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ICG MAGAZINE

ONE

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IN

MIAMI

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PROMISING

YOUNG

WOMAN

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YEARLY

DEPARTED

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REGINA

KING

Q&A


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contents FILM FEST ISSUE January 2021 / Vol. 92 No. 01

DEPARTMENTS gear guide ................ 20 first look ................ 28 depth of field ................ 30 deep focus ................ 32 exposure ................ 34 production credits ................ 86 stop motion .............. 92

38

FEATURE 01 FIGHT OF THEIR LIVES Tami Reiker, ASC, helps Director/ Producer Regina King take One Night in Miami from stage to screen.

FEATURE 02 PAINFULLY FUNNY The Sundance hit Promising Young Woman cracks a new narrative code, thanks to its fiercely independent writer/director, Emerald Fennell, and her newly minted Guild Director of Photography, Benjamin Kračun.

FEATURE O3 DONE & DUSTED – PLEASE! The world’s funniest female comics give 2020 the send-off it deserves in Amazon’s one-of-a-kind streaming event.

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54 70


“Regina King’s

feature is simply

ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES OF THE YEAR”

“Enhanced by gorgeous lighting,

VIBRANT CINEMATOGRAPHY

and a retro-Technicolor setting, this delve into the past explores themes that still resonate profoundly today”

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION In All Categories Including

BEST PICTURE

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY TAMI REIKER, ASC


president's letter

The End of the Beginning For this first month of 2021, I’m sharing this page with our National Executive Director, Rebecca Rhine.

As I write this on December 22, it is the date that begins the lengthening of daylight hours, which I always look forward to as a hopeful moment when darkness begins to give way to light. It is also the first day of winter, which seems more daunting than usual as we hunker down to get through our coldest time of the year. Those two opposing events seem especially appropriate right now. After feeling good about our work beginning to return, we are now threatened by another wave of the virus, taking us statistically back (and potentially beyond) the damage that was done last March. Thankfully, this time the uncertainty is mitigated by the advent of vaccines that offer hope, and a rough timetable for the coming year, which can’t come soon enough. It will be a long time before we can go back to work or life without testing, PPE, social distancing and all that the pandemic has burdened us with, but there is real progress, and a brighter future awaits us in 2021. After winning an important battle in Egypt in 1942, Winston Churchill said: “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.” I think that quote describes our moment as we head into the brighter future that this new year offers. John Lindley, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600

Last December we were gathering at various union holiday events, and last January the National Executive Board solidified its priorities for 2020 and beyond. It turns out that many of those priorities – benefits, safety, inclusion, training, organizing and politics – were more than words on paper. They were the principles that have held us together over the course of this most difficult year. We now know our Local can survive one of the most unexpected challenges of our lifetimes, but we also know that many of our members are still suffering. Embedded in all of this Local’s priorities are the principle of unity and our shared obligation to look out for each other. They form the foundations of our industry’s safety protocols, the Hardship Fund, the MPI benefit extensions, and our political focus on working families.

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And though stretched incredibly thin, IATSE members made and donated PPE, joined outreach efforts to reach isolated members and their families, continued to mentor new members, and contributed to numerous volunteer efforts, as well as donating to food banks and toy drives. Anne Frank said, “No one has ever become poor by giving.” A member recently shared that he left a postpandemic job early so that another member would have the opportunity to earn much needed benefit hours. When we come together we are always richer and stronger for it. Rebecca Rhine National Executive Director International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau

STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers

ACCOUNTING

Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra

COPY EDITORS

Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley

CONTRIBUTORS

Patti Perret Sara Terry Merie Wallace, SMPSP Valentina Valentini

January 2021 vol. 92 no. 01

Local

600

International Cinematographers Guild

IATSE Local 600 NATIONAL PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC VICE PRESIDENT Dejan Georgevich, ASC 1ST NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Christy Fiers 2ND NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Baird Steptoe NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Stephen Wong NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Jamie Silverstein NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Deborah Lipman NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine ASSOCIATE NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Chaim Kantor

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE

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ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2021, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Non-members may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

www.icgmagazine.com www.icg600.com


Photo by Sara Terry

wide angle

H

ow eager was this industry (and membership) to say goodbye to 2020? Enough that one of our features (for this annual Film Fest Issue) profiles an Amazon Prime production consisting entirely of the world’s funniest women eulogizing the horrid year that was. In typical 2020 fashion, our article on Yearly Departed (Done & Dusted – Please! Page 70) details the challenges of a COVID-safe shoot that required multiple sets, green screen “pods,” and a director (Linda Mendoza) and director of photography (Paula Huidobro – ICG Magazine September 2020) who worked remotely from the set, as did the comic stars of the show (who were never in the same room together). As Yearly Departed 1st AC Penny Sprague (teamed with B-Camera Operator Bonnie Blake) recalls about the COVID limitations: “Most of the First AC’s were positioned behind a wall of blacks so that the actors/comedians couldn’t see us. Even though I was positioned behind a black, I made a slit so that I could watch my camera move on the dance floor and see if our comedians/actors moved as well.” Finding a workaround, in the toughest of times, aptly describes our cover story on One Night in Miami (page 38), the feature directing debut of Regina King, shot by Sundance Film Festival alumna Tami Reiker, ASC. Based on a play by Kemp Powers (who also penned the screenplay), the film, set in 1964, could not be more resonant with this year that was. After Cassius Clay defeats heavyweight champion Sonny Liston at the Miami Convention Hall, he convenes with fellow Black Civil Rights warriors Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.), and Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge) in a Miami motel room, for an intense, politically-charged conversation that takes up more than half the film. Challenged as to how to cover a dialogueheavy, mainly single location story, Reiker’s solution was to keep both of her ALEXA 65s

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(shooting 6K in a 2:39 aspect ratio) on jib arms, with A-Camera Operator Chad Chamberlain, SOC, and B-Camera Operator Austin Alward operating manually. With the camera underslung on a Lambda head, the ICG team could go from the ground to nine feet in the air while floating and following the talent, “creating moves organically with what’s happening in front of you, as opposed to a rehearsed dolly move,” Reiker explains. Creating surprising content (that feels unrehearsed) was also the ticket for our final January feature, Promising Young Woman (Page 54) – a smash hit at Sundance 2020 that went on to become an indie sensation. The genre-busting horror-comedy was written and directed by Emerald Fennell and shot by newly-minted Local 600 Director of Photography Benjamin Kračun, a Croatian-German filmmaker who grew up in Scotland. Kračun, who was heavily influenced by American independent cinema, says shooting a movie with an L.A.-based Guild camera team was a dream come true; adding that “joining Local 600 has opened up another whole world for me in terms of work and connections.” Local 600 Unit Publicist James Ferrera, whose résumé includes other indie sleepers like Promising Young Woman, helped to position the project for festival consideration and awards season with a firstlook behind-the-scenes photo (that distributor Focus Features released on its social channels in April 2019). Ferrera, who calls the Fennell-Kračun partnership “inspiring to watch on set,” also says the Sundance Premieres selection served up an “unprecedented” spirit of understanding for the importance of EPK (Electronic Press Kit), BTS (Behind-the-Scenes), and FYC (For Your Consideration). “Emerald was so eager to come in as soon after completion of principal photography as she could to contribute her voice to the EPK/BTS,” he remarks, “knowing how significantly that would help my department and our team deliver to Focus the most significant production marketing assets possible. “Here’s a woman,” Ferrera continues, “seven months pregnant…who owns her femininity, and that doesn’t mean that she cannot very decisively navigate a predominantly male-dominated world of filmmaking in Hollywood. I remember watching her direct and thinking that this kind of empowerment is what all young girls should be witness to.” David Geffner Executive Editor

Email: david@icgmagazine.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Patti Perret Fight Of Their Lives “From the very first day on the set of One Night in Miami, the energy was palpable. Everyone was very excited to be working on this story of these iconic men. It is my hope that my unit stills captured some of that powerful energy of these wonderful actors and Regina King’s artistic vision.”

Valentina Valentini Exposure, Fight Of Their Lives, Painfully Funny “One of the many things I love about Sundance is that it falls in the first month of the year when possibility feels endless and ambition is high. We need that kind of lift-off for 2021, and getting to speak to first-time directors/longtime industry veterans like Emerald Fennell and Regina King puts us in the right mindset to take ahold of this coming year.”

ICG MAGAZINE

ONE

NIGHT

IN

MIAMI

+

PROMISING

YOUNG

WOMAN

+

YEARLY

DEPARTED

Cover photo by Patti Perret

+

REGINA

KING

Q&A


gear guide

film fest issue

ARRI Orbiter

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“I needed a hard light for a night dream sequence out by the beach for On Our Way. I used the 15-degree optic because it provided the strongest output. Working next to the water, outdoors, and having battery power was very useful, especially because the Orbiter is as bright as an M8 while running on battery.” ALEX SALAHI Local 600 Camera Operator

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WATCH TRAILER FIL M FES T I S S UE

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gear guide

film fest issue

Lindsay Optics Brilliant² Rota Grad

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“Everything is about speed on set, and I never want to hold up Production. The new Lindsey Optics RotaGrad is a grad filter you can reorient in a matter of seconds with one finger. It has a soft enough roll-off to pan within the frame, which is almost unheard of.” JOHNNY DERANGO Local 600 Director of Photography

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FIL M FES T I S S UE

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gear guide

film fest issue

Matthews Matthshield Floppy

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“For our interviews, it helped create barriers to transmission even when we were forced to be in relative proximity to our subjects. I just wish I had one on hand the last time I had to shoot a scene with movie blood splattering everywhere!” JAMES MATHERS Local 600 Director of Photography

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gear guide

film fest issue

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“For a recent documentary, the auto ND on the FX6 worked great on my time-lapse shots, and it kept the sky beautifully exposed for the entire run. The autofocus worked flawlessly as I off-framed my interview subjects using its built-in face detection.” DAVID J. FREDERICK Local 600 Director of Photography

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“The lenses I chose for Supernova were based on the look that Director Harry Macqueen wanted for his film, which was somewhat old fashioned, warm and romantic in feel, offering a close and intimate chemistry between the two main characters. I arranged a screening for him of Edward Norton’s Motherless Brooklyn, on which I had previously used Cooke Panchro/i Classic Primes, and Harry loved them on that film. Subsequent testing for Supernova featuring the principal actors confirmed our thoughts. Harry described them as having a rounded and natural feel which reels in the viewer.

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FIRST LOOK

Sarah May Guenther 2ND ASSISTANT CAMERA BY PAULINE ROGERS GUENTHER ON THE SET OF KING OF STATEN ISLAND / PHOTO BY MARY CYBULSKI

Being a camera assistant was an obvious career path for Sarah May Guenther. Her home (used as a set for Woody Allen’s The Purple Rose of Cairo) was decorated with endless tools, cable lines, and technical gadgetry. “[When I was] four-and-a-half, my father, [Local 644 1st AC] Russell Guenther, was diagnosed with ALS, and he was determined to relay all of his knowledge, locally and internationally, while he could,” Guenther recalls. “I didn’t understand, then, how inherently a lot of this stuff would manifest in a career for me.”

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After acting in two life insurance commercials at the age of seven, Guenther realized she was happier being with the other engineers (or just being a kid). At 14, she began as an intern at ARRI in Blauvelt, NY, updating contact lists, watching Wolfie Schmidt, the head lens tech repair with Zeiss glass, and “annoying the heck out of the ARRI service staff,” she laughs. Throughout her years at ARRI, Guenther credits Schmidt, Kurt Schlund, Phil Gosiewski, and John Sakellariou as mentors who taught her about engineering, cameras, and management. “My first

day on a set was as a camera P.A. on Life on Mars,” she recalls. “I don’t remember much from it, except successfully delivering camera reports to the second AC at the right time, and a romance scene in which all of the stacks of papers on the desk were knocked off the table and set dressing had big reset times. I think I was about 17, and it was wonderful.” As Guenther rose through the ranks of the camera department, she credits such Camera Operators like Buzz Moyer, SOC and Stephen Consentino, as well as Camera Assistants like Tim


01.2021

“Being a great team player and motivating everyone for the greater good is my objective.”

Metivier and Gavin Fernandez in preparing her for what would become an eclectic career. “If there is one job that will be talked about for the rest of time, it will be Noah,” she adds. “Matty Libatique [ASC] and Darren Aronofsky; four months of nights in endless rain, handheld, and 35mm. We manufactured our own waterproofing/water-lens prevention system and dragged it through the volcanic ends of the earth. We shot – on average – with seven cameras. As a loader, I took a gator around set just to be on top of the waterproof reloads and the full-time Technocranes. Every day was a battle with the elements, and backgrounds of around 400 people.” Directly in juxtaposition to Noah was the filmfestival hit Eighth Grade, shot by Andrew Wehde for writer/director Bo Burnham. The indie feature, which premiered at Sundance 2018, featured a cast of fourteen-year-olds and was lit mostly by cell phones. “Reliving my own time as a middle schooler, while also performing many roles for this small-budget movie was both freeing and collaborative,” Guenther shares.

on The Blacklist that involved being in the back of a sinking cargo van filled with live rats trying to escape the water to freedom, and a five-minute love scene as the van slowly gyrated as it sank. Big lesson learned – always read the script before saying yes to the job!”

