request is available in the district’s central office. The district will not charge a fee to search o r retrieve information. You have the right to request in writing the amendment of your child’s education records that you believe are inaccurate or misleading, or violate the privacy or other rights of your child. The school district will decide whether to amend the records within 45 school days of receipt of your request. If the school district refuses to amend the records you will be notified of the refusal and your right to a hearing. You will be given at that time, additional




information regarding the hearing procedures. Upon written request, the district will schedule and provide written notice of the hearing to challenge information in your child’s education files. Parent consent is required before personally identifiable information contained in your child’s education records is disclosed to anyone other that officials of the school district c ollecting or using the information for purposes of identification of your child, locating your child and evaluating your child or for any other purpose of making available a free appropriate public education to your child. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Additionally, the school district, upon request, discloses records without consent to officials of another school district in which your child seeks or intends to enroll. A parent may file a written complaint with the Pennsylvania Department of Education at the address below alleging that the rights described in this notice were not provided. Pennsylvania Department of Education Bureau of Special Education Division of Complia nce 333 Market Street Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333 The Department of Education will investigate the matter, issue a report of findings and necessary corrective action within 60 days. The Department will take necessary action to ensure compliance is achieved. Complaints alleging failures of the school district with regard to confidentiality of personally identifiable information may also be filed with: Family Poli cy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Ave, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605 The school districts listed above will provide ongoing screening services. If you wish to learn more, have questions, or believe your child may need to be identified, please contact your local school district contact. EARLY INTERVENTION IDENTIFICATION

POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF WEAKNESSES IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL DOMAIN AREAS AND OTHER RISK FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY (Requirement of Section 14.212(b)) A developmental delay is determined by the results of a developmental evaluation. The results of one or more domain areas (adaptive, personal-social, communication, motor or cognitive) have to show at least a 25% delay or a score of 1.5 standard deviations below the mean (Standard Score of 77 or below). The delay results in the need for specially designed intervention/instruction (SDI) in order to participate in typical activities and routines. Children with a developmental delay may show weaknesses in the following areas: Adaptive – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty dressing/undressing; using utensils to eat, removing shoes without assistance, distinguishing between nonfood/food substances, or have difficulty with toileting needs. One may have difficulty moving independently

OTHER FACTORS THAT COULD INDICATE A DISABILITY Developmental disabilities are birt h defects related to a problem with how a body part or body system works. They may also be known as functional birth defects. Many of these conditions affect multiple body parts or systems. Researchers have identified thousands of different birth defects. Birth defects can have a variety of causes, such as: Genetic problems caused when one or more genes doesn’t work properly or part of a gene is missing, Problems with chromosomes, such as having an extra chromosome or missing part of a chromosome. Environmental factors that the expectant mother is exposed to during pregnancy, such as Rubella or German measles or if she uses drugs or alcohol during pregnancy. FACTORS CONSIDERED WHEN DETERMINING MENTAL GIFTEDNESS 1. The child performs a year or more above grade achievement level in one or more subjec ts as measured by a nationally normed and validated achievement test. 2. The child demonstrates rates of acquisition/retention of content and skills reflecting gifted ability. 3. The child demonstrates achievement, performance, or expertise in one or more academic areas as evidenced by products, portfolios or research, as well as criterion-referenced team judgment. 4. The child demonstrates early and measu red use of high level thinking skills, academic creativity, leadership skills, intense academic interest, communication skills, foreign language aptitude, or technology expertise. 5. The child demonstrates that intervening factors such as English as a second language, disabilities, gender or race bias, or socio/cultural deprivation are masking gifted abilities.

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In Pennsylvania, a child between three years of age and the s chool district’s age to begin school who has a developmental delay or one or more of the physical or mental conditions listed above, will be identified as an “eligible young child.” The parents of these children have the same rights described above. The Pennsylvania Department of Education is responsible for providing programs and services to eligible young children under Act 212 of 1990, the Early Interve ntion Services System Act. Screening for preschool children is available through the DART Program operated by Allegheny Intermediate Unit #3. To schedule an appointment for screening call the AIU at 412.394.5987. For additional information, contact the school district.

around the house, understanding that hot is dangerous, putting away toys when asked, indicating an illness or ailment to an adult, or demonstrating caution and avoiding common dangers. Personal-Social – Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty responding positively to adult praise, rewards or promise of rewards; greeting familiar adul ts spontaneously, enjoying simple stories read aloud, helping with simple household tasks, initiating social interaction with familiar adults, expressing affection/liking for peers, playing cooperatively with peers, stating first name, last name, age, or whether he is a male/female; using objects in make-believe play, using ‘I’ or ‘me’ to refer to himself, or recognizing facial expressions of common emot ions. Communication - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty following 2-step verbal commands, associating spoken words with pictures, recalling events from a story presented orally; engaging in extended and meaningful nonverbal exchanges with others, using words to get his needs met, responding to ‘yes’ and ‘no’ questions appropriately, or asking ‘wh’ questions. Motor - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty running without falling, kicking a ball without falling, walking up and down steps alternating feet without assistance, walking backward, imitating the bilateral movements of an adult, pointing with his index finger independent of the thumb and other fingers, scribbling linear and/or circular patterns spontaneously, using t he pads of fingertips to grasp a pencil, holding a paper with one hand while drawing or writing with the other hand, fastening clothing without assistance, cutting with scissors, copying a circle, or imitating vertical and horizontal markings. Cognitive - Pre-kindergarten aged children with a developmental delay may have difficulty attending to one activity for 3 or more minutes, reciting memorized lines fro m songs or TV shows, showing interest in age-appropriate books, matching/naming colors, responding to one and one more, giving three objects on request, matching shapes, identifying objects by their use, identifying items by size, identifying colors of familiar objects not in view, or identifying simple objects by touch.


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

    

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Collier Township welcomes the new Township Manager Sal Sirabella and the new Codes Enforcement/Zoning Officer Tom Plietz.

Residents can submit their email address to the township so that they could be informed of special meetings or happenings taking place in the Township.

 • October 3 to December 16, 2011. Dates are approximate and subject to change depending on weather. • Leaves must be raked curbside or to the edge of residency. • Pick-up will be via the Township’s “Leaf-Vac” along residential streets only. •Leaves may be bagged. Use brown leaf & garden bags only – no plastic. After December 16, 2011, all leaves must be bagged with leaf bags (not plastic bags).

