ICG Magazine - February/March 2019 - Awards Season

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ICG MAGAZINE

CAPTAIN MARVEL THIS IS US + GLORIA BELL + MILLION DOLLAR MILE




SUBSCRIBE ONLINE @ICGMAGAZINE.COM


ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATIONS ®

BEST PICTURE INCLUDING

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY • ALFONSO CUARÓN “

THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR. THE RAVISHING IMAGES ARE PURE ASTONISHMENT. A TRUE WORK OF ART.”

CLICK TO WATCH VIDEO

PETER TRAVERS,

WINNER

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

ASC AWARD NOMINEE

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY ( THEATRICAL RELEASE)

ALFONSO CUARÓN


CONTENTS

60 CAPTAIN MARVEL

Ben Davis, BSC, helps debut a pre-Avengers super-heroine.

DEPARTMENTS GEAR GUIDE / 14 DEEP FOCUS / 22 BOOK REVIEW / 26 ON THE STREET / 30 RE-PLAY / 34 EXPOSURE / 38 PRODUCTION CREDITS / 96 STOP MOTION / 112 6

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FEBRUARY/MARCH 2019

70

MILLION DOLLAR MILE Cash-hungry contestants make for TV’s most exciting (and daunting) new reality competition show.

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GLORIA BELL Argentinian cinematographer Natasha Braier, ASC, ADF, lights up Julianne Moore’s portrayal of rediscovered youth and purpose.

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76

THIS IS US The #1 drama on broadcast television hits its stride in Season 3 thanks to a Guild camera team that’s as fast and sure-footed as any in the industry.

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Photo by Scott Alan Humbert

P RESIDE N T ' S LETTER / /

THE APP THAT CHANGED THE WORLD Shortly after the tragic death of Local 600 Camera Assistant Sarah Jones, on February 20, 2014, on the set of an independent film near Savannah, GA, our National Executive Board went into action. The goal, five years ago, was to help this industry avert similar tragedies. Sarah’s death was due to illegal behavior by those in charge. The fact that crewmembers were not informed of the danger at the Georgia location was also problematic. So what could we as a Guild do to help our industry become safer? Working through the ICG Safety Committee, an app was developed for smartphones that would supply information without the Internet, so users could access every bulletin published by the Motion Picture and Television Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee. With this app, ICG safety experts wanted filmmakers to be able to recognize a dangerous situation; and reference protocols to work within established safety parameters. They also wanted users to be able to call the safety hotline for any major signatory of the IATSE International – studios, networks, large production companies, etc. – as well as ICG’s own 24/7 safety hotline to report and/or address dangerous working conditions. All of those functions were released eight months after Sarah Jones’ passing, and in the intervening years the app has been downloaded thousands of times by IATSE craft members. And ICG’s Safety App has never been restricted to Local 600. Indeed, one of its mandates was to be available industry-wide. Over time, our Safety Committee has modified the app with features that include Safety FAQ’s, a section on Workplace Accident or Illness, a Safety To-Do List, safety articles that are periodically updated, and a section on Workplace Harassment and Discrimination, which includes ICG’s own policy, the ICG Diversity Committee’s Statement, Regional and State EEOC (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) offices/ contact information, and the studios’ harassment and discrimination hotlines. Harassment and discrimination are safety issues and should be acted upon immediately. Another feature adds a way to report unsafe hours or other hazards directly to ICG’s offices. [All reporting is confidential, and acted upon with alacrity and purpose.] Since the app’s release, ICG has approached the Motion Picture and Television Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee with its video highlighting the dangers of “free driving,” i.e., a camera

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operator handholding a camera in the front seat to capture the car’s driver, usually an actor, while the vehicle is in motion. The outcome of an air bag deploying in that situation would be catastrophic; and the Industry-Wide Safety Committee agreed, issuing a Safety Bulletin on Recommended Guidelines For Free Driving last May. Local 600 has also hired experts to provide guidelines on the risks of radio frequency (RF) equipment attached to cameras on sets. When safe working distance guidelines are not observed, RF signals have been shown to cause physical damage due to the localized heating of living tissue, and may possibly contribute to other ill bodily effects like cancer. We’re also working to determine safety parameters for camera operators required to execute long handheld takes with heavy equipment, concerns that were raised at the recent Videotape Agreement Negotiations, where the producers committed to forming a labor-management subcommittee, including Locals 600 and 695, to consult with an ergonomics expert with the goal of refining the Awareness Sheet on Extended or Excessive Takes and converting it into a Safety Bulletin. The work of the ICG Safety Committee and the NEB has been swift and decisive, borne out by the fact that this app is now in use around the globe – despite the contact numbers not being applicable for each particular country and region. To bridge that gap, after the ASC International Symposium, where 36 countries and cinematography associations were represented, ICG made available an open-coded module with instructions that will allow each union, society and nation around the world, to include its own unique safety hotlines. The pilot program for this is in progress, with the first recipient nation being New Zealand. Richard Bluck, President of the New Zealand Film and Television Guild, who was present at the ASC symposium, is adapting the Local 600 Safety App for his country’s use as I write this. The ultimate goal is for this app to be available for professional use and in film schools around the world. (Every time I speak to or teach a group of students or teachers I insist they download ICG’s Safety App before we get started.) Think about our own Local 600 members travelling to countries that don’t have well defined safety regulations, and the imperative to export our own industry safety standards becomes that much more important. There’s no doubt – this app can change our world.

Steven Poster, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

M4AT R I X AXIS GIMBAL


February/March 2019 vol. 90 no. 02

Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers ACCOUNTING Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra COPY EDITORS Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley CONTRIBUTORS Ron Batzdorff David Geffner Kevin Martin Margot Lester Harry Zimmerman

INTERNATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHERS GUILD Local 600 IATSE NATIONAL PRESIDENT Steven Poster, ASC NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Heather Norton 1ST NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT Paul Varrieur 2ND NATIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Eddie Avila NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Douglas C. Hart NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Christy Fiers NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine

PUBLICATIONS & PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Spooky Stevens, Chair

CIRCULATION OFFICE 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, CA 90046 Tel: (323) 876-0160 Fax: (323) 878-1180 Email: circulation@icgmagazine.com

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ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2018, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Nonmembers may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

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W IDE A N G LE / /

O

ur first double issue of 2019 lines up with Hollywood’s awards season, which includes the Golden Globes, SAG, ASC, DGA, Oscars, and the 56th Publicists Awards Luncheon, hosted by Local 600 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel. This year’s Publicists Awards will be unlike any other given the loss of Publicist Awards Committee Chairman and ICG National Executive Board Member Henri Bollinger. The words that passed the lips of anyone who met and worked with Henri, who left us last summer, a year before his 90th birthday, were typically “Old World gentleman,” “gracious and courtly,” “kind and considerate,” and other superlatives that spoke not only to Henri’s supreme professionalism but also his exquisite character. Henri was, in the Yiddish vernacular of his own European/ Jewish heritage, a “real mensch,” i.e., a person of integrity and honor. Over and beyond Henri’s polite and appealing nature were his contributions to this industry and to the craft of publicity, which cannot be overstated. Henri joined the Publicists Guild of America when the organization was in its second year of existence (1957), and served for nearly six decades on the Publicists Awards Committee. He ran his own agency for some 50 years, handling clients that included Bob Barker, Shirley Jones and Marty Ingels. Henri represented the PR needs of entities as diverse as the Prism Awards and Binion’s Hotel and Casino/Las Vegas, where he helped publicize “The World Series of Poker.” (Yes, it’s one of ESPN’s most popular annual events now, due in no small part to Henri). His feature work included Wes Craven classics like The People Under the Stairs and Nightmare on Elm Street; in the world of television, shows like The Price Is Right, The Kennedy Center Honors, Simon & Simon, and The Julie Andrews Hour were all made better by Henri’s talents. My personal memories of Henri stemmed from long afternoons at ICG’s thrice-annual National Executive Board meetings, where he presided over one of the many smaller break-out groups tasked with putting action issues before the general board. Publicity & Publications was always one of the larger

committees, with a room full of people eager to provide input. The meetings, which were always civil but precariously long-winded, would sometimes go off the rails into arcane details or nonessential areas, and that’s when a stout but gentle voice would rise above the clamor. It was Henri, of course, the committee head and natural leader, urging us all to get the heart of the matter, to make cogent choices and decisions, to be clear and concise in the messaging that would come out of that room. The annual awards luncheon with which Henri came to be synonymous actually started in the early 60’s, and as he relayed in the event’s 50th-anniversary program, it was preceded by the “Ballyhoo Ball,” a raucous nighttime gathering where celebrities let their guards way down (to the chagrin of their own publicists in attendance). In that anniversary program, Henri describes boozed-up stars (like Frank Sinatra and John Wayne) nearly coming to blows in the parking lot. He tells first-hand tales from an era before social media and the Internet turned the public relations craft into one of the most demanding and unpredictable of any in this industry. Henri, of course, straddled both eras – merging the humanistic touch of Old Hollywood with today’s “thumb-out” digital revolution. In a Variety article from 2016, Henri recalled how he saw, early on, the need for new technology in his own practice. When a client asked him to send out press information at 2 a.m., Henri recounts how, “I could not stay up that late, so I recruited a student from my PR class at UCLA Extension. [The press release] got sent out at 2 a.m., and at 9 a.m. I got a call from the client, who was pleasantly surprised at getting all the responses that early in the day.” We have many articles in this double issue, stories about Captain Marvel, This Is Us, Gloria Bell, and Million Dollar Mile, along with insights from experienced awards-season veterans like Unit Still Photographer Trae Patton (page 20) and the ICG crew behind The Grammys (page 48). But be sure to check out the tribute piece on Henri Bollinger (page 42) from ICG Staff Writer Pauline Rogers, herself a former publicist. I guarantee, even if you never met Henri Bollinger, you will be, in Henri’s own words, “pleasantly surprised” by the value of a life and career extremely well lived.

CONTRIBUTORS

David Geffner (Family Plot)

“Visiting with the production team from This Is Us supplied a much-needed dose of optimism for the future of broadcast television. The risks creator Dan Fogelman, director Ken Olin, and especially DP Yasu Tanida (are you listening, Emmy?) and his Guild camera team take each episode are inspiring. The Vietnam storyline in Season 3 proves just how far this show will move out on the ledge.”

Margot Lester (Borderline)

“There’s nothing quite like covering smallerbudget films, as Natasha Braier, ASC, ADF, did with her Guild team on Gloria Bell. They require a combination of creativity and logistical prowess that the blockbusters don’t. I’m always impressed with what a Union crew can pull off in a short amount of time and on a tight budget using their imagination, innovation and intestinal fortitude.”

CORRECTION The crew listing for Glass (January Issue, Page 70) should have listed Ian Seabrook as the Underwater DP on the main unit with principal cast.

ICG MAGAZINE

David Geffner

Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

CAPTAIN MARVEL THIS IS US + GLORIA BELL + MILLION DOLLAR MILE

cover photo: Chuck Zlotnick

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In my second or third year working The Golden Globes, I wandered onto the red carpet

and, perhaps because my credential said “Production,” I was not removed by security. I gave NBC those images, and the rest became history. I went from the “party photographer” to the behind-the-line red-carpet shooter to the roaming-on-the-red-carpet shooter. These days, I do everything – The Globes, The

Emmys, Oscars, Grammys, AMA, ACM, People’s Choice, Billboard Music, Latin Music, The Voice, America’s Got Talent and more.

Awards shows are purposely upbeat and filled with sensory overload. The key is to be the standout of

all distractions, so you can command talent’s attention long enough to get your shot. You are competing with hundreds of journalists,

photographers, videographers, looky-loos, and wannabes, so to get someone’s attention while still being kind and courteous is very different than my normal day job of being a fly on the wall as a unit photographer.

You will be yelled at, pushed, pulled, and hear the “You can’t be here, there or there” line – several times. It all has to wash away as you concentrate (cont'd on page 22)

TRAE PATTON UNIT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER

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02/03.2019


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on who is in front of you, who is coming up near you and who just passed by – all at once. Speed is king. Looking/working 360 degrees will get you the shot that outlets want to publish.

Red carpets usually open in the early afternoon, but crunch time never

seems to happen until about an hour before the show, when about 80 percent of the main talent arrives. That’s when your job officially becomes a war zone!

Once that last big celebrity walks down the carpet, I transition inside

the venue, sometimes photographing the show itself, or capturing those fun moments between celebrities in commercial breaks, or in the “Deadline” room where even the most seasoned photographer could have a seizure from all the strobes pointed at the winners in their victory elation.

Post awards, I will often shoot the host network’s after-party, which usually only allows a small handful

DEE P F O C U S 24

of photographers inside. It then becomes a dance to find who needs to be photographed and with which network executive (or other celebrity). You have to be sensitive, as guests are transitioning from wanting to be seen and photographed to just enjoying the evening out of the public eye.

Getting to know a lot of publicists helps when you want to stop talent

for an image. Also, being a friendly face to the network publicity group who “escorts” talent on carpet can help immensely. Having talent know you from working with them on set is my secret weapon. Being courteous to security and giving them a polite heads-up on your intentions will get you access to those Justin Timberlake/Jessica Biel shots or the Beyoncé moments.

Those second set of eyes can be invaluable. Many years ago at The Golden Globes, my digital tech, who was working out of one of the hotel bedrooms by the NBC/ Focus Features after-party, ran and grabbed me, saying, “Follow me, now.” Peter Jackson

and his wife, Peter’s DP Andrew Lesnie [ACS, ASC], and his companion, were all in the hotel room with the tech. The ladies needed a restroom, and the line was long for the one down the hall, so he had offered up our base of operations. They ended up staying in the room for quite a while, and I was able to do an impromptu photo shoot. Years later, Peter Jackson asked for the images to put in his book.

My biggest challenge was 2010, the first year The Emmys were hosted at

the new Nokia Theater, with the nearby JW Marriott as base of operations. Essentially my entire camera kit was stolen from a secure area on site before the carpet opened. That stress of trying to figure out what to do as well as contacting the police, event security, and network officials right before the carpet opened was not fun. But, the kindness and generosity of other network photographers was amazing as they lent me camera bodies, lenses, flashes, memory cards, basically everything I needed to get my job done that night.

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Australian author, film reporter and host of TNT’s Film Struck, Alicia Malone, opens her book, The Female Gaze, by describing the film The Consequences of Feminism, a black and white comedy made in 1906 by the industry’s first female director, Alice Guy. Guy used “the device of gender role reversal to make her audience think about how women are treated in the real world and how ludicrous it is to believe that women would act exactly like men if they were given more power,” Malone writes. In fact, in a post-release interview, director Alice Guy-Blaché stated that “there is nothing connected with the staging of a motion picture that a woman cannot do as

easily as a man.” That film – and Guy’s quote – set the stage for a fascinating journey through highlights of 52 female-directed films from across the globe. Through personal observations and essays by female critics, Malone takes the reader on a journey of determination, where women directors refuse to be typed as “the weaker sex.” She debunks writer John Berger’s opinion in Ways of Seeing that “…men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at…. the surveyor of women in herself is male; the surveyed female. Thus, she turns herself into an object – and most particularly

an object of vision: a sight.” Malone and her contributors argue that the male lens and perspective are objectifying women and not showing them as they are. She focuses on films by women and about women – like the 1940 film Dance, Girl, Dance directed by Dorothy Arzner, which follows a female dance troupe trying to make a living, or Elaine May’s 1972 film, The Heartbreak Kid, a darkly comedic heightening of The Graduate. There’s also Lina Wertmüller’s 1975 feature Seven Beauties, which pokes fun at men who see women as sexual objects yet are also protective of women in their families, as well as Gillian Armstrong’s My (cont'd on page 26)

THE FEMALE GAZE ESSENTIAL MOVIES MADE BY WOMEN BY ALICIA MALONE

B 26O O K REVIE W

02/03.2019


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Brilliant Career, Jane Campion’s The Piano, films by Amy Heckerling, and more recent fare, like Ava DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time. (Also included are lesser-known films from around the world.) Time and again Malone emphasizes the unique contribution of a woman’s gaze and the challenges female filmmakers have to meet the norm still, in part, set by the “male voice.” She challenges readers to answer questions like: “What happens, for example, when we look at the world from a female point of view? How do women see themselves? How do women see other women? What makes a movie essentially feminine? What can audiences of any gender identification gain by looking at film through a female lens?” It’s sad, Malone states, that even today “when women want to move up the ladder, they get locked out [because] it’s a risk to give women money. Male indie directors can get a budget to do big movies, but for women, it doesn’t seem to work the same way.” Which is strange, she also concludes,

B O O K REVIE W

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because, “we have the buying power. We are gatekeepers of what to see. We are the ones making the decisions. Women have a huge part in telling Hollywood what to see. The audience has a lot of power. More than they think. Especially women. I think if more people demand more women [to be making movies], hopefully, there will be change.” With The Female Gaze, Malone proves that with female directors behind the lens, you get more female characters on screen – and even a more gender-balanced crew. The book also shines a light on the struggles of women throughout film history, often in an almost flippant manner. Take Heckerling’s Clueless. At first, it was considered a fluff film for teens. Yet dig underneath, and viewers realize it’s anything but that. Based on Jane Austen’s Emma, Clueless takes on pop culture and how, even in the late 20th century, it influences how young women and men perceive their world. Likewise, Malone points to Susan Seidelman’s Desperately Seeking Susan, with its complicated romantic-comedy plot that

revolves around the complications of urban life – and life in general in the mid-1990s, and (as Alice Guy did) having the men take the female roles as objects and bystanders. Malone’s goal with The Female Gaze is to facilitate a change where the “best” director for the job is just that – the best director. One way to help that along is to read her book and to dive deeper into what she has to say by watching each film with a new eye. (Malone has purposely chosen films that are available on one or more streaming services.) In the glass-half-full department, readers will no doubt come away with a new insight into female characters on the screen. But, there is also the hard realization that the “female gaze” behind the lens still has a long way to go, circa 2019. ASIN: B07CXWFD8F Published by Mango Publishing and sold by Amazon Digital Services $0.00, Kindle unlimited, $5.58 to buy on Kindle and $13.51 for a hardcover.

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Tammy Sandler and Hopper Stone met a few years ago on Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters remake – Sandler as the unit publicist and Stone the stills photographer. They clicked immediately, both very comfortable working on broad comedies. Their most recent pairing, Paramount Pictures’ Instant Family, had many of the comedic elements they were familiar with – but it also had a serious side that needed to be shared with viewers. The two veterans wanted to satisfy studio and publicity venues requirements for the film’s broad comedy, but they also knew the societal/family issues would be key to the marketing campaign.

