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AUTOMARK MAGAZINE

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AUTOMARK MAGAZINE

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Monthly

AUTOMARK Pakistan’s premier magazine on automotive, engineering & energy sector

Trade with India

Editor M. Hanif Memon Sub Editor Dr. Raja Irfan Sabir

Technical Editor Muhammad Shahzad

Advertising Manager Abdul Khaliq

Circulation Manager Tahir Siddiqui

Computer Operator Salman Hanif

Web Master Mustafa Hanif

CONTRIBUTING IN THIS ISSUE Muhammad Shahzad Yakoob Gaziani Ali Hassan Shahzad Tabish M. Owais Khan

Advisors Imtiaz Rastgar CEO, Rastgar Group & CBI External Expert, Ex-chairman EDB Islamabad Abdul Majeed Sheikh President, AOTS-ABK Dosokai, Karachi Regional Center & Director (MME), NED University, Ex-Director Pak Suzuki Karachi M. Yakoob Gaziani CEO LORD Institute of Tech. Karachi Haider Nawab Advisor Planning & Development Toyota Southern Motors Toyota Defence Motors Karachi J. Pereira General Manager Product Support Division Al-Haj FAW Motors (Pvt) Ltd. Karachi Engr. IHT Farooqui General Manager Plant Karakoram Motors (Pvt) Ltd., Karachi

The views expressed by contributing writers and comments do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Monthly AutoMark magazine's management. AutoMark REGD: SC-1330

Published every month by M. Hanif Memon Postal Address Active Communications D-68, Block-9, Clifton,Karachi Visit us: www.automark.pk E-mail: magazine@automark.pk automarkpk@gmail.com Tel : 021-32218526 Mobile: 0321-2203815

Secretary Ministry of Commerce Zafar Mahmood’s secret summary sent to the cabinet on th MFN issue on February 10 proposing that the ministry be allowed to progressively phase out the negative list by December 2012 has created panic among Pakistani entrepreneurs, said a source in the ministry. “We are not surprised by the proposals of the bureaucracy that seems keener than even India to open trade gates for all products from the neighbouring country,” said Nabeel Hashmi, Chairman Pakistan Association of Auto parts and Accessories Manufacturers. He said there were also elements in the bureaucracy that want to protect Pakistan’s interest and leaked out the plans of proponents of trade with India. He said the federal secretary commerce proposed to eliminate the negative list in three instalments on a quarterly basis after approval of the cabinet with quarters ending on June 30, September 30 and December 31 of 2012. This would automatically grant the MFN status to India, he added. In this regard, the spokesman of Pakistan Automotive Manufacturers Association (PAMA) said: “The industry fails to understand how the rationale for protecting local industry would change from one quarter to the next quarter.” Instead of negotiating a long term phase out plan in the interest of the local industry, the government has tried to take short cuts and have practically sold out the national interests, he added. It is to be noted that the sectors and respective number of 636 items included in the proposed Negative List are: food and agriculture 16; minerals 3; chemicals 4; pharmaceuticals 32; plastics 74; rubber 24; paper and wood 55; textile and clothing 77; iron and steel 25; and auto sectors 311.


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AUTOMARK MAGAZINE

Company Introduction - Update

RASTGAR & COMPANY (PVT) LTD. 31 Years of Service to Pakistan's Industry Rastgar & Company (Pvt.) Ltd was established in 1980. It is a marketing and industrial services company which provides compressed air, gas and construction machinery equipment to all industries all over Pakistan. R & Co operates on 4-S marketing concept, providing customer with Sales, Service, Spares and Solutions and besides manufacturer’s warranty annex our own warranty of full support of service and spares to our customers installations. For this we have dedicated team of trained manpower to meet expectation of our customers. We also offer our customer complete solutions for their specific need that cater for their own wish list. With an extremely reliable product line we offer most lucrative options to suit out client, rentals, lease, finance or outright sales. Rastgar & Co is ISO 9001-2000 certified. Services Rastgar & Co offer following services for its customers: Planning & Selection Turnkey Installations Automation Heat recovery Air Audits Service Spares Rastgar & Co shall be a marketing and industrial services company in the field of industrial machinery with a highly motivated and trained team working closely with customer for fulfillment of their needs, resulting in our sustained growth and profit. Vision Rastgar & Co is an ethical, global business corporation, socially responsible and environment friendly entity. Its vision is to meet the aspirations of its customer, shareholder, employees and stakeholder through reliable product line and services. Training Rastgar & Co is always keen to train customer for defect free performance of the equipment supplied. Training sessions are held at Rastgar & Co own training facility at Karachi, various locations at different towns all lover the cou nt ry. In -H ou se train in g is als o arra ng ed. Rental Services Rastgar & Co offers rental and standby equipment packages designed to see you through an emergency or to provide the best short or long term air and vacuum your money can buy. Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 13

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International Automotive Sector - Introduction

Chongqing KAMA Carburetor Company

Pioneer of Technical Innovation The current way of technical solution is obviously slow. So we sent our general engineer to Pakistan for close investigation of the possibility to set up a professional lab in Pakistan. In our plan, there are three main functions of this lab. Chongqing KAMA Carburetor Company is one of the most f a m o u s & professional C a r b u r e t o r manufacturers which are specialized in the design, production and sale of carburetors and service support. Currently, we have factories covering more than 12,000 square meters, with 400 specialized workers for assembling lines, and over 50 professional program technicians supporting the design, testing and production processes. We own more than 200 sets of professional JP Brother Centre equipment, CITIZEN numerical control machines, etc. The total output is 3,000,000 carburetors from 50cc to 250cc, applying to different types of motorcycles. To supply customers with better products, we also have a plan of building a new plant with 70,000 square meters in BISHAN New Industrial Zone, with the capability of supplying more than 8,000,000 sets each year. With the great goal of being the leading one among Carburetor manufacturers in China, we will keep on the progress of developing higher quality carburetors in the future.

innovation strategy which is focused to cooperate with the OEM assemblers on the aspect of technical service and support so as to do our contribution to the healthy development of the whole industry. However, the current way of technical solution is obviously slow. So we sent our general engineer to Pakistan for close investigation of the possibility to set up a professional lab in Pakistan. In our plan, there are three main functions of this lab. With the investment on top-grade testing equipment and strength of technical team, KAMA has obtained I S O 9 0 0 1 , I SO 1 4 0 0 1 a n d C C C certificates, which ensures us to cooperate with those famous motorcycle manufacturers like JIALING, LIFAN,

ZONGSH EN, LONGXIN, YINXIANG, BASHAN, SHINERAY, etc. Our carburetors have been exported to customers around the world. With good quality and reasonable price, we have obtained more than 85% of the PZ16 carburetors market which are suitable for 70cc motorcycles, the best-sale product in Pakistan. But we will not sleep on this success. We are well aware that the motorcycle industry in Pakistan is developing very fast. We also noticed the recent increase in the petrol price which would bring strong demand on better economic performance. The OEM assembler owners and the customers are looking for better quality products all the time. We would like to follow the technical

First, it allows us to carry out the comprehensive test of the motorcycle and find out the problem. With our engineer from China, we could give our technical suggestion to the assemblers. Second, we would use the facilities of the lab to conduct some training for the engineers from OEM assemblers on how to conduct testing and how to analyze the test result so as to solve problems they encounter. Third, we would also like to cooperate with the assemblers on wide range of technical aspects like old model upgrade, new model launch and new industry standard solution etc. We believe this lab will play an active part in the fast development of the motorcycle industry.

Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 14


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Trade with India - Exclusive Article

by Mohammad Owais Khan

Car makers oppose CBU import from India PAAPAM’s concern over elimination of negative list by December 2012 As many Indian items are already finding way into Pakistani market either through formal and informal way, the vendors of locally assembled cars and light commercial vehicles look more perturbed over possible elimination of negative list between two countries by December 2012 which means more influx of Indian items on Pakistan. However, the car makers are divided as Pak Suzuki Motor Company Limited (PSMCL) has a different stance on opening trade with India as compared to Honda Atlas and Indus Motor Company (IMC). Vendors do not have any other side businesses except for paltry exports. In 2010-11 autoparts exports exceeded $100 million with majority of shipments destined towards the USA, Europe, the Middle East and African countries. Around 95 per cent of these sales were to the aftermarkets. The three car assemblers have not done much on export front but they have been doing trading like importing brand new costly vehicles from Japan and other countries like Suzuki APV, Suzuki Jimny, Honda Accord, Honda CR-V, Toyota Land Cruiser, Toyota Prado, Toyota Camry, Toyota Avanza, Toyota Fortuner and Toyota Avanza at price ranging from around Rs 2,000,000 to around Rs 20,199,000. What prompted assemblers to plunge in costly vehicle imports when they literally do not have any future plans to assemble these vehicles in Pakistan for very limited buyers. Though car makers have been enjoying quite good sales despite huge influx of used cars, but they feel that the industry is facin g big pro blems to s t ay competitive amid challenges like eroding rupee value against various currencies, rising utility bills, energy shortages and inconsistency in government policies. The assemblers say that they cannot afford any reduction in duty protection as proposed by Planning Commission

which would the hit industry very badly. A leading Japanese car maker does not feel threatened in case imports of CKD, raw material, equipment, machinery, jigs are allowed from India but he sees industry’s destruction in case import of CBUs and spare parts are allowed. Chairman Pakistan Association of Automotive Parts and Accessories Manufacturers (PAAPAM) Syed Nabeel Hashmi said that before opening further trade with India, the government has to consider the investment made by the local vehicle assembling industries, registered membership base of over 350 vendor companies and over 200,000 employees located all over Pakistan in vending industries. The localization levels achieved so far by the vending industry are 55 to 70 per cent for passenger cars, over 90 per cent for motorcycles and tractors and 40 per cent in case of trucks and buses, he claims. Nabeel said in spite of the AIDP (Auto Industry Development Program) being in place since 2007, multiple policy changes have been made. Adherence to guidelines of the AIDP and update of the Tariff Based System (TBS) remains in vogue to date. Policy and tariff change which was in conflict or deviated from the AIDP was ignored by local OEMs where it suited them and this resulted in a fair amount of divergence from aims and objectives of the AIDP. “As a result, the industry has not been able to develop engine or transmission components in the car sector,” he added. He says the brands like Toyota, Honda

and Suzuki dominate Pakistani market. All three companies have a comfortable position in the market and have made in-house investments in sheet metal and plastic component manufacturing also. However, there is no investment in design departments in Pakistan by any of the big three. There has also been a consistent effort to offset localization of engine and transmission components that has lead to unrealistic cost increases in prices of local cars. This fact is being ignored by the both the Ministry of Industries and Commerce in their policy formulations for achieving obvious advantages for Pakistan’s own auto parts manufacturing industry, consumers and the exports market. The local car industry is expected to upgrade its emission standards to EURO II on July 1, 2012. In contrast, Nabeel said India is home to 40 million vehicles. A total of 9.4 million vehicles were sold in India in FY 2010 (a growth of 27% over the previous year). Annual car sales are projected to increase up to five million vehicles by 2015 and more than nine million units by 2,020. T h e m aj ori ty of I ndia 's c ar manufacturing industry is based around three clusters in the south, west and north. The southern cluster near Chennai is the biggest with 35 per cent of the revenue share. The western hub near Maharashtra is 33 per cent of the market. The northern cluster is primarily Haryana with 32 per cent. Indian auto component industry is quite comprehensive with around 500 firms in the organized sector producing practically all parts and more than 10,000 firms in small unorganized sector, in tiered format. The turnover of auto component sector has grown from a figure of $1.5 billion to $9.8 billion. Indian and Pakistani consumers have different buying patterns. The Pakistani economy is extremely liberal in imports if compared to India. India’s auto sector

Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 15


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Trade with India - Exclusive Article

PAAPAM has generated its own list for the auto sector. We are in total disagreement on the proposed target date of eliminating Pakistan’s Negative list by December 2012. has localized components to well over 90 per cent whereas in Pakistan continuous revision of localization targets have left the industry half way. India accorded MFN to Pakistan in 1996. Even without MFN status to India the balance of trade is in India’s favor with over $1.2 billion import a gain st Pakistan’s export of $268 million 201011. India has a list of 850 items on which it applies well laid out Non-Tariff barriers in which can be categorized as follows :- Harsh testing requirement, co mpl ex harmoniz ed code cl assifications, inadequate in fra s tru ct u re, s pe cia l la be lin g requ irem en ts , im po rt lic en s in g re qu ir em e n t s , s p e ci a l cu s t o m s procedures, biased Internal Government procurements favoring local products and provisions of export subsidies to local products. The NTB’s have been put in place in a very learned and systematic manner. India claims that no policy or import rules are Pakistan specific which is an accurate statement. India has a large engineering industrial base. Raw materials are home based. There is no energy crisis and no international image problem. Exports in auto parts are well supported by the Government and tuned up to well over $12 billion last year. This is due to a year on year growth average of 40 per cent. Nabeel Hashmi said for reasons noted above the Pakis ta n’s automotive industry is currently not positioned well for an onslaught of Indian finished auto goods. The Government must ensure that respective automotive parts and goods are added and retained on the negative and proposed sensitive list with India until such time that the industry is fully assured of TBT’s/NTB’s removals an d our volumes of scale ensure comfortable positions for Pakistani auto parts / eng in eerin g SME un it s. He said the government must also fulfill its commitment that it promised with PAAP AM a t t he t ime o f AI DP implementation to support the auto parts makers with -- productive Assets Investment schemes, human Resource development program, technology acquisition scheme, auto industry investment policy and auto cluster

development. These schemes were basically envisioned to ensure that auto parts makers became more competitive and are ready for the global markets. In the absence of implementation of these schemes, it is not fair to ask the industry to open up. He said PAAPAM has generated its own list for the auto sector. We are in total disagreement on the proposed target date of eliminating Pakistan’s Negative list by December 2012. Pakistan’s negative list must remain in place until such time the Government demonstrates its own readiness to tackle and handle the onslaught of Indian finished goods thereby assuring the Industry its rightful share of Pakistan’s domestic auto market and capacity enhancement of Pakistani auto parts producers to enter Indian domestic markets easily. Pakistan’s sensitive list of items under SAFTA comprised 1,136 Tariff lines at 6-digit level and Pakistan has already made 20 per cent reduction in the sensitive list without any input from respective stakeholders. 233 Tariff lines have been deleted without any due diligence. India having a large industrial base and knowing the capability of SAARC member states and in the presence of strong NTB’s and TBT’s can afford to reduce its sensitive list to minimum levels, whereas, Pakistan’s Industry is not as developed as the Indian industry. There should be no further reduction in our sensitive list lines as any further reduction would be detrimental to the local Auto Industry and Engineering sector as a whole. Pakistan is still in the process of developing standards for its products having export potential. We should e n s u r e o n a r ec i p r o c a l b a s i s reorganization of tests and accreditation of testing laboratories with India. We are still unaware as to how many testing labora tories a re accredited a nd acceptable to SAARC member states. Customs nomenclature classifications that are based on HS coding system currently are also not harmonized visa-vis both countries. As such reliance on HS coding system as is can lead to unnecessary complications. The commerce ministry must take

cognizance of ground realities of each specific industrial sector of Pakistan and negotiate such policies which offer increas ed trade opportunities to Pakistani companies. WTO related measures, Regional FTA’s wherever introduced must be with the consent of stakeholders. PAAPAM favors step wise trade opening with India in the following manner. Implement AIDP within the Auto sector through the Engineering Development Board of Pakistan. Introduce immediate structural reforms, policy changes and capacity building of GOP departments managing Pakistan’s Trade Policies and Import regimes. Harmonize Quality Standards and Testing laboratories between both the countries. Harmonize HS codes regimes including their nomenclatures In order to provide a level playing field to our manufacturers the following imports may be allowed from India through all routes (including Wagha) immediately. This will assist our industries to achieve a more competitive pricing structure.

1. Raw Materials which include steels, plastics & rubber 2. Special machinery & Equipment including testing equipment 3. Tools, Dies, Jigs & fixtures 4. Process & manufacturing inputs 5. Sub-components when imported by PAAPAM members under a J.V. duly approved by the EDB. To ensure that local auto parts industry continues to grow both in the shape of volumes and technology, import of finished auto parts in any form including CKD/SKD must not be allowed for OEM’s or aftermarkets. PAAPAM would also support and e n c o u r a g e I n d ia n a u t o m o b i le manufacturing companies who would like to invest in Pakistan at OEM level within the framework of the new entrants policy of the ministry of industries.....

Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 16


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by Ali Hassan

Exclusive Article

How 25 year old bikes will compete with Indian influx?