 We are looking for volunteers just like you to help make Collier parks safe, fun places for enjoying time with your family. FRIENDS is the new, non-profit organization developed to handle fundraising activities for Collier Parks & Recreation initiatives. We cannot do it without your help! We welcome a diverse group of individuals and talents. If you are interested, please contact membership chairman Barb Riedel at 412-279-8747 or email at abriedl@verizon.net.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER is in need of Volunteers In order to keep the membership fee to a minimum, we are asking for volunteers to help man and manage the facility. Duties will be greeting guests and checking-in members I. D. Hours will be M-F, 8am-11am and 4pm-8pm. Saturday 8am-5pm and closed on Sunday. The Fitness Center is located on Porter Way off of Private Lobaugh Street from Nike Site Road. The facility has various strength training equipment, and a number of fitness machines, bikes, treadmills, etc. There are also ladies and men's showers and a sauna available for your use. For information or to sign-up to volunteer call: Bob Caun, Parks & Recreation Director, 412- 279-2525, Ext. 125 or bcaun@colliertwp.net. Hope to see you there enjoying yourself soon.

NIKE SITE FITNESS CENTER MEMbERShIP FEE INDIVIDUAL 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP RESIDENT $60.00 NON-RESIDENT $85.00 FAMILY 6-MONTh MEMbERShIP (3 or more persons in family) Nobody under 14 without an adult. Absolutely nobody under 12 years old. RESIDENT $140.00 NON-RESIDENT $180.00

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Board Parks and Recreation Month at 6:30 PM of y Fourth Tuesda Each Planning Commission y of Each Month at 7:00 PM First & Third Thursda

$3.00 $5.00

  ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES: (412) 279-2525 8AM to 4:30PM – Mon., Tues., Thurs. 8AM to 7PM Wed., 8AM to NOON Fri. Codes/Zoning Office:

(412) 279-9998

Tax Office:

(412) 276-5277

Public Works:

(412) 279-8828

Police Station:

(412) 276-5051

Municipal Authority:

(412) 279-4941

Emergency:

911

Collier Township Website: www.colliertownship.net

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(Workshop/Agenda) Board of CommissionersEach Month at 7:00 PM Last Wednesday of (Regular/Business) Board of Commissioners of Each Month at 7:00 PM Second Wednesday ion (As Needed) Civil Service Commiss nth at 7:00 PM First Tuesday of Each Mo (As Needed) Zoning Hearing Board ch Month at 7:00 PM Ea of y sda Third Tue

NON-MEMbERS - PER VISIT RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT

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   Since 2000, the Night Walk on the Panhandle Trail has been a Halloween tradition in Collier Township. This year the festivities begin at 7 PM on Saturday, October 22nd. The Rennerdale Youth Group will carve more than 100 pumpkins donated by Beccari’s Farm Market, Thoms Run Road. Collier Girl Scouts will set out and light the jack o’ lanterns along a half-mile stretch of the Trail from the bridge near the Walkers Mill trailhead to the Sunnyside entrance. Bonfires light the night and hot chocolate and sweet cider are distributed by Collier Friends of the Panhandle Trail. A costumed volunteer will delight the kids with stories near the Quarry bonfire. This year’s treat bags for children aged 11 and under will be distributed at the Quarry. Also new this year, children was well as adults are encouraged to wear costumes and parade on the Quarry stage. Parking is available in the Public Works yard at 110 Noblestown Road. The event is free but donations are welcomed! For updates, got to www.panhandletrail.org.

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● For all ages including organization & school field trips. ● Free refreshments & station tours. ● Please come visit us and our duck pond. For more information, see our website at www.rennerdalevfd.com.

Line up is 12:30 pm at Webb Field. Parade starts at 1 pm. Every child in costume receives a treat bag plus prizes. Cookies and drinks will be served. Chartiers Valley Band will be in the parade. Any questions, call John Kripp at 412-276-4252.

   

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All you can eat pancake breakfast including your choice of pancakes, bacon, sausage, eggs and beverages. The sixth annual Open house & Membership Drive will have demonstrations, exhibits and prize giveaways. Presto VFD is located at 5228 Thoms Run Road with ample parking across the street. For more information, please call the station at 412-221-5677 or visit the website at www.prestovfd.org.

t s e f r e b o t k O

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The Friends of Collier invites all to their First Annual Oktoberfest that will be held Friday, September 30th from 6:00 – 10:00 PM and Saturday, October 1st from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM at the newly acquired Charles E. Kelly Support Facility located at the former Army base off of Nike Site Road. Come with friends and family and enjoy nightly performances by local bands, tasty foods, desserts, beer and great entertainment for the kids. Vendors are needed, if you are interested in participating, please contact Janet Wank at 412.279.9998 or jwank@colliertwp.net.




   

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The Kirwan Heights VFD, Presto VFD and the Rennerdale VFD once again thank the Hall of Flame Golf Committee for their efforts in holding the fifth successful Hall of Flame Golf Outing. Through their efforts and with the strong financial support of Collier residents, businesses and neighboring businesses, the Golf event once again raised more than $40,000.00. These funds are shared equally by each Fire Company to help cover the rising costs of personal protection gear and necessary fire and emergency equipment. The raffle winners were: Charlotte Davis (1st); Mal Bruce (2nd) and Dave Clemens (3rd). Next years golf outing will be in July, 2012.

NON-EMERGENCY: 412-279-6911: This is the main number used to contact the Collier Township Police. When you call this number and specify that you need Collier Police, they will contact the on-duty officers and send them to the correct location or inform them to return your call. This number is the MOST effective way for a resident or business owner to reach the police.

 The First United Presbyterian Church of Rennerdale is hosting its 7th annual Golf Outing on Saturday, September 10, 2011 at Fort Cherry Golf Club. Cost is $80 which includes 18 holes of golf, cart, refreshment at the turn and dinner. All proceeds go to our Christian Education and youth program. If interested in participating, please call the church at 412-276-2268 or e-mail lisaandjimmason@comcast.net.

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OFFICE: 412-276-5051: This number is for leaving a message for a specific officer in their voicemail. This will be listened to when the officer is on duty next. This number may also be used for general questions. SOLICITATION: Anyone who goes door to door to advertise their business or products, even by placing a flyer, is a solicitor. They need a permit for this. There are rules as to when and where they are allowed. Solicitors are not allowed where there are signs up such as Cloverleaf Estates, Nevillewood, Nevilleside, and Summit Ridge. They are not allowed at houses with no soliciting signs or who are on the no soliciting list. If someone comes to your door they need a permit and their ID. When in doubt, call 412-279-6911. ALARMS: Any resident or business with an alarm system needs an alarm permit. Resident alarms cost $50, business alarms cost $65. This is a one-time fee. You can have three free false alarms in a calendar year, after that they cost $25/each.

