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ICG MAGAZINE

September 2019 … The TV Issue

MODERN

POSE LOVE

/

GRAND

HOTEL

/

ECA

HONOREES


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MOST NECESSARY VIEWING OF THE TV SEASON.” TV GUIDE

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contents

THE TV ISSUE September 2019 / Vol. 90 No. 7

DEPARTMENTS gear guide ................ 14 replay ................ 22 deep focus ................ 28 exposure ................ 32 production credits ................ 94 stop motion .............. 106

SPECIALS Stars Of Comedy ................ 36 Depth Charge ................ 72

42

POSE

FX’s hit series sashays into Season 2 with more than just creative momentum – it’s become a life-changing experience for the many Local 600 members behind the lens.

GRAND HOTEL The diverse cast, crew and locations for the new ABC/Disney series, executive-produced by Eva Longoria, all move to a sunny Floridian beat.

MODERN LOVE New York-based Director of Photography Yaron Orbach and a Guild camera team visualize much more than “sex and the city” in this new Amazon series.

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54 64


16

EMMY NOMINATIONS ®

INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGR APHY FOR A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE

“PART ONE” BRADFORD YOUNG,

ASC

VISUALLY STUNNING thanks to Ava DuVernay’s longtime collaborator, the cinematographer Bradford Young.” THE NEW YORK TIMES

F R O M T H E E M M Y® AWA R D W I N N I N G D I R E C T O R O F 1 3 T H AVA D UV E R N A Y

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THE TV IS S U E

7


Photo by Tobin Yelland

PRESIDENT'S LETTER //

Still Cinematography To Me We have seen a lot of changes in film and television over the years. Some of them all of us would consider to be for the better, while some a lot of us could argue about. When I started in this industry in 1979, I predominantly worked in the video world, and from the moment I entered the business I heard rumblings that “film is dead.” As early as the beginning of the 1980s, when the first high-definition (HD) cameras showed up, some people said HD would replace film, and yet for the first two decades of my career that did not happen. In fact, in the early 90’s I started shooting film. Mostly it was on commercials, and I loved it – that uneasy feeling in the pit of my stomach when the film went to the lab, wondering if I captured what I thought I did, was an incredible motivator. But even then the industry was changing; we weren’t seeing film dailies anymore, and the commercials weren’t being cut on film. The negative was developed, scanned, transferred to tape and input into an AVID non-linear edit system. When Y2K arrived, the mantra of “film is dead” reappeared. This time it was due to the advent of 23.98 progressive-scan video cameras. I had spent a good part of the 1990s producing and directing new product rollouts for Sony Broadcast, so when the F900 Cine Alta came out I was familiar with that system. In 2001, when our union was fighting to keep so-called “video” productions under the Basic Agreement, I was hired as the DIT on one of the first episodic TV shows in New York City to shoot with the Sony F900. The Education of Max Bickford was a CBS drama starring such A-list actors as Richard Dreyfuss, Marcia Gay Harden, Peter O’Toole, and Eli Wallach. The show represented many firsts – I had never worked in long-form, and the crew had never worked with video cameras! The change was challenging for our Directors of Photography, as well. Not only did these cameras not have the latitude and dynamic range they were accustomed to with film, everyone could now see their work (on a monitor). It always amazed me how so many people who spent years trusting the cinematographer’s skills and instincts now felt empowered to comment just because they could see it in real time. It was also difficult for me to understand a world where you worked so many hours a week, often in adverse conditions. I remember the first time Max Bickford was on location at Wagner College on Staten Island. I had just set up my DIT cart, which at the time included a 24-inch CRT, and it began to rain. I started

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wrapping up my gear, and the AD said: “What are you doing?” I said: “It’s raining.” To which he replied: “So?” I reiterated: “It’s raining!” Everyone just stopped and stared at me. “You people shoot in this?” I said. “It’s uncivilized.” While that represented the first real challenge to film’s supremacy in the TV world, many features (and also still many TV shows) were still being shot on film. The next “film is dead” wave came with the advent of the first logarithmic recording cameras, such as the Thomson Viper and the Panavision Genesis. While still not possessing the latitude and dynamic range of film, they were getting pretty close. With more recent cameras, like the ARRI ALEXA, Panasonic VariCam, Panavision DXL, and Sony VENICE, digital capture systems now rival (and in some cases exceed) the recording capability of film. And yet film is hardly dead – checking out this week at Panavision NY with me were four film jobs. The last two jobs that I day-played on were hybrid shoots, with film being shot for day exteriors and digital for low light interiors and nights. In the end, of course, the capture medium is not the main determiner – what matter are the talents of our union crews and their abilities to overcome all challenges. This month in ICG Magazine we are highlighting the honorees of the 2019 Emerging Cinematographers Awards. This year’s honored films were all captured with digital cameras, but who knows: maybe next year’s winners will choose to shoot on film, or possibly in the future some other capture medium will exist. Whatever they decide to shoot with, we will continue to celebrate the talents of these young filmmakers, because no matter how much change there is in the industry, we will always recognize excellence in cinematography.

Lewis Rothenberg National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


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September 2019 vol. 90 no. 07

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS Margot Carmichael Lester Elle Schneider JoJo Whilden, SMPSP

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Lewis Rothenberg NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Dejan Georgevich, ASC 1ST NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Christy Fiers 2ND NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Stephen Wong NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Jamie Silverstein NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Deborah Lipman NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Spooky Stevens, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES WEST COAST & CANADA Rombeau, Inc. Sharon Rombeau Tel: (818) 762 – 6020 Fax: (818) 760 – 0860 Email: sharonrombeau@gmail.com EAST COAST, EUROPE, & ASIA Alan Braden, Inc. Alan Braden Tel: (818) 850-9398 Email: alanbradenmedia@gmail.com

ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Nonmembers may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

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WIDE ANGLE //

M

uch to the chagrin of ICG National Executive Director Rebecca Rhine (renowned in our office for her use of data-rich PowerPoint presentations), I offer the following opinion based not on any analytic study or statistical modeling, but anecdotal evidence and a good feeling ­– deep in my bones – that this industry is turning a corner. Let me explain. Nearly a decade ago, I approached a handful of Local 600 members whose films were in the Sundance Film Festival about a piece for the magazine. The common thread was that they were all female. That list ten years later is now quite illustrious, including Oscar nominee Rachel Morrison, ASC, and Emmy Award winner Reed Morano, ASC; but at the time each replied they longed for the day when the story would just be about their work as cinematographers, without the gender designation. “Do you ever ask Roger Deakins what it’s like to be a male cinematographer?” one of the subjects quizzed. My silence was my response. And then I said Local 600 members – male and female – have been working for decades toward creating gender equality in this industry. Speaking about your own victories, big and small, in a union magazine, will help to convince a new generation of union women their success is attainable. That, in turn, may inspire the next generation, and so on until it will, finally, just be about the work. And, by the way, the same goes for stories about AfricanAmerican, Latino, Asian, Jewish, LGBTQ Guild members, and so forth. When would those stories only be about their skills as film craftspeople and not necessarily the societal, economic, and political roadblocks they overcame to get here? We’re not there yet. But our annual Television issue provides hints we’re getting closer. Let’s start with our cover story, written by Margot Carmichael Lester. The FX series Pose (page 42) is about low-income transgender performers, surely one of the most marginalized subcultures in this (or any) country. Pose was created by six-time Emmy winner Ryan Murphy, whose sets strive for a kind of color/gender/preference blindness, in that creativity – from any corner – is the loudest voice in the room. Listening to Pose Production Designer (and

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IATSE Local 800 Art Directors Guild member) Jamie Walker McCall (Exposure, page 32), as well as Pose Directors of Photography Nelson Cragg, ASC, Simon Dennis and Andrei Bowden Schwartz, talk about how “below the line” skills are nurtured on the show is pretty cool. But more surprising are the many comments from the show’s crewmembers – male and female alike – who describe the series as “unlike anything” they’ve experienced, “life-changing,” and “important,” when viewed through a societal lens. Yes, it’s a small sample size. But when we add in a feature on the ABC/Disney series Grand Hotel, written by ICG Staff Writer Pauline Rogers, the warm-andfuzzy factor builds. A reworking of the hit Spanish show Grand Hotel is executive-produced by Eva Longoria, who also directed two episodes. Longoria notes in the article that when she and producing partner Brian Tanen began to crew-up, it was with a reverse gender bias. “It started with cinematographer Alison Kelly and trickled down from there,” Longoria shares. “Two female ADs, a female stunt coordinator, and seven of the 13 directors are female and/or persons of color. All highly qualified – and a great way to showcase their talents.” It’s a strong statement made more so by its source – a Mexican-American producer/director, presiding over a network series about Latino business owners in Miami. And given Longoria’s many efforts to lift up underserved groups (a feature documentary she executive-produced called The Harvest focused on the 500,000 child migrant farmworkers in the U.S. and helped to promote awareness for CARE – Children’s Act for Responsible Employment), it’s a win in Hollywood’s social evolution. One last sign from this September issue that the times they are a ‘changin’? Guild cinematographer Alison Kelly talks at length about how she structured the look for Grand Hotel, which included a challenging recreation of a Miami hurricane (on a stage in Manhattan Beach, CA), and a live outdoor concert complete with freestanding truss, stage, and two lighting towers. Kelly heaps praise on her camera team, as well as her partnership with other key IATSE departments, namely Production Designer Steve Saklad, Gaffer Eric Forand, and Key Grip Michael Price. In turn, everyone notes Kelly’s leadership and organizational skills, with Price calling her “the heart of the show’s look.” One of the article’s highlights is what’s missing: Nobody mentioned Kelly’s gender. Here’s hoping (with a shout-out to my friends from Sundance) that one day soon, the same can be said about this editorial space.

CONTRIBUTORS

Elle Schneider (Love, Actually)

“As a filmmaker from New York, I love speaking with cinematographers who embrace the city as a character, and I enjoy hearing how they weave its visuals into the stories they’re telling, like Yaron Orbach did with Modern Love.”

JoJo Whilden, SMPSP

(Not Strictly Ballroom, Stop Motion) “I started shooting set stills in 1997 on an indie film called High Art. The director was my best friend, and I was paid $50 per day to shoot and print the photos! The film turned into a hit at Sundance and Cannes, and 20,000 hours later I still do what I do because I love working with actors, creatives and all the other union crew members – and I love the autonomy of my job.”

ICG MAGAZINE

David Geffner Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

September 2019 … The TV Issue

MODERN

POSE LOVE

/

GRAND

HOTEL

/

ECA

HONOREES

Cover photo by JoJo Whilden, SMPSP


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TECHNOLOGY THAT EVOLVES WITH ITS CREATORS “RED has played a big part on Stranger Things. In Season 1, the DRAGON sensor gave us the filmic, smooth look we wanted. In Season 2, we used the HELIUM sensor for greater latitude and framing with extra wiggle room for VFX. And in Season 3, we moved to a large format sensor with MONSTRO that blew us away!” - Tim Ives, ASC Cinematographer for Stranger Things

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09.2019

BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE – IN-CAMERA – FOR THE CBS DRAMA

SEAL Team BY PAULINE ROGERS FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF CBS

It’s trial by fire, and it isn’t CGI. In Episode 217 of CBS’s hit primetime drama, SEAL Team, Lisa Davis (Toni Trucks) is in Officer Candidate School (OCS), where her training includes fighting through different sections of a claustrophobic/chaotic environment, a shipboard fire simulator known as “The Crucible.” Davis must lead her classmates to safety while putting out various fires, sealing bulkhead doors, and eventually carrying a “dummy” to safety. But as the flames and danger grow, she freezes up, hearing the voice of her sister who died in a house fire years ago, in which Davis could only save one sibling. In the intense emotional and physical maelstrom, the Navy specialist

hyperventilates and passes out, failing the mission. Three episodes later, however, Davis goes back into The Crucible, pushing past her personal demons to complete the training exercise. Cinematographer Alan Jacoby (who rotates with James Muro, ASC) says SEAL Team prides itself on doing as many effects incamera as possible, with safety always being the first priority. In addition to the regular technical advisors, the production team – Executive Producer/Director Chris Chulack, Jacoby, the DGA Assistant Directing team led by 1st AD Dan Shaw, Production Designer Stuart Blatt, Special Effects Coordinator Chris Nelson, and the Local 600 camera crew – worked with a fire advisor to make sure

Trucks handled her gear appropriately, as well as a stunt coordinator. “We had only one day to shoot the sequences for both episodes [which included a few pages of dialogue outside The Crucible before they go in],” Jacoby relates. “We had to move fast, and keep everything safe for up to six to eight actors, myself and two other operators, as well as SFX and stunts – in a very claustrophobic situation.” Blatt says they started looking into shooting the sequence in a real working fire-training facility, “but were never able to get approval and cooperation in a timely manner,” the designer shares. “We also spoke of building a set onstage so we would be able to control all elements, but after (cont'd on page 24)

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24 REPL AY

09.2019

conversations with Chris Nelson, that was deemed impractical.” That meant finding a location that looked like a U.S. Navy vessel – low ceilings, narrow halls, and a confined space – which turned out to be Lanterman Developmental Center in Pomona, where other SEAL Team action sequences have been shot. “It sat in the middle of a collection of buildings we’ve previously used as a military installation,” Blatt adds. “So we could point the camera in every direction without hiding anything.” Location secured, Blatt and Jacoby worked out a plan for Jacoby to interact with his crew, while still maintaining the safety distance needed for stunts. Modular elements were built, which allowed for mounting fully adjustable fire bars. The construction crew then built cage walls and corridors with steel ship doors. Using pipe rigs dressed on the steel wall frames, the camera could travel with the actors through the maze or dolly with them while shooting.

Nelson says the team mulled over ways of layering fire into the shots, “to make it feel as menacing as possible while still maintaining a safe environment,” he states. “Our actors were dressed in full firefighter gear and had an actual breathing apparatus. Fire suits and respirators protected the camera crew and my department. In between shots, we would ventilate the set with fresh air and dissipate the heat. “The biggest challenge,” he adds, “was making it feel as dangerous as possible while actually faking it with lenses, camera angles, and strategic placement of our fire bars and other material.” Lighting had to be mostly practical: firebars and flashlights (helmet and chestmounted) – the same units real firefighters would use. “We had high-intensity blinking red emergency lights to augment the chaos,” Jacoby recalls. Gaffer Dayton Nietert adds that the firebars were also key for “eye-catch in the close-ups,” as the firefighting masks

were very reflective and it was critical to see only fire reflected, not a movie light or an LED panel. “We wanted to give the guys who were doing the handheld work the ability to portray the real sense of danger inside The Crucible,” Nietert says. Jacoby worked closely with Nelson to make sure there were “places where we could put a couple of fill lights that would be safe from melting or interfering with his lines,” Jacoby explains. “For close-ups, we created ratios, and I could dial up or down. The low-light capabilities on the RED Gemini are fantastic – plenty of stop even with 90/45 shutter and 48 frames per second. We also did some 6 for 6 frames per second, when she has her breakdown. Key grip Lawton [Richie] Metcalfe built large tents on either side of the sets so FX could slide in Ritter fans between takes to ventilate the setsquickly,” he adds. Metcalfe says the challenge of working with fire “is always knowing anything can happen. Making sure we have cross(cont'd on page 26)

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department cooperation is vital. As the key grip, being in charge of camera safety as well as my crew’s safety is paramount. Because of the amount of fire for the Crucible, Chris Nelson and I decided to have stunt players watch the camera operators while they were inside. Trusting their judgment and working with stunt players that deal with this type of environment made the scene that much more exciting.” After rehearsals commenced for Episode 217, “it felt like a big chunk of the scene could be achieved in a oner,” Jacoby recounts. “The tech advisor showed us the correct way real candidates would clear the exercise. Then Stunts and [episode director] Chris Chulack and I devised a way for me to move around safely and between the actors so it felt like [I was] a part of the scene without it being contrived. After doing it dry, we introduced the fire to the rehearsals, walkthrough, then half-speed, and FX would turn up and down different fire bars as I spun around and stepped over hazards. Lots of cast and crew collaboration [was involved] to keep it safe while still feeling the danger/intensity.” The Guild camera team worked up to full-

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speed rehearsals; and then with confidence high, they started shooting. “The gear was heavy and hot,” Jacoby continues. “The AD’s and medic kept us hydrated between takes and setups. We were minimal for the crew allowed inside the set – focus pullers and most everyone outside. In the final cut, the first half of the scene plays in a oner and then keeps with the intimacy through the whole scene – and that vibe continues into the Episode 220 scene. We were able to sneak in a couple of additional cameras for cutaways, but for safety and storytelling, it was mostly the one combat camera [RED Gemini with the guts in a backpack] – with me operating – wide and close, intimate and confined.” “SEAL Team is a cinematic narrative, from the perspective of the main characters,” Chulack concludes. “For a sequence like this, where the character is tested, the only way to do it was literally – not with CGI. As challenging as it sounds, it was pretty much standard operating procedure for our great crew. They all love doing exciting shots for real. What they can do with the camera comes off on the screen. And the audience loves it.”