Analysis of Pakistan and India bike industry Irrespective of merits and demerits to our local industry, stake of jobs of thousands of people and future of our huge vendor base after more liberal trade with India – one thing looks certain that consumers may be able to see arrival of used new design bikes of higher engine capacity from India. However, much will depend of the prices of Indian bikes to lure the buyers. Many consumers have set their eyes on the bright prospects of running high engine capacity Indian made bikes hopefully from n ex t year as the government looks firm to phase out negative list of items between the two countries by December 2012 thus paving way for more entry of Indian goods. It is not clear what government has planned about the future of our local bike industry which has been showing tremendous growth after the entry of low priced bikes introduced by Chinese bike assemblers. How the local industry (Japanese and Chinese bike assemblers) will face the influx of Indian bikes as the government has clearly indicated of eliminating negative list by December 31, 2012. It is a real fact that the auto vending industry of Pakistan during the last 15 years has come a long way in terms of acquiring technologies to manufacture a wide range of hi-tech products not only for domestic market but also catering for export market to some extent. The localization levels achieved so far by the vending industry are over 90 per cent for motorcycles but surprisingly the price of Japanese CD70cc is Rs 66,000 as its producer continues to increase prices on rising cost of production and appreciating value of Yen against the Rupee. However, local vendors claim that the high local content in case of motorcycles has made Pakistan, as one of the cheapest manufacturers of this mode of

M. Sabir Shaikh

Nabeel Hashmi

transport worldwide because the cost of parts produced by PAAPAM members is substantially lower than cost of imported parts. The quality and reliability of each and every part that is localized is certified by the parent companies assembling their vehicle brands in Pakistan. With an average 35 per cent growth in the two to three wheeler sector during the last decade, there has been a mushroom g r o w t h o f v en d o r s p r o d u c i n g components for this sector. The motorcycle production has also touched the level of 1.7 million units in 2010-11 in which Honda bikes still hold a major market share. During 2010-11, motorcycle sales have recorded growths in excess of 25 per cent over the last year. The Chinese bike makers mainly focused on 70cc two wheelers which are invariably the Japanese version of the Honda CD70. So me in cen tive in the s hape of reimbursement of taxes for exports has started a trickle flow of motorcycle exports from Pakistan, but still requires more seriousness from the Ministry of Commerce to really achieve its true

potential. At the moment, Pakistan has 57 TwoThree Wheelers. Unrecorded exports of motorcycles are being done in large numbers to Afghanistan. Two-Three wheelers have also made inroads in African and South Asian Countries. However, accurate CBU Export figures are not available.

Giving a history of Indian bike and vendor industry and their achievements, Chairman PAAPAM Syed Nabeel Hashmi said India is the Asia’s third largest economy. Indian auto market is one of the fastest growing auto markets in the world, and India is home to 40 million vehicles. A total of 9.4 million vehicles were sold in India in FY 2010 (a growth of 27 per cent over the previous year). Motorcycles accounted for 78 per cent of the total two wheelers sold. India produced 8,418,626 two wheelers in 2009-2010 as compared to 8,026,681 units in 20082009. He said the Indian industry, over the years, developed the capability of manufacturing all components required to manufacture vehicles, which is evid en t fro m the h ig h lev els o f Indigenization achieved in the vehicle industry as well as the components developed for the completely Indian made vehicles like the Tata Indica, Tata Indigo, Mahindra Scorpio, Bajaj Pulsar, TVS Victor and TVS star. There is a dire need that production of bikes in Pakistan must cross five million units per year from the current 1.7 million units. Over the last few years, the Indian Auto Component Industry has created a robust capacity base and all of the world’s major manufacturers have set up their manufacturing units in the country. The quality of the components

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Automotive Sector - Update

He said there is a higher valuation advice imposed on imports of parts and accessories. We pay customs duty as per whole weight on clearance of parts at the ports but at some dry ports collect half duty by assessing half weight. produced by the component industry in the country is certified by the fact that, out of the 498 ACMA members, 9 are Deming Prize winners, 4 are JIPM award winners and 1 is Japan Quality Medal winner. The turnover of auto component sector has grown from a figure of $1.5 billion to $9.8 billion. Low labor costs, availability of skilled labor and high quality consciousness among Indian vendors have spurred the growth of auto component exports from India. In 201011 the overall auto parts exports touched $5 billion. Indian component industry has now reached a high degree of maturity in terms of quality and productivity and has also developed capabilities in the area of design and en g in eer in g, w h ich a re c riti ca l requirements for being a part of the global supply chain. According to WTO, India’s average bound tariff rate was 48.6 percent, while its simple MFN average applied tariff for 2009 was 12.9 percent across all goods. Given this large disparity between bound and applied rates, exporters to India face tremendous uncertainty because India has considerable flexibility to change tariff rates at any time. While India has bound all agricultural tariff lines in the WTO, over 30 percent of India’s non-agri tariffs remain unbound, i.e. there is no WTO ceiling on the rate. India maintains very high tariff peaks on a number of goods including automobiles and motorcycles (60 per cent for new products, 100 per cent for used products). Some ad valorem equivalent rates exceed 300 percent. PAAPAM ch ief sa id P akis ta n Government, MOC and FBR need to do a lot of homework and understand what its strength and weaknesses are with specific focus on engineering sector. Pakistan is still in the process of developing standards for its products having export potential. We should e n s u r e o n a r ec i p r o c a l ba s i s reorganization of tests and accreditation of testing laboratories with India. We are still unaware as to how many testing labo rato ries are a ccredit ed an d

acceptable to SAARC member states. Nabeel Hashmi said the commerce ministry is the prime government organ tha t is suppos ed to ensure that Pakistan’s industrial base does not suffer due to the proposed MFN status to India. The commerce ministry must take cognizance of ground realities of each specific industrial sector of Pakistan and negotiate such policies which offer increased trade opportun ities to Pakistani companies There is a need for initiating a detailed study on the impact of opening doors to India with a focus on Auto sector. The study must look into the TBT’s and NTB’s restricting export of Pakistani Auto products. He said the State Bank should enhance SME assets value to Rs 400 million for Engineering Auto Industry to avail SME p re fer en t ia l ma r k u p reg i m es . Clarification on FDI investments of Indian companies in Pakistan and vice versa by Pakistan Businessmen needed and reduce mark up rates and banking spread to create a more competitive environment.

Chairman Association of Pakistan Motorcycle Assemblers (APMA) Mohammad Sabir Shaikh looks highly worried over the fate of 25 year old model local assemblers of Pakistan when full-fledged trade with India will underway from January 2013. Before further liberalizing trade with India, the government should remove the bottlenecks being faced by the Chinese bike makers. For example, he said that the makers of Honda and

Suzuki bikes are enjoying concessionary duty relief of zero to 20 per cent while Chinese bike makers are forced to pay 15 to 65 per cent customs duty. The government has yet to remove the dual taxation system for the bike industry. Currently, the officials of Sales Tax and Customs are harassing the bike makers by making cases which indicates that some officials force the assemblers to evade taxes and duties and then other officials come to grab the industry people in th e n a me of recov ery drive. Sabir said that Customs Department PRAL takes two to three months to clear completely knocked down (CKD kits) as per list passed by the Engineering Development Board (EBD) for bike assemblers but in contrary, the CKS for makers of Honda and Suzuki are cleared in 24 hours. Is this is a fraud or c o n t r a d i c t i o n , h e qu es t i o n e d . Motorcycle assemblers pay their sales tax returns every month through computerized network and PRAL also holds computerized record of every CKD kits imports. But assemblers are frequently asked to present their records, he said. He said there is a higher valuation advice imposed on imports of parts and accessories. We pay customs duty as per whole weight on clearance of parts at the ports but at some dry ports collect half duty by assessing half weight. Japanese bike makers were provided export refund for shipping bikes to Afghanistan but small assemblers, d es pit e s en di n g t he ir bik es t o Afghanistan for the last three years, are not getting export refund, APMA chief said.