 CTMA continues to provide the necessary main sewer line inspection, maintenance and repair as required under the Allegheny County Health Department Consent Order which affects all municipalities in Allegheny County. Under the Consent Order, no surface water may enter the sanitary sewer system and individual property owners must make certain that they have disconnected any roof leader or stairwell or driveway drain that is connected into the sanitary sewer system. Property owners must make certain that their house air vent and house cleanout are exposed to grade for necessary maintenance in order to have the sewer system function properly and be available should a dye test pf the property be requested. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 15

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This spring CTMA accepted from the contractor the sanitary sewer lines installed to serve 19 properties located along Baldwin Rd. East and West. The project cost was $542,696.15 and was constructed with the cooperation of the property owners that were served by this project. Sewer lines have been designed to serve properties along the opposite of Baldwin Rd., and McMichael Rd., Baldwin Rd, Scotts Run Rd. and portions of Ridge Rd. to McMichael Rd. This project has been substantially delayed due to the refusal of a number of property owners to grant the required right-of-ways needed to construct the project. Without the cooperation of all property owners in providing the necessary right-of-ways, projects of this type are delayed indefinitely and, in some cases, are abandoned. CTMA had applied for a PA H2O Grant for the entire project. The Commonwealth of PA notified CTMA that the project could not be founded at this time. Provided by Dan Oberleitner, Chairman of CTMA

EMERGENCY: 9-1-1




   ChIMNEY AND FURNACES Chimney maintenance is vital to your family’s safety. • Have your chimney inspected and cleaned on a regular basis. • When possible, burn seasoned woods (dryness of the wood is more important than hard wood versus soft wood). • Smaller, hotter fires will burn more completely and produce less smoke than larger fires. • Do not burn cardboard boxes or trash, as they can spark a chimney fire. • Install stovepipe thermometers, which help monitor flue temperatures where wood stoves are in use, then adjust burning practices as needed.

TRICK OR TREAT SAFETY Don’t get caught up in the holiday spirit —make sure your children trick-or-treat safely. • Rather than buying a mask, use makeup to decorate children. That way, they can see more easily. • If your kids go trick-or-treating after dusk, make sure they have a flashlight and are wearing retro reflective material. • Dress children in warm, light colored clothing so that they may be easily seen when crossing the street. • Do not purchase Halloween costumes and other items which are not marked “Flameproof” or “Flame-Retardant”. • Remind children to skip houses that are not well-lit. • Check candy before allowing kids to eat it. • Avoid tricks that could cause bodily injury, destroy property, or cause a fire.

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WhAT IS STORM WATER? Storm Water is water from precipitation that flows across the ground & pavement when it rains or when snow & ice melt. The water seeps into the ground or drains into what we call storm sewers. These are the drains you see at street corners or at low points on the sides of streets. Collectively, the draining water is call storm water runoff.

FALL CLEAN-UP Yard work does not end simply because summer is over. Here are some safety tips for tackling autumn tasks around home. • When lifting heavy bags of mulch, use a wheelbarrow when possible, and remember to lift with your legs, not with your back. • Be careful when pruning. Pruning from a ladder is especially dangerous. • To avoid blisters when doing yard work, wear gloves. • If you are doing a lot of raking, try an ergonomic rake, which can be found at most hardware stores and garden centers.

along the way empty into our waters, too, because storm water does not get treated. • Pet wastes left on the ground get carried away by storm water, contributing harmful bacteria, parasites & viruses to our water. • Vehicles drip fluids (oil, grease, gasoline, antifreeze, brake fluids, etc.) onto paved areas where storm water runoff carries them through our storm drains & into our water. • Chemicals used to grow & maintain beautiful lawns & gardens, if not used properly, can run off into the storm drains when it rains or

WhY IS STORM WATER “GOOD RaIN GONE WRONG?” Storm water becomes a problem when it picks up debris, chemicals, dirt, and other pollutants as it flows or when it causes flooding & erosion of stream banks. Storm water travels through a system of pipes & roadside ditches that make up storm sewer systems. It eventually flows directly to a lake, river, stream, wetland or coastal water. All of the pollutants storm water carries 16 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

bACK TO SChOOL SAFETY Parents must do some homework to keep their kids healthy and safe. Don’t let safety “fall” by the wayside. • Walk and ride to school safely. Obey traffic lights and signals, walk only in crosswalks, and listen to the crossing guard. • If your kids bike to school, be sure they wear a helmet. • If possible, always walk your child to the bus stop and pick them up as well. • Keep backpacks light – a child’s backpack should only be 5 to 10 percent of his or her body weight, according to the American Chiropractic Association. • A backpack with wheels is easy to maneuver and reduces back stress. If your child does choose to wear a backpack, utilize both straps. Slinging the backpack over once shoulder may cause spinal curvature.

Chartiers Valley

when we water our lawns & gardens. • Waste from chemicals & materials used in construction can wash into the storm sewer system when it rains. Soil that erodes from construction sites causes environmental degradation, including harming fish & shellfish populations that are important for recreation & our economy. This information was supplied by Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. For more information go to www.dep.state.pa.us.




  you thought block parties were a thing of the past, think again! Chestnut Street in Bridgeville has been holding an annual block party for the past 27 years. Each year, neighbors close off the street and party until 11 p.m. Children play games in the street, including bobbing for bubble gum in pie pans filled with whipped cream, find the prize in a pile of hay, and football, of course. A sheet is decorated every year, commemorating the event, and while organizers said there have been a couple of years when the party wasn’t held, those years are few and far between. Even and odd numbered houses take turns between bringing appetizers and desserts and hotdogs, hamburgers and chicken are grilled on the street. The group even set up a screen to project the Steelers preseason game against Atlanta, and a stage w here neighbors can demonstrate their talents which ranged from a vocal and kazoo rendition of Harry Woods’ 1927 classic “Side By Side,” rock and roll standards like “Johnny B. Goode,” and a family blowing on the slide trombones and trumpet. 

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

Raceway predecessor Applies for

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West Allegheny

are a fan of the Imperial Raceway, it’s probably no surprise to you that much of Imperial’s amenities came from the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena. What may surprise you is that the tiny Borough of Heidelberg has applied for historic status for the site. The application was denied once because it was submitted based on its history of racing. The borough researched the matter further and found that the raceway wasn’t just known for the excitement that later found itself at Imperial. The Heidelberg Raceway was the site of the final 1956 Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus under the big top, documented in national outlets like the New York Times and Life Magazine. It was a ½-mile racetrack that hosted four NASCAR races and where Richard Perry’s father, Lee Perry won his first NASCAR race. It was also home to countless boxing matches, soccer games, fairs and circuses. Now, Heidelberg Manager Joe Kauer wants Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena to be recognized for the history it’s provided the region since during its brief, 25-year lifespan. “We submitted for one of those roadside historical markers. The state kicked our application back saying we needed more than just four NASCAR races to declare it historical,” Kauer said. “They said, ‘What’s there of national historical significance,’ so we researched it, and it was the final act of the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Circus under the tent.”