LOCAL 600 CREW SEASON 2 Director of Photography Alan Jacoby A-Camera Operator Dominic Bartolone A-Camera 1st AC Todd Avery A-Camera 2nd AC Arturo Rojas B-Camera Operator Jason Goebel B-Camera 1st AC Andrew Degnan B-Camera 2nd AC Ryan Jackson Loader Noah Muro DIT Raul Riveros Still Photographer Carol Kaelson


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“When people aren’t exhausted, they work faster and smarter. It’s kind of a no-brainer. ”

On Game of Thrones, if a crewmember had a great idea, it got used. So, as well as

Robert McLachlan ASC, CSC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTO BY MACALL POLAY, SMPSP

When I started, there were only three major networks producing TV drama. That’s not a lot of openings for cinematographers. When I landed my first credit on MacGyver at the age of 33, it felt like a miracle.

Now there are literally hundreds of dramas being produced and so many

more opportunities. Yet I think breaking in now is a more daunting prospect. And there’s still no substitute for paying your dues. I started from the time I got out of school – shooting whatever I could get my hands on for 10 years. And when I got my break, I was ready.

When people ask me why Game of Thrones was so good, my first glib answer

is always: “It’s partly because it was made by people who were not totally exhausted.” My other answer is that they created a culture of excellence I’ve rarely seen, even on feature productions.

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having a crew that got enough rest and got to have dinner at home every night and had lives, you also had a crew that felt personally responsible for the product, and that equaled great morale.

When you work a 10-hour day in the U.K.,

there are never actor turn-around issues that push call times into the weekend. Cast and crew have time to recover and prepare for the next day’s work. When people aren’t exhausted, they work faster and smarter. It’s kind of a no-brainer.

I’ve been reading about new studies on “decision fatigue.” Researchers found that the

more decisions you have to make throughout the day – no matter how trivial, the sooner you’ll start making bad ones. Nobody makes as good decisions later in the day as they do when they are fresh. And that’s studying people who work 9 to 5! So why are filmmakers expected to produce just as great work at 3 a.m. on Fraturday after a week of 14-hour days as they do on Monday morning? We all know how well that works.

I recently left the Showtime series Ray Donovan after five satisfying seasons. I

loved it because I got ringside seats for exceptional acting, but also because they left the final look, apart from the VFX, totally in my hands. Still, I didn’t want to feel like I was coasting to the finish line. I’d stopped artistically growing and knew it was time to move on. (cont'd on page 30)


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30 DEEP FOCUS

My current show is Lovecraft Country for HBO. It’s sort of…I don’t know…The Green Book meets The Outer Limits. It’s inspiring, original and very cool. I’m surprised at how satisfying it is to be shooting 6K with

a Sony VENICE and the new Zeiss large-format Supreme primes. To have that shallow depth of field available, aided by T1.5 lenses, but also super-deep focus if you want it, thanks to the amazing speed of that camera with its 2500 ISO base, is fantastic. And the built-in ND’s on the VENICE always help maintain consistent depth of field.

I think it was Conrad Hall (ASC), who said that in order to

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do great cinematography you need to have the “director in your pocket.” I wouldn’t go that far, but I’ve worked with close to 400 directors. To say some are better than others is an understatement. The first sign it’s going to be a hard slog is if, during blocking, they stand in the opposite corner from where the operator and I have gravitated. It’s always all uphill after that. [Laughs.]

I do my best to collaborate with a director, as I would want

a DP to be with me when I am directing. There are two kinds of directors I most appreciate: those with a well-honed eye and good visual taste, and those who come from the theater and just want us to set up all the shots while they work performance. Both always help us create handsome and appropriate cinematography.

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32 EXPOSURE

Jamie Walker McCall BY MARGOT CARMICHAEL LESTER PHOTO BY MICHAEL PARMELEE

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“Jamie is a secret weapon.” That’s how Alexis Martin Woodall, executive producer for the FX smash hit Pose, describes production designer Jamie Walker McCall. “She can do anything. Design a room. Design a set. But her real talent is designing wallpaper,” Woodall laughs. “Seriously, she is incredibly modest and very diligent. For instance, when I saw her recreate the ballroom for Season 2 – it was a location in Season 1 – I couldn’t believe how she translated every detail. It feels identical, right down to the worn paint. She cares about getting it right. I respect her so much.” McCall, who hails from Hopkinton, MA, originally set out to be an architect, then an advertising art director. But while studying at Pratt Institute, she saw Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring and a new career path came into focus. “I was blown away by how the art department created the Tolkien world,” she recalls. “Every little detail was given such attention. It also didn’t feel like it was all done in front of a giant green screen; it felt real, which I attribute to the art team and Peter Jackson. Once I watched The Making Of…, I knew that’s what I wanted to do.” After graduation, McCall moved to Los Angeles, starting out in graphic design on a pilot called Queen B with Alicia Silverstone and Danny DeVito. The set decorator, Danielle Berman, recommended McCall as a graphic designer to Derek Hill for the second season of House M.D., where she worked for seven years before moving on to art direction and eventually into production design. McCall art directed on Ryan Murphy’s Feud: Bette and Joan, which garnered an Emmy nomination for production design. That assignment led to more work with Murphy. Her inaugural run as production designer was on four episodes of Murphy’s The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, which also earned an Emmy nod for sets and design. That led to Pose and to Murphy’s upcoming The Politician, a comedy

debuting on Netflix this month. McCall says she loves working with Murphy and his team because “the thought-provoking storylines make each design a challenge, while the continued support I receive from Ryan Murphy and the producers makes it exciting to present ‘out there’ concepts in a supportive environment.” What’s the best thing about designing for Pose? Jamie Walker McCall: The best thing is to design for a show I’m truly proud to work on – a show that gives me artistic freedoms to create a world for an incredibly educational and important story that needs to be told. Where did you draw inspiration for the show’s overall look? Late-1980’s New York City was, thankfully, very well documented. Season 1, I spent a lot of time researching and reading about life in New York City. Season 2 takes place in 1990, when a lot of change was starting to happen in New York – visually with the “broken window policing” theory – so, I tried to convey small changes like less trash being dressed in the city. For interiors, texture-wise, I drew a chunk of inspiration from documentary photos of Russia I came across researching one day. Although the photos were current, they have a very late 1980’s vibe in color with very layered textures of years past. I love symmetry and clean lines.

Not always easy to do on sets that are layered, but I try to find balance in the overall design. I think it’s being a Libra that drives my need for balance [laughs]. What are the special challenges of designing for eras still in recent memory? The hardest part is the city exteriors. They are modernizing rapidly in New York City. For Pose, finding places that still look like 1990 has become quite the task with LinkNYC kiosks and Citi Bikes on every corner. How do you collaborate with Pose’s directors and cinematograpers – Nelson Cragg, ASC, Simon Dennis and Andrei Bowden Schwartz? Before each season, I’m usually brought on a month before the DP and director. I use that time to research and create mood boards for the overall look of the show based on my initial conversations with [co-creator/writer] Ryan Murphy for that season’s concept and tone. Throughout the season the boards become instrumental in showing new directors the mood of the show and how to keep the overall look consistent. Once the episode starts shooting, I work closely with the DP – we discuss the design of each set, the backgrousnds, and the best way for him or her to light the set with practicality and interest. Once camera is up, we look at the composition, and if it requires more

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34 EXPOSURE

09.2019

practicals, the art department runs them in and we adjust. It’s really a collaborative effort. There’s a lot of practical lighting. How do you work with the cinematographers and gaffer to get that right? We all work really well together to make the composition what it is. Once a set is designed, we then do a lighting plan. I discuss it with the DP and add any practicals if needed. Which sets are you particularly proud of? This season I’m most proud of two sets. First, the funeral home because it’s a combination of every funeral home I’ve ever been to as a child and an adult. It’s oddly comforting. Second is our Hellfire Club [an upscale BDSM establishment]. It’s the complete opposite of the funeral home in that instead of designing from experience, I got to think completely outside the box with textures and fantasies. I really wanted to evoke a feeling of the set being alive with its textured walls that look like healed skin lacerations; we then added a gloss everywhere in hopes that it would feel like a dank, moist underbelly of seedy 1990’s New York. It does! I also love how you established a washed-out and depressing palette for the hospital, peep-show space and Stan and Patty Bowes’ New Jersey home. The hospitals and peep show are not places you want to go. They aren’t places we usually associate with happiness, especially in our storyline. I wanted to add a certain amount of drab to these places so that you could feel the character surrounded by sadness. I inherited the Bowes’ house from the pilot, but we continued the tone-on-tone throughout the season to make Stan and Patty’s feel like it was mundane suburbia in contrast to Stan’s Trump-esque, colorful, fast-paced New York work life. Speaking of New York, shooting on location can be challenging. Which spaces stand out for you? The Season 1 episode “Pink Slip” – Little Papi’s takedown had a lot of elements to it. We needed three street corners that all connected visually for the scene. The neighborhood was in East New York. Also in that episode, the “Drug House.” It was actually a vacant apartment at the time that had just been freshly

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“Readers should know how many departments collaborate to make the show’s final look what it is.” painted and prepped to be rented. Our amazing location manager, Audra Gorman, somehow convinced the owners to allow us to transform it. We had to take someone’s pristine newly renovated apartment and thrash it. The scenics had a field day. Every time I entered I asked for more layers! I promised the owner that my team would get it back to its original state, if not better – which they did. In Season 2, we filmed in a real 2019 drugstore. Due to it being a working drugstore, we only had a small window to dress a few aisles for our shot. Needless to say, there is a fair amount of product in the background we could not replace. Not being able to re-dress the entire store to my liking was a challenge and upsetting. Alexis told me about your impeccable recreation of the ballroom from Season 1. Did you have to recreate any other practical locations for the soundstage? Yes. We built a replica of Blanca’s apartment on stage in Season 1, Episode 103 when I took over for [Production Designer] Judy [Becker]. My crew did an amazing job getting the details right from the location that was in the pilot. What’s the biggest artistic, logistical or technological challenge, and can you give us an example? Occasionally being tight on time. Here’s an example: We had only over a lunch break to change over Blanca’s nail salon from under construction to completely freshly painted and her moving in. We achieved this by pinning up aged Visqueen all over the ceiling, having the back wall cut into thirds and put on casters so that we could have one side painted dirty and under-renovation looking, and the other side painted our fresh Melrose Pink [described by Benjamin Moore company as “a deep mid-

tone pink with a noticeable black undertone, Melrose Pink is fashionable and futuristic, conveying a sleek, modern sensibility”]. We also applied aged dirty frisket – low-tack adhesive – all over the remaining brick walls that easily peeled off to reveal our fresh white brick walls. Once camera broke for lunch, the team swarmed the place, flipped the walls around, removed all the Visqueen from the ceiling and peeled off the frisket. Then we brought in some of the set dressing. All in all, it worked, and the shooting crew stayed on schedule. Sounds like a true team effort. Readers should know how many departments collaborate to make the show’s final look what it is. The Locations department finds amazing options to chose from; Construction and Set Design have knocked it out of the park with our builds this year; Set Dressing and Props bring life to our world; and we work closely with Costumes so our look is cohesive. It’s a big team effort. What’s one skill or talent production designers need that would surprise us? I think it’s different for every production designer. Most people have no idea what a production designer does. The reading comprehension seems to surprise people the most – how we take what’s written on the page and turn it into a visual world that works for the storyline. It’s important to me because the writers create the world through their words, and it’s my job to interpret the words visually, bringing it all to life. For example, the takedown scene I described before – there was a lot of scripted action in that scene, so I had to make sure the set location I was pitching had all the components necessary for the scripted action, and [I had to think through] how each beat would play out on the set before presenting that set location as an option. The writers often write in specific details to which all production designers pay attention, because later on, they could play a role. What else should we know about you? I would love to direct someday – any project for which I’m given the opportunity. The challenge and experience would be invaluable.


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36 SPECIAL

Stars Of Comedy SITCOM SPECIALISTS TALK ABOUT HOW MUCH THE GENRE HAS CHANGED IN RECENT YEARS. BY PAULINE ROGERS

DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC / PHOTO BY BYRON COHEN

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37 09.2019

When Donald A. Morgan, ASC, first started to shoot sitcoms at Metromedia (Good Times and The Jeffersons), they were stage-bound with old Norelco tube cameras and lighting at around 200 foot-candles. And when Christian La Fountaine, ASC, started working on Newhart with his father, George, that show was also stage-bound with BNCR cameras. Both men are still shooting comedy series, but, like many others in the genre, they mix stage with location, and everything in between. Traditional multi-camera pedestal-bound sitcoms have changed dramatically (pun intended) in recent years. One of Morgan’s most interesting shows, The Ranch, for streaming giant Netflix, is a multi-camera comedy that stars Ashton Kutcher, Debra Winger and Sam Elliot, and centers on the son of a Colorado rancher who returns from a semi-pro football career to run the family business. The Ranch, as Morgan and line producer Melanie Patterson both observe, is not “afraid to be dark or half-lit.” “The story calls for muted colors, halflit faces and dark areas,” Morgan describes. “Our main tools are Sony F55s and detuned Panavision lenses. I remember one day, I was in color correction at LEVEL 3, and I passed by Lisa Wiegand’s [ASC] show and saw that they were trying to apply a 35mm grain. I loved it – and brought the idea to The Ranch. We ended up painting with a 16mm grain [7219 film] Live Grain electronically.” Still using tungsten-based lighting for the most part, The Ranch also uses LED daylight sources, dialed 3900 and 4500, to simulate ambient daylight through windows. “We have fun with the new tools to get our version of sunsets – creating gradations of color to fit the moment,” Morgan adds. “I kind of wish we had had Liteblades, Litepanels, and Cineo tools when I was first starting.” While La Fountaine says the biggest change in shooting comedy has been the digital cameras, it’s still the lighting that’s most central to helping the audiences see the characters and comedy beats. “For Alexa & Katie, using independently controlled DMXenabled lights expands the number of units we can use beyond the dimmer rack power because they use hot power,” he explains. “Merry Happy Whatever, where we break a bit from tradition, uses Panavised Sony F55’s, Primo lenses, two dollies, and two pedestals. We occasionally use a jib. And we shoot at an effective range of around 1200 ASA with a key of about 18 to 20.”

CHRISTIAN LA FOUNTAINE, ASC / PHOTO BY ALI GOLDSTEIN

DAVID MILLER, ASC / PHOTO BY COLLEEN HAYES

La Fountaine says new tools like dimmable/programmable lights have lessened the need for grids and “hot lighting.” The Director of Photography uses everything from complex DMX-controlled lights to “prosumer” devices and LED cyc Strips. “On Alexa & Katie we use Briteshots, an easily programmable light that is DMX controlled and uses minimal power and only 10 channels,” he continues. “They create lightning, police sirens, strobes, film projector lighting, fireworks, and color chases as you would see in a dance club. In the season

finale, ‘Winter Formal,’ these lights were great for dance effects – easily programmed and versatile. They have become our go-to lights.” La Fountaine also uses Skypanels, Quasars, and LED cyc Strobes, all of which are DMX. He’s even employed prosumer devices. “In the scene before Alexa enters a dance,” he describes, “we used an outrageously expensive fifteen-dollar light as our ‘hero’ light for the entrance to the dance. It was one of those exterior Christmas-light projectors that you use on the front of your house. I think our gaffer, Walter Berry, has a Home Shopping

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38 SPECIAL

Network addiction when it comes to picking up unusual lighting devices online. We also used rope lights and home accessory lighting devices from Ikea. From an ad in the Sunday newspaper, I found a little ‘plug and play’ cube light that we use for smaller profile TV effect lighting. It cost all of ten dollars!” Until The Good Place, David Miller, ASC, hadn’t done much comedy. But when David Hyman (Assistant Director on The West Wing when Miller was the show’s 2nd Unit DP) called, he was up for the job. “The design of comedy today fascinates me,” Miller shares. “Dan Bishop, who designed Mad Men, did an amazing job turning the old Spartacus section of the Universal backlot into The Good Place, building a world of pastels and yogurt shops that turns out to be hell. My other show, Veep, designed by Jim Gloster, is also a very nontraditional comedy.” The Good Place stage shoot employs cameras on dollies and Steadicam, with plenty of Technocrane and the Universal backlot being redressed to represent “the good place” itself. “We shoot with three ARRI ALEXA XT’s and a Fuji 18-85 premier zoom. B and C cameras usually have the Fuji 25 to 300 zoom,” Miller continues. “Veep, on the other hand, is all handheld – with ARRI Amiras, which are easier for the operators to handhold all day.” Miller says LED lighting hasn’t really changed his style. “LED’s use less electricity and don’t require an air-conditioned set, but the way I use them isn’t much different than [Tungsten or HMI],” he states. “That said, I do like having