APMA chief said the government has to remove these problems being faced by the small bike assemblers but it seems that some government departments are looking forward to destroy the low cost bike makers by their controversial and biased policies just to favor Japanese bike assemblers so that influx of Indian bikes could play havoc with small bike makers…

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Automotive Sector - Update

Monthly sales performance review Indus Motor Company Limited (INDU) witnessed a four per cent YoY growth in sales to 34,366 units in 8MFY12 as against 32,991 units in the same period last year. Pak Suzuki Motor Company Limited (PSMC) has witnessed a 35 per cent YoY growth to 70,162 units in 8MFY12 as against the sales of 52,067 units in the same period last year. Honda Atlas Cars Pakistan Limited (HCAR) has posted a biggest decline in its sales of 33 per cent YoY to 7,024 units in 8MFY12 as against 10,444 units in the same period of previous year. Pakistan Automotive Manufacturers Association (PAMA) has just released local automobile industry’s sales and production numbers for the month of February ‘12. As per the data, Auto sales of the industry witnessed substantial growth of 17 per cent YoY to 111,552 units in 8MFY12 as against the sales of 95,635 units in the corresponding period last year. Conversely, on monthly basis, industry sales have posted a modest drop of 27 units to 14,940 units in the month of February ’12 in comparison of 14,967 units in the previous month. Overall industry sales were higher because of the low based effect improved agricultural income. Pak Suzuki Motor Company Limited (PSMC) has witnessed a 35 per cent YoY growth to 70,162 units in 8MFY12 as against the sales of 52,067 units in the same period last year. Highest growth was observed in the sales of Suzuki Swift

of 86 per cent YoY to 4,500 units as against 2,420 units in the same period last year. Suzuki Cultus under the domain of 1000cc segment witnessed a handsome 38 per cent YoY jump in its sales to 9,573 units in the comparison of 6,919 units in the same period last year, followed by Suzuki Alto whose sales also experienced a massive 32 per cent growth to 9,854 units versus 7,438 units in the same period last year. Above all, Suzuki Mehran and Suzuki Bolan both segments posted growth of 37 per c en t Y oY a n d 47 p er cent YoY respectively. Indus Motor Company Limited (INDU) witnessed a four per cent YoY growth in sales to 34,366 units in 8MFY12 as against 32,991 units in the same period last year. Hilux, under pick up segment led the growth in sales of the company with a gigantic 88 per centYoY to 2,561units as against 1,374 units in the

Malaysian firm to build Karachi-Hyderabad Motorway A five-member Malaysian delegation led by Special Envoy of the Prime Minister o f M a la ys ia fo r S out h As ia o n Infrastructure Dato Seri Samy Vellu called on Minister of State/Chairman Board of Investment, Saleem H. Mandviwalla to explore business and investment opportunities in the country. The High Commissioner Malaysia, Dato’ Ahmed Anwar Adnan also accompanied the delegation. Dato Seri Samy Vellu in form ed BO I th at a M alays ia n construction firm Bina Puri Holdings

Bhd had received a letter of intent in November from the Pakistani National Highway Authority (NHA) for the expansion of the four-lane KarachiHyderabad highway. The same company is also involved in residential and industrial projects in Lahore. The proposed M-9 motorway will cost an estimated Rs18.2 billion and the M-9 will be one of the busiest highway in Pakistan, with 23,000 vehicles approximately every day.....

same period last year. Toyota Corolla posted an upsurge in sales by six per cent YoY to 29,040 units as against 27,423 units in the same period last year. Cuore remained as the only segment of the company whose sales experienced a substantial decline of 34 per cent YoY to 2,765 units as against sales of 4,194 units in the same period last year. Honda Atlas Cars Pakistan Limited (HCAR) has posted a biggest decline in its sales of 33 per cent YoY to 7,024 units in 8MFY12 as against 10,444 units in the same period of previous year. The plunge in the sales of the Honda cars w a s p r im a r ily b ec a u s e o f t h e substantially lower sales of its both brands Honda City and Civic. Sales of Honda Civic were decline by a massive 37 per cent YoY to 2,781 units as against the sales of 4,446 units while sales of Honda City were lower by 29 per cent YoY to 4,243 units as against 5,998 units in the same period last year. The main reason behind the decline in the sales of was suspended operation from December 2011 to February 2012 on the back of unavailability of the parts owing to floods in Thailand from where the company imports CKD kits. As far as the market share is concerned, Pak Suzuki Motor Company leads the market with 63 per cent market share followed by Indus motor company and Honda Atlas Cars with 31 per cent and 6 per cent market share in 8MFY12. Currently we recommend a HOLD s t an ce o n P SMC a n d I NDU ... ..

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Automotive Sector - Update

Pak-Suzuki stops booking orders The price of 50kg gas cylinder with kit is now tagged at Rs37,000-38,500 as compared to Rs24,000-27,000 prevailing ahead of government`s ban. A conversion centre staffer said that his work is going on as the market is facing shortage of cylinders mainly after the ban.Those who have kits and cylinders are charging higher rates. A leading Japanese car assembler discontinued booking of Suzuki Mehran, Bolan and Alto (CNG variants) from Feb 11, 2012. Pak-Suzuki Motor Company Limited (PSMCL), whose 80 per cent production used to comprise CNG fitted vehicles, has asked its authorised dealers to provide details of any orders in the pipeline by Feb 15. Th e comp an y ha d sus pen ded procurement of kits from importers and a leading manufacturer in the middle of January. The company is consuming available imported stocks or those were under import before government`s ban on import of CNG kits and cylinders. An official of the company said that the decision was taken by the firm on Feb 11 after finishing available stocks. The company enjoys over 50 per cent market share in total vehicle sale in Pakistan. The PSMCL official said that consumers, who used to rely on factory fitted CNG vehicle, would now feel the pinch after the discontinuation in booking of economy segment cars, like CNG Mehran, Bolan and Alto. `Sale of cars may initially come down by 10 to 20 per cent but in the coming months sales may dip by 30-40 per cent,` the official anticipated, adding that quality conscious people would face problems in getting kits and cylinders from conversion centres in the open market. Mehran, Alto and Bolan (excluding CNG kits and cylinders) will now cost Rs40,000-50,000 less but consumers will have make efforts to get quality kits and cylinders in open market as black-marketing of kits and cylinders has already started. The price of 50kg gas cylinder with kit

is now tagged at Rs37,000-38,500 as c om p a re d to R s 24 ,0 0 0 -2 7, 0 0 0 prevailing ahead of government`s ban. A conversion centre staffer said that his work is going on as the market is facing shortage of cylinders mainly after the ban.Those who have kits and cylinders are charging higher rates. Conversion centres claim that they are installing government-approved CNG kits and cylinders. A kit importer said that the Oil and Gas Regulatory Authority (Ogra) and HDIP must implement their regulatory framework to improve CNG conversions through licenced and authorised centres to ensure pubic safety. He demanded lifting of ban on car assemblers` CNG conversions in order to provide safe, economically attractive fuel option to middle income group. Pak-Suzuki Motors has also initiated a campaign for CNG cylinder testing service and various authorized dealers are charging Rs1,500-2,500 for this purpose from customers. The dealers are taking gas cylinders from customers on a one week promise for verifying cylinders from Hydro Carbon Development Institute of Pakistan (HDIP) besides assuring that they would get a safety-approved certificate. As per HDIP law, CNG cylinder needs to be tested after every five years for safety purposes. There is only one HDIP centre in Karachi to provide safety

certificate to CNG cylinders. Pak Suzuki`s total vehicle production surged to 56,744 units in July-January 20112012 as compared to 47,153 units in the same period of last fiscal year. Meanwhile, makers of Toyota Corolla and Daihatsu Cuore vehicles have not yet discontinued booking of CNG-fitted vehicles. An official spokesperson for Indus Motors Ltd (IMC), Ali Asghar Jamali, told media that the company was taking orders of CNG vehicles (Toyota Corolla Xli, GLi and Daihatsu Cuore) due to some stocks of cylinders and kits in its h a n d . H o w e v er , h e fe l t t h a t government`s decision would have a negative impact on sales volume of car assemblers.....

APCNGA for lifting ban on import of CNG kits, cylinders The All Pakistan CNG Association (APCNGA) has urged the government to lift the ban on import of CNG kits and cylinders and withdraw the import duty on CNG parts. This was stated by Ghiyas Abdullah Paracha the Central Chairman All Pakistan CNG Association while talking to reporters after having meeting with the Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of foreign CNG cylinder/kits maker companies from Japan, Italy, Argentina and China. The foreign investors have shown serious concerns over government decision to ban import of CNG cylinders and kits, he said. He said that the ban is affecting the business and disturbing the whole investment amounting to billion of rupees by the CNG industry and other stakeholders.....