Even though Guenther only turned 30 last summer, she’s aware how much the 2nd AC craft has changed. “When I began, nothing was instantaneous,” she explains. “Cameras were a series of cogs and motors and everything about the position was based on feel, physical interactions with the equipment, and the environment. Every position in the camera department was a lot more defined and finite, and truly had a foundation in basic engineering skills. “Today, being an A-second means wearing all of the hats; I feel more like a manager and team leader than an engineer,” she continues. “With the equipment being primarily computers, it’s less about the cameras themselves than the

technique of getting everything ready camerawise and having the loader cover me after I have slated is not an option.” Instead, Guenther shares, if she needs to step off set, the only chance is when the camera is being prepped for the shot or when the team is moving on to the next shot, “which leaves me to have to hope for the best that everything gets done right,” she states. “Dealing with additional manpower has also been a new level of scheduling madness, making sure everyone booked is successfully tested and in enough time to be cleared to be on set. That said, I feel lucky to be employed after not working for so long.” Women make up only about 14 percent of the Local 600 working membership, so Guenther says she knows it’s important to reach out and help others. “I know I enjoy seeing more women working alongside me,” she says. “I tell everyone who wants to do what I do to have patience in these difficult times – with your co-workers and your work environment. Learn the foundations of the gear no matter how instantaneous and

As her reputation grew, Guenther became known for an interesting category – underwater work. “I grew up scuba diving, and when no one at ARRI was interested in maintaining the underwater Hydroflex housings, I took it upon myself to call Matt Brown and Abe Alfaro and ask all the questions I could manage,” she explains. It was a rough overnight on a Liam Neeson movie that brought Guenther together with underwater specialist Dave Knox, SOC. The two clicked, and Guenther assisted him with housings from that point forward, fighting overheating digital cameras on the New York harbor, ARRI 435s under waterfalls in the mountains, and endless swimming pools. “Dave has been nice enough to pass me work as I have matriculated,” Guenther credits. “One of the most memorable outcomes of that was a scene

peripherals that work with the cameras, and facilitating the wishes of more instant options.” Guenther says the demand, on sets, of completing things immediately is palpable. “Sometimes it’s the DP not considering how much time it takes to do something if they cannot see it from their monitor,” she offers. “And sometimes it’s the ease of the camera fooling directors to shoot the rehearsal. There’s less time in the digital era to feel fully prepared.” Enter COVID-19, and ACs have even more hoops to pass through. “We all feel the effects of endless testing and oxygen deprivation,” Guenther describes. “But as a second AC, I have had to make adaptations to the way I run my department and my routine habits. For example, I am the only one allowed on set when the actors are present, so the age-old

impatient it seems like everything is. “So much of my job these days feels like managing pers onalities and perceptions,” Guenther adds. “Being a great team player and motivating everyone for the greater good is my objective. I try to always see every door as a possibility to be prepared for, and ‘pivoting’ as generally the name of the game. Never feel embarrassed to ask questions. I do it all the time, and I often feel like a fool for it – but a wellinformed fool.” As for any well-informed words of advice during these challenging times, Guenther says to: “Drink water! If you are wondering if you are thirsty, you should probably drink more water. The benefits of hydration are obvious, but staying clear-headed can make a huge difference in patience, attitude, and the ability to see clearly.” (cont'd on page 26) FIL M FIL FESMT FES ISSTUEI S S UE

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DEPTH OF FIELD

Still Rolling Initiative BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS COURTESY OF TOM FURCILLO

In the middle of the pandemic, with Giving Tuesday looming, Creative Solutions (the umbrella company for SmallHD, Teradek, and Wooden Camera) began to search for ways to help industry members who were struggling to survive. They searched for something with more personal results and developed by filmmakers themselves. In their hunt, they found a small organization called Still Rolling Initiative (www.stillrolling.co), started by Massachusetts-based commercial/ documentary producer Tom Furcillo. “Still Rolling

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found a unique way to support filmmakers, and we are excited to build an alliance with them,” describes Andrew Ng, Director of Marketing for Creative Solutions. “The filmmaking community’s dedication and resilience has been an inspiration to the Creative Solutions family. We hope that bringing awareness to the Initiative will continue to bring everyone together to uplift and support those who need assistance.” Furcillo, the sole proprietor of Single Light Media, which specializes in sports documentaries,

had also felt the effects of the nearly 10-month crisis. “Shooting schedules had dried up, and the prospects for work disappeared,” he shares. “I knew many were going to get hit even worse than I was, and I began thinking of those AC’s and PA’s, the ones who just made the leap to freelancers and now had to deal with the pandemic. “At first, Still Rolling was all about a way to rally a community that sometimes – myself included – gets caught up in the rat race and the showmanship of our own work on social media,”


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things is as important as the fundraising because they go hand in hand.” The second idea was to take the proceeds from the products and create a freelancer fund that could then distribute out in amounts of $500. With a plan in place, Furcillo began the laborious process of applying for grants and financing. But funding was slow, and he began exploring other venues, including signing-in with a fiscal sponsorship like Players Philanthropy Fund. “It has allowed us to function as a non-profit with their 501(c)(3) status,” he explains. Furcillo hopes other companies will take the

Furcillo continues. “I wanted to try to get everyone to stop for a moment and think of their situation. Then, I began to think about some of the people they work with on a regular basis and what this might be doing to them financially.” Furcillo says he was hopeful industry folks would pause to consider someone in their circle who needed help but was too proud to ask for it. “That’s where the initiative could fill the gap – for people who couldn’t find enough work – where unemployment benefits hadn’t kicked in or were lacking – or maybe

they just had a big life event, and some extra cash could really help them out,” he adds. The filmmaker also says he wanted to make the give and the get visible. So, he worked with a local screen printer to create a few logos to launch a store that could serve two purposes. “One was to create a badge worn by people on sets around the country that would identify the organization,” he relates. “I was thinking about the ‘Boston Strong’ logo, which, after the marathon bombing, everyone owned that shirt. The awareness side of

lead from Creative Solutions in creating their t-shirts and badges, and even donating equipment for a raffle. “Creative Solutions’ involvement did $6,000 in sales the first day,” Furcillo beams. “The sale of the cool artwork is doing what we hoped – raising awareness of SRI and the brands we partner with, and money for those in need.” With Players Philanthropy Fund behind him and organizations like Creative Solutions helping to increase visibility, Furcillo is now using his time to find those filmmakers who are most in need. He’s created a simple form on the organization’s website where someone in need can apply for help. “We had 25 applications the first day,” he says. “And they keep coming in.” A conversation with an applicant usually ends in much-needed help.” “Fast was the operative word,” recounts young AC Jeff Olive, who had just begun working in the industry when the pandemic hit and work dried up. “Unemployment was a mess, and I didn’t know when or if it would start coming in,” Olive describes. “I’d known Tom for a while, and when I found out about his initiative, I applied. I had $500 to bridge the gap before unemployment – within a week. No questions asked. “I have posted their success on Instagram,” Olive adds. “When I see people struggling or hear their story, I point them to Still Rolling. We are all about helping each other.” Furcillo says he could not be prouder of how SRI is growing. “My father got sick when I was growing up, and I watched my community rally around my family and throw fundraisers to help us out when he couldn’t work,” he remembers. “I have seen the benefit of a community first-hand, and I want our filmmaking community to do the same. “The word is spreading,” Furcillo concludes. “And as long as I have people to help, and brands involved, I will keep reaching out and helping those in need. Just remember, it’s not a weakness to reach out – it’s a strength to know you can’t always do it alone.”

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DEEP FOCUS

Igor Martinovic DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTO BY CARA HOWE

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Images can transcend the rational mind and speak directly to our subconscious. In creating moving images, we strive to create a world that captivates the audiences to the point that they cannot escape, almost in the same way we cannot escape our dreams. Peeling a storyline down to its essence informs the decision of how to conceptualize a visual approach. All creative decisions, such as the level of stylization or naturalism, way of framing, lighting, contrast... should derive from that original concept. It is a great tool to avoid arbitrary decisions and a place one can come back to. When in doubt, it’s a point of eternal return. Despite the image being the foundational tool of filmmaking, Directors of Photography, sadly, are not even recognized as authors of motion pictures. Cinematography is often depicted as a technical craft, and it’s up to us to change that perception. We should aim to elevate our conversations into the field of ideas, instead of talking about pixels, resolution, cameras, and other technical details. Technology does not determine the authenticity of the visuals. Our ideas do. Traditional television tends to be very bright, offering readily consumable content. In House of Cards and The Outsider, we wanted to reach a different level of cinematic quality. We hid characters in darkness, kept them out of focus, showed them reflected in mirrors. By applying these elements, we tried to engage the audience by drawing them in, making them participate in the experience. Paradoxically, the less we see, the more we imagine. Visuals can also be an effective tool in changing the perception of time. We used this technique often in The Night Of. As the protagonist is being “processed” through the glacially-moving justice system, his perception of time changes. This subjective approach became an important element to develop a visual language that focused on mundane details to emphasize the excruciatingly slow passing of time. Using the visual equivalent of silence, we allowed the audience to imprint their thoughts onto the visual canvas. I love exploring borderline conditions. Being negative or off-framing, darkness on the precipice

of being visible, obscured or fragmented views are elements I like to play with; providing this approach fits the narrative or a point of view of a character. That POV could either be subjective, painted through the inner perspective of a character (The Night Of), or objective, observing the world the characters inhabit (House of Cards). Moving images either produce emotional reactions with the audience or deliberately keep them at bay. Effectively, we are conductors of the audience’s emotional response. I’ve been shooting a mix of narrative and documentary films throughout my career and have always considered them equal since they are both vehicles of the same storytelling process. We’ve been using documentary techniques in fiction work (The Night Of) and fiction film elements in documentaries (Man on Wire, Wormwood). The line between the two is dissipating, creating an exciting hybrid. Josh Oppenheimer’s The Art of Killing comes to mind. I wonder if we will reach a point where the two will cease to exist as distinct categories. What might that mean for filmmaking? It is exciting to see documentaries finally being embraced by wider audiences. Previously, only a handful would have the opportunity to see them at film festivals or on public television in limited distribution. With the introduction of new media platforms, documentaries have been lifted from relative obscurity into a staple of popular culture. With the proliferation of various new media platforms, cinematographers have the chance to reshape the visual landscape in ways not imaginable just a few years ago. As I’m preparing for a new Snapchat series, to be shot in a 9:16 aspect ratio, I’m trying to adjust to a completely new canvas. Eventually, we will all have to accept as well as adapt to new evolving formats. The transition from horizontally designed to vertically oriented visuals could be as groundbreaking as the switch from black and white to color images in the 1950s. The vertical format is not entirely new, however. In this respect we can learn a lot from comic books that treat format not as a fixed form but rather as an ever changing shape. I am excited to see how this changes the way we imagine and photograph stories.

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EXPOSURE

Regina King DIRECTOR - ONE NIGHT IN MIAMI BY VALENTINA VALENTINI PHOTOS BY PATTI PERRET

One business breakfast – back when we could still have those – Regina King met with ICM Partners’ Harley Copen: “He asked me very pointed questions about the types of stories that I wanted to tell,” recounts King now (via Zoom, of course.) King served up different ideas to Copen, including a love story with a historical backdrop. By way of example, she began naming films in that genre, which were, unsurprisingly, told from a white perspective. “I don’t think you see that many [historical love] stories being told from a Black perspective in cinema,” King describes. “In a lot of ways, One Night in Miami for me is a love letter to the black man’s experience. When Harley emailed me the script, I felt like he had fulfilled [my request].”

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Of course, King has been directing television for some eight years now: Emmy-winning and Emmynominated shows such as Being Mary Jane, Scandal, Insecure, and This Is Us; the TV movie Let the Church Say Amen and the more recent The Finest. King, who began her acting career at 14 years old playing Brenda Jenkins on the NBC sitcom 227, has won a slew of acting awards herself over the last three decades, including four Primetime Emmys, a Golden Globe, and an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. The latter two were for If Beale Street Could Talk. Hot off her lead role in HBO’s genrebending and award-winning Watchmen, King’s feature directorial debut, Amazon Studios’ One Night in Miami, releases amidst a year of nationwide calls for racial equity in all areas of society. I talked to King about owning up to mistakes, how the industry continues to incrementally expand its representation, and why she chose One Night in Miami to be her first feature film. You’ve said that Marla Gibbs was the first boss lady that you saw up close. Did that impact your career choices? Regina King: Oftentimes, in life, you’re learning by example, but you don’t even realize that until after the fact; it’s that “hindsight is 20/20” saying. I was in the close company of a woman who was accomplishing things that we talk about now and applaud. I was in the stage play version of 227 that Marla put on at her performing arts theater that she owned, [acting in the lead role], and then I saw her sell it to NBC and become the executive producer, where she fought for things to be a certain way. Today, many women are making those types of projects, and there are so many examples, but not in 1984. And while I wasn’t sitting there taking notes, it had a big impact on me from a very young age. Who else has influenced your career? My mother is a teacher, which I think is a very powerful job, but it’s just not lauded as a heroic occupation. As an adult, I’ve come to realize how much of an impact teachers have in everyone’s lives. And I could name other women – and men – all day who’ve influenced me: John Singleton, Paris Barclay, Christopher Chulack, Debbie Allen, Shonda Rhimes, to name a few. Like many people who have had success, there’s a whole list of people who have been influential in some way or another. After I did Boyz in the Hood with John, and I auditioned for and got the role in Poetic Justice, I didn’t realize that directing was going to be part of my career trajectory. But it was John who opened me up to understand what a director does beyond just the relationship with an actor.