GALE TATTERSALL / PHOTO BY MELISSA MOSELEY

THE RANCH / PHOTO BY SAEED ADYANI

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instruments like the Sumo battery-powered light for quick setups. And the Astra tubes to give me a lot of light and consistent color.” LED’s do help with very large sets, such as in the Veep finale, for which portions of a political convention were recreated (using seven cameras!) on a large stage in downtown LA. Gale Tattersall’s first foray into comedy, Grace and Frankie, recently wrapped Season 6. The show is shot conservatively – master shots and coverage – on three stages at Paramount Studios. Because Netflix mandates 4K delivery, Tattersall chose Canon C700’s for his A and B cameras and several C300 MKII’s – one permanently mounted on a Steadicam – and Cooke primes and Angénieux zooms, suited to shooting iconic actors like Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. “Shallow depth of field has little place in comedy unless you are trying to create a feeling of a character being isolated from reality,” Tattersall explains. “Using more light allows us to shoot around T3.5 to T5.6 on set. On occasion I may rate at 3200 ISO and shoot at T11. I find racking focus between actors for lines of dialogue distracting, so I hold ‘splits’ as much as possible. The added bonus is you have more color in the actor’s eyes – purely because their irises are smaller. As Jane Fonda points out, we try to make the show ‘easy on the eye’ – giving the audience the best of both worlds.” Tattersall also credits his CLT, Luke Miller, for helping to develop the lighting for Fonda and Tomlin, “so we can make them as beautifullooking as they are as people,” he adds. “It’s like creating a photo shoot for each shot. Luke is now a DP with Local 600, and he’s shot several episodes


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be blended together by VFX.” As Feitshans notes about the changes in the genre: “I don’t think the term ‘situation comedy’ applies anymore. Comedy may have been born from those roots, but it’s so much more sophisticated in terms of looks and locations. There are elements drawn from feature films, onehour drama and traditional sitcoms. It’s a hybrid, almost like a half-hour movie.” “Change is coming, and it’s impossible to resist,” Tattersall concludes. “A lot of ‘humanism’ has been developed by the video-game industry, and it is crossing over into entertainment. Actors were unhappy on occasion having to perform in the sterile world of blue screen. Now they may well be – sometime in the future – replaced by a thumb drive!” “We’ve already done several virtual sets,” Feitshans adds. That’s also coming in comedy.” “Don’t freak out!” they both add. It’s progress – sort of. BUZZ FEITSHANS IV / PHOTO BY DARREN MICHAELS, SMPSP

solo. In reality, as a DP, I find I do half my work on this show in color timing. Better to fix an issue in five minutes with the colorist than on set with one hundred people waiting.” Young Sheldon, shot by Buzz Feitshans IV and set in 1989, pushes the comedy-look envelope. The show emphasizes transitions, act-ins and -outs, and movement on specific dialog cues. “We’ve tried to tailor the movement to places where it doesn’t distract from the words,” Feitshans describes. “This hybrid format requires fast last-minute changes to blocking, camera positioning and lighting, as the writing producers often punch up parts of the script on the spot.” Most of the show is on stages at Warner Bros., with a little location work at Van Nuys High School, churches, and residential areas. Feitshans shoots with three ARRI Minis (one on a Steadicam). Because the young actors are with the crew for limited hours per day, the schedules are tight. “The new LED technology has helped us a lot with the limited hours,” the cinematographer explains. “Every light is patched into a dimmer board. And we usually light the room in zones rather than on specific marks, which also helps us to move faster.” What’s really unique about Young Sheldon is the expanded use of VFX. “We have a meeting to discuss layers and provide live-action and background elements that are needed,” Feitshans explains. “Lighting compatibility and lighting effects are blended into what we know will be the final product. Often we will use split-screen technology to take performances from multiple takes and blend them into one shot. And the use of photo doubles helps us to extend our allotted child hours. Often, we will shoot half the scene and then finish the other half later – then it will

VEEP / PHOTO BY COLLEEN HAYES

YOUNG SHELDON / PHOTO BY MICHAEL DESMOND

THE TV IS S U E

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THE TV IS S U E

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Not Strictly Ballroom FX’S HIT SERIES SASHAYS INTO SEASON 2 WITH MORE THAN JUST CREATIVE MOMENTUM – IT’S BECOME A LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE FOR THE MANY LOCAL 600 MEMBERS BEHIND THE LENS. BY MARGOT CARMICHAEL LESTER PHOTOS BY JOJO WHILDEN, SMPSP / ERIC LIEBOVITZ / MACALL POLAY, SMPSP / SARAH SHATZ

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PHOTO BY SARAH SHATZ


You could look at the FX hit Pose , whose second season debuted this past June, as simply a terrific story well told. Which it most assuredly is. But that’s only part of the narrative, really.

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PHOTO BY ERIC LIEBOVITZ


P

Pose’s first season introduced a world where the very privileged and the very marginalized – living at the height of consumerist materialism and the AIDS epidemic – overlapped. The near-simultaneous rise of ballroom culture, the New Right, and the fortification of the gay and trans community in this same timeframe helped to give the show a defined social and political context, as well as a large viewing audience. With a deeper dive into the lives of the many trans characters who populate this unique sub-culture, and their impoverished backgrounds highlighting season two, the Ryan Murphy-produced drama has brazenly challenged outmoded norms. It has also shown contemporary audiences that great

results can come from personal and cultural liberation: realness in all its righteous glory. As Director, Writer, and CoExecutive Producer Janet Mock describes: “[Pose] is unlike anything else on television because it offers a moving portrait of what it means to love yourself despite being given no love from the world. It’s a trailblazing story about LGBTQ people, who are so often marginalized and discarded in our society, and re-centers them as underdogs and misfits, who band together in order to create a new kind of family.” “Everybody wants to be their real selves,” adds executive producer Alexis Woodall. “We all have something we’re nervous about. These characters show us that being real is more important than getting by. I hope for the audience they remember that and get a boost of personal bravery from it.” Nelson Cragg, ASC, a frequent collaborator with Murphy, established the visual look for Season 1’s first two episodes. “Working with Ryan is amazing because he supports the creative vision by being very open to things,” notes Cragg, who also directed episode 3. Cragg says the goal was to depict the lives of these characters honestly, “while offering some stylization, so it would not be too bleak. The inspiration was partly based on the real spaces that the balls took place in. We watched the [1990 indie] documentary Paris Is Burning and referenced the light. The spaces were not permanent, so they didn’t have huge lighting or set dressing setups. The bold red color was taken from the real balls, and we added some spotlights and disco balls. But it’s pretty close to what they had there at that time. Fluorescent overheads, lots

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“Ryan worked with a real trans cast, many of whom didn’t have on-screen experience. This meant we needed to keep the shots simple, and not do specific lighting.” Nelson Cragg, ASC

of smoke from cigarettes.” ARRI cameras, Zeiss Ultra Primes and Angénieux lightweight zooms were Craggs’ tools of choice. “I prefer working with zooms on a more raw show like this because we have to be fast and flexible,” he continues. “Ryan chose to work with a real trans cast, many of whom had not had much on-screen experience. This meant we needed to keep the shots simple, and not do real specific lighting. Because we wanted [the cast] to feel free to experiment and not be locked into a mark, we had to be ready to capture everything in a live-type environment, where you don’t want to be changing lenses constantly. Basically, we had to light spaces, not shots.” Season 1 A-Camera/Steadicam Operator Andrew Mitchell, SOC, says Cragg likes images that are graphic and cinematic. “Nelson will almost always move a light if it makes a better frame,” Mitchell shares. “If we have three cameras and one has a so-so shot, he’ll pull them out.” Devon, England–born Cinematographer Simon Dennis, BSC, shot the remainder of Season 1. Mitchell says Dennis likes to refer to shots on an emotional level. “Simon will shoot stills on his phone during the rehearsal and show them to his operators for the setups he wants,” Mitchell continues. “He gets into the camera’s technical settings, changing the shutter angle, ISO, and color temperature and riding the iris.” Season 2 was lensed by Andrei Bowden Schwartz; of the differing creatives behind the camera, Season 2 A-Camera 1st AC Damon LeMay says: “One of the joys of shooting a show with such a large performance component is that the operators and the focus pullers really get

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to play on a regular basis. Having DPs who allow you to find new and exciting moments on the fly makes that a lot of fun.” Pose’s ballroom scenes, shot on location in Season 1 and then on a painstakingly recreated soundstage set for Season 2, are key aspects of the show’s success. Loud, raucous and full of life, Cragg knew the “balls” had to be experienced in 360 degrees to make viewers feel like they were in the room. “They had to be loose and free, which meant the camera had to spin and move with the action to draw people in,” Cragg explains. “We lit with spotlights, and par cans and lights we could shoot. It provided real-life lens flares and made sure the operators were not locked into small areas. We had the amazing Andrew Mitchell on Steadicam, and that always helps! No one moves a camera like Andrew.” The ball sequences were given a deliberate Technicolor look that Dennis describes as “a reflection of how these characters feel on the inside when they gather for the beautiful ‘ball culture.’” In fact, each ball is identified by a specific choice of colors. “Some of these were pre-planned and some were organically worked out on the day once I’d seen the costumes and blocking,” Dennis adds. “All the LED Astera and PARcan units on set were controlled from our central board, so it was a very quick process to try out ideas. Thank goodness for today’s advanced LED lighting systems, as it would have been impossible without them.” Season 2 A-Camera Operator Peter Vietro-Hannum says the biggest challenge to the balls was their sheer

PHOTO BY JOJO WHILDEN, SMPSP


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PHOTO BY JOJO WHILDEN, SMPSP


magnitude. “The standard coverage of a normal scene doesn’t apply,” he remarks. “There were dozens of characters that needed to be seen, and around 50 to 75 extras with fantastic costumes that make the whole scene come to life. We always had three cameras. A-camera usually started with a wide lens on the Technocrane, and the B and C cameras work the crowd with long lenses.” Adds Schwartz: “It gets tricky to hide cameras from each other and not cast camera shadows from the spotlights. The solution is to not go for too many similar frame sizes at once, but rather to pair a super-wide with two long-lens cameras. After that, it’s all about synchronizing with the walkers and dance numbers and making sure we’re ready for changes.” The ball costumes and art design also required a high level of experimentation. “We did so much research, starting with Season 1 when Lou [Eyrich] and I were co-designing,” recalls Analucia McGorty, who took over costume design for Season 2. “We spent six weeks researching the ballroom scene and culture, but also New York in general. We want to make sure we’re representing these subcultures and parts of New York accurately. It should be visually delicious.” McGorty calls it a “privilege” to be able to create, shop for and dress Billy Porter, a style icon in real life who presides over Pose’s ballroom’s activities as the character Pray Tell. “Billy has this great, beautiful star power that’s not male or female,” McGorty adds. “Sometimes we just bring in bolts of fabric, as he’s so open to anything.” The level of complexity Pose’s costume department gets into is remarkable. For a Marie Antoinette costume, donned by Dominique Jackson as Elektra Abundance, in Season 2’s opening episode, the dress – magnificently decadent and royal – also required a functioning carousel and faux guillotine! “We made it in two weeks,” McGorty describes. “We had to figure out what materials to use for the skirt so it would spin and function to the motion of the coat, and so the costume lifted up for the guillotine. It had to be light for the actor to wear – for 10 hours – and to move and act in it. We had to make sure to do multiple

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PHOTO BY JOJO WHILDEN, SMPSP


“I’m so grateful for how all the departments work together to make things happen. We’re all separate Locals, with different responsibilities, but none of this would succeed if we didn’t work as a team.” Costume Designer Analucia McGorty

rehearsals with the choreographers so everyone would know how it worked. We had so many prototypes and samples and even had to handpaint these little horses.” As for her give-and-take rapport with the camera department, McGorty says it’s a close one. “I think of them as partners in what we’re doing,” she adds, “because they’re so collaborative. I’m so grateful for how all the departments work together to make things happen. We’re all separate Locals, with different responsibilities, but none of this would succeed if we didn’t work as a team.” Portraying Pose’s many different characters requires special attention to lighting. Schwartz says the goal isn’t to equalize everyone within a shot, but rather to ensure people are represented accurately and attractively. “When we’re shooting wides, we look for areas to sneak-in special lights for those with darker tones or shadowing hairdos,” he explains. With coverage, I read the scopes to make sure everyone’s reading at the correct baseline for their fill or key side. We have different lighting approaches to different characters.” All three directors of photography prefer nailing exposures in-camera, rather than relying on post. As Dennis describes: “It can often just be simple tricks of flagging,

netting, eye or catchlights. Of course, you can window faces in post, but for me, I want to embed the look incamera. Lighting-wise we used soft direct sources to shape, and when the opportunity arose we embraced backlight in a location or set to help the skin tones glow. Color is such a huge part of my love of being a cinematographer, so I used color also to capture those skin tones, whether it be vibrant or subtle.” Mock says Dennis’ preparation and approach were integral to a show that features an array of directors working on a tight schedule. “Simon lights with such authority and swiftness,” she obser ves. “He’s trained as an editor so he understands coverage. Those are all skills that come in handy when you’re tight on time and need to figure out what’s absolutely necessary to cover a scene at the end of your day. I don’t think I could ask for a better partner on my directorial debut [Season 1, Episode 6].” The director (who recently signed a historic deal with Netflix) describes how her prep with Dennis allowed for more time on-set to capture complex shots. “We had a 360 shot in the middle of a crowded ballroom. It was Blanca confronting a playboy who has wronged her. We had to cover the runway performances, then tilt-up dramaticaly to the balcony to capture Blanca’s moment with our crane. Simon was also helpful in helping

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PHOTO BY MACALL POLAY, SMPSP


LOCAL 600 CREW SEASON 1

SEASON 2

Directors of Photography Nelson Cragg, ASC Simon Dennis

Directors of Photography Simon Dennis Andrei Bowden Schwartz

A-Camera Operator/Steadicam Mark Schmidt, SOC

A-Camera Operator Peter Vietro-Hannum

A-Camera 1st AC Stanley Fernandez

A-Camera 1st AC Damon LeMay

A-Camera 2nd AC Christopher Eng

A-Camera 2nd AC Amanda Rotzler

B-Camera Operator Brian Jackson

B-Camera Operator Wylda Bayrón

B-Camera 1st AC Wesley Hodges

B-Camera 1st AC Ro Rizzo

B-Camera 2nd AC Corey Licameli

B-Camera 2nd AC Mike Swearingen

Loaders Ronnie Wrase Matt Albano

Loaders Kristina Lally Alyssa Longchamp

Still Photographer JoJo Whilden, SMPSP

Still Photographers Eric Liebowitz Macall Polay, SMPSP Sarah Shatz

me achieve a oner when Patty walks out of the diner and onto the street, and the camera lands through the window on a heartbroken Angel. These were tricky shots that we had mapped out during that lunch and accomplished on the night of because of our planning together during that twohour page turn.” LeMay notes that one of Pose’s defining visual elements is that close-ups are often shot with wide lenses. “A 27mm is a common lens for our close-ups,” he states. “And we’re often less than four feet from the actors.” The results are intimate frames that put the camera (and the viewer) in the scene instead of observing it. “All credit for maintaining the intensity of the scenes should go to the cast,” LeMay adds. “These actors are so dedicated. All we can offer is to be quiet and professional. They do the rest and deliver fantastic performances, even with a camera directly in their face.” Vietro-Hannum agrees. “Their personal stories and willingness to get emotionally naked are like no cast’s I’ve ever worked with.” Small spaces, like the Peep Show rooms and the hallway of Blanca’s apartment, add authenticity and complexity. Dennis says he tried to keep those spaces as simple as possible. Production Designer “Jamie Walker

McCall [see Exposure, page 32] always worked with me on providing decent practicals in-frame to boost or express the look needed,” Dennis recounts. “Sometimes it’s a simple bare bulb, but the type, color, and texture of that bulb are enough to express what’s needed. You can’t just leave those choices to chance, especially if it’s primary source lighting the scene, which we would then augment as needed.” McCall, a member of IATSE Local 800 (Art Directors Guild), says that Simon is a “delight to work with” and brings her sets to life. “We continually bounce ideas or concerns off of one another. I often send him emails after I’ve looked over the dailies. It’s usually praise, but he may tell you otherwise,” she says, laughing. One memorable tight shot in a tight spot took place in the Season 2 opener. Blanca (Mj Rodriguez) and Angel (Indya Moore) needed to have a serious conversation, and a cast member suggested shooting the scene as Blanca deep-cleans the bathroom. “The bathroom is five feet by five feet, so you can’t really fit in there,” recalls director Gwyneth Horder-Payton. “But maybe we could find a way because the characters would be doing that.” The close surroundings highlighted the intimacy between the characters and brought

home the fact that Blanca cannot get away from her HIV diagnosis. “For me, it’s about keeping my mind as open as possible to different approaches,” Horder-Payton adds. “I realize our cast members are coming from a very different place and that their choices may be more viable.” In truth, everyone involved with Pose says the show has been transformative, providing inspiration, education and, perhaps most importantly, affirmation. “It’s important to say out loud how much the show means to all of us who work on it,” Schwartz concludes. “We all feel we’re lucky to be here, and we greatly appreciate the cast and the stories that we’re telling. It can be a challenging show, but the entire concept is so inspiring. What it means to the audience, and especially to the cast, makes it very special and unique.” LeMay appreciates how relevant the issues are in today’s world. “Violence against transgender women remains appallingly common in the U.S., with over two dozen – mostly women of color – killed last year and a number more killed just in the time we’ve been making this show,” the AC states. “I know this is an issue the cast is keenly aware of and that we all should be aware of, as well.” For all of those reasons, working on Pose has become a different kind of experience for the many IATSE crewmembers who are not part of the show’s subject community. “To honor the transgender community with creativity and respect was lifechanging in many ways,” Dennis reflects. “When your work can change or inspire real lives, it alters your perception of what your responsibilities are as a director of photography: it’s not always just entertainment.”  Horder-Payton concurs. “On this show, more than any I’ve done, the driving principle is this idea of love and respect for other human beings. Their community has had to stick together to protect themselves, they have great love and respect for each other, and that comes out all day long. Not just between the actors, but also among the crew. Pose is the most loving place I’ve ever experienced.” Ultimately, Cragg says, the work is changing the world for the better. “It’s introducing millions of people to a sub-culture they had no idea even exists. It put these supposedly marginal people right in people’s living rooms and portrays them as real human beings. That is important and hopefully can make someone’s life better. What more can you ask in telling a story?”