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Face to Face - Exclusive Interview

An Exclusive Interview with Syed Imran Mehmood, CEO Force Batteries (Pvt) Ltd. by Hanif Memon Syed Imran touched upon various topics ranging from local and international challenges for the consumer industry. His aim is to bring an international standard battery capable of competing with and exceeding the very best batteries available in the market curren tly. Follow ing a re edit ed transcripts of the interview: Q: In your opinion, what are the challenges the consumer industry is facing globally? What kind of mindset should one have while competing in to d a y’ s e ve r- ch a n g i n g m a rk et ? Answer: The world around us is ever changing. The growing needs and consumption patterns of the global consumer are a challenge for suppliers and producers the world over. Thriving as a business in today’s world cannot be as easy as it was ten or maybe twenty years ago. In aiming to understand the trends and forces which will shape our respective industries in the future, we

ca n n o t o v er lo o k t h e d e m a n d s consumers are placing upon us today it rema in s our bigg es t con cern . Preparing today for a better tomorrow is the goal we all should work towards, together. Q: What do you make of Pakistan’s battery industry and what key points should a new market entrant consider

About Syed Imran Mehmood, CEO Force Batteries (Pvt) Ltd. Islamabad Syed Imran Mehmood is the CEO of Force Batteries (Pvt) Ltd. He is an Associate member of the Institute of Cost & Management Accountants of Pakistan (ICMAP) since 1997 and has over 15 years of progressive experience and has held various senior positions in t h e P a ki s ta n b a tt er y i n d us t ry . when competing for survival with the very bes t in the ma rket place? Answer: Over the years there has been a tremendous growth in the battery industry in Pakistan. Consumers are looking for quality batteries which provide durability, performance and value for money. Our aim is to bring an international standard battery capable of competing with and exceeding the very best batteries available in the market currently. We will stick to our

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Face to Face - Exclusive Interview

brand promise and our customers’ will Ins hallah h ave only praises an d satisfaction with regards to a Force Batteries product. Q: What should the consumers expect from Force batteries in the near future? Answer: Force Batteries mean quality, reliability and performance guarantees. When we say guarantee, we mean to ensure this by providing a 6 months free replacemen t warra nty to all our customers. The future is now, as Force Batteries are now available in markets. Q: Some say that the battery industry is already saturated, since Force batteries is going to be a new entrant in the industry, what is your vision & mission in catering to the consumer needs of the battery industry? Answer: We are persistently striving towards our mission: Endurance being our strong point. It is not just a saying but a common universal law on which most of our science has established its foundations. As Darwin puts it in his theory of natural selection, ‘survival of the fittest’ - The individuals who best adapt to the environment are the ones who will most likely survive. Granted the market is saturated, however this saturation is due to sub-standard battery products being available on a mass scale. We on the other hand have a completely different target market – consumers who are looking for a top grade in t ern a tio n a l s ta n da rd ba t tery . Therefore we are very confident that the end consumer will not compromise on p erfo rma n ce a n d qua lit y w hen purchasing a battery, after all a substandard battery will only cost you more in the long run. Force Batteries is catering to this vacuum in the market

due to the short fall of a qu ality b attery product. Q: What will be the main a rea s yo u will be focusing upo n in order to satisfy your customer n eeds and a c hi evi ng constant success? A nswer: Taking a good look at the market out side, it is easy to n otice that in compa ri so n w ith the othe r brands/names, force batteries ensures high quality control and a constant check upon the material being used for the manufacturing of top quality batteries. Our prime focus is our customers’ satisfaction. It helps us build confidence in our self which in return inspires us to keep putting in our 100% for our customers. Q: It is believed that the core values of an organization guide it through tough situations. What values & norms does Force Batteries have embedded for achieving enduring success? Answer: Maintaining our high values in order to keep our promise, we follow a strict line of guidelines, encompassing our internal strengths. Collaborated leadership, accounting for the courage to stand tall in a challenging world is the in tegral part of our system. R es ea rch in g ma rk et n eeds a n d identifying the ever evolving consumer trends through evaluating consumer responses allow us to be on step ahead of the competition. Our other values such as integrity, discipline, maintaining quality standards and our brand promise are the Hallmarks for the future success of Force Batteries. Q: As the name suggests, force batteries will introduce batteries, but can you briefly explain the specific product range being introduced? Answer: Force Batteries has a complete range of products which cater to a variety of domestic and commercial needs. Our battery products range from 32AH to 240AH. These batteries have been produced in various power outputs and

sizes keeping in mind the needs of the end consumer. Therefore we can confidently say that Force Batteries has a p ro duc t for e very c on s um er. Our batteries are now available in the ma rket an d ou r con sumers will immediately feel the difference after purchasing a Force Batteries product. Q. What is your target market, OEM or Direct Customer? Answer: We are targeting Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM), direct customers as well as institutions. Our aim is to encompass the entire market as there is no limit to customer demands for high grade batteries. Q. Force Batteries is looking to expand into the international market – How do you think this will contribute to Pakistan’s economy? Answer: As you know we are a home grown Pakistani company, however our aim is to expand our business globally since the product range we are currently marketing have been produced to c o m p e t e w it h b o t h l o c a l a n d international brands. Therefore our contribution in terms of sales revenue, taxation, foreign exchange earned and job creation will help contribute to a more prosperous Pakistan. Our hope is that more Pakistani companies aim to start exporting to reduce the burden on th e exch equ er due to Pa kista ni consumers constantly looking to foreign markets for products which can easily be available locally if we emphasize on quality standards such as those at Force Batteries. Q. What is the market strategy behind Force Batteries? Answer: Our strategy is to produce and market an international standard battery brand for the Pakistani consumer. We have brought in a number of new innovations in the market and are aiming to set a new trend in the Pakistani battery industry. Therefore our brand image, packaging and quality standards are all tailored to match any internationally available brand as our future aim is to take Force Batteries global. Q. Are there any other specific products which you created solely for the Pakistani market? Answer: Yes, the FR30. It is specially designed for 3wheel vehicles such as auto rickshaws and generator sets. As I said earlier, every customer is important to us.

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Announced to launch two light vehicles

Chinese auto group to launch light vehicles The plant has a capacity of 11,000 units per annum which can be expanded according to the requirement. “We plan to further penetrate in the Japanese-dominated automobile market through introducing our product line in LCV and passenger car categories,” Chin a FAW G ro up Co rporation , co m mo n ly refer red to a s Firs t Automotive Works (FAW), is all set to introduce two light vehicles brands namely FAW X-PV and FAW Carrier in Pakistan. Hilal Khan Afridi, chief executive officer (CEO) of Al-Haj FAW Motors – the local joint venture partner of the Chinese group – told press media that Al-Haj FAW has invested Rs1 billion to set up an assembling plant to start production of new vehicles. The company has recently completed its assembly plant located at main National Highway, Zulfiqarabad Karachi. He said that FAW X-PV is 1000cc mini van with a seating capacity of seven plus one, while other one FAW Carrier is also a 1000cc mini pickup for loading purpose and with a loading capacity of 1 ton, which is higher than most other ve hic le s o f th e s a me c at eg ory . The price for X-PV mini van will be Rs.699,000 and FAW Carrier mini pickup would cost Rs.609,000. The company said that within a period of three years, 100 percent manufacturing will be done locally. Afridi said that these new additions have

EFI technology and complaint with Euro4 emission standards, which are still not available in the small Japanese vehicles being assembled in the country. These two small vehicles are a new induction in the Pakistan’s automobile industry aimed to provide comfortable and affordable transport to the general masses, he added. It may be mentioned that Al-Haj FAW Motors has been actively involved in the heavy commercial auto market since 2006. “Our group previous ly was on ly assembling heavy vehicles. It has now decided to start production of small vehicles as well. We are the second largest heavy vehicle provider in Pakistan with a 40 percent market share,” he said.

About AL-HAJ Group The very first of ‘AL-HAJ’ companies was launched in 1960 at Jumrud Khyber Agency in District Peshawar, NWFP. Late Haji SakhiGulAfridi was the founder and first chairman of AL-HAJ Group, a visionary person who had the ability to foresee the future and to turn prospective business into accomplished business goals. The operations initially included the import and export of electronic products, clothes and tyres. Later, the Company expanded its business and became the main dealer of Hino Pak by the name of AL-HAJ

Motors. The Group is in the proces s of continuous growth under the skill guidance of Haji Shah JeeGulthe Chairman of the Group. The proprietors of AL-HAJ Group of Companies have a very close and friendly relationship with Pakistan, Afg hanistan & Chin ese governments and higher authorities. The Organization has grown into four Strategic Business Units (SBUs), which are working throughout Pakistan, Afghanistan, China and United Arab Emirates.