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Is directing more fulfilling than acting, or vice versa? I can’t say it is more fulfilling. While they are both absolutely connected, they’re just very different. Directing allows me to have a little more agency with whatever the project is. As a director, I do get the opportunity to work with more people that have to do with the storytelling process – the cinematographer, the production designer, wardrobe, producers. It gives the opportunity to have in-depth creative sessions and discoveries with more than just your castmates, director, or wardrobe designer, which I kind of feel for an actor is the extent. What did you learn from directing television about crewing up? Directing TV taught me a lot. It was kind of the point, actually – doing all that TV before directing this film. I used it like my school, and I’m very thankful for people like Shonda and Mara Brock Akil who gave me those first opportunities to go to school, if you will. Once I realized that I wanted to be a director, Chris [Chulack] and Paris [Barclay] helped point me in the direction I needed to go. I shadowed both to see what a director has to do beyond working with the actors. As for crewing up, I learned that communication is paramount. A good communicator for me is a person that one: doesn’t yell, and two: takes the information and can distill it so we can have a shorthand, because time is never your friend. When you’re able to identify crew members who are great communicators, or your communication styles are compatible, it makes for solution-based thinking. I don’t care how much you prepare; you’re going to run into something where you have to come up with a solution quickly. Despite its period setting, One Night in Miami echoes current racial equity issues. Was that something that drew you in? Absolutely. That made it even more powerful when I first read it. It’s not like these conversations haven’t been going on, whether it’s 1950, 1960, 1990, or 2020. I read somewhere that someone said they felt like our film was trying to point a finger, weighted too heavily toward current events. And I was like, “Wow, that clearly is a person who probably isn’t Black.” [Laughs.] We are all guilty of being in our own bubble. I don’t know you and I don’t know what you’ve gone through; it has no bearing on me, but this is an American story. And that person clearly has no connection to experiences other than their own, and the American histories they’ve been fed. Black storytellers are more visible in Hollywood

“It was John Singleton who opened me up to understand what a director does beyond just the relationship with an actor.”

than ever before, but not black faces – especially behind the lens. How does that change? A lot of pressure lands on those of us getting the opportunities now. If we are successful, it creates more opportunities for others. It’s unfortunate it has to be that way – that how a Shaka King or a Gina Prince-Bythewood does determine if Black crews are going to be given an opportunity. It’s not fair, but that is what history has shown. I do feel that articles and conversations like this one are helpful. When journalists and outlets decide to report on the subject matter, it keeps the spotlight on the fact that there are so many talented people out there who are not getting an opportunity, and for no legitimate reason. With #OscarsSoWhite and the social justice issues from this past summer, do you think Black representation will continue to change this industry? I think it has to. I do hear often from [other people of color], who say that they hear these conversations about Black and white, but what about them? I feel that this is opening up the conversation for them to take the charge


01.2021

and for us to do it together. But the reality is, there is a storied history between Black and White people in America. And so much of that history has been revised. Because of that, we have to fight for Black people. It’s not that we’re saying we don’t care about Latinos, or Asians, or Native Americans, or anyone else in this country who isn’t white. It’s just a very specific story on how America was created that has to do with the history of how Black people came here, how they built the country, how Black bodies died and were erased so that the country can be what it is. That makes it a very sensitive topic. But I do feel like we are making moves that aren’t lateral – moves that are going to change systems, which will benefit all [people of color.] A few years ago at the Golden Globes, you pledged that everything you produced from then on would be at least 50 percent women. Have you been able to hold that promise? It’s been hard. And no, I have not been able to hold that promise. I knew that it was going to be tough, and the lesson I learned from that is: “Do

and then say later!” [Laughs.] But what’s done is done. It won’t stop me from trying to continue to achieve that. Why haven’t you been able to hire at least 50 percent women? We are in this space now where so much is in production, and that’s a wonderful thing. But that also means there aren’t as many [female crews] available to go around. In some cases, when I had hired women for a specific position, whether it was scheduling or whatever, they weren’t able to remain on. And with an indie film [like One Night in Miami], you don’t have as much latitude, money, or time. Some people who may have been available budget-wise, we couldn’t afford to fly them in and put them up. I also had to hire crew in New Orleans for the tax incentive and budget, so many factors come into play. Some will say that is the reason why what I said was such a naïve statement. That’s fine. I’ll accept that. But it’s not going to stop me from continuing to try and reach those goals. What I was able to do on this film was meet and beat a diversity number. I have to give myself some grace for the fact that

more than 50 percent of our crew were not white cisgender males. Even before COVID-19, features were trailing small-screen content in many ways. What do you think the future holds for the theatrical experience? I love going to the movie theater. I like the whole experience – the sound, the big screen, the popcorn and candy! In the past ten years or so, we had the dinner-at-the-movies experience, and oh my god, that’s an experience. And I do realize that when I bring that up, there are people out there who are like, “Well shit, I can’t spend an extra 30-something dollars just to go to the movie theater,” but I do surely appreciate that new trend. I know that the theaters are struggling, and I don’t want going to the movies to ever end. My hope is that perhaps we adapt as human beings. Like what Amazon is doing with the One Night in Miami – it’s going to have a small theatrical release in the places that will hopefully be open in December, and then streaming after that. Maybe as an industry, we’re going to start to work more with that type of model. But no one really knows.

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FIGHT OF


THEIR TA M I REIK ER, AS C , HELPS D IRECTOR/ PROD UCER REGINA K ING TA K E ONE NIGHT IN M IA M I FROM STAGE TO SC REEN.

LIVES BY VALENTINA VALENTINI

PHOTOS BY PAT TI P ER R ET


In 1964, Cassius Clay – soon to be Muhammad Ali – defeated heavyweight champion Sonny Liston at the Miami Convention Hall. After the event, Clay spent the night celebrating with three close friends. One Night in Miami centers around the imagined dialogue of these four iconic Black men: Clay (Eli Goree), Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.), and Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge). Based on the award-winning play of the same name written by Kemp Powers (who also penned the screenplay), the film adaptation of One Night in Miami is the feature directorial debut of actor and producer Regina King ( Exposure , page 34), who boldly states: “[The fact that it’s a] conversation for three-quarters of the film was not a deterrent. It was a welcome challenge.”

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A-CAMERA OPERATOR CHAD CHAMBERLAIN ASSUMED HE’D BE OUTSIDE THE MOTEL ROOM ON A REMOTE HEAD FOR MOST OF THE FILM. “BUT THE LAMBDA HEAD WAS THE RIGHT CHOICE,” HE SAYS. “BEING IN THE ROOM WITH THE ACTORS AND BEING ABLE TO MOVE THE JIB AND HEAD MECHANICALLY, WHILE PHYSICALLY CHALLENGING , WAS FREEING IN MANY WAYS.”

Director of Photography Tami Reiker, ASC, whose past work includes The Old Guard, High Art, Beyond the Lights, and Pieces of April (two of which were Sundance premieres for this Film Festival-themed issue), is also the only woman yet to win a competition-category ASC award for her work on Carnivàle. Reiker says she also was eager for the challenge of visually adapting the talky source material. “The bookends in the script are incredible,” Reiker shares. “The fight where Cooper knocks out Clay and then the celebration in the diner after Clay wins the fight against Liston. We knew how we were going to shoot those scenes. What we had to figure out was how to shoot inside one motel room, with very long takes, for most of the film.” Viewers are inside The Hampton House, a historic Miami motel still in operation today, for more than half of the film’s 108-minute runtime. The story serves up weighty, emotional conversations as the quartet discuss their struggles against the backdrop of the Civil Rights Movement and cultural upheaval

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of 1960s America. Reiker took an organic approach to allow these scenes to play-out in real time. “When you see 15 pages of dialogue without any action,” she continues, “it can feel daunting. It was amazing, fantastic dialogue, but it’s still wall-to-wall. Regina and I had to figure out how to authentically cover these scenes to fully immerse the audience, so they felt like active members of the conversation.” One early decision was to shoot largeformat with ALEXA 65 in a 2:39 aspect ratio. The depth and detail of shooting 6K would allow King and Reiker to strategically place the actors in the frame and keep shifting focus between them, as King wanted to avoid static shots. “I feel like we’re such colorful people,” the director describes. “While this is a period piece, I wanted it to feel visually vibrant to match [that]. Through all we’ve been up against, we’re so resilient – we still manage to sing, dance, smile, and influence culture [just by] being. So, I wanted to keep the energy, the vitality in that room, but I never wanted the

camera to be a distraction. No big sweeping movements or anything. That’s not what this piece says to me.” Reiker’s solution was to keep both ALEXA 65s on jib arms, operated manually and not on hotheads, to let A-Camera Operator Chad Chamberlain, SOC, and B-Camera Operator Austin Alward maintain control. “I used to do this a lot,” observes Reiker, who – save for the two fight scenes and a scene on top of the motel roof, all of which were handheld – employed the ALEXAs on the manually operated arms. “It was my favorite way to operate because it’s underslung on a Lambda head, so you’re not having to tell the dolly grip to move back or forward,” she continues. “You have a fouror five-foot arch, and you can go from the ground to nine feet in the air while floating and following the talent, creating moves organically with what’s happening in front of you, as opposed to a rehearsed dolly move.” Chamberlain, whose recent credits include Bill & Ted Face the Music and Project Power, remembers talking with Reiker about the


TOP/BOTTOM: REIKER SAYS THE TASCHEN PHOTO BOOK GOAT (GREATEST OF ALL TIME): A TRIBUTE TO MOHAMMAD ALI, WAS THE PRIME VISUAL REFERENCE IN RECREATING CLAY’S FAMOUS BOUT WITH LISTON, SHOT IN A NEW ORLEANS-AREA SOUNDSTAGE.

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bulk of the film being shot on a jib arm and assuming he’d be outside the room operating a remote head. “But Tami always sees ten steps ahead,” he smiles. “The Lambda head was the right choice here – being in the room with the actors and having the ability to move the jib and head mechanically, while physically challenging, was freeing in many ways.” A big key to Reiker’s approach was Dolly Grip Wayne Sharp, who was fully in sync with the Operator to react and move in instinctual ways. Chamberlain was also on a track, which gave him and Sharp the flexibility to move in and around the characters throughout the long stretches of dialogue. A-Camera 1st AC Sarah Brandes also played a vital role. Chamberlain says having Brandes on the team “allowed us to go for creative choices that would evolve midscene, particularly during the roof and boxing scenes, where we were no longer anchored to anything.” Brandes, who has worked with Reiker for

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14 years, first as her loader, then as 2nd AC, and now as focus puller, says the beauty in her work comes from finding the beauty in the moment. “And that’s kind of the point of the build with the dolly, mini jib arm, Lambda head being underslung,” Brandes notes. “It provides this floating feel that allows you to happen upon moments.” “The goal was to try to create a continuous omniscient movement nearly the entire film,” Chamberlain adds. “Even as the characters would pause, we would attempt small, sometimes imperceptible and uncomfortable movements. This perpetual motion made our static frames that much more powerful. That was another brilliant decision by Tami that went against my instincts, and was, once again, the perfect choice for this project.” Though the film’s source material was stage-driven, the 1960s play-out continuously in the film, including in Malcolm X’s family

home and at a Sam Cooke concert in Boston. For Production Designer Barry Robison, recreating these locations wasn’t necessarily difficult, given the wealth of visual archival material. But he still kept a meticulous eye on bringing King’s vision to life. “This is such an important piece of history,” Robison describes, “that I did not want to take many liberties. I knew if we were going to be faithful to the exact specifications of the motel room, that would be impossible to shoot in. Without overscaling it, I suggested we increase the size of the walls incrementally.” Robison laid out the markings on the floor in the art department and put up partitions so that King and Reiker could begin to feel the space, but the room was still going to be small. The Hampton House did have special rooms for special guests, so, Robison calculated, Malcolm X was given such a suite – he used the empty room off the main room to enlarge the space and give King more flexibility in blocking the actors.