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PHOTO BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

Heat

THE DIVERSE CAST, CREW AND LOCATIONS FOR THE NEW ABC/DISNEY SERIES, GRAND HOTEL , EXECUTIVE-PRODUCED BY EVA LONGORIA, ALL MOVE TO A SUNNY FLORIDIAN BEAT. BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT / BYRON COHEN / MITCH HA ASETH / ERIC MCCANDLESS THE TV IS S U E

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When Executive Producers Eva Longoria and Brian Tanen acquired the rights to Gran Hotel – a period piece set at a castlelike hotel at the turn of the century in rural Spain, they knew that the hit show was still airing and in production. “There was no need to try to do a literal remake,” Tanen explains. “So we opted for big changes, letting the original inspire us but telling a modern story in a contemporary setting.”

At the core of this bold family drama is the story of a wealthy Latinx family, “something you almost never see on television without the wealth being tied to drugs,” Tanen says. “It’s also the story of the staff – and a mystery at the center of it all.” Miami became the natural location for the new ABC/ Disney series Grand Hotel, as tourism is Florida’s biggest industry. Miami Beach hotels (many designed by architect Morris Lapidus) have a rich, distinctive character. To infuse reality into the pilot, it was decided to shoot on location at the legendary Fontainebleau; and to bring that look to the screen was pilot cinematographer Yasu Tanida (ICG Magazine, February/March 2019, This Is Us), who used two ALEXA Plus

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cameras on dollies and one ALEXA Mini on a Steadicam. It was Tanida’s first time with the Leica Summilux lenses, “a good fit with their sharpness and color renditions,” he says. Tanida added Panavision zooms and macro lenses to enhance the look. Once the series was picked up, cinematographer Alison Kelly came onboard, and the team set about creating this Dynasty-meets-telenovela, on stages in Manhattan Beach, CA. Kelly worked with Production Designer Steve Saklad, who supplied beautiful and precise sketches to create the series mainstay, the hotel lobby, on set. “The Fontainebleau made me fall in love with circles,” Saklad describes. “We feasted on circular walls all over the Lobby set, which originally

included a full drive-up entryway, a giant circular lobby space, circular cocktail bar area, manager’s office, interior restaurant, and full wraparound poolside terrace café. “We had 20-foot-high walls of glass wrapping the curved front lobby façade and another 20-foot-high glass wall wrapping the Circle Bar,” Saklad adds. “When Alison poured in that [simulated] tropical sunshine, you could almost smell the suntan lotion of a hot day in Miami Beach.” “Steve is a true artist and was wonderful to collaborate with,” Kelly shares. “He designed an incredible world for us to film – the sets were vast, which allowed for long lens work and interesting depth but also provided grand wide shots.” Gaffer Eric Forand says the challenge for the big set was footprint and height. “We had big lights, 20K’s, and T12s that could move side to side and up and down on both ends of the set,” he explains. “There was a bank of windows to a patio restaurant and the front entrance – at opposite ends – 120 feet apart. The hard light was backed up by skylight, provided by diffused ARRI SkyPanels. This gave us color control to create subtle differences for all times of the day.” Inside, Forand provided Kelly with accents of LED Ribbons under stair treads, inside and behind bars and counters. “In many of these, we would run 2700K, 6500K, red-green-blue (RGB) diodes, which gave us five colors to mix, allowing us to change the whole feel of the place at the touch of a button, thanks to our Lighting


PHOTO BY ERIC MCCANDLESS

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PHOTO BY MITCH HAASETH

PHOTO BY ERIC MCCANDLESS

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PHOTOS BY ERIC MCCANDLESS

Console Programmer Tom Howard,” Forand adds. “We also accented the edges of the space using LED fixtures, mostly SkyPanels with Chimeras, so we could also shift colors there as well.” For the Lobby set, Kelly needed to carry daylight ambiance into the big room and also had to find a way to manage sight lines for wide-angle shots. A suggestion from Key Grip Michael Price, who says Kelly was “the heart of the show’s look,” solved both puzzles. “Think half a football field long, with set walls as low as 18 feet in areas, so we knew we could have considerable sightline issues,” Price recounts. “I proposed a set extension of black/white ultra-bounce material to wrap the perimeter. This would prevent unwanted light from spilling into the set while providing a large white surface to add bounce fill onto the set.” It also allowed Kelly and Forand to get away from using toplight or softboxes inside. Adds Forand: “We positioned smallish light sources to work 10-foot sections of bounce around the entire room.” Rigging Key Grip

Les Percy and his crew hung more than 10,000 square feet of material from the stage perms. Kelly describes the all-important Miami sunlight as “another character” on the show. “We designed a lighting plan so each set could have a wide variety of times of the day and different qualities of light to suit the story,” she explains. “In addition to our T12s and 20Ks, the controllable quality of the ambient ‘daylight’ was very important.” To achieve this, Forand and team built several large 12-by-8-foot and several 4-by4-foot softboxes suspended by biaxial motors for direction control. These had ARRI SkyPanels inside, which allowed for highly specific movement and color control. Many of the scenes within this massive set involved multiple characters with asides and scenes within scenes. “Five or six principal actors, with coverage of a scene, was a challenge to keep on schedule,” remembers operator Steve Matzinger, SOC, “as Production wanted to keep our actors fresh and limit our days to 12 hours. Thanks to Alison’s incredible organization, we were able to jump from Steadicam to cranes, to our big open lobby set, then back into tiny

practical sets with three cameras squeezed in to get coverage. “After plotting out the big dance, we would move on to lighting, letting operators Dan Ayers [SOC], Matt Blute, and myself work out the dance of the three cameras,” Matzinger adds. “Often we would work together to see best how to allow for a Steadicam shot through the lobby, using a long-lens cutaway for coverage, but also keeping the look interesting and fresh.” While the hotel’s lobby is where much of the series plays out, one of the key visual challenges to the show was a massive hurricane – standard fare for Miami residents. “It was the very last thing we filmed on location [by Yasu Tanida] at The Fontainebleau,” explains Tanen. “It was late at night, and we were running these loud, massive fans and rain machines. The real hotel guests were not pleased. But the sequence was key to making the show work, and we knew we needed it. While filming, our crew was committed to safety, and Arielle Kebbel [Sky] was an absolute trooper

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SERIES DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY ALISON KELLEY (L) LINES UP A SHOT WITH EXECUTIVE PRODUCER/DIRECTOR BILL D’ELIA / PHOTO BY MITCH HAASETH

about getting pelted with water and wind, take after take.” Kelly says the hurricane was also recreated on stage and just outside the stage door on an exterior set at Manhattan Beach Studios. “Our SFX Coordinator, John Cazin, brought two 100-mile-per-hour wind machines and a 40-foot rain bar to simulate the tempestuous nature of the storm – wind and water coming from every direction,” she remembers. “With palm leaves and other debris flying about, all the cameras had to be outfitted with rain deflectors and covers, and the whole team suited up in extreme weather gear. We used the ARRI SkyPanel S360 on a lift at one end to modulate the color and movement in the hurricane, and a flyswatter rigged with a 20-by-20 bounce for ambient fill.” Even the camera crew admits the

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hurricane scenes were fun to execute. “The first was a flashback where Sky, the missing sister of one of the main characters, Danny, is looking out the giant windows in the Circle Bar, watching the hurricane happen,” explains Ayers. “The shot was a push in from outside the windows into a medium shot where she turns and runs into the lobby and gets lost in the crowd. The hard part was when we had a couple of Ritter fans trying to recreate hurricane winds blowing on us with rain and flying debris. We kept getting palm leaves under the dolly as we pushed in, so it was bumpy.” The second hurricane scene was during the season finale, where viewers learn what happened to Sky. “She is running from someone through the hallway of The Grand Hotel and gets to the door to either go outside into the hurricane or down another

hall,” Ayers continues. “But that door to the inside hall is locked, so she has to go out into the storm. “I thought that following her with Steadicam would be better since we could follow her down the hall longer and build up the tension. The only issue would be once the camera got out the door the winds would blow the Steadicam around,” he adds. “Alison liked the idea of Steadicam – with a couple of grips waiting around the corner of the door to jump in with some four-by-four doubles to block the wind when I exited the hallway. It worked great, and with only one take!” Kelly says it was another example where the Cine Ring came to the rescue. “We mounted it to the Steadicam and were able to change the intensity and color of the fill as they stepped out into the storm. It was an invaluable tool.”


Mover and Shaker BY PAULINE ROGERS / PHOTO BY ERIC MCCANDLESS

Eva Longoria was young, naïve, and not paying much attention to the landscape when she became a household name starring in Desperate Housewives some 15 years ago. “The budgets were different; there was no social media. It was all about metrics,” reflects Longoria, who is now the executive producer/ director of the new ABC/Disney series Grand Hotel. “We had to deliver a story that would make everyone want to sit down in front of their television every Sunday night and watch.” An activist at heart, Longoria soon learned that she could leverage her celebrity to support issues that spoke to her deep concern for social justice – behind the scenes in the entertainment industry and up front spearheading several non-profits. When she and partner Brain Tanen acquired the rights to the Spanish TV hit Gran Hotel, presenting the Latino community in a positive light wasn’t the only concern. She readily admits to searching out a production team that was extremely diverse in gender and color. “We crewed-up with a conscious bias toward women,” Longoria recounts. “It started with cinematographer Alison Kelly and trickled down from there. Two female AD’s, a female stunt coordinator, seven of the 13 directors – female and persons of color. Highly qualified – and a great way to showcase their talents.” The many socially relevant projects Longoria has been a part of include Reversing Roe, which she calls “timely, important and urgent, not only to women but to everyone. In an unbiased way, we presented both sides of the argument, so everyone will know where we are headed.” The PBS documentary, A Class Apart, told the story of an unknown Mexican American attorney, who, in the early 1950’s argued a civil rights case all the way to the Supreme Court, and won. “Sometimes

you have to tell the story of one person – humanize an issue so people can digest it,” Longoria, who executive produced the film, shares. The Harvest which she executive-produced for Shine Global, Inc., focused on the 500,000 child migrant farmworkers in the U.S., the film promoted awareness to support and enact CARE (Children’s Act for Responsible Employment). Recently, Longoria teamed up with Emmy Award-winning writer Lena Waithe and MACRO and The Black List to launch “The MACRO Episodic Lab, Powered by The Black List,” which offers people of color the opportunity to develop and produce an original digital or television script. “It’s all about discovering talent and building a pipeline,” she explains. As if all that were not enough, in the wake of the #MeToo movement Longoria joined forces with Reese Witherspoon, Natalie Portman, and other leading Hollywood women to co-found the #TimesUp campaign, which has now spread well beyond the entertainment industry. “It’s more than creating a safe workplace everywhere,” she offers. “We want to provide women with a sustainable chance at independence and financial stability, within existing systems where they are oppressed.” Still, if you ask Longoria what her biggest passion is, the response is likely to be the Eva Longoria Foundation (ELF), which seeks to empower Latinas everywhere through education and entrepreneurship. The organization has made STEM education a primary focus – and has, to date, helped more than 2,100 low-income youths engage in STEM activities. Conscious that her visibility is a big part of driving the success of her giving back, Longoria still appears in front of the camera (she has a small part in Grand Hotel) and has also directed her first pilot for the CW, called Glamour.

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PHOTO BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

PHOTO BY RICHARD CARTWRIGHT

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Where would a hotel story be without capturing the goings-on inside the various rooms? Assistant Mark Legaspi calls these scenes a different type of challenge for the union team. “It’s about the blocking with the actors,” he offers. “Having them come in and out, and moving through the rooms. We frequently shot with two cameras simultaneously, and to account for blocking and adjustability, dolly grips Michael Epley and Joshua Miller would often lay dance floor and coordinate multimark moves that ended up being a dance between the two cameras to get all the coverage in two sizes at once. “The operators and dolly grips would choreograph the moves with the standins. I was particularly impressed at how much coverage we were able to get all at once using these dance-floor moves,” Legaspi continues. “Sometimes, the dollies would also have sliders on them to make them compound moves. From my point-of-view as focus puller, it kept the firsts on their toes, as these shots were always being fine-tuned from take to take.” Grand Hotel also features some scenes considered non-traditional for network TV, i.e., a live concert where Kelly was able to make use of equally non-traditional lighting tools. “In the second episode, there is a concert outside,” she explains. “A full stage and two lighting towers were installed, three bar areas and hundreds of extras, with four cameras. We had two songs to film on stage but also five or six scenes that took place while the concert was in progress, ending with a stunt/visual-effects shot. Eric and I were in agreement that we needed to bring in a dedicated programmer for the stage fixtures. There were story beats in the performance, and we needed to craft specific stage looks in that palette.” Forand says the concert was built with freestanding truss and staging structure. “Tom [Howard] and I designed the rig using Martin MAC Vipers, MAC Quantum Washes, and other LED color-controllable static units,” the gaffer recounts. “I was able to keep Tom off the main unit the day before the shoot, which freed him to work with live show programmer David Kane. We built a one-minute song sequence and a 30-second slow song sequence that worked in the background of other scenes. While David was running that, my crew would move a couple of soft/medium sources around the house floor, which

acted as [lighting] vignettes within the overall concert.” Other challenging moments, per Kelly, were the first day with a new team (led by DGA assistant directors Anna Notarides and Michele Labrucherie), and a large action scene culminating in a stunt (designed by stunt coordinator Helena Barrett) that chased a car on three city blocks in Westwood. “All of the permit restrictions changed on the day,” Kelly recounts. “Without the strong leadership of director Eva Longoria (see “Mover and Shaker,” page 61), it could have been a disaster, but instead was an auspicious kick-off for the series. “There was also an exterior scene with Gigi [Roselyn Sanchez] and her two daughters shopping that, because of the location, we had to shoot when the sun was just not in a great spot,” Kelly continues. “Trust the grips to come up with a solution. They walked down the street with an eight-by-eight diffusion frame next to the actors as Dan pulled them on a Steadicam. It was quite a parade, and it saved the day.” Describing Grand Hotel as a “parade” of color, scope, lighting and camera, all executed flawlessly by an experienced IATSE crew, is an apt metaphor. Certainly, that’s how Technicolor DI colorist Tom Forletta and dailies colorist Brandon Lippard approached the rich source material with which they were presented. “The sets and wardrobe were so well designed,” Forletta states, “they offered a diverse color palette that gave me the opportunity to create a range of looks from bright and beautiful to dark and moody, mixed together with some interesting treatments for the flashbacks.” “The trickiest material for us to time was probably the backdrop outside of the presidential suite,” Kelly notes. “It was unfortunately very close to the set and less than ideal. But, that didn’t prevent Tom or Brandon from making it fit. We had great communication, and Brandon’s morning stills were invaluable – they allowed me to find smooth transitions when needed. “The best part of shooting Grand Hotel,” the cinematographer concludes, “was that it was such a wonderful and diverse set. Both the cast and the crew were fantastic. We even had day players – crew and cast – commenting on what a delightful and harmonious atmosphere it was.”