In a film like Ghostbusters, Stone relates, it was all about finding a frame, which somehow conveyed the message of that broad comedy, and would also be approved by an actor. “With Instant Family, it was more than the comedy,” Sandler adds. “We looked for images that showed viewers would both laugh and cry – images that the moviegoer could relate to in some way. “This was writer/director Sean Anders and his wife Beth’s story,” Sandler continues. “And Sean didn’t want the film to come off as preachy – his goal was to tell an entertaining story that people could not only relate to, but also perhaps learn from.” To wit, Sandler and

Stone were always looking for ways to, as Stone says, “convey the isolation of the two protagonists combined with their journey to become a family.” Having worked in studio publicity for many years, Sandler had the advantage of knowing the types of images a studio looks for in marketing a film. “Hopper and I worked together to deliver images that showed Pete and Elli’s life before kids, their struggles with the idea of adoption, as well as the fun and sometimes stress that a young couple goes through when becoming new parents of three siblings overnight,” she explains. “We wanted to show their journey to becoming a (cont'd on page 30)

INSTANT FAMILY UNIT PUBLICIST TAMMY SANDLER AND UNIT PHOTOGRAPHER HOPPER STONE, SMPSP, ADOPT AN OUTSIDE-THE-BOX APPROACH BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS BY HOPPER STONE, SMPSP COURTESY OF PARAMOUNT PICTURES

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family and that all that hard work would pay off in the end.” “The advent of social media has broadened what we need to cover,” Stone adds. “No one knows what the digital department will come up with for a campaign, so we had to talk about what we’d see on set that might become a campaign – sometimes that’s the smallest detail that digital could use as an Instagram moment.” The pair found other moments beyond the lens of cinematographer Brett Pawlak, which could add to the journey. “We were constantly looking for shots and did interviews with the many amazing people from families who adopted children,” Sandler adds, “like the men and women who were children in foster care who worked as background extras in the Adoption Fair scene; the filmmakers made sure to include them whenever possible. “Hearing their stories about how they came to adopt their kids was very emotional,” Sandler continues. “And meeting and talking to successful women who came from the foster care system and beat the odds was inspirational. Some of them were people whom Sean and [co-screenwriter/producer] John Morris met when they were doing their research. Maraide Green, a 20-year-old UCLA student, impressed them so much, they brought her in as a PA to help them keep things real.” “She even has a cameo as a waitress in

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the ice cream shop,” Stone notes. “We both knew capturing Maraide would go a long way in visually telling the story Sean wanted to tell.” Another “beyond-the-cameras” moment that Sandler and Stone worked together to capture was a set visit from Dr. Charles Mulli. Sandler learned, “He is a hero in the adoption world like no other. We knew it was important to capture this – carefully.” Dr. Mulli was an abandoned child in Kenya who grew up on the streets. Through hard work and business acumen, he became one of the richest men his country had ever seen – until he quit working for money and began taking in abandoned children. He legally adopted over ten thousand children and built a whole new model of family with incredible success” The challenges for a stills/publicity team have morphed over the years. On a film like Instant Family, helping to capture Maraide or Dr. Mulli’s journeys became almost as valuable as securing more traditional marketing elements for Paramount. “We tried to find a balance between being trite and sentimental, and still showing some sweetness and heart,” Stone explains. “There was always a sense on set of playing the reality of the situation, as opposed to purposely tugging at heartstrings or forcing drama. I really just put on my old photojournalist hat and shot what was in front of me. We were fortunate to have such terrific and cooperative actors to work with,

as well as a director who ‘gets it.’” Guild publicity teams like Sandler and Stone can often have an increased responsibility on a film – like helping to control crewmembers and/or cast from shooting pictures and/or video and posting to social media – a sensitive issue that must be tackled without denying talent the ability to tell their behind-the-scenes journey. “People are excited about the project and don’t realize that the studio usually has a strategy for when and where they want to get information out in the world,” Sandler explains. “And then, of course, there are also the uncontrollable moments when we were out in public – and everyone has a cell phone to record their excitement at seeing a celebrity and production in their city.” One of the highlights of interviewing these families for Sandler was meeting a mother and father who had three biological sons and adopted, through the foster care system, three biological girls. “It reminded me of The Brady Bunch,” she smiles. “We knew people would relate.” Even though Tammy Sandler and Hopper Stone have been doing this job – very well – for a long time, they’re both eager and excited to be a part of the storytelling process. “A movie is a collaboration of so many different crafts,” Sandler concludes. “And being able to tell the story from behind the scenes, from the crew’s perspective, is also very important.”

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They may be senior citizens, but Forrest Tucker (Robert Redford), Teddy (Danny Glover) and Waller (Tom Waits) still have more game than most bank robbers decades younger. And that’s what Writer/Director David Lowery, Executive Producer Patrick Newall, Stunt Coordinator Ele Bardha and Cinematographer Joe Anderson wanted to make very clear in a scene from the 2018 Fox Searchlight Pictures release, The Old Man & the Gun, in which the trio scopes out a bank heist from the roof of a high-rise across the street. “Not only did we want to have a moving

camera on the roof of the high-rise with the actors, we also wanted to be able to see the actors on the edge of the building while zooming out from down below at street level. In camera, not with CGI,” Anderson recalls. A perfect location in Dayton, Ohio, was found – a bank from the 1930s with a 15story building directly across the street. “But,” Anderson adds, “the building had no guard rail on its roof. Visually it was great, but performing the scene safely would be a challenge.” Another element that impacted safety, as Newall describes, was that “David, Joe

and [Production Designer] Scott Kuzio felt it was vital to capture the real wind and other dynamics you get with shooting on a roof many stories above the street. David wanted shots that panned to the bank below, and this was only possible by putting the actors on the roof ’s edge. But with no railings and an uneven roof, one bad trip and you could easily fall off.” While everyone agreed conquering the old roof was a perfect metaphor for the three men out to make a big score, the fear factor was so high that half of the scouting crew was reluctant to even step out on the roof. Enter (cont'd on page 34)

THE OLD MAN & THE GUN SAFETY FIRST FOR A DARING BANK ROBBERY SCENE BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS COURTESY OF ELE BARDHA FRAMEGRAB COURTESY OF FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

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“There was no edge. No air conditioning hut. Just a flat roof. Well, as flat as an old roof could be.” Stunt Coordinator Ele Bardha

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stunt coordinator Bardha, who logged hours on the roof, alone, trying to figure out how to accomplish the scene safely. “There was no edge. No air conditioning hut. Just a flat roof. Well, as flat as an old roof could be,” he recounts. Working safely (without the crew fearing for its safety) began with Bardha buying crowd fencing from a local vendor, locking the pieces together and creating a pen some ten feet away from the edge. “This became our ‘safety zone,’” he states. How then to secure those actors and crewmembers who had to leave the safety zone? “We decided on dead-lined safety harnesses,” Newall describes. But because the building had historical status, the team wasn’t able to drill into the rooftop to secure the harnesses. So Bardha obtained the architectural blueprints and engineer structural-weight limits and decided to get 55-gallon drums and fill them with some 450 pounds of water weight. He created a truss around the water anchors and hooked the harnesses to this structure. “Of course we tested it,” Bardha shares. “We had ten people anchored to the truss – jumping away at the same time. And the barrels didn’t budge.” Once Redford, Glover, and Waits were relatively comfortable, safety-wise, they began to venture closer to the edge. Then the challenge became how to place the cameras. “Our main concern for the camera crew was the space, peppered with cast and stunt people tied off and multiple safety

lines exposed up top,” adds First AD Tomas Deckaj. “We were seriously concerned about tripping.” Key Grip Jeff Fisher’s solution proved to be perfect. “I chose a lightweight CamMate jib for the crane work on the roof because everything had to be hand-carried to the roof,” Fisher explains. “And, since we weren’t building the arm out very far, the 2032 had enough rigidity to get the shot, get over the actors’ shoulders and look down into the street. Because of the wind [gusts exceeded 40 mph], we added extra ballast to the base of the jib to stabilize it. We also had speed rail and additional hardware for the arm if needed.” How did Camera Operator Dave Schwandner handle shooting these legendary actors and the setup? “At first, I felt like I was entering a snake pit,” he laughs. “The stunt team and grip department had the set ready to go, and from my standpoint, it was a matter of just clipping in and setting the frame. The team was so good that at no point did I feel like ‘Oh man, I should have been on this scout.’ Joe and the rest of the team prepared the set for us. “One of the things that I had to be conscious of, as I circled the actors and even shot down to the bank below, was that wind factor,” Schwandner adds. “If there is any amount of wind, the crane/jib acts as a sail. Fortunately, the wind was in our favor for this one.” “The shot was very well-planned,” adds First AC Amy Faust. “On the day, my second, Joe Bou, and I took a limited amount of gear

up to the roof. Most of the camera gear stayed inside the stairwell. The essentials were against the side of the building, as out of the wind as possible. I made camera adjustments and pulled focus remotely from the safe side of the temporary fencing. For lensing and filtration changes I was harnessed in by the stunt team.” To emphasize the vertiginous location, Operator Jeff Barklage, SOC, was inside the bank, shooting upward through large artdeco windows. “I could see the silhouette of the three cast members [safety harnesses not showing] looking down, from a very low-angled perspective,” he explains. “Juxtaposing between the low angle and the high angle really forced the audience to realize that these characters were in a somewhat precarious high-altitude situation.” “I am so happy we were able to pull this shot off with the actors,” concludes Anderson. “We had gone to great lengths to shoot as much of the movie practically as we could, including car crashes, police shootouts, and prison escape stunts. It would have been slightly disappointing to concede that approach on this epic shot. I love being able to use VFX to help make a shot great, but I think the audience can subconsciously feel the difference when the main execution of a shot is done for real in front of the camera. Our crew in Cincinnati was equally enthusiastic about this challenge and their talent and professionalism made it all happen – safely.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Joe Anderson A-Camera Operator Michael Fuchs, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Johnny Sousa A-Camera 2nd AC Michael Wooten B-Camera Operator Dave Schwandner B-Camera 1st AC Amy Faust B-Camera 2nd AC Joe Bou

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C-Camera Operator Jeff Barklage, SOC Kameron Mogadam C-Camera 1st AC Kiely Cronin C-Camera 2nd AC Megan Cafferty Loader Chris Ratledge Still Photographer Eric Zachanowich Publicist Peter Silbermann

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KEN OLIN BY DAVID GEFFNER PHOTO BY RON BATZDORFF

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The list of actors who have made a full-time transition into directing is – surprisingly – a short one. Ron Howard and Fred Savage, both child actors who began in television, are two prominent examples, along with perennials like Rob Reiner and Clint Eastwood, who also learned the craft on the small screen. Ken Olin, whose fame burned brightly in the late 1980s, playing Michael Steadman on Thirtysomething, says he always felt more comfortable behind the camera; he actually began that transition on Thirtysomething, where he directed six episodes under the mentorship of co-creator/co-executive producer Edward Zwick. “I made plenty of mistakes, and Ed was not shy about letting me know it,” Olin now laughs about that early on-set education. “But [Zwick] continued to encourage me and provide me with opportunities. For that, I’m forever thankful.” Obviously, that education paid off. Olin’s directing credits in the last three decades include ground-breaking series like Freaks and Geeks, Felicity, The West Wing, Breaking News, and most notably, the Golden Globewinning spy series Alias, which he executive produced for TV franchise maker J.J. Abrams. The ultra-popular Brothers & Sisters and the short-lived but critically acclaimed Sleepy Hollow each gave Olin the chance to cast a strong visual imprint as executive producer/ director. But even with such landmarks in his rearview mirror, the Chicago native calls his recent work for NBC’s This Is Us, created by Dan Fogelman, one of the best fits of his career. He’s not only executive produced all three seasons, working closely with Executive Producers/Directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa; but Olin’s also directed more episodes than anyone else (including Ficarra and Requa) combined. He helmed all the episodes of a key Season 3 storyline that involves “big three” sibling Kevin Pearson (Justin Hartley) traveling to Vietnam to learn about his father’s war service. The segments

– partially shot in Ho Chi Minh City – are unlike anything This Is Us has attempted; they provide a visual texture and depth (courtesy of Olin’s partnership with DP Yasu Tanida and his Guild camera team) that are rare for broadcast television. Olin spoke with ICG Magazine just hours before This Is Us was to be honored by the American Film Institute for the third consecutive year – another first for a broadcast series. ICG: What led up to you coming onto This Is Us, first as executive director, and now, with Season 3, as the show’s busiest director? Olin: My wife, Patty [Thirtysomething co-star Patricia Wettig], and I were going to move back to New York. I had done several series back-to-back and I felt like my sensibilities were not quite being fulfilled. Television is really hard, and when you’re in sync with the creative team, it’s this fantastic evolution that feels like home. But when you’re not, it’s just hard for everyone. So, I had decided to stop executive producing,

as it was just too arduous. Then I got sent this script for a show that at the time was called 36. They said they were changing the title and wanted me to come on as an executive producer/director, as the creator, Dan Fogelman, had done mostly single-camera half-hour. I went into my office, not really sure what to expect, and an hour later I came out and said, “Oh, Patty. This is really good. I mean, really, really good.” My wife laughed and said, “But I thought…” I said, “I mean, this is the best pilot I’ve seen since Alias. It’s so fully realized. I’ve got to do it.” Why do you think Dan Fogelman wanted you on the team? [Laughs.] Dan claims he’d never seen Thirtysomething and only knew that I had done some show in the ’80s. Evidently, his mother was a huge fan of Brothers & Sisters, and whenever they were together he would watch the show. I will tell you, it’s so unusual to have a Hollywood meeting where you are completely transparent about your feelings. I loved everything about [This Is Us] and told Dan that. Of course, there’s always that step from pilot to series, where whatever is organic needs to be expanded, hopefully over many seasons, and I said one of my strengths is growing the [show creator’s] vision to make that happen. The next day I talked to John and Glenn, who come from an indie film background, and their approach, stylistically, is very different than that of most TV family dramas. They spoke about a more objectified visual plan that lent itself to the saga aspect, which also sounded exciting. With most shows I executive produce, I direct the first and last episode of each season, and as John and Glenn already had vacations planned for that part of the schedule [laughs], that’s how it played out. The show is unconventional – it’s shot completely handheld, and it moves through many different time periods, in every episode. What surprised you about that first season? I directed four episodes in Season 1, and with each experience, I felt like my connection with Dan’s sensibilities just kept growing. Dan is a writer, first and foremost. He’s so brilliant in the editing room, so his primary concern with directors (cont'd on page 40)

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is: will they give him options in editorial? I think my everyday choices as an executive producer – design, sets, locations – with the new directors, continued to cement Dan’s trust in me. And because he spends so much time in the editing room, that allowed me to have more time on set. Typically, I’ve been the one locking episodes in editorial, and the time to devote to directing wasn’t there. Here, directing is the most productive use of my time. And that’s what Dan, Elizabeth, and Issac [co-show runners Elizabeth Berger and Isaac Aptaker] all wanted. When [series DP] Yasu [Tanida] said the show was all handheld, I was surprised. You have to go back to Homicide, but even there the use of handheld was different. I remember doing one episode of Brothers & Sisters that was all handheld, and the network freaked out! [Laughs.] But there were two things about the pilot [shot by Guild DP Brett Pawlak] that John and Glenn brought over to the series that have changed the way people experience a family drama. The handheld, as you say, is one, but it’s a feeling that’s nothing like Homicide, which is unsettling and gritty. Both Dan and I really like a beautiful, pretty frame, and Yasu is absolutely brilliant in providing that, even on a TV schedule! What our handheld does is make the frame a bit more arbitrary and observed. More like life unfolding. The other thing John and Glenn wanted was for the narrative to be more objectified. Thirtysomething, Brothers & Sisters – those shows always started with the question: Whose point of view is it? Not literally shot from one POV, but emotionally experienced through a single character. Telling this story through the eyes of an entire family, which also goes to the many different shifts in time and place you see each episode, is a more objectified way to tell a story, and that’s John and Glenn. It’s also rare for one DP to shoot every episode of a series these days. Describe your partnership with Yasu Tanida. I’ve never worked with a DP who is so fast, and yet so capable of making things look beautiful. TV directors are used to compromising, based on the amount of time you have, which isn’t much. Yasu comes from this

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latest generation of cinematographers who totally understand the latitude and scope of the medium. He knows how to light so that he will have everything he needs when he gets into color timing. This allows him and his crew to move very quickly, without those compromises. I get – at least – three times the amount of setups I used to get on other shows, which gives us the opportunity to shoot more like a movie. It also perfectly serves the material, as we didn’t want all these shifts in time period to feel like flashbacks or flash-forwards. Jack and Rebecca driving in 1970s Los Angeles, or a Super Bowl Sunday in Pittsburgh two decades later, should all have the same immediacy as a contemporary scene – Randall, Beth, Kevin, Kate, and Toby today. Yasu’s speed and photographic… feel and textures, allow me, as a director, to accomplish that. No question. Season 3 has a Vietnam storyline that’s more ambitious than any other season. You shot in Ho Chi Minh City for four days, as well as at a remote lake north of Los Angeles. What stood out about these episodes? I was in high school when the ’60s ended, so that was my time, and I’ve never gotten to explore that as a director. Everything I’ve seen about that period, at least in the last 15 to 20 years, has this rosy patina that lacked the grit and sweat, the tough beauty if you will, that I remember. Like that great line from [Bob Dylan’s] Blood on the Tracks: “There was revolution in the air.” I did a lot of research, watching films from that period, as well as choosing the music for those episodes. Yasu and I talked about having a style that felt immediate and present, the antithesis of a historical document. And, of course, there are visual moments from Vietnam – you can see so many in Ken Burns’ great documentary – which we wanted to convey. Like when Jack’s friend is wounded and they are bringing him to the helicopter. We’re looking over their shoulders as the helicopter lands, with dust, dirt, the light flaring into the camera, that’s so evocative of my own memories. Yasu mentioned an unscripted moment where the soldier throws the football into the lake. That same football led to the

death of a young soldier on a landmine, and a subsequent firefight. [Pauses.] Honestly, you don’t get many opportunities in television to create a frame like that, and I think it’s probably the best shot I’ve ever done. We saw the early morning light and knew we only had a very short window. To me, the mist hanging over the water is reminiscent of a Japanese print. It’s so beautiful and so sad at the same time. If the [Vietnam] episodes are successful, it goes to Yasu’s photographic brilliance, coupled with the fact that I experienced that time on an emotional level. I didn’t have to recreate that time from a distant perspective – I was there. And so was [novelist and Vietnam war veteran] Tim O’Brien, who wrote that episode. Was he on the set with you? Yes, he was! And he’s not a movie guy – at all. Tim watched us doing a battle scene and he freaked out because he didn’t understand camera coverage. “You can’t just have people start shooting,” he yelled. “This is just f•^%$d! It’s f•^%$d!” And then he’d watch three takes and see how the performances would evolve, and how the angles would link up, and say: “This is the most amazing thing I’ve ever seen!” [Laughs.] The television landscape has changed a lot in the last 30 years. How do you see this evolution? Things have changed, of course. But the possibilities [in broadcast TV] are still incredible. Yes, the [broadcast] audience has shrunk, but This Is Us still has an enormous reach. There was a long period where it felt like for a show to work on those other platforms, characters had to be borderline sociopaths. [Laughs.] People loved it and I get that. But for a show like This Is Us, and for broadcast TV in general, I don’t think psychopathy is the right formula. Both Dan and I are fundamentally hopeful people, and we wanted this show to reflect those values – humanism, decency and kindness. Working with NBC, who has been an incredible supporter, we don’t have to compromise to fit into that box. The story has to fit that medium, and I think that holds true for however, wherever, and whatever people consume on television.