The designer also used framing devices – doorways or archways, or a mid-century modern Japanese-style screen on a track so that Reiker could close the space down or open it up. He had fly walls for Reiker to get longer lensing and more depth into the room, and added camera ports – windows cut into the wall and covered by a photograph or a painting. All of these created different challenges for Chief Lighting Technician Allen Parks, who recounts that “the ceilings were very low and dressed to look like concrete. The art department helped us out by leaving the center ceiling panels open for lighting; and given the need for lowprofile lights, we chose Astera Titan and Helios tubes in dual tube holders with Honeycrate fabric grids.” Parks rigged the tube arrays into the ceiling in each corner of the hotel bedroom set. Reiker also requested baby scoop lights with snoots, so Parks built four 10-inch discshaped units with Litegear bi-color LED’s, 1/4 CTS, and Magic Cloth diffusion. They were

contained by 18-inch black corrugated plastic snoots and plastic honeycomb grids, which allowed Parks’ team to throw a tight fill light on the cast members without overexposing the surrounding set. As he continues: “Those lights, strategically placed along with some LiteGear LiteMats and KinoFlo Freestyle LED fixtures, allowed the actors and camera to move freely through the set during lengthy and emotional takes.” Reiker worked closely with Robison and Costume Designer Francine Jamison-Tanchuck to create a palette of vibrant blues, greens and warm tones throughout the story. As Light Iron Supervising Colorist Ian Vertovec recalls: “I worked with Tami to bring out depth and shape to complement the complex choreography established between the actors’ blocking and the camera movement.” Many crucial scenes shot outside of the motel room were shot in LaPlace, Louisiana,

and at Second Line Stages in New Orleans. Robison found a hotel an hour outside of the city that suited the motel’s exterior hallways, dining space, the phone booth in the parking lot, and the pool. For Cooke’s Boston concert and an existing club for the Copacabana, both of which only needed surface changes to make them period-correct, a French Quarter theater was used. For a tense, nine-minute rooftop scene, Robison came up with a unique solution. “Regina and I wanted to shoot outside at night,” Reiker recounts. “And we did not want to shoot on a green screen. But every roof we scouted, the actors would have to have been on wires because of safety. Barry came up with this genius idea to build the roof on shipping containers right outside the sound stage. We were outside the city, so there was nothing around it, and we had 280 degrees of total darkness. I put little pinpoints of light all around – from a few hundred yards away to a quarter-mile away – to help recreate the Miami

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“Regina and I had to figure out how to authentically cover these long dialogue scenes to fully immerse the audience, so they felt like active members of the conversation.” TAMI REIKER, ASC

skyline, so you felt the life out there. VFX added buildings and fireworks in post.” Clay’s boxing fights took place in an arena built on the soundstage. They were recreated faithfully with the help of the Taschen book GOAT (Greatest of All Time): A Tribute to Mohammad Ali, which chronicles Muhammad Ali’s career, and which Reiker describes as their Bible for those scenes. Parks carefully studied the Taschen book, recreating a period lighting grid, including the same 1K scoops. “In the photos of the fight,” Parks describes, “the lighting rig appears to contain randomly placed scoop lights, but upon further examination, we were able to discern a patterned plot. The set decorators were a major help with research and drafting plans. Sourcing the period scoop lights –18-inch Altman 1K Scoops – was surprisingly easy since MBS Equipment Company happened to have 30 or so gathering dust in Burbank. We

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also employed some vintage Mole Richardson 12-inch 2K studio Fresnels from them, too.” Pulling focus for the fight scenes was no easy task for Brandes, as Reiker’s “finding beauty in the moment” approach did not change for handheld boxing scenes, with choreography and rehearsals. But Brandes’ skill in building up and breaking down the ALEXA 65 (so that Chamberlain and Alward had a maximum comfort level) provided key support to the Guild camera team. “I think initially Chad thought the camera would be on his shoulder and he’d shoot it from up high, like the human-head perspective,” Brandes relates. “But as we got into shooting, everyone agreed it made more sense to bring the camera down lower so that you were in with the action. This meant Chad was cradling [the ALEXA] a lot, which gave him a bit more stability. But it also meant I was constantly adjusting the build – shape handles, easy rigs,

no easy rigs, no handles – just sort of building it so you could fire it like it was a machine gun with one handle. The ALEXA 65 is fairly large, so my goal was to get it as comfortable and maneuverable as possible, and to not have things get in the way, like the Teradek or the MDR, which can get so hot they could burn an arm.” As for King’s feature directing debut, those who assumed adapting a stage play to the screen would be a tough ask were right. But as King concludes, “I was very much aware of what I was getting myself into,” she shares. “And at the end of the day, someone’s always going to say that it feels like a play. But I would challenge those people to go and read the play, and they will see that Tami and the camera crew did an exceptional job of keeping just enough energy in the images to not distract from Kemp’s hard-hitting dialogue, which is, of course, the essence of the film.”


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LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Tami Reiker, ASC A-Camera Operator Chad Chamberlain, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Sarah Brandes A-Camera 2nd AC Sienna Pinderhughes B-Camera Operator Austin Alward B-Camera 1st AC Zach Blosser B-Camera 2nd AC Haley Turk DIT Tyler Blackwell Loader Ben Maner Still Photographer Patti Perret

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1ST AC SARAH BRANDES WAS CONSTANTLY ADJUSTING THE BUILD OF THE ALEXA 65 FOR CHAMBERLIN (ABOVE). “MY GOAL WAS TO GET IT AS COMFORTABLE AND MANEUVERABLE AS POSSIBLE,” SHE SAYS, “AND NOT HAVE THINGS GET IN THE WAY, LIKE THE TERADEK OR THE MDR, WHICH CAN GET FIL M FES T I S S UE BURN AN 53 SO HOT THEY COULD ARM.”


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Google “comedy horror directors,� and a half-dozen male headshots pop up. Historically, it’s a male-dominated space, like so many others in the entertainment industry. But that space is evolving, and there are more opportunities for women, BIPOC, and LGBTQ+ filmmakers. And, as the gatekeepers evolve criteria for what makes good art, Sundance has always been a platform for marginalized artists. FIL M FES T I S S UE

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“Women have had to survive by making things funny,” shares Emerald Fennell, writer/ director/co-producer of the Sundance hit Promising Young Woman. No surprise, then, that Fennell’s first feature would be a hybrid comedy-horror about a young woman named Cassie (Carey Mulligan), who, years earlier, dropped out out of medical school due to a traumatizing event with a close female friend – an incident that drives this unique revenge tale. The slow burn of Cassie’s double life – coffee shop worker by day, bar crawler by night – reveals that Fennell is after a comedy that is more troubling than most shock horror flicks, and she’s also permitting viewers to laugh. Or

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as Fennell describes: “[My girlfriends and I] are the funniest at our most vulnerable, and when the worst things have happened to us.” Promising Young Woman debuted at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival in the Premieres section, which for anyone – and especially a first-time filmmaker – is a dream come true. Fennell, whose short film Careful How You Go played at Sundance in 2018, says, “Park City is just magical in general, but Sundance, in particular, was, well… I couldn’t believe it; I was pinching myself the whole time.” Though Fennell can make any subject seem to possess the newness of a baby’s laugh, don’t be fooled. She is a multi-hyphenate of

epic proportions, having authored a children’s fantasy series and horror novels, played Camilla Bowles on Netflix’s hit series The Crown, served as showrunner on BBC’s second season of Killing Eve, written the book for Andrew Lloyd Webber’s West End Cinderella adaptation and, just over a year ago, stepped into the director’s chair on her first featurefilm set while seven months pregnant. The keys to that creative speedway, according to Fennell, are being okay with getting no sleep, a fierce love of writing, and the privilege of having financially and emotionally supportive parents. She also adds that surrounding herself with supportive people is paramount,


“ I remember watching Emerald direct and thinking that is the kind of empowerment all young girls should be witness to.” UNIT PUBLICIST JAMES FERRERA

but it’s frightening because they’re also very analytical and, rightly, have high expectations.”

given her first feature debuted during a global pandemic, a world where cinemas have all but shut down and blockbusters have turned back into something more akin to Blockbuster nights. As Focus Features Chairman Peter Kujawski, whose company is releasing Promising Young Woman, observes: “You have to be able to adapt and work with these circumstances. For us at Focus, we’re lucky to be a part of the Comcast Universal family, where we’re able to harness the power of that incredible infrastructure. We worked with the team across the company adapting to the theatrical and PVOD model, so we could

continue distributing films in theaters all year long while providing optionality for consumers to see our films in areas where theaters may not have opened.” And Promising Young Woman has gotten a theatrical release, albeit a short, targeted one for a discerning crowd. “I was having a bath just before the [Sundance] premiere,” says Fennell, “and I was staring at the wall thinking, ‘Oh, this is happening now?’ Not only are people going to watch it, but people who’ve already watched 30 movies, people who know everything there is to know about films [will be watching. Sundance goers] are so warmly disposed towards films in general,

The Sundance premiere was only the second time Fennell had seen her film with an audience (the first was with a test audience). For Director of Photography Ben Kračun (Beast, The Third Day), Sundance was the last celebration and gathering of people he had before going into lockdown in early March. But as Kujawski says, “the electricity from that first screening in Park City hasn’t subsided all year.” Promising Young Woman was Kračun’s first time in Park City, though Beast had screened as part of the Spotlight section in 2017. And although Kračun had attended premieres of critically acclaimed films at other major festivals, he feels that the audience reaction to Promising Young Woman was like nothing he’s ever experienced. “The participation with the audience and that film is so specific,” he says, remembering the gasps and sniffles but also the laughs. “People have now seen the movie and written about it, and we’re a bit more aware of how it’s coming across. But at the premiere, we did not know how it was going to go down. It was quite nerve-wracking for everyone.” Kujawski says that the number of people who continue to ask him about this film trumps that of any other release he’s worked on, crediting the story’s ferocious voice and the way it tackles such an important subject while defying genre. Promising Young Woman Unit Publicist James Ferrera (ICG Magazine April 2020), who’s worked on other Sundance hits, found it inspiring to watch Fennell and Kračun work together. With Fennell’s high energy and intensity grounded by Kračun’s calm, Ferrera

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knew it was something special early on. “Here’s a woman,” Ferrera recounts, “seven months pregnant, who is the director, the producer, and the writer. She owns her femininity, and that doesn’t mean that she cannot very decisively and clearly navigate a predominantly male-dominated world of filmmaking in Hollywood. I remember watching Emerald direct and thinking that this is the kind of empowerment all young girls should be witness to.” In his initial meeting with Fennell and co-producer Fiona Walsh Heinz, Ferrera hit the ground running. He brought up early positioning for awards and festival consideration by creating an early buzz with a first-look behind-the-scenes photo – which Focus released on April 2, 2019, through its social channels. He also looked to choosing still-photo days as a team to make certain key scenes were adequately covered, and ensuring access to talent and filmmakers for the electronic press kit (EPK) and behind the scenes (BTS) materials to be mined for festival, release, digital and For Your Consideration (FYC) campaigns. In what Ferrera calls an “unprecedented” spirit of understanding of how important the EPK, BTS, and FYC are to the film’s potential marketing, on more than one occasion when the BTS crew wasn’t able to

cover a scene, Fennell made a point of doing a take just for BTS. “I specifically recall the first time this happened,” Ferrera shares. “It was the scene at Cassie’s house when Madison [Alison Brie] tracks down Cassie and gives her the tape. I’ve never had that happen before. And Emerald was so eager to come in as soon after completion of principal photography as she could to contribute her voice to the EPK/BTS, knowing how significantly that would help my department and our team deliver to Focus the most significant production marketing assets possible.” Not only did Ferrera enjoy tremendous inclusion and significant access with the BTS work, but he was also included in tech scouts, which he wishes were standard practice for unit publicists on all titles, as they helped him at so many levels. Promising Young Woman was originally going to shoot in Cleveland, Ohio, but ended up in Los Angeles for logistical and taxrebate reasons. That allowed Kračun, who is half-Croatian, half-German, and grew up in Scotland, to join Local 600. Because it was such a fast run-up to the shoot, Kračun doesn’t recall thinking much about the Guild at the

time, but as he reminisces, the importance of the moment comes into focus. “Growing up in the U.K. and Scotland,” he describes, “American films, and especially American independent cinema, was something that influenced me for decades. Watching all those movies, I was probably dreaming of making a film in America. That is one of the stepping-stones you need to take if you are going to ‘make it,’ so to speak. And now that I’m in Local 600, it’s opened up another whole world for me in terms of work and connections.” Because Kračun has shot seven lower budget films in the U.K., a $6 million script wasn’t all that daunting. But given how fast the shoot was going to be, and how limited the prep time, Kračun understood the challenge. As a single-camera ALEXA shoot for 23 days with big-name actors coming in for one or two days, Kračun knew he needed to convince Fennell to let him come out to L.A. for a few weeks before prep officially began. “It all comes down to planning, and Emerald knew that,” says Kračun, who was able to go on location scouts and have indepth conversations about the world Fennell created for Cassie. And though she’s worked in so many aspects of the filmmaking industry, it bears reminding that Promising Young Woman

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TOP/MIDDLE FENNELL DESCRIBES DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY BEN KRAČUN (BOTTOM) AS SOMEONE “WHO IS BRILLIANT AT MAKING SOMETHING ON A TIME CONSTRAINT, FOR LITTLE MONEY, FEEL VERY CINEMATIC.”