  

According to Heidelberg Borough’s application with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, the track was opened on Memorial Day, 1948, and was intended to be a home for horse racing, which did not become legal until years later. In addition to the main ½mile asphalt track, it also had a ¼-mile dirt track, seating for 15,000 fans, and free parking for 8,000 cars. After its closing in 1973, the site was razed and became home to “Raceway Plaza,” which has been a commercial staple for the South Hills for decades. Home to major anchor department chains such as Hills, Ames and now Wal-Mart, the site also has a Shop ‘N Save, McDonalds and Long John Silvers. “You would never guess that all this history just happened right down the street,” Kauer said. “This marker will remind people, so people don’t just think of it as a Wal-Mart or a Shop ‘N Save. People don’t even call it Raceway Plaza anymore. It was all Heidelberg people that ran it and worked it. Ike Wright, the original owner of Wright’s Seafood Inn, built it. Ed Witzberger bought it and he was our mayor here for years.” Today, much of the Heidelberg Raceway and Sports Arena is still being utilized at the Pittsburgh Motor Speedway in Imperial. Heidelberg Raceway was ahead of its time among racing venues, with an electric scoreboard and air-conditioned press box, thanks to Witzberger’s vision. However, the impressive attributes of the race track succumbed to the political climate of the times, when after the track did not open for the 1974 season under a lease agreement, Witzberger cited the energy crises of the 1970s as cause for

not renewing the lease. And while the track lives on on numerous racing internet forums and discussion boards, it was the final circus performance that really brought about the end of an era for a lot of people in the region. Gene Czambel of Collier was one of those people. “It was a Monday night and I was 13 years old. It was very exciting. You knew they were coming to town,” he said. “It would take them a couple days to set up. They’d come in on the railroad. The elephants would walk down the street, carrying all that stuff, it was awesome. Normally, it lasted all week, but after this last performance, they just said that was it.” Czambel said he remembers lion tamers guiding lions through hoops, all kinds of acrobats and performers and, of course, the side show. “They had the side show and they had this guy, who was the tallest guy in the world. He was 8-foot, 2 inches tall and you’d pay the admission and go behind the curtain to see him,” Czambel said. “I got to shake this guy’s hand and they gave you a pamphlet telling you all about him.” Kauer said the borough will know in September whether or not the application was accepted. After that, will come a period of fundraising to raise the $2,500 for the marker.

t

West Allegheny | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 19




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Chartiers Valley




  What will the impact to investors be due to this most recent crisis? By Daniel L. Henry, CLU On August 2nd, President Obama quickly signed the Budget Control Act (Senate 365 as amended) after passage by the Senate 74 to 26. The House passed its version one day earlier by a vote of 269 to 161. The new law raises the debt limit to avoid a projected August 2 default and creates a bipartisan joint select committee on deficit reduction. (source: Yahoo Finance) We try not to be over tly political in this magazine as well as towards our clients, realizing that each person has their own unique views and beliefs. Yet we feel compelled to offer our perspective on these most recent debates as well as our perception as to its effects on the stock market. Without having to preface each point with, ‘in our opinion”, please know that these eight points are, “our opinions”: 1. The markets have rallied nearly 90% off the lows of March, 2009. Volatility and even corrections (defined as a 10% drop) are inevitable. (source: Yahoo Finance) 2. There is little concern that the US can’t pay its bills. This was a political event, not a financial one. 3. The professionals at Henry Wealth Management believe in building investment portfolios with via a “passive investment strategy”. The bedrock of this belief system is to globally allocate assets in a proper stock-to-bond ratio, based on one’s goals, time frames and propensities to risk. Once the allocation is chosen, unless there is a bona fide change to a person’s goals, we need to stay invested! 4. It is an easy decision to get out of the markets- fear is a compelling driver to help pull that lever. It is not knowing or frankly, having the courage to ge t back in at the right time that kills returns. The 90% run up mentioned in point 1 assumes that investors were “in” at the bottom, not “back in” at some point along the ascent. 5. The current sell-off and market drop seems to be overdone and overly dramatic, driven by politically-charged fears and fueled by nonstop media coverage. Investors won’t be satisfied for any length of time sitting in low yielding treasuries. I wonder if those who bailed out will get back in after things “calm down” (good luck defining that) and after stock prices rise to ensure that their exit and re-entrance only serves to lock in losses. 6. Pundits can’t have it both ways. The two recent and massive “Keynesian” stimulus spending packages, dubbed “Quantitative Easing 1 and 2” seemingly have not helped our economy. Others now say that cutting spending will hurt the economy. Well, which is it? For us, we allocate assets** for long-term purposes and thus, despite short-term polar opposite rhetoric or actions, do not want to be derailed in our approach. Footnote: The Budget Control Act does not actually cut spending- it only reduces the amount of scheduled annual increases. 7. On a positive note; We do like the fact that an emerging voice in our nation’s capital appears to be supportive of a shrinking government and true spending reductions. Credit card usage and balances by consumers is certainly trending downward.* Our government needs to follow suit. We believe this will help our economy and financial markets over the long-run. 8. On a positive note, #2; Talk of a balanced budget amendment is

nearing a fever-pitch. Hopefully term limits for Congress will not be far behind. These two items could help immeasurably! It’s all about incentives, which present members of Congress do not have. Many seemingly vote to keep their jobs and cater to their largest donors. Taking away lifetime jobs and forcing them to live with a balanced budget may allow them to do the right things for the right reasons without the repercussion of a re-ele ction loss. Again, we see this as helpful for our economy and financial markets. Dan Henry, CLU, is the Vice President of Henry Wealth Management, LLC, an independent financial services firm located at 1370 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA. He offers Securities through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. This article was co-authored with Phil Henry, ChFC, CFS, the firms President. Phil offers Securities and InvestmentAdvisory Services through, NFP Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. NFP Securities, Inc. is not affiliated with Henry Wealth Management, LLC. Dan may be reached at 412-838-0200 or through email at Dan@HenryWealth.com. The firm’s website is www.HenryWealth.com. The opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those held by NFP Securities, Inc. This is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendation. NFP Securities, Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice. Using diversification as part of your investment strategy neither assures nor guarantees better performance and cannot protect against loss of principal due to changing market conditions. Past Performance does not guarantee future results. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a popular indicator of the stock market based on the average closing prices of 30 active U.S. stocks representative of the overall economy.

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     

1370 W A S H I N G T O N P I K E , S U I T E 403 | B R I D G E V I L L E , PA 15017 P H O N E : 412-838-0200 | W W W .H E N R Y W E A LT H . C O M Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 21


  

Woodville Plantation hosts

weekend isitors got to step back in time at Woodville Plantation in July, as the living history museum presented a special event to commemorate the Whiskey Rebellion - historical re-enactors portraying the soldiers of Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion of the United States, the troops that defended John Neville’s Bower Hill mansion during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794. The weekend also featured a walking lecture titled, “The Events of 1794.” Soldiers of the Fourth Sub-Legion as they returned to Bower Hill discussed and re-created the fateful events of the Whiskey Rebellion, as they occurred in July of 1794. The unique event will included an encampment along the “Tom the Tinker Trail.” Participants experienced camp life with cooking demonstrations, musket firings and tactical demonstrations. A history walk starting at the PA State Historical Marker on Bower Hill near Kane Regional Center and ending at the Scrubgrass Run Trailhead covered topics such as the Battle of Bower Hill, the soldiers that participated in the battle and the Whiskey Rebellion. On Whiskey Rebellion Day, the troops of the Fourth Sub-

V

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Chartiers Valley


  

The Whiskey Rebellion began when farmers rebelled against a tax on whiskey, which was a primary source of their income, that left no room for farmers to profit from their labor. The dispute reached a flashpoint in July of 1794, when mobs ransacked Pittsburgh and a federal marshal in Allegheny County was attacked. President George Washington raised a militia of 13,000 troops and personally led them to squash the insurrection. After all the dust had settled, those few who were arrested were later pardoned by Washington.