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OH, HENRI! REMEMBERING THE ELEGANT AND UNIVERSALLY ADMIRED GUILD PUBLICIST HENRI BOLLINGER

BY PAULINE ROGERS PUBLICIST GUILD PHOTOS BY CRAIG MATHEW ALL OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOHN RAGASA & THE BOLLINGER FAMILY

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Henri Bollinger epitomized the classic Hollywood publicist, with roots so deep that when he first began in the industry the job was called “press agent.” His image, from the day he started until his recent passing in 2018, was always that of the consummate professional, whose personal dedication to clients (and colleagues, peers and friends) conjured up images of an elegant gentleman. The fact is, neither Henri’s business associates nor members of his own family knew exactly what he did to enhance the careers and personal perceptions of his client base. And yet, for more than 50 years, Henri did just that – made everyone around him better. His family history was the stuff of a Holly wood movie. Henri’s father, Luzer Bollinger, sur vived incarceration in a Siberian POW camp in the 1920s by playing chess each day with the prison’s commandant. Upon release, Luzer returned to his small Polish town to find his brother teaching ballroom dancing to the daughters of a local resort-hotel owner. One day he brought Luzer along with him to play chess with the other hotel guests. As it happened, the hotel owner was also seeking a husband for his eldest daughter. But the man’s youngest daughter – Sarah Rosalie – felt she was a better match. The two married and ended up in Belgium, where their first child, Paulette, was born. Two years later a second child arrived: a boy named Henri. Henri was just nine years old when tens of thousands of Jews were fleeing Nazi Germany for a safer haven. When refugees fleeing across the border related stories to Henri’s mother of Nazi-inflicted atrocities on Jews, she went to the family’s Rabbi and said they had to leave. With suitcases crammed

with their possessions, the Bollinger family managed to arrive safely in Liverpool, England. Jewish organizations helped the family get schooling in England. Although Henri was more secure than in Belgium, the horrific blasts from Nazi V-1 rockets served as unnerving reminders of their daily peril. Soon enough, Henri developed definite ideas about where his life was going: He was going to be [drumroll] an actor! Enrolling in the Marion Ross School of Drama, he found auditions to be nearly as exciting as the callbacks. He was soon cast in a number of stage productions, including the national tour of Lillian Hellman’s Watch On the Rhine, and for small parts in several movies, including a scene with Jean Simmons in David Lean’s Great Expectations. Not long after, relatives living in Chicago, aided by Jewish organizations in the U.K., helped to sponsor Henri and his sister Paulette’s immigration to the United States. Soon, Henri felt the urge to move to New York to audition for acting roles. To support himself he landed a job in New York Public

Library’s theatre arts department doing research for both filmmakers and press agents. It started young Henri on a different career path – first writing releases for a Broadway press agent, then PR for Lowe’s Theaters, and later moving to Los Angeles, when KTLA offered him a job as publicity manager. A move to top PR firm Cleary, Strauss and Irwin (where he met his soul-mate Sandy – mother of his three children) set him on a partnership path. But, for reasons he kept close to his heart, a partnership track was not for him, and he went out on his own – taking Consolidated Cigar (Ernie Kovacs and Edie Adams) and Nick Vanoff ’s The Hollywood Palace with him. For the remainder of his career, Henri would remain a solo act. What was Henri like in those early days? He was and would always be a gentleman, a family man, and a classy, understated public relations practitioner who quietly abhorred the term “press agent.” He was an innovator – creating low-key but extremely potent public relations campaigns. There are several (cont'd on page 44)

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stories that people have told – bits and pieces that combine to create a tapestry that typifies the man and his work. For example, while he was a young, struggling publicist, his sister, Paulette, was seeing an older gentleman who enjoyed wining and dining her at one of Southern California’s most fashionable restaurants, the world-renowned Chasen’s. When Paulette’s suitor invited Henri to join them for dinner, he accepted, but only with the provision that he would pick up the tab. Henri made the reservation in his own name while requesting that he not be seated at the gentleman’s “personally reserved” table. When Henri and Paulette arrived, the gentleman was on his second or third drink at the “Bollinger” table. Henri was clueless concerning the cost of the drinks and food until he saw the menu. The forty dollars he had in his pocket would barely cover a couple of drinks. Ever cool under pressure, Henri called the waiter for the check. “That’s okay, Mr. Bollinger,” the waiter announced, “this is compliments of the management. We’re so pleased to have a ‘Bollinger’ dining with us.” Henri’s British accent – and the fact

that Chasen’s was the first restaurant in L.A. to carry Bollinger Champagne – had saved the day. It wasn’t the first time, nor the last, that the Bollinger name was mistaken for that of the champagne family’s. Henri later ’fessed up to the Chasen’s maître d’hôtel who had since moved to the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. But, while waiting in line with clients from New York, the maître d’ spotted him and called out, “Mr. Bollinger, your table is ready.” His clients were duly impressed. It seems that even then, one’s name – real or mistaken – was everything! Famous names aside, Henri was low-key and classy even when he was working with clients like Jack Binion, owner of Binion’s Horseshoe Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. Henri was brought in specifically to promote a gambling extravaganza: The World Series of Poker. “It was Henri’s suggestion that all of these events be videotaped for TV,” recalls his then partner Robert Yamin. “But Binion was having a tough time rounding up the

ten players needed for the first-ever tenthousand-dollar ‘buy-in’ game. Henri’s idea to promote the event? Display the million dollars on a table in the hotel lobby…all in cash…all in one-hundred-dollar bills…then invite the press and TV to cover it. The visual result left both the media and viewing public wide-eyed.” Classy press caught everyone’s attention – after 10 yearly events, ESPN won the rights to the series – and the rest is history. “Henri kind of inherited me when I became the representative for Muriel Cigars,” recalls actress Susan Anton. “I was young and naïve. He came up with a publicity stunt to choose the new ‘Muriel Girl.’ After I won, we were preparing for our first big press event at the Hollywood Press Club. Henri came to drive me to the event. I was dressed pretty casually, as I usually was. Henri gently suggested – in that British accent and classy tone – that I just might want to dress up a bit. He really helped launch my career.” And what did he do to further shine a light on the young Susan Anton? He had already staged a million dollars in cash for The World Series of Poker. For Ms. Anton, he arranged for her

Julian Myers, Ed Crane, Hank Grant, Henri

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to wear a million dollars of Henry Winston diamonds. But it wasn’t just clients that Henri Bollinger helped shape. He mentored young reporters, like Carl DiOrio, a fledgling journalist with The Hollywood Reporter. “Henri was always encouraging but never demanding,” DiOrio recalls. “He opened doors for me at the Cinema Audio Society and elsewhere. Most importantly, he helped me form professional bridges. His familyman side always stood out – family came first and so did a personal life. I remember a time when my life was really difficult, and at one of our lunches he gave me an extended primer and DVDs about his practice of qigong, a Chinese system of exercise and breathing similar to tai chi, which really helped.” According to client Richard Alfieri, it was Henri’s way of mixing the personal with the professional that stood out. “I see, hear and feel a booming exuberant voice, an infectious smile, a big hug and goodwill, and enormous positive energy,” Alfieri recalls. “That caring style was the reason he could arrange an interview or get good placement for a press release. It earned him immense stature

with his contacts because first: he knew how to write a story that would command immediate interest by making all the vital points, and second, he had genuine personal warmth and charisma. In a business in which those qualities are regularly counterfeited, people recognized the coin of the realm in Henri. He was an authentic person people liked.” “Henri literally adopted my family when we moved to Los Angeles,” recalls Scott Pansky of the Allison PR agency. Henri’s efforts in helping Pansky obtain a teaching job at UCLA Extension and become President of the Entertainment Publicist Professional Society (EPPS) were important contributions. “But it was Henri’s personal philosophy that we best remember,” Pansky adds. “As we flew to New York on a business trip, the conversation turned to wives. I asked him what the secret was to his relationship with Sandy. ‘Scott,’ he said, ‘imagine having Marilyn Monroe as a client and how you would treat her. Treat your wife even better!’” Henri was a family man in the best

Cicely Tyson & Henri

sense of the term. When daughter Jennifer (Goosenberg) was in the fourth grade, her class offered electives taught by parent volunteers. One of the most popular was a filmmaking class led by Henri Bollinger. “With my father’s assistance, my group created a short film about a grocery store robbery,” Jennifer remembers. “Dad worked with one student on the script, another on logistics, even the process of obtaining releases to film on location. He had a clear passion for teaching and for moviemaking that was contagious. In retrospect, my father’s participation in that school filmmaking elective may have influenced my own volunteerism in teaching art and a nutrition program at my own kids’ elementary school.” “There was even more to Henri Bollinger than a passion for both his clients and his family,” describes Ed Crane, a two-term president of the Publicists Guild and a longtime personal friend of Henri. “He was extremely concerned about the perception of publicists both within the industry and with the public at large. I vividly recall him saying, ‘The public only sees us as red-carpet hand-holders, while many of our immediate

Katherine Ross, Henri, Producer Robert Yasmin

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bosses, those who pay our salaries, seem to undervalue us, wondering: ‘Are these people really doing what we hired them to do? They always seem to be on the phone trading jokes with columnists, or down on the stages yakking it up with the stars and filmmakers.’” “It was Henri’s sense that publicists – to a greater extent than employees in other fields – know that the depth of their relationship with another individual directly affects the outcome of what they anxiously seek,” Crane continues. “Which was getting two disparate parties – like filmmakers and journalists – to sit down with each other to achieve a worthwhile result. Henri Bollinger raised the perception of publicists in many ways: for example, he implemented a two-year certificate program within the Union’s established relationship with UCLA Extension. The program was designed to teach as well as improve publicists’ writing skills, from basic news releases to full-scale motion-picture marketing plans – and everything in between.” Veteran publicist Leonard Morpurgo

notes that Henri touched everyone he encountered. “His strength was nonconfrontational. It was diplomacy,” Morpurgo states. “With just a few one-onone conversations, he was able to accomplish a tremendous amount on behalf of his fellow publicists.” Adds Hollace Davids, Senior Vice President, Special Projects, Universal Pictures: “Henri helped the industry and the world to respect and value our contributions and hard work. I was honored to speak at his UCLA class, sharing in his excitement to present information on what goes on in making a successful film campaign.” “Henri just had a profound effect on everyone he touched,” affirms independent publicist Fran Zell. “He boosted my confidence, allowing me to speak at UCLA, participate in the Publicist Guild Awards, and even speak at an event. I was insecure, fearing that my highly recognizable New York accent would get in the way. But Henri always had the right answer: ‘That is who you are, and you are charming.’ He took insecure,

fledgling publicists with only a glimmer of talent under his wing – and they blossomed. No matter the end game, Henri Bollinger was there to help things along – and always put the work in perspective.” Local 600’s Ken Harwood, who worked with Henri on both the Publicists Directory and the Publicists Guild Awards annual luncheon, puts his colleague and friend into perspective: “Henri knew what was important to everyone,” Harwood shares. “When we’d meet he’d always start off by asking how I was doing, and we’d catch up on each other’s lives. Only after that came the business. It was all about being comfortable with each other – and knowing that each relationship was a team product – and he’d always have someone’s back. In a crowded room, Henri and I would always find each other, and by looking into each other’s eyes we’d know that everything was going to be okay. That’s irreplaceable.” And so is Henri Bollinger.

Henri with his wife of 54 years, Sandy

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Top: Backstage at the Publicist Guild Awards: L to R: Lily Tomlin, ICG Local 600 President Steven Poster, ASC, Sally Field and Henri Middle: Henri in his familair position as Chair of the Publicist Guild Awards Bottom: Henri with Michael F. Miller, Jr., IATSE 4th Int’l Vice President / Dept. Director, Motion Picture & TV Production

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MELODY MAKERS

IT’S BEEN CALLED THE MOST COMPLEX AWARDS SHOW ON TELEVISION. SO HOW DOES THIS LOCAL 600 TEAM PLAN AND PREPARE FOR THE MUSIC INDUSTRY’S BIGGEST NIGHT? BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTOS COURTESY OF CBS TELEVISION

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Although it has been described by live event crews as the most difficult awards show to mount, amazingly, The Grammy Awards – The Recording Academy’s recognition of achievements in the music industry – has never won an Emmy – or anything else. A conundrum, to say the least, as The Grammys, as everyone knows, are filled with extravagant production numbers from all musical genres. And unlike other award shows, which have downtime between yearly shows – prep for The Grammys begins a scant few months after the last event. Ken Ehrlich and the core group at AEG Productions (producer Ron Basile and director Louis J. Horvitz) start plotting each individual act just a few weeks after the last extravaganza.

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For the 60th Anniversary Show, in 2018, the team decided to take the show back to New York City. “The first time we mounted a show in New York, it was different – much smaller,” Basile explains. “The show grew and grew after we brought it to Los Angeles. When we brought it back to New York, it became a challenge.” One reason, as Ehrlich describes, was the physical venue: “Madison Square Garden is a great, historic venue,” he relates, “but given a choice between historic and state-of-theart, I think I’d go for the latter. Still, we have a fantastic crew that can easily adapt and is

committed to making whatever venue we choose work.” Director Louis J. Horvitz, a long-time Local 600 member who cut his teeth on live events as an operator on The Merv Griffin Show and The Grammy Awards, heads that crew up. “Lou is now in his 10th year and his vision follows and grows along with the overall design for the show,” explains Ehrlich. “Once we have an overall plan and begin booking, we strive to make each and every performance singular, and that involves everything from scenic to lighting to shooting. That’s how we

create ‘Grammy moments.’” The team begins with a standard set up – two sets of camera teams. “One for stage right and one for stage left,” Basile describes. “It differs slightly every year due to the stage set up, but overall it is consistent.” Then everything else is up for grabs. “We were one of the first shows to move our host around the venue and break up the sense of a pattern. On The Grammys, you’ll see our hosts out in the house, backstage, and of course, onstage. But we even try to match those locations to fit the upcoming performances,” adds Ehrlich. This is where Horvitz’s camera training

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comes in. He will look at the script and the performance, confer with the artists’ representatives and then plot out every camera position and movement (see diagram below) to best suit what they want to get out of each Grammy moment. “Everything is in play from a one-camera Steadicam with someone like Chris Brown to a full-blown Bob Fosse moment with someone like Rihanna – a moment for which we might have only an hour and 45 minutes for sound check and camera rehearsal,” Horvitz shares. It takes many camera, artist and even venue meetings for the team to prep the 18 camera positions Horvitz will direct from the booth. Of course there are always surprises that come up during rehearsal, as Horvitz’s core crew – who have been in the trenches with him ever since he began the show – can attest, such as adjusting to the Madison Square Garden stage. “I was the center TechnoJib on the 2018 show,” recalls Rob Bolton. “When it came time to rehearse the first host read from the

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satellite stage, Lou wasn’t happy about how the shots were lining up. After some head scratching, we realized that in moving from Staples in Los Angeles to The Garden in New York City, the stage was 15 feet farther from the camera! As a testament to Lou, fingers were never pointed, and voices were never raised. The different departments just came together and worked out staging and seating so the crisis was averted.” Long-time Pedestal Operator Lyn Noland had a similar experience. “I was on a long-lens close-up from the back,” she recalls. “Focus, a steady hand, and timing are essential on this kind of shot. You have to always be aware of what’s coming up next and be there. It’s fast and furious. Lou is a master director and depends on this position.” As Noland describes, during rehearsal for Kendrick Lamar’s opening number, she had a fast swing from one set to another – a close-up of Kendrick performing on one

stage and a swing to Dave Chappelle in a waist shot on another set. “In rehearsal, when I whipped over to get his shot, [Chappelle] was in the dark,” Noland recalls. “It was pure luck that I found him that first time, but there was no way I had any frame of reference. After that first rehearsal I told Lou it was impossible for me to nail the shot if there wasn’t any light. Having been a cameraman himself and having worked with me for years, he totally understood the problem and spoke to [Lighting Designer] Bobby Dickinson to ask for more light. It was a touchy situation because we didn’t want to alert the audience that Dave Chappelle was there. After a few tries, we worked it out, and it was perfect on air!” Steadicam shots are often the life-blood of the show and operators like Tore Livia and Freddy Frederick always have to be on their toes. “I love the way Louis J. prepares for each performance,” Livia says. “He formulates a plan long before sound check even happens. When we start rehearsing, he watches the


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first run through and attaches his preplanned formula, adjusting to any changes that have been made. Normally he calls the Steadicam operators up on stage with him so we can talk down our individual assignments specific to choreography or the desired angle to help him tell the story.” The 2018 show at Madison Square Garden had a special performance between Elton John and Miley Cyrus. As Livia explains: “Louis J. always loves to show relationship shots between artists. He creates a sense of intimacy through the camera lens with overthe-shoulder shots where you can see both singers in the frame. His plan for the end of this performance was to have me start over Elton’s shoulder and focus on Miley singing. Once she finishes her last word, I’d make a timely move to capture Elton singing while shooting over Miley’s shoulder. Holding this long shot, Louis’s vision was for me to move from that point circling to the back of the piano, capturing the reverse shot with the piano keys in the foreground and the house and audience in the background, ending

with Elton playing the last notes of the song.” Between Horvitz’s detailed vision and Livia’s graceful Steadicam, rehearsal proved the timing was perfect for a visual finish of an intimate duet of different generations. But sometimes even the best plans have to be refined, and that’s where prep day becomes so valuable. Frederick remembers a DJ Khaled/Rihanna performance, “where Louis J. called me to the stage to meet the choreographers for rehearsal. They had their vision for this particular number, all to be shot on Steadicam. Lou and I did a dry block with the choreographers and dancers on stage so we could get some kind of timing. “Once we got on camera, for rehearsal, it was a challenge because of limited space on stage between the dancers and set pieces,” Frederick continues. “We rehearsed a couple of times while the choreographers would watch and give us notes. I could sense [the choreographers’] frustration because it wasn’t looking like they’d envisioned, more artistic than anything technical. So Louis J., in his usual manner, assigned each camera with

what we call ‘zone coverage’ and combined part of the choreographers’ vision with his and they loved it. In the performance, the opening is on one Steadicam, and midway to the end is the second Steadicam.” L.A. or New York City, Staples Center of Madison Square Garden – The Grammy Awards is one challenging, complicated show. It requires extensive cooperation between departments, and the melding of creative minds behind the camera during rehearsal – even if that’s just a scant hour to dry-run a new number, or a few minutes to asses two different visions and find a way to bring them together. Louis J. Horvitz and his award-winning Guild crew are the keys to all that polish and shine the Grammys are known for. And it’s why the technical crew may well win more Emmys this year. So isn’t it high time the show itself captures television’s highest honor (long overdue) in the live event category? Anybody?

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Watch How To Create A Lens Map With CTRL.1 57


SUBSCRIBE ONLINE @ICGMAGAZINE.COM 58 S CR EENPL AY BY ER IC RO T H A ND BR A DL E Y C OOPER & W IL L F E T T ER S DIR EC T ED BY BR A DL E Y C OOPER


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BEN DAVIS, BSC, HELPS DEBUT A PRE-AVENGERS SUPER-HEROINE, AS CAPTAIN MARVEL TAKES FLIGHT.

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PHOTOS BY

CHUCK ZLOTNICK FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF

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EARLY PRESS FOR CAPTAIN MARVEL INCLUDED A REMARK FROM MARVEL STUDIOS PRESIDENT KEVIN FEIGE INDICATING THAT THE FILM’S TITULAR CHARACTER (PLAYED BY BRIE LARSON) IS THE MOST POWERFUL HERO IN THE ENTIRE MARVEL CINEMATIC UNIVERSE. BUT WHEN RATING A SUPERHERO’S SUCCESS, IT’S OFTEN AS MUCH ABOUT CHARACTER AS IT IS SPECIAL POWERS (WHICH MAY EXPLAIN BATMAN’S LONG-TERM POPULARITY, AND WHY THAT DARK KNIGHT OFTEN WORKS BETTER ON-SCREEN THAN HIS MAN-OF-STEEL COUNTERPART, SUPERMAN).