Under this project Chinese automobile technologies will also be transferred to Pakistan in the next one-and-a-half year, he informed. He said that it is the first automobile plan t in Pa kist an for exclus ive production of FAW products and the assembly plant has been equipped with latest machinery and equipment to manufacture FAW trucks, Prime Mover, light commercial vehicles and passenger cars. The plant has a capacity of 11,000 units per annum which can be expanded according to the requirement. “We plan to further penetrate in the Japanesedominated automobile market through introducing our product line in LCV and passenger car categories,” he said and added that the FAW Group is a global leader in the vehicle manufacturing industry with a 50-year history of innovation. He said customer’s satisfaction is a major concern of the company and keeping this in mind they have established a modern service network country wide. “All our FAW dealers operate on ‘3S’ basis (sales, service, and spare parts). Our initial 3S dealership network comprises of 11 dealerships in 9 cities and we be are planning to expand our services to 15 cites,” he added. Farhan Hafiz, marketing manager at AlHaj FAW Motors, said that company’s vision is to introduce and capture significant share of the local automotive market by providing quality Chinese vehicles to the customer with full back up support through nationwide 3S dealer network. He said that the company’s focus would be to change people’s mindset about Chinese automobile in the Pakistani market by providing them quality, durability, after sales support, hence giving them the best value for their money.....

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Automotive Sector - Update

Sale of Tractors, Heavy vehicles down Data released by Pakistan Automotive Manufacturers Association (Pama) revealed jump in car sales to 85,011 units from 72,580 units despite no production of Honda Civic, Honda City and Suzuki Liana during December 2011 and January 2012. The entire auto sector showed a mixed performance in July-January 2011-2012 as compared to same period of the previous year as sales of cars, two / three wheelers, pick-ups etc., went up, while tractor and heavy vehicle sales continued to face drop in sales. Data released by Pakistan Automotive Manufacturers Association (Pama) revealed jump in car sales to 85,011 units from 72,580 units despite no production of Honda Civic, Honda City and Suzuki Liana during December 2011 and January 2012. However, a total of 49 units and 92 units of Honda Civic were sold in December 2011 and January 2012, thus making adverse impact on cumulative sales in July-January 2011-2012 which slipped to 2,756 units as compared to 3,732 units in the same period of last fiscal year. Similarly, 22 and 38 units of Honda City were sold in December 2011 and January 2012 respectively, thus resulting in cumulative decline in July-January 2011-2012 sales to 4,235 units as compared to 5,047 units in the corresponding period of 2010-2011. Toyota Corolla sales slightly improved to 24,885 units as compared to 23,740 units. In 1,000cc category, total sales rose to 16,586 units as compared to 12,945 units in which only two Suzuki models were enjoying monopoly. Suzuki Cultus and Suzuki Alto sales surged to 8,225 and 8,361 units as c om p a red t o 6, 5 07 an d 6 , 43 8 units.Hyundai Santro production remained `zero` both in the last seven months of current fiscal year and also in the co rrespo nd ing period in 20102011.

In 800cc and below 1,000cc segment, total car sales increased to 32,443 units a s c o mp a re d to 2 4, 90 4 u n it s . Daihatsu Cuore sales fell to 2,245 units as compared to 3,504 units while Suzuki Mehran and Bolan sales swelled to 19,375 and 10,823 units as compared to 13,817 and 7,583 units, respectively. Analyst Noman Khan at Top Line Securities linked improvement in volumetric sales of Mehran and Bolan for Yellow cab scheme announced by the Punjab government and deferred sales from June to July 2011 because of reduced tax structure in federal budget 2011-2012. Due to end year phenomenon when buyers try to purchase more cars in new year, overall January 2012 car sales surged to 13,125 units as compared to 9,5 33 un its in Decem ber 20 11 . T he a bov e figu res sh ow ed tha t consumers continued to show their passion for locally assembled cars despite rising import of used cars, increase in car prices on rupee-yen parity, decline in cotton prices etc. Much support to the locally made cars w as arrivin g fro m ris ing ho me remittances.

The decline in sales of Honda cars was due to suspension in production owing to unavailability of parts from flood hit Thailand from where the company importsCKD kits. The maker of Honda car will resume production by the end of this month of Honda Civic but reports are coming that Honda City production has been delayed till April this year. In bikes, Honda and Suzuki sales reached 338,794 and 12,399 units in July-January 2011-2012 as compared to 310,966 and 11,038 units while Sohrab amd Habib bike sales rose to 2,381 and 15,959 units from 1,569 and 10,959 units. Qingqi and Sazgar threewheeler sales surged to 12,971 and 10,189 units as compared to 8,209 and 9,104 units. Overall farm tractor sales (Fiat and Massey Ferguson) dropped to 13,034 from 38,416 units due to high price of tractors which jumped in April 2011 after imposition of 16 per cent sales tax (GST). However, the tractor industry is now hopeful of improved sales after the government finally reduced the GST to five from 16 per cent. Overall truck sales (Hinopak, Nissan, Master and Isuzu) plunged to 1,216 units as compared to 1,602 units while bus sales (Hinopak and Isuzu mainly) fell to 242 units from 298 units. In pick-up category, Suzuki Ravi and Toyota Hilux sales went up to 9,269 and 2,332 units as compared to 8,556 and 1,049 units. Master sales dropped to 14 units from 31 units. In Jeep (4x4), Sigma Defender sales came down to 301 units from 438 units.....

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Automotive Sector - Update

Import of CNG kits, cylinders by OEM ECC likely to take up issue Indus Motor Company's Chief Executive Pervez Ghias disclosed this while talking to a select group of reporters in Lahore. The OEM representatives held a meeting with the Federal Minister of Industries a day earlier wherein issue was discussed in detail. The Economic Co-ordination Committee (ECC) is likely to take up the issue of banning import of CNG kits and cylinders by the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). Indus Motor Company's Chief Executive Pervez Ghias disclosed this while talking to a select group of reporters in Lahore. The OEM representatives held a meeting with the Federal Minister of Industries a day earlier wherein issue was discussed in detail. The representatives while terming the ba n an e xp lic it d is c rim in a ti on deman ded of the g overn men t to immediately review its decision . It is pertinent to mention that the OEM imports just 0.2 percent of the total consumption of CNG kits and cylinders whereas commercial import s till continued that has created imbalance be tw e en t h e in d u s tr y a n d t h e commercial importers. As a result of ban, the CNG kit and

cylinder prices have reportedly gone up by Rs 20,000 in the market and same is the case with resale of the used cylinders and kits, he added. The OEMs were restricted to only import CNG kits who's L/Cs were opened before December 15, 2011. He further revealed that the Ministry of Industry has fully supported the OEMs stance and resolved to put up the case before the Economic Co-ordination Committee. To a question, he said that Pakistan Automobile Manufacturers Association did not oppose including CKD in positive list, as their import from India could be beneficial for the local industry. The CKD of the same company having same quality would be cheaper, as it would help save freight cost if price remains the same, he maintained. The import of completely built unit (CBU) was included in the negative list because of strong opposition from the

stakeholders in the perspective of trade with India under the MFN status. He, however, ruled ou t any fear regarding the CBU import from India and argued that its import was already allowed from China and Korea that has no significant impact on the local industry. Similarly, CBU import from India would not be cheaper and thus there would be no harm to the local industry, he maintained. He further contended that there was no concept of negative list in presence of MFN status and we would have to be competitive in the coming days, as negative list has to be phased out by the end of this year....