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“Sundance goers are so warmly disposed towards films in general, but it’s frightening because they’re also very analytical and, rightly, have high expectations.” WRITER/DIRECTOR/CO-PRODUCER EMERALD FENNELL

was still Fennell’s first time directing a feature. “Ben is brilliant at making something on a time constraint [for little] money feel very cinematic,” adds Fennell, who first met and worked with Kračun on her TED Conference short film in the spring of 2018. “I was going to be making [my first feature] in America, a place I’d never made anything before, and I suppose what I wanted, quite frankly, was somebody with whom I could communicate. [Our prep was so short], so it would have to be someone [with whom] I could at least feel there was a shorthand.” Ferrera remembers that symbiosis on set, and how Kračun’s quiet and subtle humor meshed so well with Fennell’s hyper personality. “I never really knew what it was Ben was trying to do,” Ferrera recalls. “I could get a bit of an idea from lighting, but until I saw dailies, I didn’t realize how picturesque he was framing shots. Like every frame was a beautiful photograph. It was stunning.” Fennell’s aesthetic is pop-culture heavy. She is a Sweet Valley High and Cher Horowitz fan but also loves Alfred Hitchcock. She’s interested in showcasing the ‘subverted feminine,’ as she calls it – the uncanny, the domestic, with something slightly askew. “I always think of Coraline and the mum with buttons for eyes that keep falling out of her head,” Fennell smiles. “That’s the kind of world I’m interested in, where things feel familiar, but aren’t. Women cover up their sadness with clothes, with nails, they make things look good. Look at Cassie’s mom

[played by Jennifer Coolidge]. She lives in this house which has become her child. It couldn’t be crammed with more cherubs and pink. It’s become a kind of mausoleum to a happy family. So when it came to those discussions with Ben and [Production Designer] Michael [Perry], we wanted to make the look very specific.” Perry (who was the designer on Sweet Valley High) and Kračun built Cassie’s world in Promising Young Woman to feel inviting, innocuous, pretty and sweet, but with bleeding around the edges, a bandage over an open wound. Kračun went for wide and angular framing with Panavision G Series anamorphic lenses. He wanted a look that was “bendy” and, subconsciously, a feeling that something is awry. The scene could be beautiful and dangerous at the same time, which is technically difficult. But Kračun likens it to overloading on a bunch of sweets, where the image feels slightly off-kilter. “The clothing and the light filters are all designed to make the viewer feel comfortable, but it’s in those moments where all the dark stuff happens,” he adds. Fennell calls the approach “a delicate line, because you don’t want something to feel artificial or arch; you don’t want it to be so distant that you can’t get emotionally invested,” she explains. “But I did need it to feel ‘other.’ Even though we have cell phones and laptops, [the film] doesn’t feel particularly like any time. We shot in parts of L.A. that aren’t particularly recognizable,

so that it could feel like any town, any bar, anyone’s life.” And to this point – the balancing act of sexual assault being both foreign and familiar – is part of the reason that, after a year of distribution turbulence, Promising Young Woman came out in select U.S. cinemas on Christmas Day. “Actually,” offers Kujawski, “Christmas has proven to be a wonderful moment for audiences to immerse themselves in bold and daring cinematic visions. Think of Tarantino’s Django Unchained, Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, or last year’s war epic 1917. We’re confident that people will not be disappointed when they spend part of their holiday with work as powerful and unique as this.” In the U.K., the film will be released on Valentine’s Day, and while Fennell stresses that for both releases, COVID-19 safety is of utmost importance, the team wanted Promising Young Woman to feel like something people could process as a community. “I wanted to make a film a bit like how Get Out was so accessible to the quote-unquote woke, white, liberal people,” Fennell concludes. “That was such a shock to those of us who watched it and thought, ‘Oh my God, all of these microaggressions, all these things we didn’t know about, how awful.’ It was done so brilliantly. I want everyone to be able to take something from [Promising Young Woman], and I don’t want it to feel like it’s shutting the door having these conversations. I’ve always argued for Valentine’s Day, honestly, because I think it’s the most romantic film of all time.”

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LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Ben KraÄ?un Operators Mike McGowan, SOC Dana Morris, SOC Dennis Dwyer 1st AC Sarah Brandes 2nd AC Rochelle Brown DIT Chase Abrams Loader LaTerrian Officer-McIntosh Still Photographer Merie Wallace, SMPSP Unit Publicist James Ferrera

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UNIT PUBLICIST JAMES FERRERA PRAISES THE SYMBIOSIS ON SET BETWEEN THE HYPER-DRIVEN FENNELL AND THE LOW-KEY KRAČUN (FAR LEFT). BEN’S SHOTS WERE SO PICTURESQUE LIKE EVERY FRAME WAS A BEAUTIFUL PHOTOGRAPH. IT WAS STUNNING.”

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DONE &


DUSTED


– PLE T HE WO R LD ’ S FUNNIEST FEM A LE C OM IC S GIVE 2 0 2 0 THE SEND -OFF IT D ESERVES IN AMAZO N ’S ONE-OF-A -K IND STREA M ING EVENT. BY PAU L I NE R OGER S

PH OTO S BY NICOLE WILD ER

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“I can’t imagine a better way to lay this unfathomably awful year to rest than by giving some of the world’s funniest women the last word,” says Emmy-winning actress/producer Rachel Brosnahan (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel - ICG Magazine January 2019). And thanks to Amazon Prime Video, Brosnahan and Phoebe Robinson (2 Dope Queens), Tiffany Haddish (Girls Trip), Sarah Silverman (I Love You, America), Natasha Rothwell (Insecure), Ziwe Fumudoh (Baited with Ziwe), Natasha Leggero (Another Period) and Patti Harrison (Shrill) have all come together (virtually, in this age of COVID) to eulogize everything from casual sex to beige Band-Aids, and all things in between. “[They are] giving us all the opportunity to heal through laughter collectively,” Brosnahan describes. Directed by Emmy-nominee Linda Mendoza (Tiffany Haddish Presents: They Ready) and shot by Emmy-nominee Paula Huidobro (ICG Magazine September 2020), Yearly Departed, which employed an almost all-female production and camera crew, was written and designed for COVID-compliant conditions. “None of the actors wanted to be together in the same space,” Huidobro explains. “We used green screen pods, often running seven cameras at a time, using motion control and other cinematic tools to give postproduction enough options to stitch the various performances together, to make it look like everyone was in a seedy, downscale mortuary.”

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Production design was underway when Mendoza and Huidobro came aboard. Mendoza asked to split the stage because, as she recounts, “with our schedule, there was no way to complete the turnarounds with one set. The motion control also wouldn’t fit, and we needed to be able to access that every day we were shooting, since all the women were coming at different times.” As Production Designer Suzuki Ingerslev details: “The mortuary room was split in half so that you had two separate sets. We called them set A [the stage] and set B [the mourners’ section]. The talent on stage A would give their eulogy, and on set B, the mourners would react to the speakers. The set was built more like a multicam


“The mortuary room was split in half so that you had two separate sets... the talent on stage A would give their eulogy, and on set B, the mourners would react to the speakers.” PRODUCTION DESIGNER SUZUKI INGERSLEV

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[Due to COVID] “Most of the First AC’s were positioned behind a wall of blacks... I made a slit so that I could watch my camera move on the dance floor and see if our comedians/actors moved as well.” PENNY SPRAGUE

set, with a camera aisle and no fourth wall. We still wanted it to look and feel like a real location. So we added a lot of quirky details, provided as much depth in the set as possible, built-in lighting, and had fun with wallpaper and drapery. Mortuaries are all about the drapery. “The biggest challenge,” Ingerslev adds, “was duplicating some of the objects in the set so that there would be a little overlap on the two halves of the sets to help camera and VFX find their bearings. During COVID, it was difficult finding multiples of anything. We also tried to make the room a little larger so that there would be plenty of space for the crew and talent to work safely. The sets also featured extra doorways to be used as camera ports, and for easier equipment and crew access.” What was unique (becoming less so in the age of COVID), was the purposeful lack of physical interaction between departments. Once Ingerslev and her team were done with the sets, they were out of the stages – allowing each department to come in and do their jobs. When the interaction was necessary, it was often done remotely. The notion of workflow took on a whole new challenge as Huidobro was tasked with photographing the world’s most complicated Zoom call, “with A-list talent safely isolated, being shot live, with the cinema-quality of an Amazon production,” she describes. Both Mendoza and Huidobro approach their projects organically, with comedy timing being paramount. “Still, they had to keep the live energy of the performances and reactions, without the actors being in the same place,” explains DIT Ian Spohr, who worked closely with Mendoza, Huidobro and Chief Lighting Technician Mark McCarthy.

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The goal was to both supply images to all departments, so they were on the same page, and give Postproduction enough material to create the shabby intimacy of disparate personalities coming together in a run-down funeral parlor where, for some strange reason, some of the world’s funniest women are “giving 2020 the business,” laughs Spohr. “Think family mortuary adjacent to a strip mall in Middle America, and that’s where Paula shines. She has a great eye for crafting niche looks without their feeling overly stylized.” With the added layer of COVID safety, the Guild camera team had to plan carefully. “All that technology is in-between the actors,” explains Spohr. “Paula knew that we had to streamline everything. So, I worked with Technical Director Aaron James to strip away the creature comforts and favor what was versatile and stable.” Spohr says he would make adjustments for color and exposure that were sent downstream. “But where I would normally just have a LUT box, there was an entire engineering department doing live comps, mocap, playback integrated into live feeds to all departments, and sending elements back to me,” he recalls. “We strived to ensure people saw what they needed so that the talent could react in real time. That way, Linda could craft the performances, and Paula could photograph them as naturally as possible.” Many open-ended conversations, with people often not in sightline, were required to make Yearly Departed work. As Spohr continues: “Multicam shooting makes it impossible to optimize every angle, every time. [Chief

Lighting Technician] Mark McCarthy had full control of luminance and chrominance values across the sets, so we could work together, making tweaks to the grade and adjustments to lights to optimize difficult coverage scenarios. The goal was to ensure they were dynamic, without having to ‘fix it in post’ – and [this was] more important being on the set.” Lighting was certainly tricky for McCarthy, as everything he designed would go through Board Operator Ryan Johnson. “We were all told that we would be working with women of various ethnicities and ages, and we had to make them look as good as possible – within the challenges of the shoot,” McCarthy explains. “Overall, we had a plan to keep the light soft, to wrap the actors, and be able to change very quickly. We were also dealing with COVID, so having lights thoughtfully placed meant LED’s were the only option.” McCarthy decided to light the two sets, the podium and the audience, with top light from ARRI S60 SkyPanels with Space Light kits and silk dots through a full grid. When light was needed through the “windows,” he used Lustr Source 4s with 36-degree lenses. “For the speakers at the podium, we used three LiteGear LiteMat Plus 8s, with one above center and one on each side, angled in with 216 draped over everything,” he recounts. “We played with the levels depending on hairstyles, usually leaving the center strongest to get into the eyes. We also had two backlights, one Lustr Source 4, and a row of Astera Titans, again playing with levels depending on hair and wardrobe. And, for the podium itself, a four-by-8-inch LED pad with tracing paper for under the chin.”


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The audience was lit with a 360 through a 20by-20 full grid, in addition to top light and window lighting. As McCarthy adds: “We decided on adding just a LiteMat 2L for a slight edge for the close-ups.” Green screens, essential for COVID compliance, added yet another challenge to the workflow. “We created what we called ‘green screen pods,’” explains Tammy Sutton, Emmy-winning VFX Supervisor, Barnstorm VFX. “This was the perfect way to have the actors sitting by themselves, in front of a green screen, and watching a live feed from the main stage. We could record the natural reactions to each performance, and in post, we composited them into the practical funeral-home set.” Lighting was done with S60 Sky Panels for the actors, S60 Space Lights through a full grid, and S60 Sky Panels as a backlight, keyed with an S60. The edge light came from a LiteMat 2L. Four “pod” setups were run at the same time, keeping the shots locked off so that cameras could be set up, and then the crew could leave the area and watch through a feed. “We also used a motion-control camera setup to add some dynamic camera moves, while only shooting one actor at a time,” Sutton adds. Mendoza planned the opening motion-control shot, setting the move with Huidobro, and as she recalls, “finding it very tough to lock-in the timing.” For the motion-control work, each actor was shot one at a time with the same camera moves and then split into their respective positions in post. Sutton describes how an actor making their entrance through the door would walk in, hit their mark, nod to someone in the audience (marked by an empty chair with their picture on it), and take their seat as the camera followed them. “Throughout the shoot, we would run the same programmed camera move with each actor, one at a time, then layer them all together,” Sutton describes. Pacific Motion’s Craig Shumard used the Gazelle Motion Control crane to capture repeat passes of live recorded moves. “The talent needed to be in small sets, so we recorded these ‘hero’ shots with the lead talent,” he says. “Then we did all the same moves with three or four other actors in their positions. Once all the talent had been shot with the same passes, we then did clean plates with no talent. At that point, all of the footage was turned over to the post house to layer together.” The combination of COVID safety restrictions and multiple sets meant Huidobro had to carefully place each “Guild camera team” for maximum

effect. These included: A-Camera/Technocrane/ Motion Control Operator David Kister and 1st AC Al Cohen; B-camera Bonnie Blake and 1st AC Penny Sprague; C-Camera Lauren Gadd and 1st AC Camille Freer; and D-camera Jamie Stephens and 1st AC Yen Nguyen. Huidobro placed several lock-offs with 1st AC Michelle McKinley (which was the kickoff wide in the funeral set). The remaining cameras, locked off, on the second stage, were helmed by 1st AC Yoshihiro Kinoshita and 2nd AC Loren Azlein. A-B-C-D cameras were ARRI Minis, and the lock-off cameras were Sony VENICE. Each camera had an Angénieux 12-1 zoom, except for the A-camera on a wider zoom. “Bonnie and I were on one wing camera with Jamie Stephens, and Yen was on the second wing camera,” recounts Sprague. “Angénieux zooms and a dance floor for most of the wing shots. All AC’s were behind the blacks – hidden from the set. “Because of COVID, they had to limit the number of on-set crew,” Sprague adds. “So, most of the First AC’s were positioned behind a wall of blacks so that the actors/comedians couldn’t see us. [Al Cohen was the only 1st AC allowed on set.] That, in itself, posed difficulties, because I like to watch the actor and the camera when shooting. So even though I was positioned behind a black, I made a slit so that I could watch my camera move on the dance floor and see if our comedians/actors moved as well.” Mendoza worked closely with Lead Editor Kelly Lyon to figure out timing and build-in the magic of the show. Stitching the various VFX elements together in post was facilitated by Editor Giselle Murillo, who calls Yearly Departed an “unusual shoot, with a fast production schedule and a quick post schedule, not to mention people in New York, Pasadena, Portland, and points between on Zoom, text, and email, and a director who was very meticulous.” Editing-wise, Murillo says a time-saver with the green screen singles was making new footage with the comped plates, “instead of having to do it individually for each shot we used,” she adds. “That clip was grouped with the green screen shot, same timecode, and same file name as the original shot to help with the turnover process. “One of the hardest aspects was choosing shots that made it feel like they were all in the same space,” she says. “It was important to have reactions or create moments where it appeared that the cast was interacting. That element involved a lot