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Fortunately for audiences, the Captain, aka Carol Danvers, is invested with plenty of complexity. In her back story, Danvers was an injured test pilot saved by extraterrestrial intervention, and over the course of the film, as she finds her way home to earth, the limits of her powers are tested. That begins another path of discovery and one that will lead into how she factors into the upcoming Avengers: Endgame. Co-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, brought aboard for their fresh indie-minded perspectives, chose Ben Davis, BSC, as their cinematographer. Davis is no stranger to the MCU, having shot Avengers: Age of Ultron and Doctor Strange, as well as indie dramas like Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. He says Captain Marvel straddled the differing sensibilities of these contrasting projects. “It’s very character-centric and all about Danvers’ emotional journey,” Davis relates. “Much of the work is very intimate, and the choice of lens was key because the camera is either following her or leading her into these new environments. When Brie’s character arrives on Earth, it can’t be that you’re already there and watch her arrive; you have to go along with her in order to feel the emotional arc she travels.” While the action spans worlds, Davis found the most welcome challenge in its setting of Earth in the recent past. “I liked getting the chance to shoot this portrayal of an extraordinary character against a realistic environment, which helped ground the movie,” he elaborates. “Setting it in the 1990s meant there was a visual language in place, one that provided ideas for how we’d move the camera.” Davis says he, Boden and Fleck wanted the technological side of camera movement minimized, so there wasn’t much in the way of CableCam rigs or expansive crane shots. “But we did use zooms and quite a bit of handheld,” he adds. “There was a lot we took from 1970s films, which is my favorite period owing to all those great Gordon Willis [ASC] films and The French Connection [shot by Owen Roizman, ASC]. That approach kept things real because we didn’t want the camera flying around in all directions.” The large-format ARRI ALEXA 65 was the primary capture device,

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though some scenes utilized Panavision DXL2s, which cut well with RED WEAPON VV Monstro units used in tight spaces. “Ben liked the ALEXA 65 for how it rendered the fabric,” 1st AC Bill Coe recalls. “With all the different costumes featured, that was pretty important.” Coe recalls that early camera tests went significantly beyond shooting lens charts. “We shot actors in costume and prosthetic make-ups from Legacy Effects, which was a real plus, letting Ben make serious decisions about looks up front.” For a flashback to Danvers as a young girl, four Blackmagic Micros were mounted to a go-cart. “It used to be that the quality drop was significant with small units, but these GoPro-sized systems are very high quality,” he declares. “You can put really good lenses on them and set shutter and iris appropriately.” Davis favored a series of rehoused Canon K35 lenses for much of the film. “Panavision’s Dan Sasaki tailormade some beautiful glass for us,” he continues. “For the period sequences, we wanted a softer look that was essentially like film. Then, for space scenes, we usually went cleaner, using Panavision Spheros, which was another way to build contrast between the environments. But Dan’s tailor-made lenses were so beautiful, I couldn’t help myself; I wound up sneaking them on closer views during the alien stuff too.”

His past Marvel experience made clear for Davis the need for understanding how live-action would integrate with VFX up front. “You always need to have a clear, even vivid idea of what that set extension is going to look and feel like,” he declares, “so you can create a light source that will work for what is being added later as well as what you have on-set. I work very closely with the VFX supervisor and production designer on this kind of conceptualization; if you don’t get things fully decided, it wastes your prep, and if that happens, you wind up creating light on set that is non-committal; a compromise you need to avoid.” Production designer Andy Nicholson’s challenges were two-fold: depicting the 1995 period, and introducing the Kree and Skrull races to the MCU. “We’re going to be seeing more of these aliens going forward,” Nicholson shares, “so we had to come up with visual material that supported the idea that these cultures have been at war for millennia. A city that covers an entire planet is an old science fiction concept, but we tried to show it in an everyday fashion – the social structure of people within the city as well as the unique architecture.” Nicholson studied the comic book source material and then filtered that through the script’s specific needs. “Something I picked up working on Gravity is creating 3D looks in the art department before building anything. That way we can find out early if it’s impractical, or if the directors want to suggest an alteration that we can quickly accommodate. The feedback loop is such that set designers and concept artists are working hand-in-glove, showing a set, even offering them a chance to walk around it using virtual reality.” For Visual Effects Supervisor Christopher Townsend, the film’s naturalism was a major draw. “The directors come from a strong indie background, and bring an organic outlook that’s centered on character,” he explains. “For space, they wanted us to steer away from Guardians, with the super colorful nebula. We create fantastically unique worlds but take pains to ground them in some kind of reality. There’s an aesthetic language that all Marvel films adhere to, so it is a bit of a mix-and-match between the old and the new.” Speaking of old and new, Captain Marvel features much more youthful versions of S.H.I.E.L.D. team members Coulson [Clark Gregg] and Nick Fury [Samuel L. Jackson], which required a larger amount of de-aging work than previous MCU outings. “[De-aging is] a painstaking, frame-by-frame manipulation of the image,” Townsend explains. “And since I’ve used them many times previously,

“THE BAR IS SO HIGH WITH VISUAL AND TECHNICAL MATTERS NOW THAT THERE’S A TENDENCY TO ALWAYS WANT TO LEAP BEYOND

WHAT HAS BEEN DONE.

B U T T R UTHFUL L Y,

I T CA N O FTE N BE BE TTE R TO SIMPLY B E R EAL AND IN TH E MOMENT .” Ben Davis, BSC

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Lola Visual Effects was our main go-to for that work. We spent a huge amount of time in preproduction determining how the younger Sam Jackson would look. That included what we could do practically that could help their effort, like with hair and makeup, plus we had reference of him in other movies from that era. Supervisor of additional VFX Janelle Croshaw looked after that whole body of work, which requires a light touch to avoid stepping on his performance. Photographing people with different lenses and in different lighting conditions can alter their apparent age rather drastically; in reality, we accept that. But with digital manipulation, those situations come off like red flags, so we have to be especially careful not to go too far afield.” Gaffer Ross Dunkerley had worked with Davis on Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, but Marvel was his first MCU project. “When they told me I had two months of prep, my first thought was, ‘What am I going to do with all this time?’” Dunkerley admits. “But as it turned out, we could have actually used another couple weeks! Usually on features there is one production meeting, and then we’re all off and running. But on Marvel, there were sequence meetings almost weekly.” Dunkerley found these meetings to be absolutely crucial. “We might find that the stunt team needed to use half of the real estate we thought was reserved for our lighting units,” he describes. “After doing seventeen Clint Eastwood films, this was the polar opposite. When Clint shoots the white script and the white schedule, it’s very cut-and-dried. But these films are constantly evolving. They plan for weeks of additional photography so they can reshape after seeing a cut. On all those Eastwood movies, I’ve only been involved in one reshoot – and that was an insert shot of a cigarette lighter!”

Taking advantage of a lucrative tax incentive, Marvel shot in Los Angeles, which Davis says was something of a treat. “I love having to bend and flow with the restrictions that arise out of being on location,” he states. “The bar is so high with visual and technical matters now that there’s a tendency to always want to leap beyond what has been done. But truthfully, it can often be better to simply be real and in the moment. There’s a certain amount of naturalism that, if you can capture it, is just wonderful. A casual viewer might not recognize the tremendous amount of work, because you don’t ever just get it handed to you.” To recapture the streetlight look of period Los Angeles, Luminys supplied sodiumvapor and metal-halide fixtures. A vacant local mall offered empty storefronts that could be redressed appropriately. “A lot of the street stuff was just a matter of changing graphics to bring the period look,” Nicholson explains. “We had a lot of fun with the Blockbuster video store set dressing, ordering videotapes from all over the country and buying blank Blockbuster boxes off eBay for three months. Doing research for that era is odd because it predates all that Internet imagery; we didn’t even find a lot of photographic reference for the stores. There was also the matter of creating the standees and promotional artwork for the films of the era.” Captain Marvel first appears in a Sanja Milkovic Hays creation, a green costume verging on teal. “It was actually impossible to capture that hue properly in the camera,” Davis admits. “So we had to manipulate the palette so the digital sensor could see it as the human eye would, very green, but our capture contained some element of blue, and, depending on color temperature of lighting and the camera setting, that fluctuated.” Although Davis calls the DIT tent a “lure of sorts,” he makes a conscious effort to avoid spending all his time there. “It gives you the chance to make minute adjustments, but I try to resist because there’s a relationship between those in front of the camera and those behind it, and that can’t be conducted properly when you’re forty feet away behind a black curtain. On-set, it’s not just a matter of looking through the camera, but also seeing what is happening outside of the frame.” Davis says he chooses to not create CDLs on-set and usually employs a filmemulation LUT. “I’ve gone back to an approach like shooting on film; if I want

“I’VE GONE BACK TO AN APPROACH LIKE SHOOTING ON FILM; IF I WANT SOMETHING TO LOOK DARK, I’LL UNDEREXPOSE, AND IF I WANT A WARMER PALETTE, THAT’S WHAT THE LIGHTS DO ON THE SET FOR ME.” Ben Davis, BSC

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“I EMBRACE THE ADVANCES IN LED, BUT BY NATURE, IT IS A SOFT SOURCE.

WHEN YOU CREATE A SOURCE FOR SPACE, YOU NEED THE HARDEST LIGHT IMAGINABLE.” Gaffer Ross Dunkerley

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something to look dark, I’ll underexpose, and if I want a warmer palette, that’s what the lights do on the set for me. We’ve got a complex workflow with multiple VFX vendors for our large post effort, and that has the potential for complicating matters in ways that can compromise the imagery. Keeping the parameters going out with our material to vendors as simple as possible is a benefit. Image transformations get sidestepped, which keeps things from getting missed, so you don’t wind up facing additional issues in the DI.” Captain Marvel features two new alien planets, which Davis says required two distinctive atmospheres. “My rationale is that the atmospheric conditions might bend the light from a sun in a way that makes it appear quite different from Earth,” he explains. “Part of that thinking was that it would let the colors pop.” Davis and Dunkerley concurred on the use of Mole-Richardson tungsten PARs. “I’ve been a fan for years, but, to my knowledge, Dumbo was the first film Ben used them on,” the gaffer shares. “I was delighted

LOCAL 600 CREW Directors of Photography Ben Davis, BSC A-Camera Operator Geoff Haley A-Camera 1st AC Bill Coe A-Camera 2nd AC Bobby McMahan B-Camera Operator Sarah Levy B-Camera 1st AC Steve Wong B-Camera 2nd AC Trevor Carroll-Coe Additonal 2nd AC Ryan Creasy Splinter Unit DP C-Camera Operator Chris Duskin C-Camera 1st AC Chuck Whelan C-Camera 2nd AC Eric Amundsen Maxima Operator Brice Reid DIT Daniel Hernandez Loader Colleen Mlezvia Digital Utility Luis Hernandez Still Photographer Chuck Zlotnick Publicist John Pisani

to find that Ben equally appreciated their unique attributes. The quality of light works as a single point source and creates a nice lens flare. I embrace the advances in LED, but by nature, it is a soft source. When you create a source for space, you need the hardest light imaginable. We were actually photographing the lights; when you see a sun source in frame, nine times out of ten it will be one of our tungsten Pars.” For the spaceship interiors, Dunkerley relied on RGB LEDs, but he also reintroduced older technology. “For one sequence, we used a concert lighting unit like a Vari-Lite, but on steroids – Syncholite’s 6400-watt Xenon,” he recounts. “It’s antiquated technology, so there aren’t many people who know how to service them, but they gave a distinct, organic feel. Xenons have a breathing quality that sets them apart; a light that gives off an energy that doesn’t seem too perfect.” Each race’s ship had its own palette, with vessel lighting via built-in practicals. “Even with the most fantastic alien environment, you need something genuine that hints at the advanced technology,” says Davis. “Oftentimes we had fixtures specially designed by the art department, and then I’d place LEDs behind them and use RGB to create distinctive color patterns.” Acknowledging the impact of CG on sci-fi art direction, Nicholson says user interfaces can often fall to VFX. “I tried to establish different motifs and styles for the Kree and the Skrull,” he notes. “The latter possess shape-changing abilities, which led me to an organic look and feel in showing how their ships function. The Kree vessels also have distinctive silhouettes, which I carried through on the interiors.” One alien exterior, on Torfa, was shot in a quarry outside L.A. “We had originally planned to shoot days, but I didn’t have the necessary controls to create a distinctive look in this sand pit at midday during a bright L.A. summer,” Davis relates. “Going to nights gave me a blank canvas on which to build. Obviously, it cost more to have big lights for that set, and I wound up using three Bebee [Night Light] units and a lot of cranes with LED four-by-four panels [Cineo LBK1K’s].” Bebee provided three 9×6K HMI trucks in support of the nocturnal shoot. Having worked with Davis on the second Avengers, Townsend knew the DP to be open to collaboration regarding VFX embellishment. “Ben might say he wants an environment to be foggy,” Townsend describes. “I’d ask, ‘Can you shoot without it and let us add it in later?’ That kind of give-andtake is always going on, as is the issue of interactive lighting on-set. When interactives work, they are brilliant; but when the timing is off, it’s a nightmare. We tried to make intelligent calls, like whether adding one more moving element would be worthwhile.” Regarding an HDR finish, Davis is on the fence. “Sometimes it helps, but other times it most definitely does not,” he smiles. “Say you’re keying off a practical while shooting two characters. In HDR, that source gets incredibly bright, distracts from the characters and makes the rest of the image look dark. In order not to damage what already works, you have to either bring up the shadow areas or knock down the brightness of the source. I strive to finish my best standard version, and then use that as a reference for the HDR. Cinematographers can’t rely on a straight image transform, and we need to be vocal about representing our needs throughout the grading process.”

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THE SOLOIST ARGENTINIAN CINEMATOGRAPHER NATASHA BRAIER, ASC, ADF, LIGHTS UP JULIANNE MOORE’S PORTRAYAL OF REDISCOVERED YOUTH AND PURPOSE IN GLORIA BELL .

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PRODUCTION STILLS BY

JA IMIE T RU EBLO OD , S MP S P BEHIND THE SCENES STILLS BY

HILA RY BRON WYN G AYL E, S MP S P

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IT’S NOT SO MUCH A REMAKE AS A REMIX. THAT’S HOW CINEMATOGRAPHER NATASHA BRAIER, ASC, ADF, DESCRIBES GLORIA BELL , THE UPCOMING RELEASE FROM A24 ENTERTAINMENT. CHILEAN WRITER/DIRECTOR SEBASTIÁN LELIO REVISITS HIS OWN ORIGINAL ARIEL-WINNING FILM FROM 2014, GLORIA, WHICH WAS ALSO HIS COUNTRY’S OFFICIAL SELECTION IN THE 2016 FOREIGN-LANGUAGE CATEGORY FORbyTHE M. Night Shyamalan’s thriller Split, about three girls kidnapped a disturbed man (James McAvoy) with 24 distinct personalities, including “The 86TH AWARDS. INCLUDE Beast,”ACADEMY offered a stunning reveal at LELIO’S the end thatOTHER referencedEFFORTS an earlier Shyamalan film, 2000’s Unbreakable. The shocker was the reappearance of David Dunn (Bruce DISOBEDIENCE AND THE OSCAR-WINNING A FANTASTIC Willis), the sole survivor of a train wreck who came to believe he was invincible. WOMAN, EACH OF WHICH CAME OUT IN 2017. 72


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The lead character, here played by Julianne Moore, is a divorced woman of a certain vintage who hangs out in L.A.’s dance clubs to assuage her loneliness and maybe find a second chance at love – or at least happiness. When she falls for Arnold (John Turturro), the passion is immediate and intense. Navigating the relationship’s ups and downs, Gloria finds an inner strength she didn’t know she had – and the independence she didn’t know she wanted. “Initially, Sebastián wanted us to create something from scratch with new context and new locations,” recalls Braier, whose recent work includes The Neon Demon and the 2019 Sundance Dramatic Competition film Honey Boy. “We started by going through the script, and I asked questions. This is how I can get in the director’s head to begin to understand the essence of each scene. Then I can start to think about where the camera would go.” Best laid plans aside, it became apparent to Lelio during preproduction that “he couldn’t destroy in his head the experience of the other film, including what worked and didn’t work in the edit,” Braier adds. So, the pair ended up returning to the original film’s shot list to recreate scenes conceptually. Still, the movie had to make sense with a different Gloria in a different world. The original character was Chilean and had lived through the Pinochet dictatorship, which added weight to the role that the American Gloria could not carry. And shooting in L.A. and Las Vegas enabled the crew to capture the vastness of an urban landscape decidedly different from Santiago, where the prior film was set. “There was still a lot of room for me,” reflects Braier, who hails from Buenos Aires and earned a master’s degree in cinematography at the National Film and Television School in England. “I could still frame, choose location and light in a completely new way. To me, it felt like prepping a film with a director who knows exactly what he wants. It never felt like remaking another movie.” Braier and Lelio went to locations, took photos and mulled over shots. She used the Artemis app to create a visual storyboard. Scene numbers were assigned to each image, along with information on camera placements and notes on lighting, grip and color. These were shared via the Good Notes app with Gaffer Manny Tapia, Key Grip Nicholas Franchot, and DIT Ernesto Joven (all of whom worked with Braier on the 2016 Cannes premiere, The Neon Demon), and 1st AC Ignacio Musich. Natasha Braier, ASC, ADF

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Top R and L: Gaffer Manny Tapia worked closely with Production Designer Dan Bishop to provide Braier with on-camera motivated light sources Bottom R and L: Braier and director Sebastian Lelio used Lelio’s shot list from the first film (2014) to conceptually recreate shots

“We can discuss the ideas so when we go to the tech scout, it’s really fast and they already know what I want to do. We have that layer of work done,” Braier notes. That was crucial on a production that had one week of tech scouting and prep and a one-day camera test. “Natasha’s a very good communicator, so you always have all the information you need as head of department,” Musich says. “She’s very organized and sees the problems before you’re in the situation. You know what you’re going to do and how to manage the logistics of each location.” Gloria Bell was shot entirely on location, including in the basement of the Hollywood Elks Lodge, Calamigos Ranch in Malibu, CA and Las Vegas. Braier observes that the benefit of location shooting is that “places look real and force you to find camera positions that are in a human scale. The real challenge is more for the grip and gaffer,” of which she gets no argument from Tapia. “Lighting-wise, you have to get very creative and have a great production designer on your side in order to give you motivated light sources on camera that you can use to your advantage,” the gaffer explains. “I had worked with [Production Designer] Dan Bishop before on Danny Collins, so I knew he would help where he could.” Shooting in Las Vegas had several logistical consequences. Tapia recalls wanting to place a Max-Menace arm with a Manny Mat to light Gloria at

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a Caesars Palace roulette table, “and it took seven weeks to actually get permission from the casino security and the pit bosses so we could do it in a precise way where we wouldn’t block security cameras or interfere with the gamers all around on a live casino floor,” he remembers. [A Manny Mat is a 6-color RGBA-HY LiteMat 3 that LiteGear, Inc. custom-made for Tapia on The Neon Demon.] “We can dial-in any color, and they are a bit lighter than an ARRI SkyPanel for rigging purposes,” he notes. When the script had Gloria cruising down the Vegas Strip on one of those double-decker tour buses, another set of issues arose. A height restriction required the interactive lighting to be low profile, and the vehicle’s limited onboard power necessitated using a Grip Trix Battery/inverter system to power five Manny Mats. Tapia controlled them with a 24-channel DMX 524 dimmer console so he could change their color to match naturally occurring hues in the environment. Braier controlled on-camera flare colors via her own DMX-iT 12-channel dimmer board. Elsewhere in the film, Tapia deployed LiteGear


Custom 6-color ribbons for set pieces, and colored bulbs and smaller moving lights/strobes from 4Wall Lighting, run through Board Operator Chris Ferguson’s dimmer board. A Panaflasher added additional low-intensity light as needed. A dance number set to Laura Branigan’s hit “Gloria” was shot in a large space with intricate camera moves and lighting requirements. “It’s a lot of fun doing dance scenes,” Musich says. “Even choreographed dancing is unpredictable, though, so it’s very challenging to pull focus. When you add in a lot of handheld or Steadicam, and you’re shooting anamorphic with a 75-millimeter or tighter lens, it’s even more difficult.” Using a Preston Light Ranger, which Musich says has changed the way he pulls focus, made the sequence easier to capture. “I can focus more on the story and work in a very organic way,” the AC shares. “It gives me a lot of freedom to choose or change focus at my will, so I can just go for it.” Tapia used many moving lights for the sequence and created a subtle ambient glow from overhead S-120 SkyPanels that lit through an existing fabric umbrella. Astera AX1 tubes were sprinkled throughout, with Chauvet uplights for wall scrapes and exterior HMI’s with Lee 728 Steel Green gels for a subtle cyan/moonlight. Braier, who prefers to achieve most of the look in-camera, opted for an ALEXA MINI with Cooke Xtal Express anamorphic lenses. DIT Joven says he loves how Braier “takes care to create a neat composition, but still produces a dirty, indie style that’s authentic and beautiful, not your typical impeccable look.” The pair works closely on set, communicating via headsets so color correction is done in real time. “We’ve developed our own language,” Joven adds. “When we want to shoot very dim moody light, we shoot on proper exposure for the camera, and then I darken the live grade so we don’t give up detail or quality. We call it ‘la trampa,’ which means ‘the trap’ in Spanish, but here it’s like a trick or a cheat. I try to start with a hefty trampa so she can close or open the iris as much as she wants.” Braier says most of her work has been in anamorphic, “especially since digital came into the game. Anamorphic lenses give us a more filmic look. That’s the strong reason to use them,” she explains. “Of course, when I talked with Sebastián about it, there were more profound reasons that had to do with character and space and loneliness. Gloria is a character who’s alone, and anamorphic accentuates the feeling of isolation. You can even create a lot more space between two people in a frame.” The rest of the film, however, was a departure from Braier’s usual style: single camera, lighting for the environment instead of the actors, and pushing the boundaries of darkness and color. “I’m always drawn to darker setup and not over-lit or very lit stuff – I don’t even know if I have a reason,” she laughs.