Legion made camp at Woodville Plantation, marched and drilled. Guests were able to experience 18th century military camp life, see tactical demonstrations, musket firing, marching and ceremonial drills. Soldiers discussed what camp life was like in the army of 1794. Visitors also learned 18th century cooking techniques as Woodville’s cooks prepared dinner for the encamped troops. Woodville Plantation, the home of John and Presley Neville, is Western Pennsylvania’s link to the late 18th century. Built in 1775, this living history museum interprets life during the period of 1780-1820, the Era of the New Republic. Guided tours of the house are available every Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, go to Woodville’s website at www.woodvilleplantation.org or call 412.221.0348.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 23




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Chartiers Valley




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• CALL TODAY FORhas DETAILS Outreach program provided us the • Family Owned & Operated since 1860 opportunity to grow and our • Personalized “Celebration of Life Services” at thestrengthen area’s guaranteed lowest cost relationships within community.” • Only Beinhauer can provide complete Cremation Services usingthe our own Crematory operated by license • Cemetery Services at Woodruff MemorialBeinhauers Park and can newpersonalize Community Mausoleum~Free Veterans services for

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BeinhauerFamily Services

“We have a lot of service based groups that meet in our community room. A church group meets at the Peters Township location every IF YOU DON’T KNOW THE BEINHAUER NAME, Sunday at 10 a.m.,” says Scott Beinhauer. YOU MUST BE NEW TO THE COMMUNITY. The decision to open up the community Beinhauer Funeral Homes have been part room to groups was of the community since 1860, with six twofold: One, it generations of the family, nurturing and gave the funeral growing their business, along with operating home a place for the second oldest active crematory in the large groups to United States. The Beinhauer family strives to assemble or hold be a part of the communities they serve. ceremonies; “The family business is important to all of second, it was a us, and there’s a great deal of heritage and way to give back to legacy that has been established by past the community that generations. We’re making impressions and has supported them building relationships today within our over the decades. communities, continuing a legacy of heritage “We wanted to and trust,” says Rick Beinhauer, the company’s make available a leader and a fifth generation family member. space that anyone in the community could use; Beinhauer is proud to have the sixth generation for example, educational seminars and currently active in the family business with continuing education courses for nurses, Scott Beinhauer, licensed funeral director. seniors, caregivers, hospices, and veterans, to The Beinhauer family serves five mention a few. An annual memorial service is communities in the South Hills—Peters held in the community room for any family Township, Bethel Park, Bridgeville, that wishes to attend. In Bridgeville, we have a Dormont/Mt. Lebanon, and Canonsburg. digital resource sign that not only informs the Their locations are family-friendly, providing community about funeral service information, children’s rooms, cafés where food and but also other community events, such as beverages can be served, and a community programs at the library, Rotary functions, room where dinners and luncheons can be community day, church fairs, and other scheduled. newsworthy information. Our community

the options they can in-house with their own staff. “We’re in the business of helping families create an event or service that is an extension of their loved one’s life—something that provides a meaningful experience for the family and the community,” says Scott Beinhauer. Some of those personal touches include an interactive website, personalized DVD videos, and webcasting of funerals, which, through the use of a password protected website, can give those with physical considerations or travel limitations the ability to attend a loved one’s funeral service over the Internet. “There are a lot of little things that are done for funerals. People create photo collages that chronicle their loved one’s life, or bring in personal items that represent one’s hobbies or lifestyles. You have the year of birth and the year of death, and then you have the dash in the middle. We focus on the dash—everything in the middle that that person has done for their family and community. We help the family celebrate and honor the life that was lived,” says Scott Beinhauer. The Beinhauer family also manages Woodruff Memorial Park Cemetery, located on Route 19 in North Strabane Township. The newly constructed Community Mausoleum offers magnificent crypt entombment as well as extensive cremation niches, including bronze and beveled glass and a beautiful indoor chapel. Adjacent to the human cemetery, Peaceful Pastures provides a final resting place for pets of any kind, including the area’s only pet funeral and cremation center, which houses its own crematory. For more information on Beinhauer Family Funeral Homes and their cemetery and cremation options, call 724.969.0200 or visit them at www.beinhauer.com.

Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 25




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Chartiers Valley




Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 27




Bridgeville Public Library celebrates

           

T

he official Grand Opening of the Bridgeville Public Library, the culmination of 10 years of planning toward the vision to create a center for lifelong learning and a destination where everyone can go to connect, explore, discover, and grow, was celebrated on June 12, at the new location at 505 McMillen Street (off Dewey Avenue). Local representatives were on hand to share their thoughts on the landmark day, including U.S. Congressman Tim Murphy; The Office of State Senator John Pippy; 45th District Representative Nick Kotik; Allegheny County District 4 Representative Michael Finnerty, Bridgeville Mayor Donald Dolde, who will serve as master of ceremonies; and Fr. Jason Del Vitto, St. George Antiochian Church delivered the invocation. They were joined by Allegheny County Library Association Executive Director, Marilyn J enkins, local leaders and Joyce Heinrich, event chairman. The ceremonies included the formal dedication of a flag pole, donated by board president, Nino Petrocelli, Sr., in memory of his mother, Alberina Petrocelli, conducted by American Legion Post #54 and Boy Scout Troop #2. Vocalist Hannah Drake and South Fayette Middle School ensemble provided patriotic-themed musical accompaniment. “We are writing a new chap ter in a 49-year journey, made possible by the flow of resources from the Bill and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust,” said Donna Taylor, library director. To acknowledge the McDivitt’s gift to the community and their generosity in perpetuity, the Bridgeville Public Library Board of Trustees voted to dedicate the Bill & Grace McDivitt Center for Lifelong Learning in an unveiling ceremony. A response of gratitude and appreciation was given by Martha Mihalyi Fitzmier of Decatur, GA, friend of the McDivitts and daughter of fellow