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of hunting through reactions and looks from a person and finding others from another character, who both happened to be looking in the direction that you need them to.” Murillo says the layering of the cast in the wide shots was another element that took longer than anticipated. “Reactions were shot back-to-back, and sometimes they don’t hold the look as long as you like for the wide shot,” she continues. “So, we found ourselves left with the choice of replacing it or remapping the shot to make it fit the time that we needed. It’s very easy to fall into any one of these rabbit holes of building a shot or a moment to connect everyone. But, with the turnaround, we either had to rely on each other to help find pieces to use, string outs we made of certain looks, reactions, mood, actions, et cetera, or decide what scenes/shots/moments needed that time or to move on.” Huidobro calls Yearly Departed a puzzle from the very beginning. “We had to block without having seen the full cast in the same room, interacting with each other, yet we had to make it appear so,” she shares. “Linda and I needed to figure out the shots that would serve as a transition from

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one speaker to another, or connect them all when they first came into the room, and their reactions to each other.” Huidobro says the green pods provided safety and calls the motion control “incredibly important,” as it allowed them to store multiple moves. “Unfortunately, we had to decide what shots those would be without Linda ever having had a chance to block them with the actors,” she explains. “We set those with stand-ins, and the actors had to repeat what we decided in advance, which is extremely unusual, to say the least. “Before the team had to move into remote” [Mendoza’s sister tested positive for coronavirus, and Huidobro and Mendoza had to move off the set], Huidobro concludes, “there was one day of rehearsals. I think the experience of making Yearly Departed represented what this year has felt like for a lot of us. It was dark, funny, confusing, and we had to adapt to unexpected situations constantly. It was all full of humor, and we were all so grateful to be working again. It was also completely ironic that I had to do my job remotely, which for a DP is almost impossible but an exciting challenge.”


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LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Paula Huidobro A-Camera Operator/Techno/Jib David Kister A-Camera 1st AC Al Cohen A-Camera 2nd AC Jonathan Stromberg Techno/Jib Tech Jeff Schultz B-Camera Operator Bonnie Blake, SOC B-Camera 1st AC Penny Sprague B-Camera 2nd AC Ben Perry C-Camera Operator Lauren Gadd C-Camera 1st AC Camille Freer D-Camera Operator Jamie Stephens D-Camera 1st AC Yen Nguyen E-Camera 1st AC Michele McKinley F-Camera 1st AC Yoshihiro Kinoshita G-Camera 1st AC Rosie Oxnard H-Camera 2nd AC Loren Azlein DIT Ian Spohr Loader Tim Balcomb Digital Utilities Wallace Dixon Glenn Ampil Still Photographer Nicole Wilder

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PRODUCTION CREDITS COMPILED BY TERESA MUĂ‘OZ The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information in compiling this section. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa MuĂąoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com 86

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First Man / Photo by Daniel McFadden

Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note


20TH CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 4

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOAQUIN SEDILLO, ASC OPERATORS: SPENCER HUTCHINS, SOC DUANE MIELIWOCKI, SOC, PHIL MILLER, SOC ASSISTANTS: KEN LITTLE, CLAUDIO BANKS, ERIC GUERIN, DAVID STELLHORN, ERIC WHEELER, JIHANE MRAD CAMERA UTILITY: PAULINA GOMEZ DIGITAL UTILITY: DUSTIN LEBOUEF

“9-1-1: LONE STAR” SEASON 2 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY STRAHORN, JOE BRODERICK, DOUG HOLGATE OPERATORS: BRICE REID, DEAN MORIN, MIKE VEJAR ASSISTANTS: JAMES RYDINGS, KAORU ISHIZUKA, CARLOS DOERR, KELSEY CASTELLITTO, CHRIS BURKET, RON ELLIOTT, KOJI KOJIMA STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRICE REID DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PETER RUSS CAMERA UTILITY: JOE PACELLA DIGITAL UTILITY: BASSEM BALAA TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK TECHNOCRANE TECH: JAY SHEVECK REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: BRICE REID

“LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 9

GARRETT HURT, MARK GONZALES STEADICAM OPERATOR: KRIS WILSON JIB OPERATORS: MARC HUNTER, RANDY GOMEZ, JR., NICK GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITIES: CHARLES FERNANDEZ, SCOTT SPIEGEL, TRAVIS WILSON, DAVID FERNANDEZ, ADAM BARKER VIDEO CONTROLLER: GUY JONES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: KAREN NEAL, MICHAEL DESMOND 2ND UNIT DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERND REINBARDT, STEVE GARRETT

“MIXED-ISH” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TROY SMITH OPERATORS: JACK MESSITT, JOSH SCHNOSE, JONATHAN GOLDFISHER ASSISTANTS: LOU DEMARCO, CHRISTOPHER DAWSON, TONY MULLER, BEN SHURTLEFF, JULIUS GRAHAM, SCOTT WHITBREAD DIGITAL LOADER: ZAC PRANGE CAMERA UTILITIES: EDUARDO GONZALEZ, ANDY MACAT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FREDRICK GREISSING

“REBEL” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC OPERATORS: GARY ALLEN, RANDY BAER, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, JOHN BOYD ASSISTANTS: MISSY TOY-OZEAS, SEAN ASKINS, AL MYERS CAMERA UTIITIES: JOHN WEISS, STEVE MASIAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: VON THOMAS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: PATRICK WYMORE, MICHAEL BECKER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TODD A. DOS REIS, ASC OPERATORS: IAN DODD, DEMIAN SCOTT VAUGHS, ERIC DYSON ASSISTANTS: JAMIE STEPHENS, OLIVER PONCE, JASON GARCIA, RICHARD KENT, MELISSA FISHER, LANI WASSERMAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: DEMIAN SCOTT VAUGHS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SAM MCCONVILLE LOADER: ANNIE LI DIGITAL UTILITY: ALEXA HEGRE

“LOVE, VICTOR” SEASON 2

“STATION 19” SEASON 4

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN WAKAYAMA CAREY OPERATORS: JOSEPH B. HERNANDEZ, YVONNE CHU, JUSTEN HERNANDEZ ASSISTANTS: CHRIS GEUKENS, BRIAN WELLS, GENNA PALERMO, LOREN AZLEIN STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOSEPH B. HERNANDEZ LOADER: CONNER DANIELS

ABC STUDIOS

“BIG SHOT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALISON KELLY OPERATORS: DAN AYERS, STEVE MATZINGER, MATT BLUTE ASSISTANTS: JAMES SPRATTLEY, ALEX GROSSFELD, AARON GAMBEL, EMILY ZENK, JOE DIBARTOLOMEO, BLAKE HOOKS LOADER: ALEX GADBERRY DIGITAL UTILITY: MISSY BURGESS TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

“GREY’S ANATOMY” SEASON 17 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ALICIA ROBBINS, STEVEN FRACOL OPERATORS: ERIC FLETCHER, MARCIS COLE, JEANNE TYSON ASSISTANTS: NICK MCLEAN, FORREST THURMAN, CHRIS JONES, KIRK BLOOM, LISA BONACCORSO, J.P. RODRIGUEZ STEADICAM OPERATOR: MARCIS COLE STEADICAM ASSISTANTS: FORREST THURMAN, LISA BONACCORSO CAMERA UTILITY: MARTE POST DIGITAL UTILITY: SPENCER ROBINS CRANE TECH: STEVE MCDONAGH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LISA ROSE

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 18

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARYN OKADA, ASC, SPENCER COMBS OPERATORS: RON SCHLAEGER, MARIANA ANTUNANO, BRIAN GARBELLINI ASSISTANTS: TONY SCHULTZ, HANNAH LEVIN, WILLIAM MARTI, GAYLE HILARY, GREG WILLIAMS, TIM MCCARTHY STEADICAM OPERATOR: RON SCHLAEGER STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TONY SCHULTZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDREW LEMON UTILITIES: GEORGE MONTEJANO, III, ROBERTO RUELAS SPLINTER UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN GARBELINNI

A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS

“THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 18 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: TOM BECK PED OPERATORS: DAVID WEEKS, PAUL WILEMAN, TIM O’NEILL HANDHELD OPERATOR: CHIP FRASER JIB OPERATOR: DAVID RHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: DONOVAN GILBUENA VIDEO CONTROLLER: JAMES MORAN HEAD UTILITY: CRAIG “ZZO” MARAZZO UTILITIES: ARLO GILBUENA, WALLY LANCASTER, DIEGO AVALOS

BEACHWOOD SERVICES

“DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 55 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VINCE STEIB OPERATORS: MARK WARSHAW, VICKIE WALKER, MICHAEL J. DENTON, STEVE CLARK CAMERA UTILITIES: STEVE BAGDADI, GARY CYPHER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ALEXIS DELLAR HANSON

“THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 8 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON BLOUNT OPERATORS: SCOTT BROWNER, NATE HAVENS ASSISTANTS: TRACY DAVEY, GARY WEBSTER, JENNIFER BELL PRICE, MICHELLE BAKER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN MILLS LOADER: DILSHAN HERATH

BONANZA PRODUCTIONS, INC “SHAMELESS” SEASON 11

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY HARDWICK OPERATOR: SYLVAIN D’HAUTCOURT, KRISTY TULLY BOTTOMS ASSISTANTS: RYO KINNO, DARBY NEWMAN, DAVID BERRYMAN, TIM LUKE LOADER: MAYA MORGAN DIGITAL UTILITY: AMI MARISCAL STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PAUL SARKIS

CALLING GRACE PRODUCTIONS “SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDRIJ PAREKH, ASC OPERATOR: HEATHER NORTON ASSISTANTS: TOSHIRO YAMAGUCHI, ELIZABETH CASINELLI, AURELIA WINBORN, LIZ HEDGES STEADICAM OPERATOR: JULIAN DELACRUZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GUILLERMO TUNON LOADER: KATIE GREAVES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOJO WHILDEN

CBS

“BULL” SEASON 5 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DERICK UNDERSCHULTZ, JOHN ARONSON OPERATORS: BARNABY SHAPIRO, DOUGLAS PELLEGRINO ASSISTANTS: ROMAN LUKIW, SOREN NASH, MICHAEL LOBB, TREVOR WOLFSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEITH PUTNAM STEADICAM OPERATOR: BARNABY SHAPIRO LOADERS: NIALANEY RODRIGUEZ, REBECCA HEWITT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DAVID RUSSELL

“DIARY OF A FUTURE PRESIDENT” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LOWELL PETERSON, ASC OPERATORS: RORY KNEPP, SOC, PAUL PLANNETTE ASSISTANTS: JOHN C. FLINN, IV, JOHN POUNCEY, CANDICE MARAIS, DON BURTON STEADICAM OPERATOR: RORY KNEPP, SOC LOADER: BOBBY HATFIELD

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 40

LIGHTING DESIGNER: DARREN LANGER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT BRAUN OPERATORS: JAMES B. PATRICK, ALLEN VOSS, ED SARTORI, HENRY ZINMAN, BOB CAMPI, RODNEY MCMAHON, ANTHONY SALERNO JIB OPERATOR: JAIMIE CANTRELL CAMERA UTILITY: TERRY AHERN VIDEO CONTROLLERS: MIKE DOYLE, PETER STENDAL

“EVIL” SEASON 2 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PETR HLINOMAZ, FRED MURPHY, ASC OPERATORS: AIKEN WEISS, KATE LAROSE, PARRIS MAYHEW ASSISTANTS: ROBERT BECCHIO, RENE CROUT, ALISA COLLEY, VINCENT LARAWAY LOADERS: TONI SHEPPARD, HOLDEN HLINOMAZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH FISHER

“THE NEIGHBORHOOD” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTIAN LA FOUNTAINE OPERATORS: BRUCE REUTLINGER

LIGHTING DIRECTOR: CHRISTIAN HIBBARD OPERATORS: GREG GROUWINKEL, PARKER BARTLETT,

JANUARY 2021 PRODUCTION CREDITS

87


GEORGE LA FOUNTAINE, CHRIS WILCOX, KRIS CONDE CAMERA UTILITIES: CHRIS TODD, VICKI BECK ASSISTANT: CRAIG LA FOUNTAINE VIDEO CONTROLLER: CLIFF JONES

“THE TALK” SEASON 11 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: MARISA DAVIS PED OPERATORS: ART TAYLOR, MARK GONZALES, ED STAEBLER HANDHELD OPERATORS: RON BARNES, KEVIN MICHEL, JEFF JOHNSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHARLES FERNANDEZ UTILITIES: MIKE BUSHNER, DOUG BAIN, DEAN FRIZZEL, BILL GREINER, JON ZUCCARO VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“WHY WOMEN KILL” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL PRICE, ASC OPERATORS: SCOTT BOETTLE, JOHN HANKAMMER, COBY GARFIELD ASSISTANTS: DARRELL HERRINGTON, DREW HAN, MARK SASABUCHI, GARY JOHNSON, ERIC MATOS, JOSH NOVAK STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOHN HANKAMMER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MIKE RUSH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE WILDER