“If you look at my work, it tends to be kind of darkish until I met [The Neon Demon director] Nic Refn and fell in love with color and found something else to play with.” Lelio insisted on shooting about half the movie with two cameras and cross coverage – not any cinematographer’s preferred approach. “It’s always challenging,” Braier states. “There are two cameras pointing in opposite directions, and with anamorphic, there’s not a lot of room left.” As Moore’s character wears large-framed glasses, Braier had to create special lighting for her. “I typically light for the space or environment – I don’t do special kind of lighting for the face except maybe a little for close-ups,” the DP adds. “But I had to light for Julianne and her glasses because we have to see her eyes.” Braier’s unique lighting style has become a calling card, and she’s equally respected for her willingness to push boundaries – her own, the crew’s and the technology’s. “Natasha picks projects that she feels great about and doesn’t care about the budget,” reveals Tapia. “She wants to create interesting and original work and also fights for her crew to get what we need to make the job happen. She pushes me, the technology, and the boundaries all the time.” Gloria Bell was no exception. “I learned a lot,” Braier concludes. “I tend to choose films where I can do more extreme work, cinematographically, so it was a challenge to find the poetry, the mood, the atmosphere and those feelings photographically without using my usual approach. I found it using tools I developed on The Neon Demon in a more subtle way – flaring the lens with different colors as if we were flashing the negative, or creating texture with the light. It’s refined, so there’s a lot there, but it’s not so in your face. Sebastián’s vision prompted me to try new things and get out of my own comfort zone. I’m really proud of the results.”

LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Natasha Braier, ASC, ADF A-Camera Operator/Steadicam Dennis Noyes A-Camera 1st AC Ignacio Musich A-Camera 2nd AC Arthur Zajac B-Camera Operator Ken Lehn B-Camera 1st AC Layna McAllister B-Camera 2nd AC Michaela Angelique DIT Ernesto Joven Utility Mike Dumin Still Photographer Jaimie Trueblood, SMPSP Hilary Bronwyn Gayle, SMPSP

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FAMILY THE #1 DRAMA ON BROADCAST TELEVISION HITS ITS STRIDE IN SEASON 3, THANKS TO A GUILD CAMERA TEAM THAT’S AS FAST AND SURE-FOOTED AS ANY IN THE INDUSTRY.

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BY

D AVID GEFFN ER

PHOTOS BY

RON B AT Z D ORF F , S MP S P

PLOT FRAMEGRABS COURTESY OF

YA SU TA N ID A / N BC U N IVERS A L

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THIS IS US CREATOR DAN FOGELMAN HAS SAID HE NEVER SETS OUT TO SPILL BUCKETS OF CROCODILE TEARS ON THE NOTORIOUSLY EMOTIONAL (AND HUGELY POPULAR) NBC SHOW. BUT I’LL BE DARNED IF I DON’T FEEL MY EYES MOISTEN ON A SEASON 3 SET VISIT TO PARAMOUNT STUDIOS; WATCHING A PERFECTLY AGED MANDY MOORE DELIVER A LONG, LUMP-IN-THE-THROATPRODUCING MONOLOGUE TO HER ON-SCREEN DAUGHTER, KATE PEARSON (CHRISSY METZ), HAS THE SAME EFFECT AS WATCHING IN MY LIVING ROOM ON ANY GIVEN TUESDAY NIGHT.

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Now mind you, I’m watching the scene on two sideby-side 17-inch monitors in a blackout tent next to Director of Photography Yasu Tanida, who has guided This Is Us through every episode, save for the pilot (beautifully rendered by Brett Pawlak). Behind me is one of the episode’s writers (also tearing up), who’s not only in awe of Moore’s flawless two-take delivery, but also the overall lack of production artifice for the top-rated drama on broadcast television. The scene takes place outdoors, with several key characters, including Moore, Metz, Kate’s husband Toby (Chris Sullivan), and Kevin Pearson’s girlfriend Zoe (Melanie Liburd). In any other production universe, it would require a small army of lights, grip, track, scrims and cameras, and would take up most of the day. But when I arrive, Tanida says the company is “90 minutes ahead of schedule and just waiting for Mandy to be done in makeup.” The only light source prior to Moore’s arrival has been the soft, winter sun in the sky, and the only coverage two handheld cameras (lightweight ARRI MINI’s with detuned Panavision Primos). It’s easy to assume I wandered onto an indie feature, squatting in Paramount’s tree-lined courtyard, when the show’s appeal (and why we’re all crying in a blackout tent, in the heart of Hollywood) suddenly becomes clear. Tanida and his camera team (Operators James Takata, Coy Aune, Colby Oliver and Tim Rourke, 1st AC’s Sean O’Shea and Richie Floyd, 2nd AC’s Brian Wells and Jeff Stewart, and Loader Mike Gentile), along with key on-set partners like

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1st AD Richard Rosser and Gaffer Michael Roy, have created a capture environment that’s nearly invisible. Delicate emotional performances, like those from Moore today, are easier when the production machine treads this softly. “It’s rare to find [a department head] who is that whole package,” explains Dan Fogelman, fresh out of the writer’s room after that same day’s episode. “But Yasu is such a gifted filmmaker – how he designs his shots, where he puts the camera, how he lights – on an execution level, he’s an A-plus. He’s also insanely fast and fluid, A-plus again. And on a show this big, that’s often extremely sensitive and intimate for the actors, he’s got those leadership qualities and the kind of personality that are A-plus. It was clear he was a perfect fit in so many ways.” Fogelman is also quick to point out the prime challenge (and also a photographic strength) that Tanida and his operators face each week. “[Pilot directors] Glenn [Ficarra] and John [Requa] decided early on to never lay [dolly] track. Everything would be handheld,” Fogelman continues. “The beauty in the show, which has a lot of heightened dialogue and scripted emotional moments, would be found in the ‘happy accidents.’ It’s important for all those moments to be organic, and not to over-fabricate. Yasu and his camera team work so quick and light, so…simply, which is how that can happen.”

“ THE BEAUTY IN THE SHOW, WHICH HAS A LOT OF HEIGHTENED DIALOGUE AND SCRIPTED EMOTIONAL MOMENTS, WOULD BE FOUND IN THE ‘HAPPY ACCIDENTS.’” This Is Us Creator Dan Fogelman

Tanida says Pawlak, who used the smallfootprint ARRI MINI (as Tanida does now in Season 3, having switched over from the ALEXA CLASSIC in Season 1 and ARRI AMIRA in Season 2), created a solid template, with the main change on the series being Tanida’s lensing. “With the pilot, you couldn’t tell you were in different time periods until the end reveal,” the DP states, “and that was the feeling we wanted to carry over to the series. The eras would only be distinguished by what’s in front of the camera – wardrobe, set design, hair and makeup.” Pawlak used vintage Zeiss lenses, of different sizes and circumferences. Tanida wanted to sustain the vintage look, “but with lenses that were all matching to better handle the pace of a series,” he explains. “I also wanted to go a bit softer, so [Guy McVicker at] Panavision Hollywood put together a set of detuned Primos that have a faux vintage look, where the highlights would blow out and the blacks are a little muddy. The detuning, plus the frost coating on the back element, gives the digital sensor a more filmic look. This is more common now, but at the time, we were the first series to try it.” A-camera operator Takata, who worked on Fogelman’s last series Pitch (ICG February/March 2017, You Throw Like A Girl), praises the DP’s instincts and even-keeled demeanor. Takata says the detuned primes are a big reason why “our show doesn’t look like a typical [network series].” Although the workflow can be challenging for his focus pullers, O’Shea and Floyd, Takata actually prefers it. “I like working with the limits and characteristics of a specific sized lens, rather than on a 28-76 [millimeter], and having to zoom in or out to make it fit,” he shares. “What’s key [with this workflow] is that Yasu puts us all in position to succeed,” i.e., calling out the right sized lenses and placement so that the A and B cameras don’t have to compromise each other’s light or frame. “We’re given enormous trust to follow our instincts,” Takata observes. A freedom, he adds, is only possible because of the skills of O’Shea and Floyd, who are often working with a wide-open iris, and never having watched the scene. Takata points to the final shot in Season 1 as an example of the team’s synergy under fire. “I’m handheld on a 75-millimeter as Jack and Rebecca are having this blow-out fight,” he recounts. “Milo leaves the house and we wrap back around to Mandy, who’s crying. On Take 2, I went down with the tear to her necklace and back up to her as we caught the lens flare, and there’s Sean with perfect tack-sharp focus each time. It’s an awesome feeling to be so in sync, especially when none of it is planned.”

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Such intimate family dynamics are a This Is Us trademark, but they don’t come easily. The “Memphis” episode in Season 1, where Randall (Sterling K. Brown) watches his biological father (Ron Cephas Jones) pass away in a hospital, was, in Tanida’s words, very tough to shoot. “The writing is so good and the performances are so natural,” he explains, “that John and Glenn wanted to capture Sterling and Ron in cross-coverage. That meant each camera was literally a hair out of frame when getting their close-ups, and each guy is lit individually, with Menace arms reaching over. Lighting for two [simultaneous] angles is always difficult, but in that moment it’s really secondary to what the actors need, which is showing the culmination of this relationship over 16 episodes.” Head of Makeup Zoe Hay, whose aging of

Moore’s character ranges across five fictional decades, says she relies on Tanida’s lighting for support. “There was one episode where we needed to make [Moore] 16 years old!” Hay recalls. “I can do old-school tricks with skin prep, makeup, contour and highlight, but if [Moore’s] not lit well, my work will not translate onto the screen. Yasu is incredible with understanding my requests.” Hay laughs when asked about the omnipresent close-up cameras, calling them “extremely nerve-wracking” for a makeup artist. “Ninetyeight percent of the time you see facial hair on Milo it’s not real – it’s on lace or hand laid,” she adds. “So when that camera is right there with him – like a beautiful moment this season [3] where Jack begins crying in the car with Mandy at the end of their road trip to California [Jack’s just come from visiting the parents of a young soldier who died under his command] – what you see, and how it’s lit in the frame, is essential to our work in hair and makeup.” Intensely personal moments are not all This Is Us asks from its tight-knit production team – there’s also the occasional action set

Top: On location in Ho Chi Minh City for Season 3 Episode 7, Kevin Pearson’s visit to present-day Vietnam Bottom: Lake Piru, CA location for Season 3, Episode 4 firefight in war-time Vietnam / photo by Ron Batzdorff

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piece. One example is Season 2’s hotly anticipated “Super Bowl Sunday” episode, where the Pearson home in Pittsburgh burned to the ground (twice, actually, for interior and exterior action), and another is the “Vegas, Baby” episode (also in Season 2), which gathered the siblings in the Hard Rock Hotel at the live (and very real) “Magic Mike” male strip show. Still nothing has been as ambitious as Season 3’s episode “Vietnam.” Written by National Book Award winner (and Purple Heart recipient) Tim O’Brien, it documents Jack’s wartime reunion with his younger brother, Nick (Michael Angarano). Tanida’s A-camera team shot in Ho Chi Minh City for four days, which also included segments of a later episode where Kevin visits Vietnam to decipher the mysteries surrounding his father’s time there. The majority of the wartime scenes were recreated at a remote section of Lake Piru in Ventura, CA. They included a nighttime firefight and a helicopter medevac rescue of an injured soldier after Jack’s unit takes on heavy gunfire. As Production Designer Gary Frutkoff shares: “Yasu primarily

lights through windows as a way to motivate [or replicate] natural light. So in building or designing our sets, we’re always trying give him as many windows as we can. When we’re on location, he’ll always go towards back lighting. “But our research for designing the fishing village in Vietnam,” Frutkoff adds, “made it clear the [homes] would all face the water; and that meant we couldn’t always be sure Yasu would have that nice back light. We were able to build all the huts with very thin thatched roofs and open windows, so he could light those scenes naturally. Those structures looked quite minimal and not particularly sturdy. But it was an aesthetic choice based on the research.” Frutkoff did extensive research with O’Brien before building the village (and the army base where Jack finds his brother), but the level of

Top: Director Ken Olin calls this early morning image from DP Yasu Tanida the best single frame of [Olin’s] career. Bottom: A key moment from Season 3, “Vietnam” – Jack reunites with his brother, Nicky. Shot at Lake Piru, CA

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detail he could provide was limited. “Everywhere you look around Lake Piru there’s arid, treeless hills,” he laughs. “So Yasu and Ken [Olin] had to rely on CGI [VFX House CBS Digital] to green up the backgrounds. Also Tim, who remembers everything about Vietnam, urged us to make the water muddy and put red in the earth. But we couldn’t get either of those through the National Forest service, where the lake resides – it’s not like brown brick would be horribly detrimental to the environment, but once it’s washed in, they’d never get it out.” Hay says the Vietnam documentaries she watched “all have a certain look,” owing to that region’s humidity and the way sun tans the skin, which is different than in Southern California. “We also were dealing with much larger groups of people on camera than was typical,” Hay adds. “We’re not shooting in sequence, so the continuity with all the dirt and blood was tricky. I’ve worked in tropical climates and was prepared for [Ho Chi Minh City], where the main challenge was being able to match the same products we used here in L.A.” Hay, who has worked on WW2 films like Letters from Iwo Jima and Flags of Our Fathers, says the entire Vietnam storyline “felt just like making a feature.” As for lighting the period Vietnam sequences, Tanida had to be mindful of the winter sun – Fogelman wanted Jack’s wartime assignment to be in a fishing village. “We found a spot on Lake Piru that faced east, so the sun would rise straight ahead from the village,” Tanida recalls. “And in the late afternoon, the sun bent toward the south, shining into the village. So, we tried to shoot toward the water in the morning, and toward the land in the second half of the day. Gary created a beautiful dock and eight to ten huts, and with the VFX house able to green up the background, we pulled it off pretty well.”

“ THAT HELICOPTER SHOT WAS ALL ABOUT TIMING ... AT THE RIGHT MOMENT YOU GET THAT FLARING, AND IT REALLY BECOMES PART OF THE EMOTIONAL MAKEUP OF THAT SCENE.” A-Camera Operator James Takata

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Tanida’s modest appraisal belies the true beauty (and authenticity) of these tropical wartime scenes, given the TV budget and schedule. Ken Olin (see Exposure, page 36), who directed all of Season 3’s Vietnam-themed episodes, says an early-morning shot of a soldier throwing a football off the dock is his favorite in all of his years directing network television[Page 77, top image.] “The mist over the water,” Olin reflects, “and the fact that it has beauty and poetry but is, at the same time, so sad and pointless. It was completely improvised and just…stunning.” Tanida remembers riding in the morning before that shot, with Sean O’Shea. “There was this incredible fog everywhere, and Sean and I are like: ‘Wow! This would be so great to shoot. Ken had wanted to do something where Alvin’s character is in mourning for his friend, Squirrel [Moses Storm], because he’s the one who threw the football right before Squirrel is blown up. We rushed down to the dock and did a wide shot on a 35mm lens, and then the close-up in profile as he throws it. It took fifteen minutes; then the sun came out and the mist was gone.” Both Olin and Takata reference another shot of a soldier (Mo McRae) being evacuated via helicopter as another seminal visual moment. “The over-the-shoulder shot of Jack watching Don being loaded into the Medevac is so evocative of that time,” Olin shares. “The dust, the noise, the harsh sun, the whole military machine


Top and Bottom: Yasu Tanida on the Lake Piru set for Season 3’s “Vietnam” episode / photos by Ron Batzdorff

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trying to save this one soldier…” Takata, who says the unpredictability of the detuned lens flares is often used in interesting ways on the show, notes, “that helicopter shot was all about timing. Milo and Mo’s character have this quiet moment right before he’s taken to the medevac. We’re handheld over Milo to the chopper as it takes off, and we wrap-around back to Milo with the sun behind his head. At the right moment you get that flaring, and it really becomes part of the emotional makeup of that scene.” Fogelman, who works with his writing team through the offseason to keep pace with the show’s interlocking puzzle of time periods and storylines, says he began preparing for the Vietnam storyline eight months in advance. “Pulling that off on a network budget and schedule was so very difficult,” he reflects. “First there was the responsibility to Tim O’Brien to get the war-era scenes absolutely right. Then the fact that part of it was shot in L.A. and part in Vietnam. It’s all done practically, with nothing locked off, so every pan can reveal something you don’t want to see in frame. And there’s also the VFX component to supplement backgrounds and locations. “So you had this huge undertaking for an intimate ‘network dramedy,’” Fogelman continues, “with the overriding requirement that we stay within a certain visual rhythm of the show. When Jack’s talking to his brother at a military base, or when he gets off a motorcycle in a lotus field, it still has to look and feel like This Is Us. It’s a credit to Yasu and Ken, and our whole production team – Gary, Zoe, Michael Reitz, who leads the hair department, our AD’s – that they can pull off the near impossible. They help keep us in the conversation with these [large cable or streaming shows] with

Production Designer Gary Frutkoff created the all-important lakeside dock at Lake Piru, CA for Season 3, “Vietnam”

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LOCAL 600 CREW SEASON 3 Director of Photography Yasu Tanida A-Camera Operator/Steadicam James Takata A-Camera 1st AC Sean O’Shea A-Camera 2nd AC Brian Wells B-Camera Operators Coy Aune Colby Oliver Tim Rourke B-Camera 1st AC Rich Floyd B-Camera 2nd AC Jeff Stewart Loader Mike Gentile Still Photographer Ron Batzdorff, SMPSP

dragons and robots,” he smiles, “who only shoot eight episodes on much bigger budgets.” Fogelman’s thoughtful words about how broadcast television must continue to push boundaries to keep pace with streaming platforms (“which have no commercial restraints, shorter seasons, and no limits on profanity or content,” he says) bring me back to my morning set visit at Paramount. Sitting next to Yasu in the tent, in that rare moment when he’s not a flurry of motion, checking on minute details with director Sarah Boyd, his camera and lighting teams, the AD’s, and hair and makeup, I see him lean back in his chair, staring at the dual images on screen. “Look at that,” he says pointing to B-camera operator Coy Aune’s over-the-shoulder of Metz, who, in reality, is four years older than her onscreen mother, Moore. What I see is a frame that is incredibly steady, and the focus, by Richie Floyd, crisp and clean. Yet as the speech plays out, I can make out the slightest fluttering that tells you two human beings are guiding the camera. “That is so good,” Tanida smiles. “So, so good.”