LOCAL 600 CREW PILOT Directors of Photography Yasu Tanida A-Camera Operator Beau Chaput A-Camera 1st AC Richard Floyd A-Camera 2nd AC Carla Sosa B-Camera Operator James Baldanza, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Sean Gilbert B-Camera 2nd AC Billy Wells Loader Wade Ferrari Utility Ian Hernand Season 1 Directors of Photography Alison Kelly A-Camera Operator Dan Ayers, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Mark Legaspi A-Camera 2nd AC Emily Zenk B-Camera Operator Steve Matzinger, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Gretchen Hatz Alex Grossfeld B-Camera 2nd AC Robin Bursey C-Camera Operator Matt Blute C-Camera 1st AC Christine Hodinh Nick Cutway C-Camera 2nd AC Alex Gadberry Renni Pollock DIT Stephen Fouasnon Loader Alex Gadberry Utility Trigg Ferrano Still Photographers Richard Cartwright Byron Cohen Mitch Haaseth Eric McCandless

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PHOTO BY GIOVANNI RUFINO


Love, Actually NEW YORK-BASED DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY YARON ORBACH AND A GUILD CAMERA TEAM VISUALIZE MUCH MORE THAN “SEX AND THE CITY,” IN THIS NEW AMAZON SERIES. BY ELLE SCHNEIDER PHOTOS BY GIOVANNI RUFINO & CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS

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When the Modern Love weekly column debuted in The New York Times on Halloween Day in 2014 under the same editor it still has, Daniel Jones, it struck a resonant chord with readers. Written by a new contributor each week, and relating stories of love of all stripes and colors – romantic, sexual, familial, platonic, and just plain odd – many of the essays reflected the lives of New Yorkers in new and surprising ways. The column eventually morphed into a podcast, and even more recently a live audience event. 66

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PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS

Now with a new 30-minute Amazon series, Modern Love fans can put images to the words, with each of the eight-episode arcs of the show being adapted from more than 500 Modern Love columns. The project is the third collaboration between Guild cinematographer Yaron Orbach and Irish writer/ director John Carney, the latter known for his loose and breezy musicals set in the British Isles, such as Once and Sing Street. Although Orbach has a long history in television (see ICG Magazine, February/March 2018, Seven Seconds), it’s the first time Carney has attempted a TV series derived from distinctly American material. The director’s improvisational style and an approach Orbach often takes, which he describes as “naturalist minimalist,” meshed for a simple, uncluttered look that put the narrative on top. While each episode of Modern Love is its own unique story, the series is loosely connected, taking place within the same few weeks in New York City. For that reason, Orbach and Carney wanted a common visual language that would be free of gimmick-driven themes. “We didn’t want to create eight episodes where one is on the dolly and composed, one is very handheld, one is lit this way, one is lit that way,” Orbach recalls. “We wanted to

connect them so you feel it’s part of the same universe. “In a way, we were making eight short movies,” he continues, describing the experience as more akin to shooting a feature. “When you’re shooting a TV show, there’re a lot of recurring sets,” and you revisit that “nucleus of locations that repeat themselves” dozens of times throughout the schedule, Orbach adds. But for an anthology, “we might only be in this diner for three hours, like in a movie, and we’re never going to come back because it’s not appearing in any other episodes. So that oneness and preciousness just give it a different feel; it raises the stakes in many ways and you have to be very careful to get it right.” Carney directed five of the eight episodes, and the shorthand and friendship between the pair, after working on features like Begin Again and Sing Street, kept the set dynamic. “As opposed to TV series I’ve recently done – Seven Seconds or The Deuce – [the latter of which] is very stylized and dark at times, there is a lightness to John’s work that is based on his human stories,” Orbach says. “He wants it to be very accessible, and he’s always looking for small, real moments. With this kind of improvised approach, I use mostly practical and available light so we can freely move the camera to find those moments at any time.” Orbach says the workflow is not typical for television, and the fact that the pair don’t often rehearse makes it all the more so. “When you’re working this way, in this kind of John Cassavetes style, which is how we did Begin Again and Sing Street,” he notes, “then the lighting has to be, in some ways, very broad. You can select when to be moody, but all in all, it has to work fluidly through

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the whole scene because of the nature of improvisation, the nature of spontaneity. It’s refreshing to work with a director who is so confident to let things go and find unique, emotional moments” on set, and “comes in with such a different approach, compared to other shows where it’s so planned and meticulous.” Carney returns the compliment, saying Orbach is “fast, and loves using available light as much as possible. Which, as anyone familiar with New York knows, is the key to capturing that great city,” the writer/ director offers. “Yaron is great at capturing characters in their natural environment, which is what Modern Love is all about.” Ultimately, Carney and Orbach wanted to shoot 360 degrees for any scene, regardless of location, and not be limited by gear or lights. “But there’s no real way to do elaborate lighting setups with John,” Orbach laughs, “because we just find things as we go, and freely experiment on the day.” Steadicam and handheld cameras roaming around the space with the actors helped the pair achieve their goals. Orbach says he tried to “put the camera in the best place for where the light is, as opposed to putting the light where the camera is. It’s the reverse way of how television crews often have to work,” he states. First AC (and ICG National Executive Board Member) Waris Supanpong elaborates that “the majority of the time the

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camera was at eye level and Yaron wanted the fluidity of handheld or Steadicam to follow the action as it happens. We hardly ever used marks and gave the actors the freedom to do whatever they felt. Since Yaron uses mainly practical lighting, it means that turning around took hardly any time, and the actors would still emotionally be in the scene. I think directors appreciate that, and we could get scenes done very quickly.” The Guild team, which included A-Camera Operator Philip J. Martinez, SOC; A-Camera 1st AC Waris Supanpong; A-Camera 2nd AC Randy Schwartz; B-Camera Operator Lucas Owen; B-Camera 1st AC Rebecca Heller; B-Camera 2nd AC Nathalie Rodriguez and Loaders Brian Lynch and Mateo Gonzalez, used a lean package for Modern Love, shooting on two RED EPIC DRAGONS with Orbach’s preferred Cooke S4 primes. Eighty percent of the show was shot with a single camera. “I tend to have a fairly minimalistic approach, anyway, in most of my work,” Orbach details. “I use practicals, available light, and very small units, so even when the budget is bigger, that doesn’t affect the amount of equipment I use. I like a free set where the actors can move around, but with John, it’s taken to a more extreme level.” Supanpong notes that while “this type of style has its challenges, it can also provide a lot of freedom for me as the A-Camera focus puller. Yaron allows you to do what feels right, and if it does not work for the director, then he will tell you for the next


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take. This gives Philip Martinez [SOC] and me the ability to make decisions on the fly. We both liken it to playing music; where we both have to pay attention to one another as well as to what the actors are doing.” Minimalism is Orbach’s calling card, as he says it supports a more efficient workflow. “I have been known to do scenes with no lights at all,” he relates. “I like that.”

PHOTO BY GIOVANNI RUFINO

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS

Because of the loose, handheld nature, Orbach’s regular A-Camera/Steadicam operator Martinez played a major role in the look of Modern Love. And while Martinez and Orbach have worked together on three previous series, “Modern Love was the first time I had worked with a director with whom Yaron had a long history,” Martinez explains. “Yaron and I spoke before shooting started, and he explained how he and John work. They don’t want anything to interfere with the actor’s movement throughout the scene. Since I had a history working with Yaron, I understand the composition he looks for in a frame. The Steadicam is the perfect tool for the style they wanted. It has the same freedom as shooting handheld, but provides a better ability to position the camera in the space.” Examples of that workflow include an episode about a woman’s unlikely friendship with her doorman, for which Orbach and Carney wanted to create a light, 1950s romantic-comedy look to reflect the protagonist’s struggles finding true love.

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LOCAL 600 CREW SEASON 1 Director of Photography Yaron Orbach

“It was about a two-and-a-half-page sequence, where our main character is running around her apartment getting it ready as her love interest comes by, and she’s interrupted by the doorman calling on the intercom,” Orbach describes. “After looking at a rough walk-through, we felt a oner would capture her anxiety. But we never planned it that way, so with the help of Phil [Martinez], we had to figure it out on the spot, finding something lovely and full of energy that would also mimic the movie language we wanted to reference.” In another episode, Anne Hathaway’s character, dealing with bipolar disorder, is seen in a unique montage at different stages of her illness – from childhood to adulthood. The sequence involved as many as eight sets, with various options being discussed as to how to hide the transitions between the sets, and the actors portraying Hathaway at different ages. “We also wanted it to have a continuous feel but not be too polished, as it was being re-lived as a memory,” Orbach relates. “We visited the sets that were all placed side by side a few hours before shooting and John and I quickly realized this, too, would be amazing as a oner. John came up with a few script tweaks, and after talking with Anne about how we proposed to capture it, which was a handheld camera moving from set to set at a frenetic pace, we were ready to go. If it weren’t for John’s improvised methodology, we would have not gone with such a complex solution for this important sequence.” A two-page monologue in another episode featured a character summarizing (to a newborn baby) the tribulations it took to bring the child into the world. The scene also involved a hidden cut four years forward to the same character reading a bedtime story to a now-attentive four-yearold child. “We started with a Steadicam slowly going around our character,” Orbach recounts, “and by the end of the first take, we knew we’d scratch any coverage we’d talked about and shoot it, essentially, as a continuous take with the single hidden cut between the two parts. To not be attached to any one plan gave this whole series a sense of discovery, which is exactly the environment that John thrives in.” That was also evident in the Anne

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A-Camera Operator Philip J. Martinez, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Waris Supanpong A-Camera 2nd AC Randy Schwartz B-Camera Operator Lucas Owen B-Camera 1st AC Rebecca Heller B-Camera 2nd AC Nathalie Rodriguez Loaders Brian Lynch Mateo Gonzalez Still Photographers Giovanni Rufino Christopher Saunders

Hathaway episode, for which Orbach shot on film for one day. “It was a flashback of sorts, this kind of Mary Tyler Moore intro that’s in her head, and it was fantastic to use the [Kodak] Vision 500 pushed one stop and just kind of run around with handheld cameras,” he remembers. Orbach likes that film is coming back into television. “I feel there’s a bit less resistance now if the director demands it. I think costs have come down, and at the end of the day what it adds is not bank-breaking if you are starting with a good budget.” For Orbach, shooting that fantasy sequence on film had a real impact on the look of the sequence. “The 500 Vision 35mm grain structure sees colors and textures completely differently than digital, even if you do nothing to the negative,” he explains. “In my mind, it’s still different even if that’s considered clean 35. For that sequence, I pushed the 500 Vision one stop. That way I could still work with available lighting, but, basically, just shoot as if it were digital.

By just raising the sensitivity, I could use what I had. It looks so different when it’s transferred, it’s incomparable to digital, in my opinion.” Orbach moved to New York City as a student 20 years ago and estimates that more than 70 percent of his work is still based there. It’s a place that, he says, has provided so much throughout the years, on different levels. And given the source material as the backdrop and inspiration for the series, the city plays a pivotal role in Modern Love’s look. Orbach says what New York represents and how it is immersed in a person’s life changes as that individual changes, and he tried to capture that on screen. “I’m now a father of two, with a third on the way,” he shares. “So, for me, it’s a much different place than when I was young and single, or in a relationship and at a different place in my career,” he concludes. “I’m proud and very fortunate to have the ability to do projects like Modern Love, within which New York City is a real character within the storytelling.”


PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS

PHOTO BY GIOVANNI RUFINO

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PICTURED: 2018 ECA HONOREE T. ACTON FITZGERALD


Depth CHARGE THE RANGE AND DIVERSITY OF EXPERIENCES IN THE ECA CLASS OF 2019 ARE PROFOUNDLY DEEP, REFLECTING A UNION THAT IS EVER EVOLVING WITH THE TIMES. BY MARGOT CARMICHAEL LESTER

The films and filmmakers in this year’s group of Emerging Cinematographer Awards honorees illustrate the depth of talent in this Guild. Among this year’s winning shorts, five star young actors, three are horror/thrillers, three are documentaries, two involve boxing and one is stop-motion animation. The aspiring cinematographers represent five countries, include two

culinary whizzes – one who makes a mean rigatoni carbonara (Daniel Bombell) and another who makes a mean limoncello (Claudio Rietti) – one woman (Shannon Madden) and one two-time winner (Alejandro Wilkins). The range also illustrates how the upside of union membership goes beyond health benefits and a safe work environment. Operator Geoff George echoes the

sentiments of many of this year’s honorees: “I have been so lucky to work alongside of and learn from so many great AC’s, DIT’s, operators, and DP’s. Even as technology changes our jobs in so many ways, the roles and routines of the camera department stay constant, a testament to our union’s traditions and training.” Let’s meet this year’s group of outstanding filmmakers.

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1ST ASSISTANT CAMERA HOME BASE: LOS ANGELES, CA WINNING FILM: PRESENT DAY, ATHENS GEAR USED: ALEXA XT, ALEXA MINI (ARRIRAW), COOKE ANAMORPHIC SF, COOKE ANAMORPHIC 35–140MM ZOOM, ANGÉNIEUX 44–440MM ZOOM YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 12 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH SO MANY PEOPLE WHO HAVE INFLUENCED ME AND SHAPED ME AS A FILMMAKER. EDDY CHEN

Daniel Bombell Present Day, Athens is a Neo-Western that takes an irreverent look at a day in the life of a sheriff in dusty, forgotten Athens, TX. Despite the stifling heat, the sheriff approaches his mundane work in a creative and unexpected way: through dance. The film was shot in a single, 10hour day. “We had a small crew and everyone worked hard and fast to capture everything we needed in the little time we had. Oh, and it was 106 degrees!” recalls Daniel Bombell. “In a single morning, we captured

the complex dance sequence – where the sheriff dances through the tedious task of ticketing cars,” Bombell continues. “We utilized a 45-foot Technocrane and Steadicam, which brought energy and life to the film through camera movement.” In the afternoon, they moved to their second location – a gas station– to shoot interiors and exteriors. “I only had about an hour to light and shoot all the interiors, which was quite challenging,” he notes. And the most memorable part of

the project? Working with actor Brad Light, who is not a trained dancer. “It was fun to capture Brad being Brad,” Bombell adds. “He’s incredibly talented…innately comedic!” The ECA win is the culmination of a lifetime of work for the Sydney, Australiaborn filmmaker. “Being foreign and coming to the U.S. and working in the film industry took a lot of time,” he reflects. “But it was worth it. Being recognized for my work means the world to me. I’m excited for people to have a chance to see our film.”

“I knew that I wanted to be a DP in my early 20s. I spent many years as an assistant and learned a lot from the top DP’s working today. They enriched me as a filmmaker and inspired me to tell stories that move an audience with imagery.” THE TV IS S U E

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“As a film studies major, I took photography classes and learned to expose and make prints using Ansel Adams’ zone system. Then, after shooting some projects on 16 millimeter, I was hooked. To interpret visions and tell stories with the moving image – becoming a DP only felt natural.”

Empty Skies tells the story of a Chinese boy and his friend as they hunt for their village’s last sparrow to earn a reward and to save the boy’s sick grandmother. “Set during Communist China’s Great Leap Forward, Empty Skies was an incredibly difficult film to make, since it exposes an event which led to the death and starvation of 30 million people,” explains Tinx Chan. A New York City native, Chan draws inspiration from the work of the old pictorialists and modern street photographers, but for Empty Skies he was deeply influenced by communist propaganda imagery of the time, ASC member Caleb Deschanel’s work on The Black Stallion, and ASC member Chris Menges’ work on Kes. The filmmakers originally hoped to shoot in China but were unable

to for reasons Chan cannot share. Instead, they filmed in California, often at locations that required vigorous hiking for cast and crew. The leads were children whose native language is not Chinese, posing many challenges and restrictions. The entire film was set for day exteriors. “This forced us to shoot entirely with available light, and we had to meticulously block the scenes according to the path of the sun,” Chan describes. Earning recognition for the film made all the effort worth it. “Winning an ECA is a great honor and a personal milestone,” Chan adds. “I’d like to thank my wife, Wendy, for her ongoing support and all the other lonely spouses in our Guild for allowing us to pursue our calling: to move hearts with the moving image.”

Tinx Chan CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: BROOKLYN, NY WINNING FILM: EMPTY SKIES GEAR USED: RED SCARLET MX, 4K, 2.39:1; CANON K35; BLACK PRO MIST YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 5 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: THE GUIDANCE, KNOWLEDGE, AND ADVICE YOU OBTAIN FROM OTHER SEASONED MEMBERS. THE LIGHTING AND CAMERA OPERATOR WORKSHOPS ARE ALSO FANTASTIC RESOURCES. MARK SCHÄFER

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2ND ASSISTANT CAMERA HOME BASE: LOS ANGELES, CA WINNING FILM: FISH HEAD GEAR USED: ARRI ALEXA MINI, KOWA ANAMORPHIC LENSES, 2.39:1 YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 18 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: THE ACCESS AND OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH AND TO LEARN FROM MASTER CINEMATOGRAPHERS; THAT WAS MY REAL EDUCATION. TIFFANY ROOHANI

Based on personal experience, Fish Head is a coming-of-age story about Milo, a Filipino-American boy struggling with identity and adversity and being bullied at school. “The desire to tell stories that speak to the FilipinoAmerican experience is important to me,” explains Marcos Durian. “I took the ‘write what you know’ saying literally and wrote, photographed, and directed the film in hopes of sharing just one facet of the Filipino-American narrative.” With a minor in the lead role and in almost every shot, as well as a very limited budget, "we had to be exact about how we spent our time,” the Toronto native adds. “Especially since we only had our lead for eight hours per day, or five hours after school with mandatory breaks.” The most challenging sequence was shot in a park where Milo escapes the hardships of his youth. “What made it difficult was plotting our exterior day shots to take place at sunset, just before the sun dipped below the horizon,” Durian continues. “We had two hours to shoot this sequence, which included a complicated dolly-rig move and a high-angle shot built out of speed rail.” Being recognized for a personal story means a lot. “I’ve always considered myself a visual artist, but I came to Los Angeles with zero business connections,” he notes. “To get to this point in my career took years of dedication, sacrifice, perseverance, and hard work. Winning an ECA truly acknowledges the journey and everything it has taken to get here.”