COMMUNITY SERVICE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “UNTITLED MICHAEL CHE SKETCH SHOW” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC BRANCO OPERATORS: MICHELLE CLEMENTINE, QUENELL JONES, SOC ASSISTANTS: VANESSA VIERA MORRISON, JOSUE LOAYZA, KYLE GORJANC, JD SLATER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MICHAEL MAIATICO LOADER: COURTNEY DENK

COOLER WATER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BETTY” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JACKSON HUNT OPERATOR: JOSEPH DWYER ASSISTANTS: MEGAERA STEPHENS, GOVINDA ANGULO, JOSHUA REYES, HELEN CASSELL, PATRICK O’SHEA LOADER: EMMA HING STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: STEPHANIE MEI-LING

“GILDED AGE” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MANUEL BILLETER, VANJA CERNJUL, ASC OPERATORS: OLIVER CARY, PYARE FORTUNATO ASSISTANTS: JOHN OLIVERI, MICHAEL BURKE, SARAH MAY GUENTHER, MABEL SANTOS HAUGEN LOADERS: CALEB MURPHY, BRIAN CARDENAS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ALISON ROSA

“IN TREATMENT” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN FIERBERG, ASC, ANNE ETHERIDGE OPERATORS: JAY HERRON, TAMMY FOUTS ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL ENDLER, DONALD BURGHARDT RUDY D. PAHOYO, MIKE PRIOR DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIM NAGASAWA LOADER: EMILY GOODWIN TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SUZANNE TENNER

88

JANUARY 2021 PRODUCTION CREDITS

CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC

JAY SQUARED PRODUCTIONS, LLC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HOLLIS MEMINGER OPERATORS: PETER VIETRO-HANNUM, BEKA VENEZIA ASSISTANTS: AMANDA ROTZLER, DAMON LEMAY, EMILY DEBLASI, KRISTINA LALLY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAMES STROSAHL LOADER: TANEICE MCFADDEN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE RIVELLI

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW PRIESTLEY OPERATORS: CARLOS GUERRA, RYAN TOUSSIENG ASSISTANTS: ANDREW PECK, WESLEY HODGES, CORNELIA KLAPPER, KAIH WONG LOADERS: WILL FORTUNE, PHILIP THOMPSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH FISHER

“YOUNGER” SEASON 7

DISNEY/FOX 21

“QUEEN OF THE SOUTH” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ABE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: DOMINIC BARTOLONE, MATT VALENTINE ASSISTANTS: JASON GARCIA, DAN MCKEE, RIGNEY SACKLEY, ZANDER WHITE STEADICAM OPERATOR: DOMINIC BARTOLONE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JASON GARCIA DIGITAL LOADER: ADAM LIPSCOMB

EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD THORIN, JR. OPERATORS: STEPHEN CONSENTINO, GEOFF FROST ASSISTANTS: GRAHAM BURT, JACOB STAHLMAN, MARTIN PETERSON, KENNETH MARTELL LOADER: JONATHAN SCHAEFER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PATRICK HARBRON

“SWAGGER” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RODNEY TAYLOR OPERATORS: BODIE ORMAN, GARY HATFIELD ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER GLEATON, ELIZABETH SILVER, MARK BAIN, ZAKIYA LUCAS-MURRAY, ERIC EATON, MAXWELL FISHER LOADER: BRITTANY WILSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA KOURKOUNIS

FUQUA FILMS

“THE RESIDENT” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BART TAU OPERATORS: MATT DOLL, ANDY FISHER, CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN DEGUIRE, TAYLOR CASE, APRIL RUANE CROWLEY, MIKE FISHER, JENNIFER RANKINE, GRACE PRELLER CHAMBERS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATT DOLL STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JUSTIN DEGUIRE LOADER: TREY VOLPE DIGITAL UTILITY: RYAN ST CLAIR 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY FISHER OPERATORS: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS, MICHAEL GFELNER, COOPER DUNN ASSISTANTS: JACKSON MCDONALD, CLAIRE PAPEVIES, TAYLOR CASE, MATT EVANS, STERLING WIGGINS, TRISHA SOLYN STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS DIGITAL UTILITY: TREY VOLPE UTILITY: ERIC GAVLINSKI

HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “DELILAH” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANKA MALATYNSKA OPERATORS: JESSICA LOPEZ, ASHLEY HUGHES ASSISTANTS: JAMIE MARLOWE, DANIEL TUREK, MONICA BARRIOS-SMITH, SAMUEL KIM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JASON JOHNSON

“MANIFEST” SEASON 3

KANAN PRODUCTIONS, INC. “RAISING KANAN” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERNAN OTANO OPERATORS: FRANCIS SPIELDENNER, GREGORY FINKEL ASSISTANTS: MARK FERGUSON, EMMA REESE-SCANLON, MARC LOFORTE, GREGORY PACE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BJORN JACKSON LOADERS: KEITH ANDERSON, JESSICA CELE-NAZARIO STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ZACH DILGARD, PAUL SCHIRALDI PUBLICIST: SABRINA LAUFER

LGTV SET UP 5 PRODUCTIONS, INC. “THIS COUNTRY” SEASON 1

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHANA HAGAN, ASC OPERATOR: BRENDA ZUNIGA ASSISTANTS: NICHOLAS GOWIN, ELI WALLACE-JOHANSSON, PALMER ANDERSON, NICHOLAS BROWN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MARK GILMER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BROWNIE HARRIS

LIONSGATE

“BLINDSPOTTING” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TARIN ANDERSON OPERATORS: REID RUSSELL, JAN RUONA ASSISTANTS: IAN BARBELLA, ERIN NAIFEH, BRIAN FREEMAN, BIANCA GARCIA STEADICAM OPERATOR: REID RUSSELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: AARON PICOT CAMERA UTILITY: NICOLA CARUSO

MFW PRODUCTIONS “BLACK FRIDAY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID KRUTA OPERATORS: JOHN KOPEC, TOM FITZGERALD ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER HEBERT, NOLAN RUDMAN-BALL, CHRIS MALENFANT, MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ TORRENT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATTHEW DORRIS

MRC/APPLE/EASY MARK, LLC “EASY MARK”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHELLE LAWLER OPERATORS: ROSS COSCIA, SARAH LEVY ASSISTANTS: CHELI CLAYTON SAMARA, IGNACIO MUSICH, AMANDA MORGAN, ARTHUR ZAJAC DIGITAL IMGAGING TECH: PETER BRUNET DIGITAL UTILITY: LARRINA JEFFERSON

NARROW ISLE PRODUCTIONS “OUTER BANKS” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: J.B. SMITH, GONZALO AMAT OPERATORS: BO WEBB, MATT LYONS ASSISTANTS: LAWRANCE GIANNESCHI, III, MATTHEW KELLY JACKSON, DOMINIC ATTANASIO LOADER: NICK CANNON CAMERA UTILITY: DANIEL BUBB STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JACKSON DAVIS


NBC

“BROOKLYN NINE-NINE” SEASON 8 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICK PAGE OPERATORS: PHIL MASTRELLA, LAUREN GADD, JOEL TALLBUT ASSISTANTS: JAY LEVY, BILL GERARDO, DUSTIN MILLER, WILLIAM SCHMIDT, CHRIS CARLSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK GILBERT LOADER: KURT LEVY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN P. FLEENOR

“CHICAGO MED” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LEX DUPONT, ASC OPERATORS: FAIRES ANDERSON SEKIYA, JOE TOLITANO, BENJAMIN SPEK ASSISTANTS: GEORGE OLSON, KEITH HUEFFMEIER, SAM KNAPP, PATRICK DOOLEY, JOEY RICHARDSON, MATT BROWN STEADICAM OPERATOR: FAIRES ANDERSON SEKIYA LOADER: CHRIS SUMMERS UTILITY: ELIJAH WILBORN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH SISSON

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 8 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES ZUCAL OPERATORS: VICTOR MACIAS, DARRYL MILLER, SETH THOMAS ASSISTANTS: JOHN YOUNG, DON CARLSON, DAVID WIGHTMAN, JAMISON ACKER, KYLE BELOUSEK, NICK WILSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: VICTOR MACIAS LOADER: MARION TUCKER DIGITAL UTILITIES: CHRIS POLMANSKI, STEVE CLAY

“F.B.I.” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARC RITZEMA OPERATORS: AFTON GRANT, JAMIE SILVERSTEIN ASSISTANTS: LEE VICKERY, YURI INOUE, GEORGE LOOKSHIRE, NKEM UMENYI STEADICAM OPERATOR: AFTON GRANT LOADERS: RAUL MARTINEZ, CONNOR LYNCH

“FBI: MOST WANTED” SEASON 2 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LUDOVIC LITTEE, DANIEL PATTERSON OPERATORS: CHRISTOPHER MOONE, REBECCA ARNDT ASSISTANTS: BRADEN BELMONTE, JAMES DALY, RACHAEL DOUGHTY, CAROLYN WILLS, STORR TODD LOADER: AUSTIN RESTREPO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARK SCHAFER

“GIRLS5EVA” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN INWOOD OPERATORS: DAVID TAICHER, ROBERT PAGLIARO ASSISTANTS: DOUGLAS FOOTE, CHRISTOPHER WIEZOREK, AMBER ROSALES, PATRICK BRACEY LOADER: CHARLOTTE SKUTCH STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ANNE JOYCE, HEIDI GUTMAN

“GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON OLDAK OPERATORS: MIKA LEVIN, BRIAN OUTLAND, SHELLY GURZI ASSISTANTS: JOHN RUIZ, PATRICK BLANCHET, JENNA HOFFMAN, ROBYN BUCHANAN, CARTER SMITH, JONNIE MENTZER LOADER: MATT SCHOUTEN STEADICAM OPERATOR: MIKA LEVIN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JOHN RUIZ CAMERA UTILITY: GLEN LANDRY DIGITAL UTILITY: DEEPAK ADHIKARY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JORDIN ALTHAUS

“NEW AMSTERDAM” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW VOEGELI OPERATORS: SCOTT TINSLEY, GARETH MANWARING ASSISTANTS: PEDRO CORCEGA, JAMES MADRID,

MATTHEW MONTALTO, ROBERT WRASE LOADERS: ANABEL CAICEDO, KATHERINE RIVERA

“THE EQUALIZER” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GAVIN KELLY OPERATORS: DAVID ISERN, BLAKE JOHNSON ASSISTANTS: BEN SPANER, FILIPP PENSON, ROBERT CLINE, KATHERINE RIVERA, JIEUN SHIM, DARNELL MCDONALD DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TIFFANY ARMOUR-TEJADA LOADERS: PETER PERLMAN, IVANA BERNAL STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: BARBARA NITKE, MICHAEL GREENBERG

NETFLIX PRODUCTIONS, LLC “ARCHIVE 81” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BOBBY BUKOWSKI, JULIE KIRKWOOD OPERATORS: BUD KREMP, LISA SENE ASSISTANTS: DEB PETERSON, KYLE BLACKMAN, BENEDICT BALDAUFF, KEVIN GALLOWAY CAMERA UTILITY: KIMBERLY HERMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CURTIS ABBOTT LOADER: GABRIEL MARCHETTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: QUANTRELL COLBERT

“METAL LORDS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANETTE HAELLMIGK OPERATORS: COLIN HUDSON, MATT MORIARTY ASSISTANTS: KYRIL CVETKOV, JERRY TURNER, MIKE CROCKETT, PATRICK LAVALLEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: COLIN HUDSON STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KYRIL CVETKOV DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SEAN RAWLS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SCOTT PATRICK GREEN

“THE UPSHAWS” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC, CHUCK OZEAS OPERATORS: KEVIN HAGGERTY, VINCE SINGLETARY, DON DAVIS, CHRIS WILCOX ASSISTANT: AL MYERS CAMERA UTILITIES: JOHN WEISS, WILL BROWN VIDEO CONTROLLER/DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: VON THOMAS

ORANGE CONE PRODUCTIONS “LEGACIES” SEASON 3

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SMITH, MICHAEL KARASICK OPERATORS: BRIAN DAVIS, SOC, STEWART SMITH, SOC ASSISTANTS: GERAN DANIELS, KELLY POOR, BENJAMIN EADES, SAGAR DESAI STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEWART SMITH, SOC DIGITA IMAGING TECH: BILL MUELLER LOADER: JESSE EAGLE DIGITAL UTILITIES: AMANDA KOPEC, EMILY GIBSON

PACIFIC 2/1 ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, INC.

“AMERICAN CRIME STORY: IMPEACHMENT” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SIMON DENNIS, BSC OPERATORS: ERIC SCHILLING, JAMIE STERBA ASSISTANTS: DAVID LEB, NATHAN CRUM, JARED WILSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: ERIC SCHILLING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: SPENCER SHWETZ DIGITAL UTILITY: SHANNON VAN METRE

ROCART, INC.