28 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

founder, Betty Mihalyi. She was joined by granddaughter Katie Fitzmier of Madison, WI. The ceremony and reflection honored all six founders and their families, including Louisa Bergstrom, Grace McDivitt, Betty Mihalyi, Betty Mincemoyer, Sylvia Saperstein & Betty Sutton who incorporated the Bridgeville Publ ic Library on June 21, 1962. The official ribbon cutting by all dignitaries and board members at the entrance opened the doors for those attending to enjoy refreshments, including three cakes donated by South Fayette Shop ‘n Save. Drawings were held for Mylan Golf Classic tickets, BPL tee shirts sporting the new library logo, and more. The board of trustees took a leap-of-faith to proceed with construction of the new 7800 square foot space by leveraging a $500,000 Keystone Grant from the PA Recreation, Park and Conversation Fund for Libraries. That state funding source is now unavailable. development function was established to generate the funds needed to compliment the William and Grace McDivitt Charitable Trust proceeds, which were tapped for the dollar-for-dollar match required to qualify for the maximum Keystone grant. The combined $2.2 million from the Keystone Grant and the McDivitt Charitable Trust is one-third of what is needed for the sustainability of the library for generations to come. The Once-in-a-Lifetime Campaign for the Bridgeville Public Library is designed to generate gifts and endowment for the balance of $4.2 million over the next four years. Launch of the comprehensive campaign is under the direction of Lawna Blankenship, the development officer hired to facilitate outreach to

A

Chartiers Valley

a wide range of

prospective philanthropic resources, including corporations, foundations, families, businesses, individuals and friends. “One of the things that make great institutions is transition,” said Blankenship, who plans to meet the community and share the amazing story, the vision and great successes, already being experienc ed. he new library is a destination for all age groups, many underserved because of lack of space. A walking trail planned for the green space that surrounds the library building will compliment myriad wellness programs already in evidence. Programming has increased by 550 percent and program attendance by 869 percent in the first quarter of this year versus the same period in 2010. The library had to open at 11 a.m. to allow for children’s story time programs in the iconic train depot and caboose. Now, patrons are waiting for the doors to open at 9 a.m.

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BUILDING MEN OF FAITH, SCHOLARSHIP AND SERVICE.                 

 

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

REAL ESTATE

C h a rt ie r s Va l l e y

IN Community Magazines proudly announces a comprehensive look at the Chartiers Valley real estate market. In this section, you’ll find interesting information about creating beautiful spaces to live in, and other interesting facts about your community. F E AT U R E S T O R Y

FALL LANDSCAPING IDEAS When the dog days of summer are behind us and that first crisp snap of fall is in the air, energy seems to make a rebound and even the animals seems livelier, more alert. During this time, there’s nothing more wonderful than taking advantage of those last days of warmth to get outside and enjoy the outdoors by doing a little yard work. This is a great time to rake up all those leaves on the ground. But don’t just throw them into a trash bag to be hauled away. Leaves are great for composting and may have as much as three times the amount of minerals as fertilizer. They need to be shredded to be easier to work with, but this is easily accomplished by running a mower back and forth a few times over a pile of leaves. Also, be sure to add a little nitrogen to your compost pile with the leaves.

If your summer flowers have faded, be sure to trim back dead leaves and blooms and add some fall flowers for some more vibrant color. Mums and sunflowers can be purchased in pots to accent any garden with a fall palette, but don’t forget purple as a great contrasting color to oranges, yellows and sienna. Some fall flowers with purple accents are pansies, purple coneflowers, asters and mums. All of these will grow well in zone 6. For some green accent, you might try growing some arugula in a pot or self-watering container. This spicy, leafy plant has long been popular in France and Italy and actually grows better in the fall than in the summer. The leaves will add zest to your salads and other fall dishes. Although the planting time for arugula is in the spring, seedlings can be purchased and transplanted, however they also do well if left in containers or pots.

Helping Families Make the Right Move!

Nevillewood Office: 412.276.5000, Ext. 210 Direct: 412.276.5878 TimDowneyJr@howardhanna.com www.howardhanna.com • www.TimDowneyJr.com

Even if you’re not particularly good at growing plants and flowers, there are many ways to accent your lawn and garden with minimal effort and maintenance. Brightly colored pumpkins placed around pathways and steps give a whimsical touch to decorating. Avoid placing them in direct sunlight and directly on the ground and your pumpkin may well last for two to three months in the cool fall climate. Other low-maintenance decorations for fall are corn stalks and bales of hay. Hay bales also provide extra seating in outdoor areas. Summer may be over but your yard can still be a bright, cheerful place full of beautiful, living things. - by Pamela Palongue

sure you check out Buying? Make IN Chartiers Valley magazine before you make your next move. Selling? Looking?

Tim Downey, Jr. Realtor Chartiers Valley Sales & Relocation Specialist

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

I’ve worked in Chartiers Valley for many years.

412.221.2248 724.745.7422 www.colemanmitchell.com info@colemanmitchell.com

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Don’t miss your final opportunity to live in

Neville Manor in Collier Township! Neville Manor has only three opportunities remaining in this low maintenance living 2-cul-de-sac community. It features luxurious townhomes and carriage homes with access to the community clubhouse and pool. Located just minutes from I-79, the Pittsburgh International Airport and Downtown Pittsburgh and close to great shopping at Robinson Mall, Settler’s Ridge, and more! Neville Manor offers the lifestyle you deserve, for a price you can afford!

Want more information Call Jodie, our New Home Specialist – 412-512-6671

As Western Pennsylvania’s premier stone masonry contractor we are committed to serving our residential and commercial clients by providing high quality, reliable and consistent results at competitive rates. Our showroom is located at 3464 Babcock Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237. For additional information please call (412) 596-2114 or visit us online at www.stoneageinc.net. Andersen windows use natural wood to create a timeless combination of beauty and durability – plus All Andersen windows feature the Perma-Shield system, which protects the window’s exterior beautifully for decades. Never settle on your home builder or the window they use! Dow Building Solutions has a 60+ year legacy of providing innovative insulation and air sealing solutions such as STYROFOAM SIS™ Brand Structural Insulated Sheathing and GREAT STUFF™ Insulating Foam Sealants to home owners that help

to reduce energy costs and effectively seal a home’s building envelope from wind, rain and moisture. Heartland Homes is creating homes with the whole building envelope in mind that are not only well-built, but are actively saving money for the homeowners every month Since 1873, Kohler has been improving people’s lives with exceptional products, including kitchen and bath fixtures, faucets and accessories, furniture, cabinetry, and tile and stone. As a global leader, Kohler offers its customers world-class products to create a complete design solution. For information, ideas or inspiration, visit www.KOHLER.com.

Rex Glass & Mirror Co has been serving Greater Pittsburgh since 1958. As a family owned and operated business, we strive to provide customer service and quality craftsmanship that exceed the expectations of our customers. We design, fabricate, and install high quality residential and commercial glass products. For nearly 100 years, the Whirlpool brand has helped people all over the world find better ways to take care of household tasks. We want our customers to live cleaner, more organized, less busy and more flavorful lives through our appliances. So every Whirlpool® product is born of our decades of experience creating incredibly useful features.