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BY

PA U L IN E RO GERS

FIRE PHOTOS BY

MICHA EL YA RI S H / CBS

CHARIOTS OF

RUNNERS, DEFENDERS, ELITE ATHLETES AND CASH-HUNGRY CONTESTANTS ALL MAKE FOR TV’S MOST EXCITING (AND DAUNTING) NEW REALITY COMPETITION SHOW, MILLION DOLLAR MILE .

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“REMEMBER THE ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER FILM, THE RUNNING MAN ?” ASKS STEADICAM OPERATOR SEAN FLANNERY. “THIS SHOW REMINDED ME OF IT. MILLION DOLLAR MILE IS AN INTERESTING TWIST COMPARED TO OTHER ATHLETIC COMPETITION SHOWS THAT ARE CURRENTLY ON TELEVISION.” AND WHY SHOULD AUDIENCES EXPECT ANYTHING LESS FROM A SHOW COPRODUCED BY NBA MEGA-STAR LEBRON JAMES’ PRODUCTION C O M PA N Y , SPRINGHILL ENTERTAINMENT, AND BIG BROTHER EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS ALLISON GRODNER AND RICH MEEHAN?

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E

Executive Producer/Show Runner Lee Metzger describes the new reality series, from CBS Television, as a combination obstacle course and sporting event. “Our competitors, known as ‘Runners,’ will have to race through a mile-long course while overcoming large-scale obstacles,” observes Metzger. “They will also have to outrun a ‘Defender,’ an elite athlete who will chase them down after giving them a two-minute start.” Another unique aspect of Million Dollar Mile is that the course traverses one mile of closed-down streets in downtown Los Angeles. Prep was long and intense for the debut episode, which was a six-night shoot. Fortunately, Metzger has worked with director/cinematographer Alex Van Wagner since 2006, and they have developed shorthand about shooting style, frame rate, composition, and color. “We started by looking at other shows and movies, almost exclusively scripted, for inspiration and technical execution,” Metzger recounts. “We knew the show would be shot at night, and we were going to shoot at 24 frames-per-second, so that posed some challenges since the Runners would, in fact, be running an entire mile. The obstacles are each one-fifth of a mile apart, and the Runners have to run, complete a challenge, and continue on. The big question was: how do we cover all that?” As soon as Metzger and Van Wagner conceived a plan, cinematographer Richard Martinez helped Van Wagner create a visual reference reel “for all cinematographers [i.e., Van Wagner’s choices for camera crew] to get excited about and to inspire, visually,” Martinez relates. The visual reference reel was important because, as Martinez (also an editor and member of Local 700) explains, “to have the show edited in your head as a cinematographer is important. Shooting for editing makes post that much

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more seamless, so the editors can get to the compositions more quickly for string outs and deadlines.” One of the most exciting aspects was watching the set come together. It was ambitious – and fraught with challenges, not the least of which was lighting a mile of downtown L.A. at night for a 24-fps shoot. Metzger says they came up with a solution that allowed Lighting Designer James Barker to illuminate the streets in a vérité style, while providing a stage look of composed lighting for the obstacles. “At the same time, we didn’t want a wash over everything,” relays Metzger, “so the idea was for the streets to feel a little grittier and the games to feel more like mini-stages.” Barker says that lighting various large obstacles and areas in practical outdoor nighttime and downtown locations was daunting. But his work impressed the camera crew when they came to prep the shoot. “James and [Gaffer] AJ Taylor took risks that you don’t often find on a show of this scale,” offers pedestal operator Tim Murphy. “They kept the contrast high on both the main stage and the course, giving an intense and futuristic look to a primetime game show. Very Tron-like. Often, on the course, the athletes’ faces were lit only by their LED vests and a hard edge.” In fact, those LED vests were designed by the wardrobe department specifically for Million Dollar Mile. They required a microphone for audio, LED’s for lighting, and compliance with safety standards. Metzger adds that to cover all that frenetic action, “we came up with a leapfrog approach for the cameras to be able to jump from various obstacles without ever missing any of the shots. We realized early on that the size of the course and the kind of coverage needed would require dozens of cameras, operators, drones, and peds.” This all made for a very extensive cameraprep period. As lead AC Dave Hawes explains: “We had about 18 peds with Sony 4300’s, ARRI AMIRAS, and MINIS with Cabrio and Cooke lenses. When I came in, I asked what to label and name cameras and was told up to the letters ZB!” he chuckles. There was everything from handheld to Technocrane to CableCam and peds – as well as two Inspire 2 drones to prep. “I personally played a zone coverage throughout the show,” Hawes adds, “working with Steadicam and A-camera, who had multiple assignments and positions throughout the show.” Hawes says camera crews were in designated teams and leapfrogged each other to keep up with the course runners and the defenders who were chasing them. “The stage cameras were not really mobile, due to being hard-lined to the truck,” he shares. “Our specialty cameras were wireless and could move anywhere at any given moment.” There were three different capture setups –

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the stage, the course, and the obstacles. Each with their own set of challenges. “The obstacles are designed to test various abilities,” Metzger notes. “We built a huge water tank that is 42-by-42 and 20-feet deep and built a game around it. There are motorized obstacles that test coordination and upper and lower body, and a vertical parkour course that’s over 100 feet long. These obstacles are some of the biggest ever made; add to that the mile course to test athletes, and you have a scope never before seen in this genre.” The most challenging obstacles – for contestants and camera safety – were the Wall Walker and Spiraling Up, the latter being a 60-foot spiral staircase without any rails or support. Runners would literally have to jump or climb their way up to the top, then jump from a platform at the top and belay down. “In order to do this, we had to have them clip-in at the bottom of the staircase before ascending,” Metzger points out. Van Wagner used a combination of drone, fixed cameras, and handheld operators to cover all the action. “Cameras were preplaced on the obstacle before it was up in the air,” explains Nate Moore of The ATS Team, designers of sports obstacles for many of the reality sports challenge programs. “Not all challenges allowed this to happen, but when it is possible, this is what we prefer. This prevented them from needing to climb the obstacle or needing a harness and safety line, thus reducing the overall risk. No camera operator was stationed at the top of the obstacle.” Drone Operator Steve Smith says the “obstacle that was 10 times as exciting and sink-your-belly-button-up-into-your-throat as you look at the monitor was Wall Walker.” It’s a vertical climb up a 15- story building, after which the Runner rappels down the other side via a zip line. The Wall Walker was positioned to take advantage of a full view of the downtown Los


“ THESE OBSTACLES ARE SOME OF THE BIGGEST EVER MADE; ADD TO THAT THE MILE COURSE TO TEST ATHLETES, AND YOU HAVE A SCOPE NEVER BEFORE SEEN IN THIS GENRE.” Executive Producer/Show Runner Lee Metzger

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Angeles skyline below – making it appear deeper than it actually was. “The cameras were pre-placed on the truss at the top of Wall Walker,” Moore details. “During installation on the roof, anyone who was to go anywhere near the edge was required to wear a harness and be attached to a safety line. Even though we have a member of our safety staff with them, in a situation like this it is best for somebody with prior high-angle experience from the camera department to be involved. “It was important to make sure that no one was working under them during this process,” Moore continues. “The camera operators were in harnesses and had safety lines. If he or she was moving around during the filming, we had a spotter standing nearby.” Some of the most exciting footage on the Wall Walker came from Dave Ortkiese and Steve Smith on drones. “The challengers would come to the bottom, climb up and zip down to the stage,” says Ortkiese. “I would wrap around the north side and look at downtown, then go high to low – following the zip line and fall out of the air with them – revealing the wide shot of downtown. Steve would have the frontal view – tilt down and back out. “There were a lot of issues we had to watch out for that did not involve the contestants,” Ortkiese continues. “The wires were invisible, so we had to literally walk the course before the shoot and map out everything. We then had to factor in where the crane, holding up the Spiral Staircase and every Condor, would be, and also keep an eye on where each drone was at all times.” “The biggest challenge was just the massive coordination required of all these moving parts,” adds Operator Tracy Shreve. “The Wall Walker was fun to watch,” she admits. “I had the camera on the ground and would run to the base of the

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obstacle to get the beginning of the climb if they made it that far.” Van Wagner says one key difference with Million Dollar Mile from other shows is that runners get to choose the order in which they want to attack the obstacle course. “We had multiple peds and ARRI AMIRAS at each obstacle,” he outlines. “Our AD’s would call the shots as to what team would go to the next camera setup and be ready for the action.” Action was the name of the game, according to operator Nick Tramantano, who says the key to the success of the “floor shots” was how the camera teams worked together. “Each team member would pick a camera/ ped, agreeing or finding a middle ground on camera/ped and menu settings, then those three operators would stick to the designated cameras every time we moved locations,” Tramantano explains. “Leapfrogging cameras really keeps you on your game – sometimes you only have a few minutes to dial into a different rig and be ready, as contestants are literally sprinting towards you while being chased by a Defender!” These ground-level shots were more exciting – and dangerous – than expected. As Steadicam Operator Sean Flannery explains: “While riding on the Grip Trix Cart, we were constantly trying to find new angles, other than the simple tracking shots alongside the Runners and Defenders. And we found a point in the course where, if the timing was right, the Defender would be crossing the street heading into a challenge at the exact time the Runner would be exiting the same challenge. They would tend to cross each other right in the middle of the street, with the L.A. skyline as the backdrop. Our Grip Trix Cart driver, Art Ortiz, would travel backward at a high speed toward the two athletes as they were crossing in


LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Alex Van Wagner

Lead AC David Hawes

Lighting Designer James Barker

ACs Verlon Allen John Burt Lucas Conway Katie DeTemple Cam Kahangi Dustin Penn Jeremiah Thorne Mike Warfel

Aerial Directors of Photography David Ortkiese Steven Smith Operators Vince Acosta John Armstrong Laurence Avenet-Bradley Buddy Baab Michael Bean Brandon Benning Marc Carter Megan Drew Sean Flannery (Steadicam) Alex Garcia Jason Hafer Jeff Hamby Erik Hamilton Ashley Hughes Steve Lopez Richard Martinez Tim Murphy Pete Ozarowski Adrian Pruett Martin Runel Tracy Shreve Marques Smith Kyle Stryker Nick Tramontano

Technocrane Robert Barcelona Crane Techs Karl Eckhardt Christian Hurley Jason Kay Utilities Chris Antes Kevin Collins Tim Farmer Drory Yelin Still Photographer Michael Yarish

the middle of the street.” Flannery says the Steadicam was hardmounted on the back of the cart. “The camera would push in toward the Runner and Defender,” he continues, “and if we timed it just right we could squeeze between them as they crossed. It was a very dramatic shot that had to be executed with perfect timing so as not to run into either the Runner or Defender with the Grip Trix. Since we couldn’t rehearse the shot, we had to rely on the skill and experience of [Ortiz] to pull it off.” The ped operators were also on the lookout for interesting shots from ground level. “I was constantly asking myself, ‘What else can I cover from this position?’” remembers Martinez. “So after I covered the initial start of the race, I would flip the camera and cover [the obstacle] Spiraling Up. I was able to capture a composition where the contestant would climb into my frame with some trees in the foreground and the lit office buildings in the background for some depth. It turned out to be a crispy shot, and we ended up using it quite a bit,” he adds. “Same with Wall Walker,” Martinez continues.” I was able to fully swing around backward and shoot through some trees while following the contestant up the wall with a great two-shot of the climbers as well as a zip-line down with cityscape in the background.” As Van Wagner shares: “This show was an incredible undertaking. We had 64 cameras to keep track of at night in the middle of downtown Los Angeles. The camera teams had to move with surgical precision to ensure we captured all the action. “There were many reasons our shoot was so successful,” he concludes. “Extensive prep, of course. But mostly it was how our crew worked together, which was something special. We were having a lot of fun in very hectic situations. A true testament to a great union team.”

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PRODUCTION CREDITS

COMPILED BY TERESA MUÑOZ – AS OF JANUARY 15, 2019 The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa Muñoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com

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20th CENTURY FOX “911” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Joaquín Sedillo, ASC Operators: Brice Reid, Duane Mieliwocki, SOC, Phil Miller, SOC Assistants: Ken Little, Noah Thomson, Eric Guerin, Roger Spain, Naomi Villanueva, Jihane Mrad Steadicam Operator: Brice Reid Steadicam Assistant: Ken Little Camera Utility: Paulina Gomez Digital Utility: Joshua Smith “COOL KIDS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Chris La Fountaine, ASC Operators: Bruce Reutlinger, George La Fountaine, Chris Wilcox, Kris Conde Assistants: Brian Lynch, Jeff Roth, Craig La Fountaine Digital Imaging Tech: Shaun Wheeler Camera Utilities: Chris Todd, Vicki Beck Video Controller: Andy Dickerman Still Photographer: Patrick McElhenney

“EMPIRE” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Joe “Jody” Williams Operators: Kirk Gardner, Spencer Gillis Assistants: Andy Borham, Betsy Peoples, Uriah Kalahiki, Shannon DeWolfe Loader: Amanda Kopec Digital Utility: Mark Irion Still Photographer: Chuck Hodes

“SPEECHLESS” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Rhet Bear Operators: Patrick McGinley, Hiro Fukuda, Brad Richard Assistants: Blair Rogers, Peter DePhilippis, Geoff Goodloe, Ulli Lamster, David Erickson, James Jermyn Camera Utility: Brittany Meadows

“FRESH OFF THE BOAT” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Greg Matthews Operators: Brian Morena, Brooks Robinson Assistants: Ray Dier, Tomoka Maronn Izumi, Chris Cobb, Steve Whitcomb Camera Utility: Adam Kolkman

“STAR” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Jesse M. Feldman, Jim “Gooch” Gucciardo Operators: Aiken Weiss, SOC, Christian Satrazemis Assistants: Maurizio “Nino” Dotto, Chad Brock, April Ruane Crowley, Grace Preller Chambers Steadicam Operator: Aiken Weiss, SOC Loader: Trent Walker Camera Utility: Anna-Marie Aloia

“LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Gary Allen, Randy Baer, Larry Gaudette, John Boyd Assistants: Missy Toy-Ozeas, Damian Della Santina, Al Myers Camera Utilities: John Weiss, Steve Masias Digital Imaging Tech: Von Thomas

“THIS IS US” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Yasu Tanida Operators: James Takata, Tim Roarke Assistants: Sean O’Shea, Rich Floyd, Brian Wells, Jeff Stewart

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Steadicam Operator: James Takata Steadicam Assistant: Sean O’Shea Loader: Mike Gentile Still Photographer: Ron Batzdorff ABC STUDIOS “AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Andrew Rawson Operators: Rich Davis, Tim Walker, Lisa Stacilauskas Assistants: Max Neal, Robert Gilpin, Joe Torres, Elizabeth Algieri, Karl Owens, Jaswinder Bedi Digital Loader: Leslie Puckett Digital Utility: Steve Rommevaux “AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Allan Westbrook, Kyle Jewell Operators: Bill Brummond, Josh Larsen Assistants: Coby Garfield, Tim Cobb, Derek Hackett, Josh Novak Steadicam Operator: Bill Brummond Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Degrazzio Digital Utility: Andrew Oliver “BLACK-ISH” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Rob Sweeney Operators: Jens Piotrowski, Troy Smith Assistants: Art Martin, Dan Squires, Tony Muller Digital Utilities: Pablo Jara, Eliza Wimberly “GODFATHER OF HARLEM” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Guillermo Navarro, ASC Operators: David Knox, Christopher Moone Assistants: Jerome Williams, Cory Stambler,

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Cameron Sizemore, Benedict Baldauff Still Photographer: David Lee “GRAND HOTEL” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Alison Kelly Operators: David Ayers, Steve Matzinger, Matt Blute Assistants: Mark Legaspi, Gretchen Hatz, Emily Zenk, Robin Bursey Digital Imaging Tech: Stephen Fouasnon Loader: Alex Gadberry Digital Utility: Trigg Ferrano “GROWN-ISH” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Mark DoeringPowell Operators: Paul Sanchez, Robert Arnold Assistants: Robert Schierer, Michael Kleiman, Yen Nguyen, Dan Taylor Camera Utility: Andrew Oliver Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe “HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Michael Price, Jeff Jur Operators: Scott Boettle, John Hankammer, Andrea Rossotto Assistants: Heather Lea-LeRoy, Vanessa Morehouse, Darrell Herrington, Drew Han, Mark Sasabuchi, Michael Stampler Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Osborne “JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 17 Lighting Director: Christian Hibbard Operators: Greg Grouwinkel, Parker Bartlett, Garrett Hurt, Mark Gonzales

Steadicam Operator: Kris Wilson Jib Operators: Marc Hunter, Randy Gomez, Jr., Nick Gomez Camera Utilities: Charles Fernandez, Scott Spiegel, Travis Wilson, David Fernandez, Adam Barker Video Controller: Guy Jones Still Photographers: Karen Neal, Michael Desmond 2ND UNIT Directors of Photography: Bernd Reinbardt, Steve Garrett “STATION 19” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Oliver Bokelberg, ASC, Daryn Okada, ASC Operators: Steve Clancy, Mariana Antuñano Assistants: Tony Schultz, Christopher Garcia, Diana Ulzheimer, Tim Tillman Steadicam Operator: Steve Clancy Steadicam Assistant: Tony Schultz Digital Imaging Tech: Andrew Lemon Digital Utility: George Montejano, III A CLEAN PICTURE, LLC “CLEAN” Director of Photography: Zoran Popovic Operator: Dean Smollar ACROSS THE POND PRODUCTIONS, LLC “DIVORCE” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: John Lindley, ASC Operators: Gerard Sava, Ted Chu alterAssistants: Braden Belmonte, Abner Medina, Brendan Russell, Andy Hensler Loaders: Christos Limniatis, Austin Restrepo Still Photographer: Craig Blankenhorn


AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 5 Lighting Director: Earl Woody, LD Operators: Kevin Michel, David Kanehann, Steve Russell, Bob Berkowitz Steadicam Operator: Will Demeritt Camera Utilities: James Magdalin, Henry Vereen, John Markese Jib Arm Operator: Jim Cirrito Video Controller: Jeff Messenger A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS “THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 16 Lighting Director: Tom Beck Ped Operators: David Weeks, Paul Wileman, Tim O’Neill Hand Held Operator: Chip Fraser Jib Operator: David Rhea Steadicam Operator: Donovan Gilbuena Video Controller: James Moran Head Utility: Craig “Zzo” Marazzo Utilities: Arlo Gilbuena, Wally Lancaster, Diego Avalos

BEACHWOOD SERVICES “DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 53 Directors of Photography: Mark Levin, Ted Polmanski Operators: John Sizemore, Mark Warshaw, Vickie Walker, Michael J. Denton, Steve Clark Utilities: Steve Bagdadi, Gary Cypher Video Controller: Alexis Dellar Hanson

“CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Ian Dodd Operators: Shasta Spahn, Bonnie Blake, Taj Teffaha Assistants: Eric Dyson, Eric Wheeler, Freddy Rosado, Blake Hooks Digital Imaging Tech: Sam McConville Utility: James Dunham

BENEDICT WHITE, LLC “KNIVES OUT” Director of Photography: Steve Yedlin Operators: Dale Myrand, Terrence Hayes Assistants: Dan Schroer, Dan Mason, Felix Giuffrida Loader: Toshadeva Palani Still Photographer: Claire Folger Publicist: Amy Johnson

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 39 Lighting Designer: Darren Langer Director of Photography: Kurt Braun Operators: Jaimie Cantrell, James B. Patrick, Allen Voss, Ed Sartori, Henry Zinman, Bob Campi, Rodney McMahon, Anthony Salerno Camera Utility: Terry Ahern Video Controllers: Mike Doyle, Peter Stendal

CBS “BULL” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Derick Underschultz Operators: Barnaby Shapiro, Doug Pellegrino Assistants: Roman Lukiw, Soren Nash, Mike Lobb, Trevor Wolfson Digital Imaging Tech: Gabe Kolodny Loaders: Wyatt Maker, Nialaney Rodriguez

“MAN WITH A PLAN” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Gary Baum, ASC Operators: Glenn Shimada, Travers Hill, Lance Billitzer, Ed Fine Assistants: Adrian Licciardi, Jeff Goldenberg, Alec Elizondo, Clint Palmer, Jason Herring Utilities: Danny Lorenze, Sean Askins

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Digital Imaging Tech: Derek Lantz Video Controller: John O’Brien “NCIS” SEASON 16 Director of Photography: William Webb, ASC Operators: Gregory Paul Collier, Chad Erickson, Doug Froebe (Video) Assistants: James Troost, Helen Tadesse Nathan Lopez, Yusef Edmonds Loader: Anna Ferrarie Still Photographers: Ron Jaffe, Mike Kubeisy “NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 10 Director of Photography: Victor Hammer Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes, Peter Caronia, Jacqueline Nivens Steadicam Operators: Terence Nightingall, Tim Beavers Steadicam Assistants: Keith Banks, Richie Hughes Digital Imaging Tech: John Mills Digital Utility: Trevor Beeler
 Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe Publicist: Kathleen Tanji “NCIS: NEW ORLEANS” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Gordon Lonsdale, ASC Operators: Jerry Jacob, Vincent Bearden, Tony Politis Assistants: Brouke Franklin, Peter Roome, Jeff Taylor, Dave Edwards, Toni Weick, Stephen Vicari Steadicam Operator: Vincent Bearden Digital Loader: Levi Wells Digital Utility: Kolby Heid

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“THE CODE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jimmy Lindsey Operators: Lawrence McConkey, Chris Scarafile Assistants: Scott Koenigsberg, Joseph Metzger, Dean Martinez, Jonathan Monk Digital Imaging Tech: Matthew Selkirk Loaders: James Abamont, Alyssa Longchamp Still Photographer: Mark Schafer “THE GOOD FIGHT” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Fred Murphy, ASC, Tim Guinness Operators: Alec Jarnagin, Diana Matos Assistants: Rene Crout, Daniel Fiorito, Elizabeth Casinelli, Milly Itzhak Loaders: Vinnie Laraway, Sancheev Ravichandran Still Photographer: Patrick Harbron “THE NEIGHBORHOOD” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Chris La Fountaine, ASC Operators: Bruce Reutlinger, George La Fountaine, Chris Wilcox, Kris Conde Assistants: Brian Lynch, Jeff Roth, Craig La Fountaine Digital Imaging Tech: Chris Todd Camera Utility: Vicki Beck Video Controller: Andrew Dickerman Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe “THE PHONE” Director of Photography: Ben Kutchins Operators: Josh Medak, Jarrett Morgan Assistants: Patrick McArdle, Aaron Kirby,

Dennis Rogers, Shannon Bringham Steadicam Operator: Jarrett Morgan Digital Loader: Robert Julian Still Photographer: David Moir Publicist: Alex Worman “THE TALK” SEASON 9 Lighting Director: Marisa Davis Ped Operators: Art Taylor, Mark Gonzales, Ed Staebler Hand Held Operators: Ron Barnes, Kevin Michel, Jeff Johnson Jib Operator: Randy Gomez Head Utility: Charlie Fernandez Utilities: Mike Bushner, Doug Bain, Dean Frizzel, Bill Greiner, Jon Zuccaro Video Controller: Richard Strock Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe CONACO “CONAN” SEASON 9 Operators: Ted Ashton, Nick Kober, Kosta Krstic, James Palczewski, Bart Ping, Seth Saint Vincent Head Utility: Chris Savage Utilities: Baron Johnson, Josh Gwilt COOLER WATER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “EUPHORIA” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Marcell Rev, Drew Daniels Operator: Kristen Correll Assistants: Norris Fox, Jonathan Clark, Tulio Duenas, Gavin Grossi Digital Imaging Tech: Justin Steptoe Loader: Baird Steptoe, Jr. Utility: DeWayne Williams, Jr.


CMS “SERVANT AKA CRUMPET” Director of Photography: Michael Gioulakis Operator: Benjamin Verhulst Assistants: Scott Johnson, Nicholas Huynh, Anton Miasnikov, Leon Sanginiti, Jr. Digital Imaging Tech: Aaron Biller Loader: Sean Galczyk Still Photographer: Jessica Kourkounis COMEDY CENTRAL “DRUNK HISTORY” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Logan Schneider Assistants: Garret Curtis, Lawrence Lim, Ry Ellingson Utility: Mason Harrelson Steadicam Operators: Chris Cunningham, James Goldman, Dennis Dwyer 2ND UNIT Directors of Photography: Michael Svitak, John Connor, Pablo Berron Assistants: Darin Necessary, Brad Rochlitzer, Ryan Rayner CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC “DICKINSON” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tim Orr Operators: Jeffrey Dutemple, Arthur Africano Assistants: Gregory Finkel, Bradley Grant, Emma Rees-Scanlon, Suren Karapetyan Loader: Patrick McKeown Still Photographer: Michael Parmelee Camera Utilities: Erinn Bell, Steve Masias “NO GOOD NICK” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: John Simmons, ASC Operators: Brian Gunter, Robert McCall, Sketch Pasinski, Victoria Walker Assistant: Elena Gomez Digital Imaging Tech: Cliff Jones Jib Tech: Jorge Valenzuela Video Controller: Dave DeMore Still Photographer: Lisa Rose “THE HAMELINS” SEASON 1 (MA UNIT) Director of Photography: Attila Szalay Operators: Enrique DelRioGalindo, Patrick Ruth Assistant: John McCarthy, Thomas Bellotti “THE RANCH” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Donald A. Morgan, ASC Operators: Brian Armstrong, Randy Baer, Chris Hinojosa, Michelle Crenshaw Assistants: Don Davis, Missy Toy, Vito De Palma, Adan Torres, Al Myers Digital Imaging Tech/Video Controller: Rick Dungan

CRITICAL THINKING, LLC “CRITICAL THINKING” Director of Photography: Zach Zamboni Operators: Gustavo Acosta, Alexander Lewis Assistants: Roberto Ballesteros, Steve Ciffone, Jake Schneiderman, Ian Hernand Loader: Sean Lunski Still Photographer: Jeff Daly DC COMICS “DOOM PATROL” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Magdalena Gorka, Scott Winig Operators: Tim Fabrizio, Ryan Weisen Assistants: Chris Larsen, Jackson McDonald, Paul Saunders, Sagar Desai Digital Imaging Tech: Mark Gilmer Digital Utility: Torey Lenart Loader: Caroline Oelkers DIVA GAMES, LLC “GAMES DIVAS PLAY” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Frank Perl Operators: Hilton Goring, Tony Gutierrez Assistants: Alaina McManus, Cristina

Arboleda, Mark Reilly, Aldo Porras Digital Imaging Tech: Oliver Mancebo Digital Utility: Missy Burgess Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC. “BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 9 Director of Photography: Gene Engels Operators: Stephen Consentino, Geoff Frost Assistants: Graham Burt, Jacob Stahlman, Chris Seehase, Kenny Martell Digital Imaging Tech: Ryan Heide Loaders: Neicy McFadden, Caleb Keeler “ELEMENTARY” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Thomas Houghton, ASC Operators: Carlos Guerra, Jeremy Weishaar Assistants: Jason Cleary, Charlie Foerschner, Kyle Blackman, Patrick O’Shea Loaders: Dylan Endyke, Ryan Haddon Still Photographer: Elizabeth Fisher “HAWAII FIVE-0” SEASON 9 Directors of Photography: Kurt Jones, Newton TerMeer

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CREW PHOTO: BOSCH SEASON 5

(L to R) B Camera dolly grip - Danny Roberts, Utility - Jake Schultz, A Camera 2nd - Mike Thomas, B Camera 1st - Tim Hennessy, B Camera op - Dan Coscina, B Camera 2nd - Koko Lee, A Camera 1st - Danny Brown, A Camera op - Nick Davidoff, DP - Michael McDonough, ASC, BSC, Loader - Bob Campi, Photo Credit: Aaron Epstein Not pictured: Rotating DP - Patrick Cady, ASC, A Camera dolly - John Farmer

Operators: Greg Lundsgaard, Jim Jost Assistants: Jeff Pelton, Kanoa Dahlin, Ulysses Domalaon, Brandon Ho, Mike Prioste, Will Wacha Digital Imaging Tech: David Crans Loader: Ryan Charlton-Halweg Digital Utility: Geraldo Morales “MADAM SECRETARY” SEASON 5 Director of Photography: Learan Kahanov Operators: Jamie Silverstein, Peter Vietro-Hannum Assistants: Heather Norton, Jamie Fitzpatrick, Amanda Rotzler, Damon LeMay Digital Imaging Tech: Keith Putnam Loaders: Christopher Patrikis, Kristina Lally Still Photographer: Mark Schafer “MACGYVER” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Mike Martinez, James L. Carter, ASC Operators: Ian Forsyth, Allen D. Easton, Paul Krumper Assistants: Al Cohen, Stefan Vino-Figueroa, Trevor Rios, Easton Harper,

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Mike Torino, Danny Vanzura Steadicam Operator: Ian Forsyth Digital Imaging Tech: Greg VanZyck Utility: Tyler Bastianson “MAGNUM P.I.” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Krishna Rao, Rodney Charters, ASC Operators: Keith Jordan, Jay Herron, Scott Mason Assistants: Tony Nagy, Rylan Akama, Brian Mastumura, Zeke Hanohano, Tommy Lewis, Sal Alvarez Digital Imaging Tech: Caleb Lucero Loader: Kilani Villiaros Digital Utility: Blane Eguchi FFSO PRODUCTIONS “HOBBS & SHAW” Director of Photography: Jonathan Sela Operators: Lukas Bielan, Matthew Petrosky, Maurice McGuire Assistants: Jimmy E. Jensen, Stephen Early, Richard Masino, Seth Gallagher, Cameron Keidel, Tristan Chavez, Taylor Fenno

Steadicam Operator: Matthew Petrosky Technocane Operator: Derlin Brynford-Jones Technocrane Tech: David Haeussler Still Photographer: Frank Masi Publicist: Carol McConnaughey FIRE AND ICE PRODUCTIONS “YELLOWSTONE” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Adam Suschitzky Operators: Steven Finestone, Ryan Wood Assistants: Danna Rogers, Dylan Conrad, Elver Hernandez, Matthew Leslie, Austin Green Digital Imaging Tech: Lisa Konecny Still Photographer: Emerson Miller FX NETWORK/MINIM PRODUCTIONS “LIL DICKY” PILOT Director of Photography: Brian Lannin Operators: Chris Herr, Jason LeBlanc Assistants: Joe Segura, Jordan Cramer, Ryan Guzdzial, Cristina Arboleda Steadicam Operator: Chris Herr Digital Utility: Brooke Zbytniewski Digital Imgaging Tech: Michael Borenstein


Camera Utility: Missy Burgess Still Photographer: Ray Mickshaw GRAVITATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, LLC “PICKLE” Director of Photography: John Guleserian Operators: Michael Fuchs, Edwin Rubio Assistants: John Ruiz, Jason Cianella Digital Imaging Tech: Chase Abrams Loader: Gabriel Marchetti Still Photographer: Hopper Stone HC PICTURES, INC. “HUMAN CAPITAL” Director of Photography: Kathryn Westergaard Operator: Korey Robinson Assistants: Rebecca Rajadnya, Tsyen Shen Digital Imaging Tech: Jaime Chapin Still Photographer: Gwedolyn Capistran HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “ANDI MACK” SEASON 3 Director of Photography: Matthew Williams Operator: Scott Hoffman

Assistants: John Williams, David Rhineer, Kurtis Burr, Nick Nebeker Steadicam Operator: Scott Hoffman Digital Imaging Tech: Sean McAllister HUCKLEBERRY INDUSTRIES “HUCKLEBERRY” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Greig Fraser, ASC, ACS, Baz Idoine Operators: Craig Cockerill, Karina Silva Assistants: Paul Metcalf, Amanda Levy, Niranjan Martin, Jeremy Cannon Digital Imaging Tech: Eduardo Eguia Digital Utility: Robby Marino 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Ryley Brown IT’S A LAUGH PRODUCTIONS “SYDNEY TO THE MAX” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: George Mooradian, ASC, Tom Eckelberry Operators: Ken Herft, Cory Gunter, Tom Conkright, Jack Chisholm, Vince Singletary Camera Utilities: Terry Gunter, Kate Steinhebel Digital Utilities: Mike Pusatere, Monica Schad

Video Controllers: Keith Anderson, Brian Dodds Still Photographer: Ron Tom IT’S POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “ALTERNATINO” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Tyler Ribble Operators: Daniel Sharnoff, Benjamin Dailey Assistants: Andrew Brinkman, Cody Schrock, Alec Nickel Digital Imaging Tech: Guillermo Tunon Still Photographer: Cara Howe JAY SQUARED PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLINDSPOT” SEASON 4 Directors of Photography: Andrew Priestley, Jon Delgado Operators: Pyare Fortunato, Peter Ramos, John Romer Assistants: Andrew Smith, Aleksandr Allen, Kyle Clark, Christian Bright, Bryant Bailey, Deborah Fastuca, Kjerstin Rossi, Darnell McDonald Steadicam Operator: Pyare Fortunato Digital Imaging Tech: Chloe Walker Still Photographer: Phil Caruso

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LEGENDARY PICTURES “APEX” Director of Photography: Ben Seresin Operators: Martin Schaer, James Goldman Assistants: Simon England, Jimmy Ward Justin Zaffiro, Nathan Stern Digital Imaging Tech: Robert Howie Loader: Danny Park Still Photographer: Chuck Zlotnick Publicist: Deborah Simmrin MESQUITE PRODUCTIONS “FOR ALL MANKIND” SEASON 1 Directors of Photography: Stephen McNutt, ASC, Ross Berryman, ASC, ACS Operators: Tim Spencer, Mike McEveety Assistants: Stephen Pazanti, Jorge Pallares, Chris Sloan, Arthur Zajac Steadicam Operator: Tim Spencer Steadicam Assistant: Stephen Pazanti Digital Imaging Tech: Mike DeGrazzio Digital Utility: Robert Ruelas Still Photographer: Justin Lubin 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Stephen McNutt, ASC Operators: Mike McEveety, Ron Schlaeger

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Assistants: Jorge Pallares, Arthur Zajac, Dave Erickson, Suzy Dietz Steadicam Operator: Mike McEveety Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell “LA’S FINEST” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Robert Gantz Operators: Ian Fox, Jody Miller, Pete Romano Assistants: Jamie Felz, Casey Muldoon, James Barela, Luis Gomez, Mark Connelly Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Britton Digital Loader: Kyle Jacobs Digital Utility: Claudio Banks Still Photographer: Nicole Wilder MINIM PRODUCTIONS, INC. “DEVS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Rob Hardy Operator: Grant Adams, SOC Assistants: Patrick McArdle, Ray Milazzo, Seth Gallagher, Blake Collins Steadicam Operator: Grant Adams, SOC Steadicam Assistant: Ray Milazzo Digital Imaging Tech: Natalie Carr Loader: Mike Prior Digital Utility: Zach Madden

NBC “CHICAGO FIRE” SEASON 7 Director of Photography: Lisa Wiegand, ASC Operators: Will Eichler, Vanessa Joy Smith Assistants: Luis Fowler, Zach Gannaway, Brian Romano, Gary Malouf Steadicam Operator: Will Eichler Digital Loader: Derek Ashbaugh Digital Utility: Amy Tomlinson Still Photographer: Elizabeth Morris “CHICAGO MED” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Lex duPont, ASC Operators: Faires Anderson Sekiya, Chris Hood, Joe Tolitano Assistants: George Olson, Laura DeFiglio, Keith Hueffmeier, Patrick Dooley, Sam Knapp, Joey Richardson Steadicam Operator: Faires Anderson Sekiya Loader: Matt Brown Utility: Emmanuel Bansa Still Photographer: Liz Sisson “CHICAGO PD” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: James Zucal Operators: Richard Crow, Darryl Miller,


Seth Thomas Assistants: John Young, Don Carlson, David “YT” Wightman, Jamison Acker, Phillip Walter, Kyle Belousek Steadicam Operator: Scott Dropkin, SOC Loader: Nick Wilson Utilities: Marion Tucker, Alan Dembek Still Photographer: Sandy Morris 2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Darryl Miller “SUPERSTORE” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Jay Hunter Operators: Adam Tash, Hassan Abdul-Wahid, Danny Nichols Assistants: Jason Zakrzewski, Brandon Margulies, Eric Jenkinson, Ryan Sullivan, Esta Garcia, Rikki Alarian Jones Loader: Grace Thomas “THE ENEMY WITHIN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Frank Prinzi, ASC Operators: Todd Armitage, Jay Silver Assistants: Rory Hanrahan, Keitt, Sean Souza, Sebastian Iervolino Digital Imaging Tech: Lewis Rothenberg

Loader: Brenton Ayers Still Photographer: Will Hart “THE VILLAGE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: William Rexer Operators: Alan Mehlbrech, Matthew Pebler Assistants: Michael Burke, Michael Guthrie, Stephen McBride, Rachael Doughty Loadres: Anabel Caicedo, Brittany Jeliski OPEN 4 BUSINESS “SUITS SPIN-OFF” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Cort Fey Operators: Bud Kremp, Paige Thomas Assistants: Michael D. Alvarez, Doug Price, Summer Marsh, Rocio Meda Loader: Lindsey Gross Digital Utility: Hunter Jensen PACIFIC 2.1 “FOSSE” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Timothy Ives Operators: Mark Schmidt, Wylda Bayron Assistants: Adriana Brunetto-Lipman, Rossana Rizzo, Amber Rosales, Mike Swearingen Loader: Julia Leach