Marcos Durian “I remember seeing a Making of The Empire Strikes Back TV special as a kid. I didn’t know you could work in movies until I saw that special, and that’s when I knew I wanted to work in film.” THE TV IS S U E

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CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: SANTA CLARITA, CA WINNING FILM: EDDY GEAR USED: CANON C-300 MARK II, CANON CINEPRIMES (18-135MM), SHOT ON 2K 4-4-4 YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 20 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: YOU’RE SURROUNDED BY SO MUCH KNOWLEDGE - THE VETERANS IN THE UNION HAVE SO MUCH TO OFFER. I LEARN AND GROW FROM ALL THOSE MENTORS. ELISABETH CAREN

Chad Erickson Eddy is a thriller that tells the story of an 11-year-old boy tortured by his parents’ constant fighting. He ultimately realizes that he is the only one who can save his family. The majority of the film was shot inside a practical location, which limited the working space and created lighting challenges. “We scheduled scenes based around the sun and the way that it dropped around the house,” explains Chad Erickson. “Scouting was crucial to achieving the desired look and feel. I took many weekends before shoot-day to study the light.” The most difficult was a oner chronicling an intense dining room scene, requiring “an almost 360-degree move along with focus drop-offs in the foreground and the background to show action,”

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recalls Erickson, who was born in Cambridge, IL. It took 10 or 11 takes, evolving via brainstorming between Erickson, Steadicam Operator James Troost, and Director Richie Owens. “I like very real, raw, organic imagery that evokes the sense that you’re telling a real story,” Erickson adds. “By mixing staccato vibrating handheld work with scenes that include fluid movement, you can create peaks and valleys that bring the audience along for the journey. “Winning an ECA is lighting a creative fire for me and marks a new beginning,” he asserts. “I’m open to wherever this fun ride takes me.” Eddy premiered earlier in the year at the L.A. Film Festival – Independent Filmmakers Showcase

“ Growing up in a small Midwest town, I didn’t even know what a DP was. Then my family bought a VHS camcorder. When I looked through its blackand-white viewfinder, everything just clicked.”


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Geoff George CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: DETROIT, MI WINNING FILM: MY BLOOD GEAR USED: RED EPIC DRAGON WITH RED PRO PRIMES YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 8 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS AND LEARNING SKILLS FROM OTHER PROFESSIONALS, WHILE WORKING MY WAY UP IN THE CAMERA DEPARTMENT ON UNION PRODUCTIONS. ELISABETH CAREN

My Blood is a thriller about an exorcist preacher and his son ridding a young girl of a demon, written and directed by brothers Ben and Julien Deka. “ The D ekas are incredible visionaries who constructed a whole universe for the film,” explains Geoff George. “I am particularly proud of our work with the exorcism sequence, when the flickering lights match the rise and the fall of the lead character’s performance,” he notes. “This scene

represents what is really exciting about our job. It’s about more than using the right lenses, lighting, and camera. It’s about working together with every department to make practical and creative choices about what shapes the image and ends up in front of the camera." The electric team wired every practical and film light on set to a dozen flicker boxes and dimmers to make lighting adjustments easier. And the DIT worked on set to assemble the

scene in Adobe Premiere as they were shooting, which allowed the crew to see the exact color and exposure choices, pacing for shots and whether or not things were working in the edit. “Being recognized with an ECA is truly the best stamp of approval a young DP can ask for,” offers Detroit-born George, who won Best Cinematography for Break My Bones at the Rhode Island Film Festival. “It’s great to receive encouragement from your colleagues that you’re doing the right thing.”

“My dad was a photographer. He taught me photography at a young age and inspired me to follow a career in image making. When I was 13 years old, I saw The Shining, which led me to learn about Garrett Brown and the Steadicam, and then to explore the role of the DP.”

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Shannon Madden CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: BROOKLYN, NY WINNING FILM: SCRATCH GEAR USED: A7RIII, CANON 24MM CN-E YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 1.5 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: IT OPENS UP OPPORTUNITIES FOR HIGHER-QUALITY JOBS. ZACH DILGARD

Scratch is a horror film about “The Butcher,” who kills people because he’s possessed by the devil. The entire film is shot POV. We never see The Butcher, but we see the world and experience the action as he does. The POV is particularly effective in a sequence in which The Butcher watches his next victim from a diner bathroom, sees her leave, places his money on the table, and follows her out of the diner. “The entire scene was supposed to look like a single take, but it actually had eight cuts,” Shannon Madden explains. “Creating the look of a oner is tough, especially when you’re not static. Yet, through collaboration with our visual effects team, it seamlessly came together.”

Madden chose a dark, moody style, achieved, in part, by lots of lighting color contrast. The technique is best illustrated in a scene where The Butcher is seated in a booth with another patron across from him. “I used the sconces on the diner wall as the light motivation and squeezed in a LiteMat 2L on the side so that there’d be a bigger ratio difference between the light and dark of the patron’s face,” she recounts. Her first ECA win has Madden hopeful about what’s ahead. “Winning an ECA makes me really excited about the future,” shares the Buffalo, NY native. “Being acknowledged for the work I’ve done makes my path to becoming a cinematographer feel closer.”

“When I was around 12, I began watching films as an escape from reality. Today, I find that same sort of escape by making films. My work has taken me to so many different states and countries. Plus, who else can say they saw a monster rip off someone’s head at work?”

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1ST ASSISTANT CAMERA HOME BASE: LOS ANGELES, CA WINNING FILM: THE COIN GEAR USED: CANON 5D AND 7D, LEICA R LENSES, AND RAW STILLS YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 3 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: FINDING YOUR TRIBE. HAVING FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES WHO SUPPORT YOU WHILE CHALLENGING YOU TO GROW, WORK AND LEARN. TIFFANY ROOHANI

Bongani Mlambo The Coin, a stop-motion drama, follows a Chinese girl who moves to America, hungers for home, and searches for someone who can replicate her mother’s dumpling recipe, which contains a surprise ingredient: a lucky coin. “ S to p - m o t i o n a n i m at i o n is challenging because of the miniature scale of the work, the attention to detail required from shot to shot, and the long hours involved,” explains Bongani Mlambo. “We shot for approximately 32 days straight at an average of 10 seconds of animation a day for a final runtime of 6 minutes and 40 seconds.” The most difficult part of the project? Filming several scenes inside the main character’s body. The goal was to make the sequence feel immersive, surreal and magical. “We introduced more movement and

lighting effects that emphasized emotion and experience,” the Zimbabwean filmmaker explains. “These sequences involved considerable programming in getting an arc-motion-control system, LiteMats, tungsten units and Dragonframe software to play nicely together while an animator executed the movement, frame by frame.” This process exponentially increased the difficulty of the shoot, the margin of error, and the post-production VFX work – especially since Mlambo and his crew usually only had enough time to do one take per shot. The team ultimately prevailed and brought home an ECA – an accomplishment that Mlambo says will increase the film’s reach and celebrate his team’s “collaborative, exuberant, and reflective filmmaking spirit.”

“My desire to become a DP arose in my late teens. I took family photos with a point-and-shoot camera, which led to experimentation with Photoshop, After Effects and Premiere. While I originally thought I would become a VFX artist, I was wooed to the world of production after watching Troy, Van Helsing, and Underworld.” 86

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Jared Moossy CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: AUSTIN, TX WINNING FILM: A LUCKY MAN GEAR USED: CANON C300, SONY FS5, CANON AND ROKINON LENSES YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 1 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: NETWORKING AND MEETING OTHER CREATIVE MINDS, GAINING EXPERIENCE WITH STATE-OF-THEART EQUIPMENT, AND WORKING AS A PART OF A TEAM. FELICIA GRAHAM

A Lucky Man is a documentary that tells the story of Jared Moossy, a former war photographer, after he was hit by a drunk driver while riding his motorcycle in Austin, TX. “My life was forever changed,” Moossy explains. “Everything I learned as an infant I had to relearn at the age of 35: the alphabet, how to walk, talk, eat, make complete sentences… everything.” Making the film helped his mind function again artistically. “Seeing the thousands of photos that I shot prior to the accident played a huge part in helping me to remember my work, my passion, and who I was prior to the accident. How to read light was a muscle memory that came naturally. But learning how to use the camera again took time and practice.” Moossy was challenged to find a way to share his perspective with the world. “Only a micro-percentage of the world’s population has experienced a memory loss similar to mine,” says Moossy, who was born in Dallas. “I wanted to tell my story in such a way that the general population could understand my struggle as well as recognize the fragility of human life.” Prior to earning an ECA, A Lucky Man received a Webby Award in 2018. “Being awarded an ECA and being recognized for my visual voice – the way I paint with light – is so humbling,” he notes. “I’m grateful to wake up every morning, do what I love, and hopefully inspire others to do the same.”

“I was chosen to film Witness for HBO because of my stillphotography style, and it was the first time that I shot motion. I found motion to be more interesting than still photography. I really liked working with the team to build a final project, rather than doing everything solo.” 88

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CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: NEW YORK, NY WINNING FILM: KID BOXER GEAR USED: ALEXA MINI, COOKE ANAMORPHICS, RED EPIC DRAGON, OPTICA ELITE ANAMORPHICS YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 3 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: MEETING AND WORKING WITH MY PEERS, WHO HAPPEN TO BE THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS. ZACH DILGARD

Documentary Kid Boxer tells the story of a father who uses boxing to teach life lessons to his son. It was shot in two days, ahead of an important match. “Because of time constraints, location scouting was imperative,” explains Brazilian-born Claudio Rietti “After we found our locations, I went back multiple times to take sample stills and schedule each shot with the ideal time to shoot. “The location wasn’t impressive, so we hid it in darkness,” he continues. “I lit with simplicity in mind, keeping everything on the grid on dimmers, so we could light in real time and follow the fighters around the ring.” Rietti says he cherishes a good preproduction schedule, “one that allows me to come in with a plan,” he asserts. “Of course, sometimes it’s impossible to execute your plan on shoot day. Yet, by knowing the visual aesthetic and the shots you need to tell the story, you’re able to be flexible.” That ability was tested by the realities of working with a young lead and shooting very late hours. “We had a call time of 4:30 a.m. and quickly discovered how difficult it is for a young actor to be up at that hour,” Rietti recalls. The crew pivoted, shooting establishing shots originally scheduled for later in the morning. “Since kids will more often than not feed off of your energy, we made sure to show excitement when he showed up.” Kid Boxer scored a knockout punch with ECA judges. Says Rietti, “I am honored to be recognized by such a distinguished organization that represents the most talented camera professionals in the world.”

Claudio Rietti

“I realized that I wanted to be a DP while working on my first film as a P.A. The grips were installing a silk outside a house for an interior shot and I saw the intricacies involved with telling a story through imagery.” THE TV IS S U E

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El Gallo tells the real-life story of Mexican professional boxer Juan “El Gallo” Estrada. While training for a featherweight title card bout, Estrada recounts his childhood and obstacles faced along the way. “Long ago, I was taught the importance of story as motivation for aesthetic choices, and I try to tailor visuals through that principle,” Alejandro Wilkins shares. “The surreal flashback of young Estrada moving through a decaying estate was a very important sequence for me to film. As he walks through the location, a crumbling environment symbolizes the struggles he’s dealing with from recent life tragedies.” To capture the flashback, Wilkins and his crew used a MōVI Pro and Ready Rig to keep gear light while on location in Sonora, Mexico. The team sought an alternate

visual and technical approach for the title fight in Los Angeles. “We could not scout the fight’s location,” the Alameda, CA native laments, “and most of the lighting was set by HBO Sports. With the event being live and having to cover multiple areas quickly, we decided to go with a spherical zoom over the anamorphic primes we had previously used in Mexico.”  The RED HELIUM 8K sensor combined w i t h A n gé n i e u x ’s EZ-1 zoom delivered the needed adjustability for the unpredictable shooting conditions. El Gallo marks Wilkins’ second ECA win; his first was for Limbo.  “ This second win helps to recognize my versatility as a cinematographer,” Wilkins allows. “It shows I can create strong visual images in whichever genre I take on.”

CAMERA OPERATOR HOME BASE: LOS ANGELES, CA WINNING FILM: EL GALLO GEAR USED: ALEXA MINI, KOWA ANAMORPHIC, RED WEAPON HELIUM, ANGÉNIEUX EZ-1, SHOT IN 2.39:1 YEARS IN LOCAL 600: 13 BEST THING ABOUT BEING IN THE GUILD: THE WORKING STANDARDS ESTABLISHED ON UNION PROJECTS, THE MOST PROFESSIONAL SETS IN THE WORLD. MARK SCHÄFER

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“ In high school, I paid attention to the credits in films I admired, like those shot by Conrad L. Hall and Emmanuel Lubezki. In college, I began contributing specifically to camera and lighting departments, and have been doing so ever since.”


THE TV IS S U E

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PRODUCTION CREDITS COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF AUGUST 1, 2019 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information etc.). Please note that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job

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Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com

First Man / Photo by Daniel McFadden

(including Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units,


20TH CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOAQUÍN SEDILLO, ASC OPERATORS: CONNOR O’BRIEN, DUANE MIELIWOCKI, SOC, PHIL MILLER, SOC ASSISTANTS: KEN LITTLE, CLAUDIO BANKS, ERIC GUERIN, DAVID STELLHORN, MAX MACAT, JIHANE MRAD STEADICAM OPERATOR: CONNOR O’BRIEN SEADICAM ASSISTANT: KEN LITTLE CAMERA UTILITY: PAULINA GOMEZ DIGITAL UTILITY: JOSHUA SMITH

“FREE GUY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE RICHMOND OPERATORS: PETER ROSENFELD, MAURICE MCGUIRE ASSISTANTS: ERIC SWANEK, GREGORY WIMER, CHRISTIAN HOLLYER, JOHN MCCARTHY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DANIEL HERNANDEZ LOADER: TYLER SWANEK DIGITAL UTILITY: MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ TORRENT PUBLICIST: WILLIAM CASEY

“NATE” PILOT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE MOORADIAN, ASC OPERATORS: RON HIRSHMAN, CANDACE EDWARDS, JAMIE HITCHCOCK, JACK CHISHOLM ASSISTANTS: KEVIN MENTEER, MARK JOHNSON, NIGEL STEWART CAMERA UTILITY: KATE STEINHEBEL DIGITAL UTILITY: ERINN BELL JIB ARM OPERATOR: JACK CHISHOLM JIB TECH: HUNT HIBLER VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEITH ANDERSON

“THIS IS US” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: YASU TANIDA OPERATORS: JAMES TAKATA, COY AUNE ASSISTANTS: SEAN O’SHEA, RICH FLOYD, BRIAN WELLS, JEFF STEWART STEADICAM OPERATOR: JAMES TAKATA STEADICAM ASSISTANT: SEAN O’SHEA LOADER: MIKE GENTILE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON BATZDORFF

“WEST SIDE STORY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JANUSZ KAMINSKI OPERATORS: MITCH, DUBIN, SOC, JOHN MOYER ASSISTANTS: MARK SPATH, TIMOTHY METIVIER, CONNIE HUANG, CORNELIA KLAPPER LOADER: DAVID ROSS LIBRA HEAD TECH: PIERSON SILVER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NIKO TAVERNISE PUBLICIST: LARRY KAPLAN

ABC STUDIOS

“AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB KITZMANN OPERATORS: RICH DAVIS, TIM WALKER, LISA STACILAUSKAS ASSISTANTS: MAX NEAL, ROBERT GILPIN, JOE TORRES, ELIZABETH ALGIERI,

KARL OWENS, JASWINDER BEDI DIGITAL LOADER: LESLIE PUCKETT DIGITAL UTILITY: STEVE ROMMEVAUX

“CRIMINAL MINDS” SEASON 15 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARCY SPIRES OPERATORS: GARY TACHELL, KEITH PETERS, BRIAN GARBELLINI, JOSH TURNER ASSISTANTS: BRYAN DELORENZO, TODD DURBORAW, TIM ROE, ROBERT FORREST, TOBY WHITE, CARTER SMITH UTILITIES: ALEX MARMALICHI, JACOB KULJIS STEADICAM OPERATOR: KEITH PETERS STEADICAM ASSISTANT: BRYAN DELORENZO