Precision Stone Products is engaged in the production and distribution of premium grade architectural synthetic stone products and accessories resembling natural stone to the finest detail. Our full product line is backed by a 50 year limited warranty. Call (724) 282-2022 for more information or visit us online at www.pspstone.com. Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 33 www.LoveHeartland.com


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What's

hot Kitchen

IN THE

As we zoom into the fall season, many people are planning their home remodeling projects. Of course, the kitchen is the most important room of your home. It is the most important room not just because of the tremendous amount of time homeowners spend in it, but because of the value that a new and updated kitchen will add to your home.Here are some things for consideration when you are planning your kitc hen remodeling project.

The Kitchen & Great Room Plus Technology Open floor plans continue to be desirable in new home design and remodeling. Flat screen TV s, internet for laptops and docking stations for portable music devices allow the cook to view recipes online, email and listen to favorite music while working in the kitchen. A clever designer can allow for these items by including smartly designe d storage niches or family message centers helps to incorporate technology into the design of the room.

The "Gourmet" Kitchen Because of our challenging economy, more and more families is opting to cook at home instead of ordering out. The ever growing popularity of

cooking shows and the Food Network has sparked an interest for creating exciting new recipes. Cooking parties complete with wine tasting are all the rage. Cabinets, countertops and appliance manufactures have all stepped onto this bandwagon and there are numerous options for anything a "chef' could desire.

The "Green" Kitchen The green movement continues to increase in popularity.There is a growing trend with homeowners taking responsibility for what they have in their homes. Even more than just buying appliances and lighting that is more energy eďŹƒcient than ever, the emphasis is on sustainability. Many cabinet companies not only use eco- friendly product in the manufacture of their products,but also re plant forest areas that are used for harvesting for the production of cabinets. Quartz countertops are often made from recycled materials. Many of the quartz products on the market today have the appearance of stone without the required upkeep . The kitchen continues to be the nucleus of the home. At the end of a long day,it remains the area of the home where the family gathers. Whether it be for cooking a meal together, sitting down for a family dinner, just grabbing a quick bite on the way to soccer practice, or just to talk about the activities of the day, it is the place of gathering. A well planned and organized kitchen will make the momen ts spend there more pleasurable. This INdustry INsight was written by Laura Reid Riggin of Premier Home Design Center. Laura has been designing kitchens and baths for 26 years. She has worked in new construction and remodeling. Her designs have been featured in trade magazines, television and FANtastic Kitchens Magazine. This spring, she was a semi-finalist in the Asko kitchen design competition at the National Kitchen and Bath Show in Chicago. Premier Home Design Center is conveniently located at Collier Town Square, 1597 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA 15017. To setup an appointment or a consultation, please call 412.276.5650 or E-mail premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net or visit our website: www.premierhomedesigncenter.com.

Chartiers Valley’s Kitchen & Bath Design Center

In this economy, an investment in your home is one of the safest safest investments you can make. Whether you plan to live in your home long term or are planning to sell your home within the next 5 years, a new kitchen and bath can offer a 30% return on your investment. Premier Home Design Center offers expertise and products designed to fit your budget. Call Premier now for for an excellent return on your biggest investment. %%FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU FTJHO1MBOOJOH4FSWJDFTt".FSJMMBU4JHOBUVSF4IPXSPPNt$POTVMUBUJPOTCZBQQPJOUNFOU 34 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

Chartiers Valley

$PMMJFS5PXO4RVBSF 8BTIJOHUPO1JLF #SJEHFWJMMF 1"t email: premierkitchenandbath@verizon.net w w w.premierhomedesigncenter er.c .com


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Chartiers Valley | Fall 2011 | incommunitymagazines.com 35


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  

ealth clubs can be intimidating. Gym equipment can be overwhelming, especially when you have no idea how to use it. Gym clothing, gym etiquette and hard core gym enthusiasts can sometimes make it difficult to actually fall in love with your gym. I have been in the fitness industry for over 20 years and even when I am out of my realm or in a different city, I find it difficult popping into another gym and feeling co mfortable. I think to myself, “Geez, if I feel uneasy walking into unfamiliar territory, I can’t imagine how someone feels that is completely new to the whole gym scene.” I moved to Pittsburgh 24 years ago. I absolutely loved the gym that I had left before moving and it took me a very long time to find one here that I could love as much. It was strange, because certainly there were plenty of gyms in the area that offered the exact same amenities that I was used to, but I still struggled. It didn’t take long to realize that the problem was simple; I missed my “gym buddies.” We would meet there after work

almost every night. It was familiar, it was comfortable and most of all it was a blast. Grabbing a friend to workout with is probably one of the easiest ways to calm the nerves and help you fall in love with your gym. Quality time spent together strengthening your friendship as you strengthen your muscles. If you can’t convince a friend to exercise with you, there are other things that you can do to achieve those “love” feelings. For one, you need to realize that the majority of people that frequent the gym are people just like you – just regular folks. Hold your head high and walk through those front doors. Get on a consistent schedule and you’ll start noticing the same people there

most of the time. You’ll soon feel like part of that tribe; people who are all trying to reach the same goal - physical fitness and a love for it. Most gyms offer a wide variety of group fitness classes. You can vary your weekly schedule and never get bored. Again, hold your head high and walk right into the group fitness room. Sure, there ma y be those one or two individuals that have a “spot” in the class and you’ll want to stay out of their way; but in my experience I find people in general warm and welcoming. Most members haven’t forgotten that they were once that new kid in class too. If you have a busy life (and seriously, who doesn’t?) think of your gym as your haven. Don’t look at it like working out; look at it as de-stressing. Your gym is your own personal retreat. It is crucial time that you have set aside for yourself. Adopt the attitude that fitness is fun and make it a priority. What’s not to love about that? The health benefits of regular exercise cannot be overlooked. Joining a gym is the easy part. Staying consistent and sticking with your program are the hard parts. But if you’re in love with your gym, there will be nothing that keep s you from “falling” into fitness. This INdustry INsight was written by Lisa Troyer. Lisa has been in the fitness industry for more than 17 years and is the owner of Fitness Fanatics in the Great Southern Shopping Center. She currently holds four nationally recognized fitness and personal training certifications and can be reached at 412.220.4190, ext. 3 or at fitnessfanatics@verizon.net. Check out www.fitnessfanaticsinc.com for more great fitness tips.