PIDC approves development of five sectors Pakistan Industrial Developmen t Corporation’s (PIDC) board of directors, on Wednesday, approved development schemes of five sector including gems, jewellery, furniture and wooden art center that would help boost the ind us trial s ecto rs a n d g enera te employment. Federal M inister for Production , Chaudhry Anwar Ali Cheema, while chairing the meeting of the board of directors of PIDC said, “The Ministry of Production is all set to promote and develop the industrial sector of the country along with putting special focus on uplifting the neglected areas.” These schemes have already been cleared by the PIDC development wo rkin g p art y (DW P ) a n d als o recommended by the board’s finance committee. Cheema said, “The ministry hopes that the establishment of these centers shall

not only play an important role in the skills development of the poor people of these areas but will also prove instrumental in boosting the industrial activities and making their productivity competitive”. Hence, the minister added, these schemes will contribute in the Gross Domestic Product of the country. Cheema further directed the officials of the ministry and the management of PIDC to make their best efforts in developing the respective sectors to achieve ultimate goal of national economic development of the country. “Time is of the essence and complete transparency needs to be maintained in achieving the desired goals”, he added. An official of the Ministry of Production told media, “Although Pakistan has rich resources of gems and stones, yet it needs to come up with an innovative strategy for proper utilisation of the

resources”. He said, “Pakistan has billions of dollars exports capacity in the sector. Businesses in this sector could earn huge foreign exchange if they focus on value addition in gem and jewellery instead of exporting in raw form. Currently, its exports are about $320 million.” The new schemes which got approval from the board include, Sargodha Ind us tri al Pa rk , R ura l Cra ft Development Project of Ahan, Lahore, Establishment of Common Facility Training & Manufacturing Centre of Fu r n i t u re P a k i s t a n a t G u j r a t , Establishment of Centre of Excellence for Wooden Arts at Sargodha and Establishment of Gems and Jewellery Training and Manufacturing Centre of P a k i s t a n G e m s a n d J e w e lle r y Development Company at Sargodha.....

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Automotive Sector - Update

Now it’s diesel-run buses for Islamabad Clearly, the Capital Development Authority (CDA) has been successful in selling the idea of starting diesel-run buses instead of CNG-run buses to the prime minister after two months of consistent efforts. On January 6, press media had reported that CDA officials were findings it difficult to start a CNG bus service given the shortage of gas and depleting resources, and its chairman had come up with a proposal for diesel-run buses. And now insiders in the civic agency claim that two days back Prime Minister Gilani called CDA Chairman Farkhand Iqbal and asked him to forget about CNG and launch the service with diesel buses. Unlike previous timelines, this time the civic agency has been given a deadline to get the project running within 15 days. The federal capital has a population of more than 1.5 million with a growth rate of four per cent per annum and one of the main problems confronting the res iden ts of I sla maba d is n on a va ila bility o f c om fo rta ble an d affordable transport system. Islamabad is said to be the only capital city where there is no bus service for the citizen – the last private bus service Varan Tours was shut down in 2002. In July 2010 the CDA had planned to launch a bus service within six months, but it could only make abortive attempts. In its budget for fiscal 2010-11, the authority had allocated Rs10 million for th e air- con d itio ned CNG b us es project.According to civic agen cy officials, this time around the PM was of the view that as CNG reserves were fast depleting in the country therefore the CDA should go for other options to provide an affordable bus service to the citizens. An emergency meeting was called of concerned officials of the CDA after this and they were given the task of meeting the 15-day deadline. “It is not a difficult task to prepare a plan for diesel bus service in 15 days because there is no significant difference between CNG and diesel bus services,”

said the CDA chairman. He said his team will definitely meet the target given by the prime minister. However, some officials of the CDA’s planning wing said it was highly impossible for the authority to launch a bus service even in a month because the city managers have to start work from zero to introduce diesel bus service. “For the last 10 years they were working on CNG bus service and now they have to conduct feasibility study on diesel bus service,” an official said. Meanwhile, the district administration of Islamabad, which is also called the local administration, is hopeful that diesel bus service could be launched if its assistance is taken. “We have already worked on plying diesel buses but the service could not be launched due to some reasons,” said Deputy Commissioner Islamabad Amir Ali Ahmed. He said his department and the CDA could jointly start a successful bus service by g iv in g s o me in cen ti ve s t o th e transporters. The official said the local administration was planning to initiate bus service for schoolchildren with 40 diesel buses. It has been learnt that many transporters

had shown interest in running bus service in Islamabad but the demands they presented before the CDA and the local administration were not fulfilled after which they kept themselves away from such ventures.According to a senior CDA official, dealing with the project named Bus Rapid Transit, 11 companies had expressed interest last year in the project out of those five were pre-qualified. Some of these trans porters h ad demanded land for establishing high pressure CNG stations and some asked the local administration to enhance fares so that they could meet the high cost of CNG and other overhead expenses. The CDA sources said the owner of a consortium was interested in setting up his own high-pressure gas stations for his promised 300-bus fleet and quit when the CDA refused. However, the real losers are tens of thousands low-income people who have to commute between Islamabad and Rawalpindi daily and were looking forw ard to a go od bus service. “Due to lack of public transport service, people use their cars and motorcycles to reach different destinations that create traffic jams on city roads,” said a resident of F-7, Shakeel Ahmed. Similarly, an office-bearer of Islamabad Citizens Committee, Khalil Sufi, said the govern men t must launch s uch a respectable bus service in which not only poor or mediocre could travel but welloff people could also prefer to use it.

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by Murtaza Haider

Transport Sector - Article

Pakistan’s first Business Express train The train may be profitable at 100 per cent capacity where it will generate approximately 4.86 million in gross revenue of which 3.1 million rupees will be paid as royalties to PR, while the remaining 1.7 million rupees could cover operating costs and generate a profit. It took Four Brothers to put Pakistan Railways, or at least one of its trains, back on track. It will, however, require many more than the Four Brothers Group to sustain a vibrant train service in Pakistan. To say that Pakistan Railways (PR) is haemorrhaging is an understatement. Y e a r s o f n e g le c t , i n a d e q u a t e maintenance, corruption, and lack of

s killed man agement brough t th e Railways literally to a halt earlier this month when its employees refused to let trains run after not being paid their salaries and pensions. Pakistan Railways is one of several similar assets that have become a financial liability instead of being profitable. At present Pakistan R ailways is operating passenger service only on profitable routes. Short-haul service has been suspended for lack of resources. PR had suspended freight service

completely and has only recently attempted to restore freight service between the port city of Karachi and the consumer markets in northern parts of Pakistan. The table below suggests that freight transport was down by 13 per cent and passenger transport was down by 8 per cent in 2009-10. While freight service once generated 30 per cent of Railways’ revenue, it is now down to

zero..... Source: Pakistan Economic Survey, 2010-11 Pakistan Railways is facing four major challenges. First is the deterioration of infrastructure resultin g in the shortage of locomotives. Out of a fleet of nearly 500 locomotives, only 100-odd locomotives are in service. Eighty per cent of PR’s locomotives have broken down an d are in need of repair. According to Railways’ engineers, a large number of locomotives are in fact

beyond repair. As recently as in 2008, PR owned 280 locomotives. The current rolling stock is around 1,761 cars. The number of freight cars is around 17,698. Reports suggest that 80-plus per cent of Railway’s bridges are beyond their service life and are no longer in a state of good repair. A Senate delegation recently learnt that fewer than 20 per cent of the machinery in the Mughalpura Workshop in Lahore is operational thus limiting the operational capacity of railway workshops to repair and refurbish rolling stock and locomotives. The second major challenge deals with the Railways’ inability to purchase fuel from Pakistan State Oil (PSO). Since PR has already exhausted its credit facilities with PSO, it could no longer purchase diesel on credit. The federal government has recently doubled the credit limit for PR, which has resulted in the resumption of fuel supply to Railways’ fuel depots. Thirdly, becau se of liqu idity constraints, Railways could not even pay salaries an d pens ions to its employees.