“GROWN-ISH” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK DOERING-POWELL, ASC OPERATORS: PAUL SANCHEZ, JENS PIOTROWSKI ASSISTANTS: ROBERT SCHIERER, YEN NGUYEN, MICHAEL KLEIMAN, DAN TAYLOR STEADICAM OPERATOR: JENS PIOTROWSKI STEADICAM ASSISTANT: YEN NGUYEN LOADER: ANDREW OLIVER DIGITAL UTILITY: ZAC PRANGE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“GREY’S ANATOMY” SEASON 16 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERB DAVIS, ALICIA ROBBINS OPERATORS: FRED IANNONE, STEVE ULLMAN, LESLIE MORRIS ASSISTANTS: NICK MCLEAN, FORREST THURMAN, KIRK BLOOM, LISA BONACCORSO STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE ULLMAN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FORREST THURMAN CAMERA UTILITY: MARTE POST

“HIGH FIDELITY” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CARMEN CABANA OPERATORS: DAVID KNOX, CHRISTOPHER MOONE ASSISTANTS: JEROME WILLIAMS, JASON RIHALY, CAMERON SIZEMORE, KELSEY MIDDLETON LOADERS: JAKOB FRIEDMAN, FRANK MILEA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PHIL CARUSO

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 17 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: CHRISTIAN HIBBARD OPERATORS: GREG GROUWINKEL, PARKER BARTLETT, GARRETT HURT, MARK GONZALES STEADICAM OPERATOR: KRIS WILSON JIB OPERATORS: MARC HUNTER, RANDY GOMEZ, JR., NICK GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITIES: CHARLES FERNANDEZ, SCOTT SPIEGEL, TRAVIS WILSON, DAVID FERNANDEZ, ADAM BARKER VIDEO CONTROLLER: GUY JONES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: KAREN NEAL, MICHAEL DESMOND

ABOMINABLE

“BREWS BROTHERS” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATRICK STEWART OPERATORS: PATRK THELANDER, PARKER TOLIFSON, MIGUEL MEDINA ASSISTANTS: SETH KOTOK, BRYAN G. HAIGH, ROB MONROY, VANESSA WARD, CANDICE MARAIS, ALDO PORRAS, OTIS SHERMAN LOADERS: DYLAN NEAL, TYSON BANKS DIGITAL UTILITY: LINDSEY GROSS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KEVIN ESTRADA

AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 6

LIGHTING DIRECTOR: EARL WOODY, LD OPERATORS: KEVIN MICHEL, NATE PAYTON, STEVE RUSSELL, CHRIS WILLIAMS STEADICAM OPERATOR: WILL DEMERITT CAMERA UTILITIES: HENRY VEREEN, SALVATORE BELLISSIMO, ANDRES VELASQUEZ, JR. JIB ARM OPERATOR: JIM CIRRITO VIDEO CONTROLLER: JEFF MESSENGER

A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS

“THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 16 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: TOM BECK PED OPERATORS: DAVID WEEKS, PAUL WILEMAN, TIM O’NEILL HAND HELD OPERATOR: CHIP FRASER JIB OPERATTOR: DAVID RHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: DONOVAN GILBUENA VIDEO CONTROLLER: JAMES MORAN HEAD UTILITY: CRAIG “ZZO” MARAZZO UTILITIES: ARLO GILBUENA, WALLY LANCASTER, DIEGO AVALOS

BEACHWOOD SERVICES

“DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 54 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TED POLMANSKI, MARK LEVIN OPERATORS: MARK WARSHAW, VICKIE WALKER, MICHAEL J. DENTON, STEVE CLARK CAMERA UTILITIES: STEVE BAGDADI, GARY CYPHER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ALEXIS DELLAR HANSON

BIG BEACH TV PRODUCTIONS

“SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM BRICKER OPERATORS: CHLOE WEAVER, BEN VERHULST ASSISTANTS: CHARLIE PANIAN, TIFFANY NATHANSON, MARIELA FERRER, RYAN MONELLI STEADICAM OPERATOR: BEN VERHULST DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TYLER GOECKNER-ZOELLER CAMERA UTILITY: ANDREW PAULING STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MERIE WALLACE

2ND UNIT DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERND REINBARDT, STEVE GARRETT

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY NORMAN, WILL REXER OPERATORS: ALAN MEHLBRECH, MATTHEW PEBLER ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL BURKE, MICHAEL GUTHRIE, STEPHEN MCBRIDE, VINCENT TUTHS DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: LUKE TAYLOR LOADER: CORY MAFFUCCI

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DERICK UNDERSCHULTZ OPERATORS: BARNABY SHAPIRO, MALCOLM PURNELL ASSISTANTS: ROMAN LUKIW, SOREN NASH, MICHAEL LOBB, TREVOR WOLFSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THOMAS WONG LOADERS: QUINN MURPHY, NIALANEY RODRIGUEZ

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LIGHTING DESIGNER: DARREN LANGER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT BRAUN OPERATORS: JAIMIE CANTRELL, JAMES B. PATRICK, ALLEN VOSS, ED SARTORI, HENRY ZINMAN, BOB CAMPI, RODNEY MCMAHON, ANTHONY SALERNO CAMERA UTILITY: TERRY AHERN VIDEO CONTROLLERS: MIKE DOYLE, PETER STENDAL

“LEVIATHAN”

“OZARK” SEASON 3

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BEN KUTCHINS, ARMANDO SALAS OPERATORS: BEN SEMANOFF, MIKE HARTZEL ASSISTANTS: LIAM SINNOTT, KATE ROBERSON, CRIS TROVA, JOHN HOFFLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE ELROM LOADER: TAYLOR SEAMAN

BONANZA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SHAMELESS” SEASON 10

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY HARDWICK OPERATORS: CHRISTIAN HERRERA, CHRIS HOOD ASSISTANTS: RYO KINNO, DARBY NEWMAN, DAVID BERRYMAN, SAL ALVAREZ LOADER: MAYA MORGAN DIGITAL UTILITY: BROOKE MAGRATH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL SARKIS

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“BULL” SEASON 4

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 38

“MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: GLENN SHIMADA, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, ED FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, JEFF GOLDENBERG, ALEC ELIZONDO, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING UTILITIES: DANNY LORENZE, SEAN ASKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN

“NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTOR HAMMER OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES, PETER CARONIA, JACQUELINE NIVENS STEADICAM OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS STEADICAM ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN MILLS DIGITAL UTILITY: TREVOR BEELER
 STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE PUBLICIST: KATHLEEN TANJI

“THE TALK” SEASON 10 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: MARISA DAVIS PED OPERATORS: ART TAYLOR, MARK GONZALES, ED STAEBLER HAND HELD OPERATORS: RON BARNES, KEVIN MICHEL, JEFF JOHNSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHARLES FERNANDEZ UTILITIES: MIKE BUSHNER, DOUG BAIN, DEAN FRIZZEL, BILL GREINER, JON ZUCCARO VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“WHY WOMEN KILL” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL PRICE OPERATORS: SCOTT BOETTLE, JOHN HANKAMMER ASSISTANTS: HEATHER LEA-LEROY, VANESSA MOREHOUSE, DARRELL HERRINGTON, DREW HAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDREW OSBORNE DIGITAL UTILITY: RICH CONTI

CENTRAL PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“UNTITLED AWKWAFINA” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KATHRYN WESTERGAARD OPERATORS: KYLE WULLSCHLEGER, CHRIS ARAN ASSISTANTS: TIM TROTMAN, ZACK GRACE, CAROLYN PENDER, ALEXANDER DUBOIS LOADER: SEAN MCNAMARA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ZACH DILGARD

DC COMICS

“STARGIRL” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT PECK, MIKE KARASICK OPERATORS: DEKE KEENER, RYAN WEISEN ASSISTANTS: ADAM CASTRO, JUSTIN COOLEY, BILLY MCCONNELL, CAITLIN TROST STEADICAM OPERATOR: DEKE KEENER STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ADAM CASTRO


DIGITAL UTILITIES: BECCA BENNETT, KELLY HARLE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JONATHAN KLEPFER

DELTA BLUES PRODUCTIONS “QUEEN SUGAR” SEASON 4

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTONIO CALVACHE, KIRA KELLY OPERATORS: GRAYSON AUSTIN, ROB STENGER ASSISTANTS: TROY WAGNER, RY KAWANAKA, JONATHAN ROBINSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: GRAYSON AUSTIN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRIAN STEGEMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SKIP BOLEN

ENDEMOL SHINE

“EXTREME MAKEOVER: HOME EDITION” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB WHITAKER, JOHN IKENOUYE OPERATORS: KAKO OYARZUN, JASON FORD, JEREMIAH SMITH ASSISTANTS: DAVE KAPLAN, JUSTIN WITT, JERRY HUDGENS, BLAKE WADDELL, ELIE VERBLE JIB OPERATOR: CHRIS SCHULTZ JIB TECH: BRYCE BONN

EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC.

FX NETWORK

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN NEWBY, PAUL ELLIOTT OPERATORS: TWOJAY DHILLON, CHIP BYRD ASSISTANTS: E.J. MISISCO, LANE LUPER, JASON SEIGEL, DANIEL MAESTAS STEADICAM OPERATOR: TWOJAY DHILLON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MIKE DEGRAZZIO LOADER: BISHOP PATTISON DIGITAL UTILITY: HILLARY BACA REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: TWOJAY DHILLON

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN TANZER OPERATORS: ADAM SKLENA, DAVE GASPERIK, DAVE HIRSCHMANN ASSISTANTS: GAVIN WYNN, ANGELICA GIANGREGORIO, NOAH BAGDONAS CAMERA UTILITY: JOHN GOODNER DIGITAL UTILITY: MICHAEL BAGDONAS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PATRICK MCELHENNEY

“INTERROGATION” SEASON 1

“MADAM SECRETARY” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LEARAN KAHANOV OPERATORS: JAMIE SILVERSTEIN, LISA SENE ASSISTANTS: HEATHER NORTON, DAMON LEMAY, HILARY BENAS, EMILY DEBLASI STEADICAM OPERATOR: PETER VIETRO-HANNUM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEITH PUTNAM LOADERS: KRISTINA LALLY, RAUL MARTINEZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SARAH SHATZ

FIVE PINTS HIGH, LLC

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“IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA” SEASON 14

HILLMAN GRAD PRODUCTIONS “TWENTIES” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHELLE LAWLER OPERATORS: MICHAEL WILSON, SHELLY GURZI ASSISTANTS: JACQUELINE STAHL, RAFIEL CHAIT, SCOTT JOHNSON, NICHOLAS NIKIDES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS HOYLE UTILITY: AMANDA HAMADAY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

HORIZONTAL SCRIPTED

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SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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MAIN GATE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “GOD FRIENDED ME” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JON DELGADO OPERATORS: THOMAS SCHNAIDT, DANIEL HERSEY ASSISTANTS: BLACKFORD SHELTON, III, MARCOS RODRIGUEZ QUIJANO, BEHNOOD DADFAR, ALFONSO DIAZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHANDLER TUCKER LOADERS: ANGEL VASQUEZ, MIGUEL GONZALEZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

MANHUNT PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“MANHUNT: LONE WOLF” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN LINDLEY, ASC, ERIC MOYNIER

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“THE RIGHTEOUS GEMSTONES” SEASON 1

“BILL & TED FACE THE MUSIC”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHELLY JOHNSON, ASC OPERATORS: CASEY HOTCHKISS, CHAD CHAMBERLAIN ASSISTANTS: BRAD PETERMAN, RY KAWANAKA, ZANDER WHITE, RIGNEY SACKLEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHAD CHAMBERLAIN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: RY KAWANAKA LOADER: ADAM LIPSCOMB STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PATTI PERRET

NARROW ISLE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “OUTER BANKS” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRAD SMITH OPERATORS: BO WEBB, MATTHEW LYONS ASSISTANTS: LAWRENCE GIANNESCHI, WILLIAM HAND, MATTHEW KELLY, DOMINC ATTANASIO LOADER: NICK CANNON

NBC

“BROOKLYN NINE-NINE” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICK PAGE

OPERATORS: PHIL MASTRELLA, LAUREN GADD, JOEL TALLBUT ASSISTANTS: JAY LEVY, BILL GERARDO, DUSTIN MILLER, WILLIAM SCHMIDT, CHRIS CARLSON LOADER: NICK GILBERT DIGITAL UTILITY: KURT LEVY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN P. FLEENOR

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES ZUCAL OPERATORS: VICTOR MACIAS, DARRYL MILLER, SETH THOMAS ASSISTANTS: JOHN YOUNG, JAMISON ACKER, DON CARLSON, KYLE BELOUSEK, DAVID WIGHTMAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT DROPKIN, SOC LOADER: NICK WILSON UTILITIES: MARION TUCKER, ALAN DEMBEK

“F.B.I.” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TARI SEGAL OPERATORS: AFTON GRANT, CHARLES ANDERSON ASSISTANTS: LEE VICKERY, YURI INOUE, GEORGE LOOKSHIRE, SEBASTIAN IERVOLINO LOADERS: CONNOR LYNCH, NKEM UMENYI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

“WILL & GRACE” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: GLENN SHIMADA, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, ED FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, JEFF GOLDENBERG, ALEC ELIZONDO, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING UTILITIES: DANNY LORENZE, SEAN ASKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: STUART WESOLIK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CHRIS HASTON

NETFLIX PRODUCTIOS, LLC “ARMY OF THE DEAD”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ZACK SNYDER OPERATOR: JOHN CLOTHIER ASSISTANTS: TREVOR LOOMIS, BRADEN BATSFORD,


“I use filters to create an emotional change or transition in what a character feels. When you add a filter effect in post it feels forced — like an afterthought. But in front of the camera, it absolutely feels organic, part of the scene. And with a front of the lens filter, the visual story remains all the way through production and into post. No one can take that away.”

Sandra Valde-Hansen’s Streak of Brilliance

The Schneider-Kreuznach True-Streak® effects filters include Confetti, Rainbow, 6-Point Star and colored streaks in blue, green, red, gold and many more in popular professional sizes. Cinematographer Sandra Valde-Hansen has worked on dozens of features and series including White Bird in a Blizzard and Now Apocalypse. She is also an AFI instructor and currently in pre-production on a Showtime® series.

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“HILLBILLY ELEGY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARYSE ALBERTI OPERATORS: CHRIS MCGUIRE, TOM LAPPIN ASSISTANTS: GREG IRWIN, SEAN MOE, JAMIE PAIR, VICTORIA K. WARREN STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRIS MCGUIRE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PATRICK CECILIAN LOADER: DJ PHILLIPS DIGITAL UTILITY: TOREY LENART STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LACEY TERRELL PUBLICIST: ANDY LIPSCHULTZ

NICKELODEON

“ALL THAT” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: BOB MCCALL, JOHN DECHENE, JACK CHISHOLM TECHNO-JIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS ASSISTANTS: MEGGINS MOORE, DEREK LANTZ, JOSE GOMEZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GARY TAILLON VIDEO CONTROLLERS: BARRY LONG, KEITH ANDERSON

“HENRY DANGER” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE SPODNIK OPERATORS: TIM HEINZEL, CORY GUNTER, SCOTT OSTERMANN, DANA ROBERT ROSS CAMERA UTILITIES: BILL SEDGWICK, JIM ELLIOTT, DOUG MINGES JIB UTILITY: RYAN ELLIOTT STEADICAM OPERATOR: DANA ROBERT ROSS VIDEO CONTROLLER: JIM AGNOR

OLIVE AVENUE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “CASTLE ROCK” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICHARD RUTKOWSKI, JEFF GREELEY, JOHN LINDLEY, ASC OPERATORS: DENNY KORTZE, LAELA KILBOURN ASSISTANTS: TIMOTHY SWEENEY, ROBERT BULLARD, JASON BRIGNOLA LOADERS: JOSHUA WEILBRENNER, MATTIE HAMER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DANA STARBARD

NZK PRODUCTIONS

PARAMOUNT

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS WEILER, CHAD GRIEPENTROG, ANDRE MARTINEZ LIGHTING DESIGNER: OSCAR DOMINGUEZ OPERATORS: DOUG HENNING, MARK JUNGJOHANN, IVAN DURAN, ANDREW RAKOW JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ ASSISTANTS: BRANDON NEELY, TYLER DETARSIO, JERRY HUDGENS, DAVE OSTERBERG, CHRISTOPHER LEE, ERIC SCHEINER, GUDMUNDUR FRIDLEIFSSON, APPLE SCHLOSSER JIB ARM TECH: JORGE VALENZUELA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARC SURETTE CAMERA UTILITY: RUBEN SANDOVAL VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JONATHAN FREEMAN OPERATORS: JASON ELLSON, JODY MILLER, JOHN GARRETT ASSISTANTS: CHAD RIVETTI, M. DEAN EGAN, ZACK SHULTZ, TALIA KROHMAL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK PASQUARIELLO LOADER: THOMAS BELLOTTI STEADICAM OPERATORS: JASON ELLSON, JODY MILLER DIGITAL UTILITY: AUDREY STEVENS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: SEACIA PAVAO, CLAIRE FOLGER, ROBERT CLARK PUBLICIST: DIANE SLATTERY

“THE BACHELORETTE” SEASON 15

“DEFENDING JACOB” SEASON 1

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

99


RANDOM PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARTIN AHLGREN OPERATORS: STEWART CANTRELL, GARRETT DAVIS ASSISTANTS: ADRIANA BRUNETTO-LIPMAN, KEVIN WALTER, AMBER ROSALES, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL SCHILENS LOADERS: MATT ALBANO, BABETTE JOHNSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHELE K. SHORT

REPRISAL 1 PRODUCTIONS, LLC “REPRISAL” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LARKIN SEIPLE, SHAWN PETERS OPERATORS: GRANT ADAMS, MICHAEL REPETA ASSISTANTS: PATRICK BOROWIAK, DEREK SMITH, ROY KNAUF, DARWIN BRANDIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDY BADER

SHOWTIME PICTURES

“RAY DONOVAN” SEASON 7 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RON FORTUNATO, MAURICIO RUBINSTEIN OPERATORS: ERIC SCHILLING, PATRICK QUINN ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ENDLER, JUSTIN WHITACRE, JOSHUA WATERMAN, BRIAN GRANT, JR.