36 724.942.0940 TO ADVERTISE

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The 35th Annual Andy Russell Celebrity Classic Sponsor and Athlete Gala was recently held at the East Club Lounge at Heinz Field. Part of The Andy Russell Celebrity Golf Classic at The Club at Nevillewood, the event has raised over $5 million in past years for meaningful causes such as Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC Free Care Fund, UPMC Cancer Institute and the Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. The gala provided sponsors with the thrilling opportunity of mingling with their favorite former Steeler Super Stars, including Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner, over cocktails and a sumptuous dinner. Live and silent auction items, including a one week stay at the Russell’s Colorado ranch, Steelers vs. Browns tickets and unique sports memorabilia, were also offered to the guests. The music of Souled Out adde d excitement to the evening at the atmospheric East Club Lounge. “We wanted to give back to the community and there are many good causes,” said Mr. Russell, when asked about the Golf Classic and Gala. “Our event is one of the oldest traditions in Pittsburgh and it’s because of everyone supporting us here tonight.” This year the event benefited the UPMC Department of Urology; providing advanced research, diag nosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Pioneer in the field of urology, Joel Nelson, M.D., a Frederic N. Schwentker Professor and Andy and Cindy Russell

Continued on page 38

Superbowl star hosts celebrity gala in support of UPMC 1. Denise Brown 2. Karen and Fritz M. Heinemann, President and CEO of Economics Pennsylvania 3. Stacey Schwartz, Vanessa Binnie, Rich Inman, Rosemary Mendel, Linda Gasper, Bea Whitehead 4. Former Steelers, Gerry Mullins and Mike Wagner and Joan Mullins and Becky Wagner

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Continued from page 37 Chairman of the Department of Urology gave an inspirational speech at the gala. Some of the donations were also allocated for The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation. Established in 1999, the foundation funds health care and human services. It contains a diverse list

of charities including Economics Pennsylvania, an organization that educates students to become responsible and beneficial members of society b y teaching them the value of saving and spending wisely. C. Andrew Russell Laboratory for Head and Neck Cancer Research, The Leukemia Society and countless other charitable organizations are also part of the foundation.

Gina O’Malley, Special Events Coordinator at Medical and Health Sciences Foundation of the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC helped to plan and execute the event this year. “Andy is amazing . He dedicates so much time, effort and enthusiasm to this event and to his foundation”, said Ms. O’Malley.

If you would like to find out more about The Andy Russell Charitable Foundation, or purchase books authored by Mr. Russell where all of the proceeds go to charity, please visit andyrussell.org.

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5. Louise Koleman, Susan Musgrave, Barbara Card 6. Mike Mackin of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Rebecca Mackin 7. Renee Magill, Volunteer and Lori Spisak of UPMC 8. Christy Hegedus, Glen Edwards and Rochelle Steffenauer 9. Mark Windel of Platinum Sponsor, Range Resources and Camille Galmarini 10. Carol Semple Thompson, Colleen Ley 11. Jenny Szmed 12. Souled Out 13. Victoria Berdnik and David Karcher of Platinum Sponsor, Lamar Advertising and Dolores Karcher 14. J.R. Wilbur, Issac Curtis, Myron Pottios

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

academic groove

   

High school students, it’s time to plan your backto-school strategy and hit the ground running!! Call Chyten to get you ahead with the school curriculum leaving you time on your schedule to balance educational achievements with finding yourself through sports, drama, crew, tennis, etc. In addition to getting you an academic head start, Chyten can help you get the edge needed to prepare for the College applications, standardized tests like SAT, ACT, ISEE. Manjri Gupta, the Owner-Director of Chyten South Hills Center, said “Chyten stands apart by providing an exclusive study material and curriculum taught by certified Masters or Ph.D educators. We integrate everything the student needs towards higher education. Our programs include books, materials, diagnostic tests, question banks and test-taking strat egies that are available exclusively only to our students. Our curriculum team constantly researches and keeps up on the changes taking place in education and college admissions to ensure our methodologies are current and effective.” “We bring the most qualified tutors, curriculum, accountability, feedback loop and results driven processes to our sessions. The systems we have put in place ensure results st udents seek for themselves. Helping students find success in college is our focus,” Gupta said. “We offer private, semi private and small-group classes with no more

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than ten students in a class. Our format ensure dynamic discussion between students and educators allowing them to know how each student is performing,” Gupta said. “All of the work takes place at our education center, a state-of-the-art faci lity with individual tutoring rooms. Our methods have had a tremendous track record of success. We have successfully delivered an average of 274 points gain on SAT scores, and 4 to 7 point gain on ACT scores. Several of our students have achieved near perfect scores. In addition going from C to A, or A to A+ is something that we strive for and deliver.” “Great grades and standardized scores are only par t of the equation. Securing college admission of choice needs careful planning and well thought out strategy. Chyten provides desired levels of college counseling that helps student balance academics, desired college life with the intended career path in mind,” Gupta said. “College application process is time consuming and expensive. Without proper guidance lot of good money and time go to waste. Last t hing you want to do is change your major or college because you did not think through it and did not like what you selected. We plan the college application process for students, achieving college selection process steadily and consistently with your intended career and life choices in mind.” For more information on Chyten, and what its professional tutors can do for your student, go to: www.chyten.com or call 412.833.6060. Chyten is centrally located on Washington Road across from South Hills Village and is minutes away from all Chartiers Valley residents.

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East meets

West inVeterinary

Exciting new developments in veterinary medicine and services are evolving in animal clinics and hospitals all over the world. The goal is to integrate principles of both eastern and western medicine in an artful combination, or alone, to tailor the treatment needs specifically and most importantly safely, to the individual patient. At Bridgeville Animal Hospital in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, they’ve been in tegrating alternative medicine and treatments into their protocols for over a year now, expanding their treatment options as they learn more and are then able to provide more treatment modalities for their patients. Started as Bethel Park Animal Hospital in November of 2000, construction forced a move to another facility in May of 2006, which is larger, warm and inviting. There are 3 full time veterinar ians on staff, as well as a caring and compassionate staff. Here’s a little bit about the doctors and their interests:

Medicine

Dr. Joanna Rubin, VMD is founder and owner of the practice. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine in 1997. Dr. Rubin’s interests are broad, enjoying all aspects of small animal medicine and soft tissue surgery, with a special interest (and love for,) the senior and geriatric patients. Dr. Carolyn brown, DVM is a 2004 graduate of Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Brown has contributed the greatest portion of interest and study in alternative medicine. She recently studied veterinary acupuncture at International Veterinary Acupuncture Society and passed her initial exams. Her certification is expected later this summe r. Her knowledge of acupuncture and increasing knowledge of herbal remedies adds the crucial piece of eastern medicine that as a team of doctors, will access to best help the patient. Dr. Michael Meneo, VMD is a 2009 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Meneo brings to the practice, some very valuable skills and interests. In addition to traditional small anim al medicine and surgery, he’s quite knowledgeable and skilled in some orthopedic procedures that the clinic used to refer to specialty hospitals, including but not limited to anterior or cranial cruciate repair and patellar luxation repair. In short, Bridgeville Animal Hospital is now proud to offer traditional medicine and surgery, along with these emerging treatment modalities: digital radiography, Las er therapy, cutting laser surgery, veterinary acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and orthopedic surgical procedures. The veterinary hospital is excited to continue to evolve and add other treatment and diagnostic options in the future.             

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