“SWAMP THING” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Pedro Luque Operators: Matthew Doll, Michael Repeta Assistants: Patrick Borowiak, Sean Yaple, Roy Knauf, Darwin Brandis Digital Imaging Tech: Andy Bader PARAMOUNT PICTURES “ISLAND PLAZA” Director of Photography: Claudio Miranda, ASC Operators: Chris Haarhoff, John Connor Assistants: Dan Ming, Bob Smathers, Mateo Bourdieu, Max DeLeo, Natasha Mullan, Nathan Stern Steadicam Operator: Chris Haarhoff Digital Imaging Tech: Rohan Chitrakar Loader: Farisai Kambarami, Kalli Kouf Still Photographer: Scott Garfield Publicist: Michael Singer POSSIBLE PRODUCTIONS “BILLIONS” SEASON 4 Directors of Photography: Giorgio Scali, Alexander Dynan Operators: Peter Agliata, Mark Schmidt Assistants: Edwin Effrein, Cai Hall,

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Leonardo Gomez, Andrew Hamilton Digital Imaging Tech: Joe Belack Loaders: Kansas Ballesteros, Christopher Charmel “THE AFFAIR” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Steven Fierberg, ASC, Jim Denault, ASC Operators: Eric Schilling, Nicole Lobell Assistants: Michael Endler, Don Burghardt, Rudy Pahoyo, Robyn Buchanan Steadicam Operator: Eric Schilling Steadicam Assistant: Michael Endler Digital Imaging Tech: Kevn Celi Loader: Emily Goodwin Digital Utility: Glen Landry Still Photographer: Paul Sarkis PP21 PRODUCTIONS, LLC “BLACK LIGHTNING” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Scott Peck, Michael Watson Operators: Glen Brown, Fernando Reyes Assistants: Anthony Zibelli, Alan Newcomb, Alfredo Santiago, Rodell Francis Steadicam Operator: Glen Brown Steadicam Assistant: Anthony Zibelli

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Digital Imaging Tech: Justin Warren Digital Utility: Chandra Sudtelgte PARAMOUNT OVERSEAS PRODUCTIONS, INC. “TOM CLANCY’S JACK RYAN” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Patrick Murguia, Anau Valls Colomer Operators: Denny Kortze, Laela Kilbourn, Sung Rae Cho Assistants: Cesar Marrero, Sarah Hendrick, Abner Medina, Haffe Acosta, Alisa Colley, Andres Vila Loader: Daniel Cardenas Still Photographer: Sarah Shatz PICROW STREAMING, INC. “UNTITLED MEHAR SETHI PROJECT” PILOT Director of Photography: Andrew Wehde Operators: Gary Malouf, Chip Byrd Assistants: David “YT” Wightman, Meghan Noce, Joshua Ramos, Jannis Schelenz Digital Imaging Tech: Morgan Estill Digital Utility: Jazmine Harvey

SONY “JEOPARDY!” SEASON 35 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Mike Tribble, Jeff Schuster, L. David Irete Jib Arm Operator: Marc Hunter Head Utility: Tino Marquez Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Video Controller: Gary Taillon Still Photographer: Carol Kaelsonthe “SCHOOLED” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Steve Gainer, ASC Operators: Brian Shanley, Jonathan Goldfisher Assistants: Shereen Saleh, Kymm Swank, Joseph Cheung, Colleen Haley Digital Imaging Tech: Mike Bosman Digital Loader: Mimi Phan “THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Jason Blount Operators: Scott Browner, Kris Denton Assistants: Tracy Davey, Nate Havens, Gary Webster, Jen Bell-Price


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Digital Imaging Tech: Kevin Mills Digital Utility: Dilshan Herath Still Photographers: Nicole Wilder, Adam Taylor

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 36 Director of Photography: Jeff Engel Operators: Diane L. Farrell, SOC, Jeff Schuster, Ray Gonzales, Steve Simmons, L. David Irete, Mike Corwin Camera Utility: Ray Thompson Head Utility: Tino Marquez Video Controller: Gary Taillon Jib Arm Operator: Randy Gomez, Sr. Still Photographer: Carol Kaelson STALWART FILMS, LLC “NOS4A2” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Martin Ahlgren Operators: Alec Jarnagin, Edwin Rubio Assistants: Liz Silver, Robert Bullard, Richelle Topping, Chris Boylston Still Photographer: Dana Starbard

STARS POWER, LLC “POWER” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Mauricio Rubinstein Operators: Scott Maguire, Alan Mehlbrech Assistants: Michael Garofalo, Hamilton Longyear, Rodrigo Millan Garce, Alivia Borab Digital Imaging Tech: Douglas Horton Loader: Anjela Coviaux Still Photographer: Myles Aronowitz STU SEGALL PRODUCTIONS, INC. “THE LOUDEST VOICE IN THE ROOM” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Eigil Bryld Operator: Peter Agliata Assistants: Hamilton Longyear, Sarah Hendrick, Kevin Howard Loader: Anne Strauman

THE CW NETWORK “JANE THE VIRGIN” SEASON 5 Directors of Photography: Lowell Peterson, ASC, Joe Gallo Operators: Rory Robert Knepp, SOC, Paul Plannette

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Assistants: John C. Flinn, IV, John Pouncey, Jai Corria, Don Burton Steadicam Operator: Rory Robert Knepp, SOC Stedicam Assitant: John C. Flinn, IV Camera Utility: Morgan Jenkins TNT “ANIMAL KINGDOM” SEASON 4 Director of Photography: Jimmy Kniest Operators: Paul Theriault, Kimo Proudfoot Assistants: Matthew King, Kevin Anderson, Jose Figueroa-Baez, Jess Fairless Steadicam Operator: Chris Glasgow Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein

TOPANGA PRODUCTIONS, INC. “SWAT” SEASON 2 Directors of Photography: Francis Kenny, ASC, Craig Fikse Operators: Tim Dolan, Brian Pitts, Michael Otis Ropert Assistants: Ryan Parks, Logan Turner, Thane Characky, Riley Padelford, Esther Woodworth, Mike Fauntleroy Camera Utility: Carl Lammi Loader: Jonathan Taylor Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe

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CREW PHOTO: THE CHI SEASON 2

(L to R) B Camera 2nd AC, J’mme Love , B Camera 1st AC Rachel Donofrie ,Utility Joshua Smith, B Camera Operator/Steadicam Richard Crow, Director of Photography Abe Martinez , Loader Brian Kilborn, A Camera Operator Garret Benson, A Camera 2nd AC Mike Fierres, A Camera 1st AC Paul De Marte. Photo credit: Parrish Lewis

UNIVERSAL “GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Tim Bellen Operators: Dave Hirshmann, Chris Haifley, Ana Amortegui Assistants: Steve Bellen, Jessica Ramos, Erik Emerson, Jennifer Stuart, Jim Nygren, Kristina Lechuga Digital Loader: Bryce Marraro Digital Utility: Sooz Edie Still Photographer: Justin Lubin “LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 20 Director of Photography: Michael Green Operators: Brant Fagan, SOC, Mike Latino Assistants: Chris Del Sordo, Matt Balzarini, Emily Dumbrill, Justin Zverin Loader: Jason Raswant Still Photographer: Michael Parmelee “THE ACT” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Zachary Galler Operator: Richard Chapelle, Danny Eckler Assistants: Josh Hancher, Saul McSween, Warren Brace, Erik Olson

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Steadicam Operator: Danny Eckler Loader: Jennifer Braddock Digital Utility: Matt Nelson Still Photographer: Brownie Harris

Video Controller: John O’Brien Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples Still Photographer: Michael Yarish Publicist: Marc Klein

2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Richard Chapelle, ACS

“LETHAL WEAPON” SEASON 3 Directors of Photography: Andy Strahorn, William Wages, ASC Operators: Victor Macias, Joseph Broderick Assistants: James Rydings, Kaoru “Q” Ishizuka, Troy Blischok, Kelsey Castellitto Digital Imaging Tech: Peter Russ Digital Utility: Spencer Shwetz Still Photographers: Ron Jaffe, John P. Fleenor

WARNER BROS “ALL AMERICAN” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Nikhil Paniz Operators: Carlos Arguello, Eric Laudadio Assistants: Jon Jung, Jeff Lamm, Jon Lindsay, David Berryman Digital Imaging Tech: Urban Olsson “BIG BANG THEORY” SEASON 12 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: John Dechene, Richard Price, SOC, Jamie Hitchcock, Brian Armstrong Assistants: Nigel Stewart, Chris Hinojosa, Steve Lund, Meggins Moore, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Colin Brown, Jeannette Hjorth

2ND UNIT Director of Photography: Brian Pearson, ASC Operator: Stefan von Bjorn Assistants: Carlos Doerr, Phil Shanahan, Ron Elliot Digital Imaging Tech: Scott Resnick Camera Utility: Nicholas Martin


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UNDERWATER UNIT Operator: David William McDonald Assistant: Corey Bringas “MOM” SEASON 6 Director of Photography: Steven V. Silver, ASC Operators: Cary McCrystal, Jamie Hitchcock, Larry Gaudette, Candy Edwards Assistants: Meggins Moore, R. Nigel Stewart, Damian Della Santina, Mark Johnson, Whitney Jones Camera Utilities: Alicia Brauns, Andrew Pauling Video Controller: Kevin Faust Digital Imaging Tech: Benjamin Steeples Still Photographer: Darren Michaels Publicist: Marc Klein “THE PERFECTIONISTS” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Larry Reibman Operators: Matt Moriarty, Phil Anderson Assistants: Kyril Cvetkov, Jerry Turner, Mike Crockett, Patrick LaValley Steadicam Operator: Matt Moriarty Steadicam Assistant: Kyril Cvetkov Digital Imaging Tech: Sean Rawls Loader: Jasmine Karcey Still Photographer: Allyson Riggs “YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 2 Director of Photography: Buzz Feitshans, IV Operators: Neil Toussaint, SOC, Aaron Schuh Assistants: Matthew Del Ruth, Grant Yellen, Brad Gilson, Jr., Megan Boundy Steadicam Operator: Aaron Schuh Digital Loader: James Cobb

Utilities: Rudy Pahoyo, Joe Sutera, Holden Lorenz Still Photographers: Robert Voets, Michael Desmond, Darren Michaels “WHAT/IF” SEASON 1 Director of Photography: Jeffrey C. Mygatt Operators: Benjamin Spek, Joel Schwartz Assistants: Dennis Seawright, Dale White, Steven Magrath, Dustin Keller Steadicam Operator: Benjamin Spek Loader: Leslie Kolter Still Photographer: Ron Jaffe DOUBLE UP UNIT Director of Photography: Joel Schwartz Operators: Chris Taylor, April Kelley Assistants: Chuck Whelan, Kirk Bloom, Randy Shanofsky, John Paul Rodriguez Loader: Jonathan Stromberg WOODBRIDGE PRODUCTIONS “THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 6 Directors of Photography: Michael Caracciolo, Saade Mustafa Operators: Derek Walker, Devin Ladd, Jack Donnelly, Peter Reniers Assistants: Daniel Casey, James Gourley, Gareth Manwaring, Edwin Herrera Mike Guaspari, Edgar Velez Loaders: Katheryn Iuele, James Parsons Still Photographers: Christopher Saunders, Will Hart, Virginia Sherwood

COMMERCIALS ANONYMOUS CONTENT “AT&T” Director of Photography: Autumn Durald Assistants: Chris Strauser, Henry Nguyen Digital Imaging Tech: Mike Kowalczyk ART & SCIENCE “AUDIBLE” Director of Photography: Sean Meehan Assistants: Ryan Rayner, Jule Fontana, Harry Heng Steadicam Operator: Chris Haarhoff Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell “GOOGLE ASSISTANT” Director of Photography: Sean Porter Assistants: Pedro Corcega, Matt Montalto Digital Imaging Tech: Artur Dzieweczynski BISCUIT “SERVICENOW” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Operator: Chris Bottoms Assistants: Lila Byall, Laura Goldberg, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Calvin Reibman B-REEL FILMS “FORD” Director of Photography: Miguel de Olaso Assistants: Nicholas Kramer, Madison Rowley, Harrisen Howes Digital Imaging Tech: Sean Rawls

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CARBO FILMS “USPS” Director of Photography: Federico Cantini Assistant: Salvatore Coniglio Digital Imaging Tech: Paul Maletich CMS PRODUCTIONS “MICROSOFT” Director of Photography: Bradley Stonesifer Operator/Movi Operator: Connor O’Brien, John Paul Meyer Assistants: Rachel Fox, Dylan Conrad, Colleen Marshall, Chess Pettengill Techno Jib Tech: Kirk Fletcher “ZILLOW” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Assistants: Lila Byall, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Calvin Reibman COMMUNITY FILMS “CRATE & BARREL” Director of Photography: Maryse Alberti Assistants: Micah Bisagni, Kymm Swank Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell DUMMY “PRINGLES” Director of Photography: Jay Feather Assistants: Lila Byall, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein FIREFLY CREATIVE ENTERTAINMENT “SNAKE IN THE GRASS” Director of Photography: Chris Robertson Operator: Ricardo Sarmiento Assistants: James Hair, Sam Elliot, Mitch Malpica Steadicam Operator: William Green Digital Imaging Tech: Anthony Hechanova FRAMESTORE PICTURES “GEICO” Director of Photography: Larry Fong, ASC Assistants: Ray Milazzo, Blake Collins Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell GO FILMS “FIBER ONE” Director of Photography: Elisha Christian Operator: Michael Rizzi Assistants: Nito Serna, William Dicenso, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Hardwick

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HUNGRY MAN “BURGER KING” Director of Photography: Eric Schmidt Assistants: Laura Goldberg, Eric Matos Digital Imaging Tech: John Spellman Digital Utility: Holden Miller

RINGER “LEXUS” Director of Photography: Eric Haase Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Marcus Del Negro Camera Utility: Ryan Neal

“SNAPPLE” Director of Photography: Ava Berkofsky Operators: Kenny Niernberg, Jeff Bollman, Chris Taylor Assistants: Melvina Rapozo, Salvatore Coniglio, Patrick Blanchet, David Stellhorn Digital Utility: Mike Perez

ROCKET FILMS “AT&T” Director of Photography: Mark Williams Operator: Dave Morabito Assistants: Stanley Fernandez, Rick Gioia, Ron Wrase Digital Imaging Tech: Thomas Wong

O POSITIVE “IKEA” Director of Photography: Maryse Alberti Operator: Mike Berg Assistants: Nina Chien, Rick Gioia, Jeff Taylor Digital Imaging Tech: Patrick Cecilian

RSA FILMS “EVERGREEN” Director of Photography: Rebecca Baehler Assistants: Michael Farrell, Kymm Swank Phantom Tech: Matt Drake Digital Imaging Tech: Michael Borenstein

PARK PICTURES “VOLKSWAGEN” Director of Photography: Lance Acord, ASC Assistants: Mike Blauvelt, Andrew Porras Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell Camera Utility: Jesse Barba

SEEKER PRODUCTIONS “ZARA WOMEN SS19” Director of Photography: Stuart Dryburgh Assistants: Johnny Sousa, Peter Morello, Corey Licameli, Kyle Repka Steadicam Operator: Stewart Cantrell Digital Imaging Tech: Kaz Karaismailoglu Loader: Ron Rase

PARTIZAN ENTERTAINMENT “NCAA QX50 TEST DRIVE” Director of Photography: Jeff Bierman Operator: Dean Mitchell Assistants: Jared Wennberg, Christian Shonts Digital Imaging Tech: Jason Johnson

SPARE PARTS “CBS GRAMMYS” Director of Photography: Anghel Decca Assistants: Alex Waterston, Scott Miler

PULSE “NEW WAVE” Director of Photography: Adam Arkapaw Assistants: Ethan Borsuk, Cornelia Klapper Steadicam Operator: George Bianchini Loader: Joshua Bote RADIANT IMAGES “KABUKI” Director of Photography: Stefan von Borbely Assistants: Robert Ragozzine, Dan Keck Digital Imaging Tech: George Robert Morse RATTLING STICK “AUDI” Director of Photography: Adam Arkapaw Operator: Grant Adams Assistants: Steve MacDougall, Jordan Pellegrini, Conrad Castor, Noah Glazer Digital Imaging Tech: Adrian Jebef

STARDUST “HONDA” Director of Photography: Kai Saul Assistants: Nicholas Martin, Alan Certeza Digital Imaging Tech: Nicholas Fry SUPERLOUNGE “VALLEY TOYOTA” Director of Photography: Michael Svitak Operator: Andrew DePung Assistants: Brad Rochlitzer, Lee Jordan, Ben Brady Digital Imaging Tech: Bret Suding SUPERPRIME “TOYOTA” Director of Photography: Ross McLennan Assistants: Chris Strauser, Henry Nguyen Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell


THE CORNER SHOP “MASTERCARD” Director of Photography: Sam Levy Assistants: Walter Rodriguez, Kyle Repka, Dan Keck Steadicam Operator: Parris Mayhew Digital Imaging Tech: Bjorn Jackson Libra Tech: Lance Mayer Scorpio Tech: Brady Weston THE DIRECTORS BUREAU “VISA” Director of Photography: Autumn Durald Assistants: Ethan McDonald, Marcus Del Negro Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell WOODSHOP STUDIOS “BURGER KING” Director of Photography: Tom Lazarevich Assistants: Clint Moran, Danny Gardner Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell “CHILI’S” Director of Photography: Tom Lazarevich Operator: Matt Baker Assistants: Clint Moran, Erin Endow Digital Imaging Tech: Steve Harnell

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STO P M OTIO N / /

STEPHEN VAUGHAN, SMPSP 1945 - 2018

In describing his work on Blade Runner, for a Parisian exhibition of his photography in 2011, Stephen Vaughan says he never saw “the light of day.” The thick smoke, steam and dripping water on the sets and night exterior locations made it difficult for Vaughan to get an exposure and sharp detail. “Dark and often murky,” he noted, “with extreme highlights (from Xenon lamps) to the softest glow of Chinese lanterns, it was necessary to shoot with the fastest lenses and stretch the film to capture images with long lenses, which give these images a softness.” Vaughan, a founding member of the Society of Motion Picture Still Photographers, received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Camera Operators (SOC), and a Publicist Award for Excellence in Unit Still Photography. Forty years of set photography, including Oscar winners like The Natural, Rain Man, The Dark Knight, The Cider House Rules, Master and Commander: Far Side of the World, The Prestige and, most recently, Blade Runner 2049, made Vaughan a master of his craft – and as his images above attest, a creative artist of the highest magnitude. Retired Local 600 AC Harry Zimmerman (who took the accompanying portraits) became his friend after buying a print from Blade Runner, the famous close-up of Sean Young he calls, “one of my two favorites in all of cinema.” When I left camera assisting several years back,” Zimmerman adds, “I turned to Stephen as a sort of mentor, looking at his marvelous work, hanging out with him and his dog, Boomer, and getting his advice on my own burgeoning photography – all over many glasses of fine tequila in his kitchen. Stephen was a great guy, with a sardonic sense of humor. He will be missed.” 112


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