“SIDE HUSTLE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: GEORGE LA FOUNTAINE, KRIS CONDE, ELI FRANKS, BOB MCCALL TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS TECHNOJIB TECH: COREY GIBBONS

ASSISTANT: VERONICA DAVIDSON CAMERA UTILITIES: ERINN BELL, RICHARD FINE, CHRIS COBB DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: BARRY LONG

SAN VICENTE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 8

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SAADE MUSTAFA, MICHAEL CARACCIOLO OPERATORS: DEREK WALKER, DEVIN LADD, PETER RENIERS ASSISTANTS: DANIEL CASEY, MIKE GUASPARI, JAMES GOURLEY, EDGAR VELEZ, EDWIN HERRERA, KATHERYN IUELE STEADICAM OPERATOR: DEVIN LADD STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MIKE GUASPARI LOADERS: HAROLD ERKINS, MARK BOYLE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: WILL HART

SONY

“CALL YOUR MOTHER” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: EDDIE FINE, RON HIRSCHMAN, DEBORAH O’BRIEN, DAVID DECHANT, BRIAN GUNTER ASSISTANT: JASON HERRING VIDEO CONTROLLER: DEREK LANTZ UTILITIES: RICHIE FINE, DAN LORENZE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA BROOKS

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 36 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, MIKE TRIBBLE, JEFF SCHUSTER, L. DAVID IRETE JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 37 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, L.DAVID IRETE, RAY GONZALES, MIKE TRIBBLE CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

SOURDOUGH PRODUCTIONS, LLC “SUCCESSION” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATRICK CAPONE OPERATORS: GREGOR TAVENNER, ALAN PIERCE ASSISTANTS: ETHAN BORSUK, CORY STAMBLER, BRENDAN RUSSELL, ALEC NICKEL LOADERS: JOSHUA BOTE, NAIMA NOGUERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MACALL POLAY

STALWART PRODUCTIONS

“FEAR THE WALKING DEAD” SEASON 6 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JALALUDIN TRAUTMANN, BVK, RAMSEY NICKELL OPERATORS: RAMON ENGLE, KRIS HARDY ASSISTANTS: MARK BOYLE, THEDA CUNNINGHAM, SAM PEARCY, DON HOWE STEADICAM OPERATOR: RAMON ENGLE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAMIE METZGER DIGITAL UTILITY: JASON HEAD LOADER: LOUIS WATT

JANUARY 2021 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: JOE DATRI TECHNOCRANE TECH: RYAN CROCI REMOTE HEAD TECH: JOE DATRI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RYAN GREEN PUBLICIST: SHARA STORCH

“KEVIN CAN F**K HIMSELF” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADRIAN PENG CORREIA OPERATORS: SHANNON MADDEN, JOEL SAN JUAN ASSISTANTS: GREG WIMER, DEAN EGAN, JAMIE FITZPATRICK, MATT HEDGES LOADER: AUDREY STEVENS DIGITAL UTILITY: ANNI ABBRUZZESE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOJO WHILDEN

STARZ P-TOWN PRODUCTIONS, LLC “HIGHTOWN” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRAD SMITH, RADIUM CHEUNG, HKSC OPERATORS: DAVID KIMELMAN, DEREK TINDALL ASSISTANTS: ALAN ALDRIDGE, SEAN YAPLE, SETH LEWIS, NICK COCUZZA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MALIKA FRANKLIN LOADER: CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DANA HAWLEY

THG ENTERTAINMENT, INC. “THE HATING GAME”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NOAH GREENBERG OPERATOR: NIKNAZ TAVAKOLIAN ASSISTANTS: ADAM GONZALEZ, JOSEPH ROBINSON, JIEUN SHIM, DARNELL MCDONALD DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN KERSTEN

THIMBLE PEA PICTURES, LLC

“UNTITLED ANNA DELVEY ART PROJECT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY NORMAN OPERATORS: GEORGE BIANCHINI, GREGORY PRINCIPATO ASSISTANTS: ROBERT MANCUSO, NICHOLAS HAHN, JUSTIN MANCUSO, EVE STRICKMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DOUGLAS HORTON LOADER: JONATHAN PERALTA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: NICOLE RIVELLI, LIZ FISHER, CHRIS SAUNDERS

TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “FOR LIFE” SEASON 2

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CLIFF CHARLES OPERATORS: ELI ARONOFF, RICARDO SARMIENTO ASSISTANTS: DEAN MARTINEZ, JELANI WILSON, KELLON INNOCENT, BRIAN GRANT LOADER: JAMES ABAMONT

“S.W.A.T.” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRANCIS KENNY, ASC, CRAIG FIKSE OPERATORS: TIM DOLAN, RILEY PADELFORD, MICHAEL OTIS ROPERT ASSISTANTS: RYAN PARKS, TIM COBBS, THANE CHARACKY, BAIRD STEPTOE, II, LOGAN TURNER, GARY BEVANS, MIKE FAUNTLEROY STEADICAM OPERATORS: TIM DOLAN, RILEY PADELFORD CAMERA UTILITY: CARL LAMMI LOADERS: TREVOR BEELER, LOUIS HERNANDEZ

UNIVERSAL

“LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 22 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL GREEN OPERATORS: JONATHAN HERRON, MICHAEL LATINO ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER DEL SORDO, MATTHEW BALZARINI, JUSTIN ZVERIN, EMILY DUMBRILL LOADERS: MAX SCHWARZ, JASON GAINES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

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JANUARY 2021 PRODUCTION CREDITS

VERTICAL HOLD PRODUCTIONS, LLC “PRODIGAL” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY WOLBERG, CHRISTOPHER RAYMOND OPERATORS: MALCOLM PURNELL, BRIAN JACKSON ASSISTANTS: ALEX WATERSTON, HAMILTON LONGYEAR, WARIS SUPANPONG, KEVIN HOWARD, KATIE WAALKES, RANDY SCHWARTZ CAMERA UTILITY: MCKENZIE RAYCROFT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KYO MOON LOADER: MATTIE HAMER

WARNER BROS

“ALL AMERICAN” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NIKHIL PANIZ OPERATORS: ERIC LAUDADIO, DANIEL WURSCHL ASSISTANTS: JON LINDSAY, BLAKE COLLINS, GREG DELLERSON, JESSICA PINNS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: URBAN OLSSON

“ALL RISE” SEASON 2 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HARP, AMANDA TREYZ OPERATORS: TIM ROARKE, STEPHEN CLANCY, SHANELE ALVAREZ ASSISTANTS: MATT GUIZA, KRISTI ARNDS, RANDY SHANOFSKY, ADAM TSANG, COLLEEN LINDL, BENNY BAILEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEPHEN CLANCY STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KRISTI ARNDS LOADER: PETER PEI DIGITAL UTILITIES: MORGAN JENKINS, KAREN CLANCY

“THE KOMINSKY METHOD” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAIME REYNOSO, AMC OPERATORS: MICHAEL WALSH, BONNIE BLAKE, JOEL PERKAL ASSISTANTS: ROBERT MUTHAMIA, JIM THIBO, CAMERON OWEN, YEVGENIY SHRAYBER, OLIVER PONCE STEADICAM OPERATOR: MICHAEL WALSH LOADER: ROSE LICAVOLI CAMERA UTILITY: CHRISTOPHER BROOKS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ERIC VOAKE, ANNE MARIE FOX

“YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BUZZ FEITSHANS, IV OPERATORS: NEIL TOUSSAINT, SOC, AARON SCHUH ASSISTANTS: MATTHEW DEL RUTH, GRANT YELLEN, BRAD GILSON, JR., JAMES COBB STEADICAM OPERATOR: AARON SCHUH STEADICAM ASSISTANT: GRANT YELLEN DIGITAL LOADERS: BAILEY SOFTNESS, JENISE WHITEHEAD STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ROBERT VOETS, MICHAEL DESMOND, DARREN MICHAELS, NICOLE WILDER

YALE ENTERTAINMENT, LLC “PANAMA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PJ LOPEZ OPERATOR: CARLOS ZAYAS ASSISTANTS: JULI SILVER TARACIDO, BRENDALIZ NEGRON COLON, ZORAIDA LUNA, NATASHA LUNA CAMERA UTILITY: THATIANA HERNANDEZ LOADER: NESTOR CESTERO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LAURA MAGRUDER

“BOB HEARTS ABISHOLA” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATTI LEE, ASC OPERATORS: MARK DAVISON, CHRIS HINOJOSA, JON PURDY, MICHELLE CRENSHAW ASSISTANTS: JEFF JOHNSON, VITO DE PALMA, MARIANNE FRANCO, ADAN TORRES, LISA ANDERSON, ALICIA BRAUNS, LANCE MITCHELL, JORDAN HRISTOV VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: T. BRETT FEENEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL YARISH PUBLICISTS: KATHLEEN TANJI, MARC KLEIN

“B POSITIVE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY BAUM, ASC OPERATORS: ALEC ELIZONDO, TRAVERS HILL, LANCE BILLITZER, EDDIE FINE ASSISTANTS: ADRIAN LICCIARDI, MICHELE MCKINLEY, JEFF ROTH, CLINT PALMER, JASON HERRING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN UTILITIES: RICHARD FINE, DAN LORENZE

“LUCIFER” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOM CAMARDA OPERATORS: MATTHEW PIERCE, DOUG OH ASSISTANTS: SIMON JARVIS, CHRIS MACK, CLAIRE STONE, TIM SHERIDAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GREG GABRIO DIGITAL UTILITIES: TYLER ERNST, RICH CONTI TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: PAUL VOUGHT REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

“MOM” SEASON 8 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN V. SILVER, ASC OPERATORS: CARY MCCRYSTAL, JAMIE HITCHCOCK, SOC, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, CANDY EDWARDS ASSISTANTS: MEGGINS MOORE, NIGEL STEWART, SEAN ASKINS, MARK JOHNSON, WHITNEY JONES CAMERA UTILITIES: ALICIA BRAUNS, COLIN BROWN, JEANNETTE HJORTH VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEVIN FAUST DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BENJAMIN STEEPLES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ROBERT VOETS PUBLICIST: MARC KLEIN

COMMERCIALS BISCUIT “MIO”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT OPERATORS: CHRIS BOTTOMS, BOB SETTLEMIRE ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN PHANTOM TECH: PATRICK MCGRAW

“TIDE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JONATHAN FREEMAN OPERATOR: VINCENT VENNITTI ASSISTANTS: RICK GIOIA, PETER MORELLO, JORDAN LEVIE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: TYLER ISAACSON

CHELSEA PICTURES “CABANUVA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF STONEHOUSE OPERATOR: NATHAN SWINGLE ASSISTANTS: JILL TUFTS, MICHAEL RODRIGUEZ TORRENT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK PASQUARIELLO

“YSL” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRED ELMES, ASC ASSISTANTS: JEFF TAYLOR, NATHAN MCGARIGAL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JESSICA TA CRANE TECH: BRADY WESTON SCORPIO HEAD TECH: LANCE RIECK


HUNGRY MAN PRODUCTIONS “AT&T”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KAI SAUL OPERATOR: TOM ARSENAULT ASSISTANTS: NICOLAS MARTIN, DAVID E. THOMAS, JR., MICHAELA ANGELIQUE, ALAN CERTEZA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BEN HOPKINS

“ROCKET MORTGAGE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, DANIEL HANYCH, NOAH GLAZER STEADICAM OPERATOR: LIAM CLARK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

ASSISTANTS: RICK GIOIA, CHRISTIAN CARMODY, NATE MCGARIGAL, JEFF TAYLOR DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE BELACK

PARK PICTURES “GEICO”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KIRA KELLY, ASC OPERATOR: ROBERT ARNOLD ASSISTANTS: KIRA MURDOCK, PRESTON PHILLIPS, MIGUEL TORRES, CARMAN SPOTO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: STEVE D. HARNELL

PULSE FILMS

“UBER GIANTS”

LOS YORK

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATT MITCHELL OPERATORS: PARRIS MAYHEW, KENNY WU ASSISTANTS: CHEVY ANDERSON, CAROLYN PENDER, CODY SCHROCK, KYLE PARSONS, JAMES DEAN DRUMMOND STEADICAM OPERATOR: PARRIS MAYHEW DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: HUNTER FAIRSTONE

“CADILLAC” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KAI SAUL ASSISTANTS: NICOLAS MARTIN, ALAN CERTEZA STEADICAM OPERATOR: LIAM CLARK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BEN HOPKINS

M SS NG P ECES

TOOL OF NORTH AMERICA

“NY LOTTERY”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GARRETT HARDY DAVIS ASSISTANTS: KEN THOMPSON, DANTE CORROCHER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATTHEW RICHARDS

“TARGET” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TRISTAN SHERIDAN ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, KAZ KARAISMAILOGLU

“P42R”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GUS BENDINELLI ASSISTANTS: ERICK AGUILAR, ANGELO GENTILE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MATT SCHOUTEN

“PEPSI” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DALLAS STERLING ASSISTANTS: MARC WIERCIOCH, JED HERNANDEZ DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN ZANIT

MJZ

“MCDONALD’S” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEANNE VIENNE ASSISTANTS: NINA CHIEN, MITCH MALPICA DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GEORGE ROBERT MORSE PHANTOM OPERATOR: TYLER ISAACSON

O POSITIVE “FORD”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARREN LEW OPERATOR: CHARLES BEYER

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JANUARY 2021 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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STOP MOTION

01.2021

Sara Terry UNIT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL - 2018

No lines or selfies in front of Park City’s Egyptian Theatre on Main Street this month. No Sundance Film Festival as we’ve known it for more than 40 years, and not as I’ve known it for the past decade as a Sundance Documentary Fellow, or, more recently, covering the festival for ICG Magazine, as well as ICG’s annual Snowdance party (held in the most beautiful sunlit room in Park City). And yet, like so many other film festivals hit hard by the pandemic, Sundance has adapted to the crazy contours of COVID-19. This year’s festival will bring film lovers (and film creators) together online and in person at socially distanced satellite screenings across the country, held in partnership with local arts organizations. Bring it, 2021.

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JANU 2021 JANU ARYARY 2021


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