SONY

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 36

“CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER COLLISTER OPERATORS: PETER NOLAN, MICHAEL O’SHEA, JR. ASSISTANTS: A. CHRISTOPHER SILANO, OLGA ABRAMSON, TROY SOLA, EDDIE GOLDBLATT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GABE KOLODNY LOADERS: WYATT MAKER, BRITTANY JELINSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: K. C. BAILEY PUBLICIST: PETER SILBERMANN

PART II

“A QUIET PLACE 2” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: POLLY MORGAN OPERATORS: MATTHEW MORIARTY, STEVE MATZINGER, STANLEY FERNANDEZ, JR. ASSISTANTS: STEVE CUEVA, HAYDN PAZANTI, RON WRASE, KATHERYN IUELE, ROBIN BURSEY LOADER: JOSH SCHNOSE LIBRA HEAD TECH: JOHN BONNIN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JON COURNOYER

PICROW STREAMING, INC.

“THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: M. DAVID MULLEN, ASC, JEFFERY JUR, ASC OPERATORS: JIM MCCONKEY, SOC, GREG PRINCIPATO ASSISTANTS: ANTHONY CAPPELLO, KELLON INNOCENT, NIKNAZ TAVAKOLIAN, JIEUN SHIM

100

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHARLES ANDERSON LOADER: KATHERINE RIVERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: NICOLE RIVELLI, LESLEY ROBSON-FOSTER, DOUGLAS PURVER

“UTOPIA” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHAWN KIM OPERATORS: BEAU CHAPUT, CHRIS REJANO ASSISTANTS: PAUL DEMARTE, DEAN M. SIMMON, ERIC ARNDT, SHANNON DEWOLFE STEADICAM OPERATOR: BEAU CHAPUT STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ERIC ARNDT LOADER: RYAN SHUCK CAMERA UTILITY: CHRIS SUMMERS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH MORRIS

POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS “KIDDING” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHER SOOS OPERATORS: BELA TRUTZ, JOHN CONNOR ASSISTANTS: SARAH BRANDES, ALICIA PHARRIS, DAN SCHROER, LARISSA SUPPLITT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAMES PETERSMEYER DIGITAL LOADER: LATERRIAN OFFICER-MCINTOSH DIGITAL UTILITY: TAYLOR KENNEDY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE WILDER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, MIKE TRIBBLE, JEFF SCHUSTER, L. DAVID IRETE JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 37 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, JEFF SCHUSTER, RAY GONZALES, STEVE SIMMONS, L. DAVID IRETE, MIKE CORWIN CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON JIB ARM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, SR. STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

STALWART FILMS, LLC

“DISPATCHES FROM ELSEWHERE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAKOB IHRE OPERATORS: THOMAS WILLS, CHONG PAK ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL LEONARD, LEON SANGINITI, JAMES MCCANN, SEAN GALCZYK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL SCHILENS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA KOURKOUNIS


STU SEGALL PRODUCTIONS, INC

UNTITLED PUPPET SHOW, INC.

WALDO FILM PRODUCTIONS LLC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER DEMING OPERATOR: KIM MARKS ASSISTANTS: DAVID EUBANK, DWIGHT CAMPBELL, JENNIFER LAI, MARK BAIN STILL PHOTOGRAPHY: WILLIAM GRAY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FREDERIC FASANO OPERATORS: MARK SPARROUGH, PATRICK MINIETTA JIB ARM OPERATOR: SHAUN HARKINS ASSISTANTS: ANDREW PECK, CHRISTIAN CARMODY DIGITAL UTILITIES: BARBARA BIANCO, CHARLES KEMPF

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LYLE VINCENT OPERATOR: TIM FABRIZIO ASSISTANTS: RICHARD LACY, STERLING WIGGINS, TOM HUTCHINSON, GRIFFIN MCCANN DIGITAL LOADER: NICK YOUNG CAMERA UTILITY: ENRIQUE FERNANDEZ-BRAVO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MURRAY CLOSE

“THE GOOD LORD BIRD” SEASON 1

UNIVERSAL

“BLUFF CITY LAW” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE SPRAGG, BSC OPERATORS: MATTHEW PEARCE, BRENT SHREWSBURY ASSISTANTS: DAVID LEB, MATT CABINUM, BETTY CHOW, JARRETT RAWLINGS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATTHEW PEARCE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DAVID LEB DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAKE LAGUARDIA

“MR. ROBOT” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOD CAMPBELL OPERATORS: JEFF MUHLSTOCK, BRIAN JACKSON ASSISTANTS: ROBERT MANCUSO, WESLEY HODGES, MICHAEL DERARIO, J.R. LARSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: JEFF MUHLSTOCK STEADICAM ASSISTANT: ROBERT MANCUSO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DOUGLAS HORTON LOADERS: AMANDA URIBE, TYLER MANCUSO REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: LANCE MAYER

“UNTITLED PUPPET SHOW”

UPD FILMS, LLC

“WALDO”

“STATEN ISLAND AKA UNTITLED JUDD APATOW/PETE DAVIDSON PROJECT”

WARNER BROS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROBERT ELSWIT, ASC OPERATOR: STEPHEN CONSENTINO ASSISTANTS: ROBERT LAU, GRAHAM BURT, SARA MAY GUENTHER, SAMANTHA PANGER LOADER: CAROLYN WILLS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARY CYBULSKI PUBLICIST: AMY LEIGH JOHNSON BEHIND-THE-SCENES: JEREMY EMERMAN

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NIKHIL PANIZ OPERATORS: CARLOS ARGUELLO, ERIC LAUDADIO ASSISTANTS: JON JUNG, BLAKE COLLINS, JON LINDSAY, MEL KOBRAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: URBAN OLSSON

VIOLET FILM, LLC “VIOLET”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK WILLIAMS ASSISTANTS: JOSEPH PROVENZANO, VICTOR CHON LOADER: KATHLEEN CORCORAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATTHEW EWING

“ALL AMERICAN” SEASON 1

“ALL RISE” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HARP, CYBEL MARTIN OPERATORS: TIM ROARKE, STEVE CLANCY, SHANELE ALVAREZ ASSISTANTS: MATT GUIZA, KRISTI ARNDS, RANDY SHANOFSKY, ADAM TSANG, COLLEEN LINDL, ANTHONY HART STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE CLANCY STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KRISTI ARNDS DIGITAL UTILITY: MORGAN JENKINS

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

101


LYNX GM3 SQ-OL.pdf 1 6/19/2019 12:14:33 PM

OPERATORS: STEVE WOLFE, MIKE MCGOWAN ASSISTANTS: JOSH KNIGHT, GUS BECHTOLD, RUSSELL MILLER, SERGEI SOROKIN, ANDRAE CRAWFORD, GREG HATTON, JOHN HOLMES, LACEY JOY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL 2ND UNIT OPERATORS: CHRIS ROBERTSON, DAVID WILLIAM MCDONALD GRAPHICS OPERATOR: DANNY NICHOLS ASSISTANT: BRANDON MARGULIES

C

M

Y

HARVEST

CM

“SHINGRIX”

MY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC TREML OPERATOR: MICHAEL ASHE ASSISTANTS: LOUIS MASSOURAS, DAISY SMITH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT STEPHENS

CY

CMY

K

HEY WONDERFUL

“BANK OF AMERICA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIEL BOMBELL OPERATOR: JOHN SKOTCHDOPOLE ASSISTANTS: PAUL SANTONI, NIRANJAN MARTIN, NOAH THOMSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRYCE MCDONALD

HUNGRY MAN “DISCOVER”

COMMERCIALS AVL SOLUTIONS, LLC “PAR-TDF”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NATHAN WILSON OPERATORS: JOE PROVENZANO, MATT BAKER, WILL DEARBORN, NICK INFIELD ASSISTANTS: ERIK STAPELFELDT, JEANNA KIM, DARRIN DELOACH, TOMMY KLINES, DAISY SMITH, MICHAEL LUNTZEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RANDY KAPLAN

CAVIAR

“DR PEPPER” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRANDON TROST OPERATOR: DAVID SAMMONS ASSISTANTS: TOMMY TIECHE, CHRIS MACK, ERIC AMUNDSEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHASE ABRAMS TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK REMOTE HEAT TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

CENTRAL PARK NORTH “LALA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RAMSEY NICKELL OPERATOR: JOSEPH LAVALLEE ASSISTANTS: PATRICK KELLY, JOE CHRISTOFORI, MARY ANNE JANKE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVE KUDROWITZ

COMMUNITY FILMS “PIZZA HUT”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: IGOR MARTINOVIC OPERATOR: DJ HARDER ASSISTANTS: LAURA GOLDBERG, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LEE DE ARAKAL

DICHOTOMY FILMS/CMS PRODUCTIONS “AT&T”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COLIN ARNDT OPERATOR: RAFAEL LEYVA ASSISTANTS: CHRIS GEUKENS, GENNA PALERMO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIMOTHY GAER

FIREFLY CREATIVE ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, INC “FX NETWORKS PROMOS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL TOLTON

102

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JO WILLEMS OPERATOR: PAUL MAILMAN ASSISTANTS: RYAN BROWN, BOB WEBECK, ANGIE BERNARDONI, ALISA TYRRILL STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOE HERNANDEZ STEADICAM ASSISTANT: BOB WEBECK UNDERWATER OPERATOR: LOREN ELKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THATCHER KELLEY

“DTV NFL” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: EDU GRAU, ASC OPERATOR: R. MICHAEL MERRIMAN ASSISTANTS: PAUL METCALF, NIRANJAN MARTIN, JOHN TAKENAKA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JESSE TYLER

“HULU” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, DANIEL HANYCH, NOAH GLAZER STEADICAM OPERATOR: DANA MORRIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERICA MCKEE

“PACE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERICA MCKEE


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INDEPENDENT MEDIA, INC.

PARK PICTURES

RADICAL MEDIA

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NEWTON THOMAS SIGEL ASSISTANTS: WALTER RODRIGUEZ, MATT DEGREFF DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROB STRAIT

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LANCE ACORD, ASC OPERATOR: JOSEPH MESSIER ASSISTANTS: BRAD ROCHLITZER, LUIS SUAREZ, TRAVIS DAKING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL MEYERS ASSISTANTS: LUCAS DEANS, PAUL METCALF, EDGAR GONZALEZ-LEON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAN SKINNER

“TRULY”

MJZ

“XFINITY” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIHAI MALAIMARE, JR. ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, ARTHUR ZAJAC DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ELI BERG

O POSITIVE

“KELLOG’S” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN ZILLES ASSISTANTS: LOUIS MASSOURAS, DAISY SMITH DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JUSTIN WELLS

“WALMART” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF KIM ASSISTANTS: ERRIN ZINGALE, JASON ADLER, BRAD ROCHLITZER STEADICAM OPERATOR: SERGIO DE LUCA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE HARNELL

“VISA”

P.I.G.

“KUBOTA” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SION MICHEL, ACS ASSISTANTS: PAUL SANTONI, NOAH THOMSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: FABRICIO DISANTO

PICROW

“LITTLE CAESARS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF POWERS ASSISTANTS: SAL VEGA, DUSTIN LEBOEUF DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM GAER

PRETTYBIRD “SLING TV”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GILES DUNNING OPERATOR: JOHN VELETA ASSISTANTS: NITO SERNA, WAYNE GORING, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT BECKLEY

“FORD”

RESET

“LEXUS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MAX GOLDMAN ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERICA MCKEE

RUFFIAN

“EXPERIAN” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TRISTAN NYBY ASSISTANTS: JARED WENNBERG, BIANCA GARCIA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: FRANCESCO SAUTA

SPEARS & ARROWS “REDWOOD TREES”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: OLIVER MILLAR ASSISTANTS: JON BOWERBANK, THERESA WONG DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM ERICKSON

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

103


MUSIC VIDEOS ISLAND FILM GROUP “KATY PERRY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ARNAU VALLS ASSISTANTS: NICOLAS MARTIN, ANTHONY VALLEJO-SANDERSON

SUPPLY & DEMAND “JEEP

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID C. WELDON, ROB MACEY (BEHIND THE SCENES) ASSISTANT: TYSON BANKS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIM HUDSON ASSISTANTS: ERIK STAPELFELDT, DAISY SMITH STEADICAM OPERATOR: MARK GOELLNICHT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERIC YU

SWEET RICKEY

WOODSHOP STUDIOS, INC.

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSEPH P. LAVALLEE ASSISTANTS: PATRICK KELLY, MARY ANNE JANKE

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSEPH P. LAVALLEE ASSISTANT: PATRICK KELLY

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOM LAZAREVICH OPERATORS: HEATHER BROWN, JUSTIN BROWNE ASSISTANTS: RYAN VOISINE, DANIEL HANYCH, ERIN ENDOW, GAYLE HILARY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PATRICK MCGRAW PHANTOM TECHS: STEVE HARNELL, MATT DRAKE

THE REVERSE

WORLD WAR 7

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JUSTIN GURNARI ASSISTANTS: BRETT WALTERS, NATE MCGARIGAL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARIUSZ CICHON

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GILES DUNNING ASSISTANTS: NITO SERNA, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SCOTT BECKLEY

TOOL OF NORTH AMERICA

WORKING STIFF

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JUSTIN GURNARI ASSISTANTS: ERICK AGUILAR, SEATON TROTTER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RAFFAELE VESCO

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW LILIEN ASSISTANTS: MATT BLEA, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATT SCHOUTEN

“BEAR AND BULL”

“FIDELITY, VAL HUGH”

“NY LOTTERY”

“COX COMMUNICATIONS”

104

“UNITED HEALTHCARE”

SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

“SONIC”

“DUNKIN”

“ENTERPRISE”


Advertisers Index COMPANY

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AMERICAN FILM MARKET 27 ARRI 19 ASTERA 29 BACKSTAGE EQUIPMENT 92 BLACKMAGIC 15 CHAPMAN LEONARD 11 CINE GEAR EXPO ATLANTA 40 CINEMOVES 9 CL ENTERPRISES 13 COOKE OPTICS 41 ECA AWARDS HONEYCRATES 96 JL FISHER 97 JVC 23 KINO FLO 93 LEE FILTERS 99 LEITZ 25 LIGHTTOOLS 30 LINX 98 MOLE RICHARDSON 94 NAB SHOW NY 4 NETFLIX 5,7, 17 RED 21 SCHNEIDER OPTICS 95 TERADEK 2&3, 104 TIFFEN 31 TRP WORLDWIDE 101 UNIVERSAL/CINEO LIGHTING 35 WARNER BROS PHOTO LAB 100

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SEPTEMBER 2019 PRODUCTION CREDITS

105


STOP MOTION //

UNIT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER

JoJo Whilden, SMPSP

“This was the first ball scene we shot for Pose, and [cocreator/writer] Ryan Murphy directed the episode. The House of Abundance characters were competing to win the Royalty category, and the costumes, make-up, and hair were amazing, creating a palpable excitement in the air. We had three cameras shooting at all times, and I always had to find a spot where I could duck out of the frame but still capture the characters’ movement (and magnificence). The ball scenes on Pose demanded all of my skill sets, including handling movement in low light, staying out of multiple camera frames, and figuring out what was going on with dozens of actors, background and crew.” 106

S EPTEMBER 201 9


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Profile for ICG Magazine

ICG Magazine - September 2019 - The TV Issue  

Filmmaking magazine featuring TV shows POSE, Modern Love, and Grand Hotel. ICG Magazine has been the world’s premier cinematography publicat...

ICG Magazine - September 2019 - The TV Issue  

Filmmaking magazine featuring TV shows POSE, Modern Love, and Grand Hotel. ICG Magazine has been the world’s premier cinematography publicat...