The fourth challenge concerns the masses (ghareeb awaam) who never

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Transport Sector - Article

While Railways is facing almost insurmountable challenges, its fate is in the hands of unskilled professionals who have not been trained in transport management. The result is a consistent decline in service, quality, and liquidity of Pakistan Railways whose management has done little beyond lobbying the government to raise its debt ceiling. miss an opportunity to destroy the very infrastructure that serves them. Pakistan Railways over the years has been a victim of the misdirected public outrage. The December 2007 riots after Benazir Bhutto’s death delivered a devastating blow to the Railways. Rioters torched 22 locomotives and 140 coaches while protesting the death of Bhutto that resulted in a massive $220 million loss to Railways. The total damage from rioting in December 2007 was estimated at $5 billion. While the Railways has continued its downward slide, the Four Brothers Group decided to step in and offer Lahore to Karachi business class rail service by operating an express train that would still take 18 hours to traverse 1,250 km. One-way trip on the Business Express train costs 5,000 ($55) rupees whereas round-trip fare averages around $99. Within days the Four Brothers Group realized that the idea for a luxury rail service would not fly. While the train has a capacity of 486 passengers, only 150 boarded the maiden ride from Lahore to Karachi last week. Since then fewer than 150 passengers have been riding the luxury rail service. Given the lack of demand and resulting

loss in expected revenue, the long-term feasibility of the acclaimed publicprivate partnership between Four Brothers and the thousands of Railways’ unionised brothers is being questioned. According to a news report, the Four B rothers Group is con tractually obligated to pay 3.1 million rupees to PR for each round trip between Lahore and Karachi. With 150 passengers on board, the gross revenue from a round trip is hardly 1.5 million Rupees, which is perhaps not sufficient to cover even the operating costs, let alone to pay r o y a lt i es t o PR f o r u s in g it s infrastructure, namely track, stations etc. Even if the luxury train operates at 70 per cent capacity, it will generate a net revenue of 3.4 million rupees for a round-trip between Lahore and Karachi. The train may be profitable at 100 per cent capacity where it will generate approximately 4.86 million in gross revenue of which 3.1 million rupees will

be paid as royalties to PR, while the remaining 1.7 million rupees could cover operating costs and generate a profit. The Four Brothers Group has reacted to the lack of demand by introducing an economy class in the luxury train with a reduced fair of Rs 3,500. The numbers I presented earlier suggest to me that the train service may be able to break even at Rs 5,000. At Rs 3,500, the service is unlikely to be sustainable and the train may soon be heading back to the docks for a long hiatus.

The problems with the Four Brothers train will be better understood when we do a quick comparative analysis of what else is available to travel between Lahore and Karachi. Using the Internet, I obtained fare by bus and other rail service between Lahore and Karachi. Note that if I were a budget traveller, Pakistan Railways’ Awami offers the most competitive oneway fare of Rs. 830. For a 1,250 km journey, the fare comes to Rs. 0.66 per km, which suggests it being a subsidized fare. The budget traveller will not turn to any other mode given the marginal difference in price. The next step up is again Pakistan Railways for a full seat at Rs. 2,270, which is still significantly cheaper than Daewoo bus service. The o ther tw o rail o ption s are st ill significantly cheaper than the Four Brothers Rs. 5,000 ‘luxury ride’. Notice that the competing modes of travel are cheaper than the Four Brothers ‘luxury’ train. While the alternative options lack in luxuries, such as flat screen TV and quality on-board meals, the alternative modes make-up for the no-frills travel with cheaper fares and more frequent service. With one train a day, the Four Brothers are operating in a niche market that may not be able to compete with the existing alternatives that may slice their fares and offer even more frequent service to m ain tain th eir c ompet it ivenes s.

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Transport Sector - Article In travel demand forecasting, a graduate course I have taught over the past 12 years in Canada, students are trained to use econometrics to develop market share forecasts for new transport services. Such forecasting allows the investors to become increasingly aware o f t h e in h er en t ris k s in t h eir infrastructure investments. Much of transport planning in Pakistan is devoid of any investment-grade forecasting, which often leaves investors to assume unnecessary risks. The ill-fated bus franchise scheme that introduced a thousand-plus buses on urban routes in Pakistan met the same unfortunate fate as most operators were forced to flee the urban transit market. I wonder why in Pakistan governments and business alike are reluctant to invest in feasibility studies but are ready to pour hundreds of millions in projects whose feasibility is far from certain. The lack of expertise in transport planning is a primary handicap in Pakistan. The university curricula in transport engineering programs is focused on highway engineering and the planning curricula is focused on soft planning skills. This has created a skill shortage in Pakistan. In May 2011, I assisted the transport planning department of the government of Punjab in recruiting professional staff for the newly constituted Transport Plan ning Unit. Of several dozen applicants not a sing le qualified candidate was available from within Pakistan for transport economist and travel demand forecasting positions. Similarly, there was hardly any skilled talent in tran sport and logis tics management. The shortage of skilled staff is even more acute in the public sector, which has the responsibility to regulate, and in Pakistan’s case even operate, transport infrastructure and services. W hile Railways is facin g almost insurmountable challenges, its fate is in the hands of unskilled professionals who have not been trained in transport

management. The result is a consistent decline in service, quality, and liquidity o f P ak is t a n R ai lw a ys w h o se management has done little beyond lobbying the government to raise its debt ceiling. The status quo is certainly not viable for Pakistan Railways where a major rethink is in order.

The current political and executive leadership is highly inept to operate Railways. The conflicting statements made by the Minister of Railways and other senior executives to the Senate and the Supreme Court regarding Railway’s ability to refurbish out-ofcommission locomotives suggest that no one is steering Pakistan Railways. Consider that on January 24 Railway Minister Haji Bilour informed the Senate that 12 to 13 locomotives were being refurbished by railways every month. Later on January 31, an official of Pakistan Railways informed Business Recorder that it would take at least six t o s e ve n mo n t hs t o rep a ir 25 locomotives. Earlier on December 27, the Secretary of Railway Board Shafiq Ullah advised the Supreme Court that by January 10, 2012, 221 locomotives

ou t of a fleet of 494 wo uld be operational. Meanwhile Secretary Railways advised the prime minister on December 23 that 19 locomotives will be refurbished in December and an additional 15 will be brought to service in January 2012. The Senate or the Supreme Court may want to run an audit o f all c on flict in g cla ims a bo ut refurbishing of locomotives to determine if it at all makes sense to continue with the governance model we have for Pakistan Railways. I would suggest that privatization should be phased into Pakistan Railways. While privatization is no panacea for a myriad of challenges facing Pakistan Railways, t he in tern a tion a l exp er ien ce in privatizing railways has been more positive than otherwise. Pakistan Railways’ bloated workforce continues to draw wages, salaries, and benefits even when the number of operating passengers trains has significantly declined while the freight train service has effectively come to a halt. In the first ph as e, freig ht service c ould be privatized. Given that it will not affect low-income passengers in the immediate future, Pakistan Railways can learn from the privatization of freight service before it expands it to passengers service, which could be privatized on a route-by-route basis, while accounting for the fact that those who will operate service on profitable routes will have to subsidise non-profitable routes. Also, Pakistan may want to consider enlisting foreign skilled experts to operate Pakistan Railways. Pakistan has entrusted foreign coaches to train its cricket team in the past. The same could be done with Railways where local talent is in short supply. Murtaza Haider, Ph.D. is the Associate Dean of research and graduate programs at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University in Toronto. He can be reached by email at murtaza.haider@ryerson.ca

The problems with the Four Brothers train will be better understood when we do a quick comparative analysis of what else is available to travel between Lahore and Karachi. Using the Internet, I obtained fare by bus and other rail service between Lahore and Karachi. Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 37


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Alternative Energy - Exclusive Article

by Muhammad Yakoob Gaziani

Alternate Energy Solution (Wind Turbines Part II) Wind-Electric System Components Understanding the basic components of system and how they function is not an overwhelming task. Here are some brief descriptions of the common equipment used in grid-inter-tied and off-grid windelectric systems. Systems vary—not all equipment is necessary for every system type.

Wind Generator Wind turbine: The wind generator is what actually generates electricity in t he sys tem. M os t mod ern w in d generators are upwind designs (blades are on the side of the tower that faces into the wind), and couple permanent magnet alternators directly to the rotor (blades). Three-bladed wind generators are most common, providing a good compromise between efficiency and rotor balance. Small wind turbines protect themselves from high winds (governing) by tilting the rotor up or to the side, or by changing the pitch of the blades. Electricity is transmitted down the tower on wires, most often as three-phase wild alternating current (AC). It´s called "wild" because the voltage and frequency vary with the rotational speed of the wind turbine. The output is then rectified to direct current (DC) to charge batteries or to be inverted for grid connection.

or when the energy is not needed. Many turbines have "dynamic braking," which simply shorts out the three electrical phases and acts as a dis-connect. Others have mechanical braking, either via a disc or drum brake, activated by a small winch at the base of the tower. Still others have mechanical furling, which swings the rotor out of the wind. Mechanical braking is usually more effective and reliable than dynamic braking.

Charge Controller Controller, Regulator A wind-electric charge controller´s primary function is to protect your battery bank from overcharging. It does this by monitoring the battery bank— when the bank is fully charged, the controller sends energy from the battery bank to a dump (diversion) load. Many wind-electric charge controllers are built into the same box as the rectifiers (AC-to-DC converters). Overcurrent protection is needed between the battery and controller/dump load. In battery-less grid-tie systems, there is no controller in normal operation, since the inverter is selling whatever energy the turbine is generating. But there will be some control function in the case of grid failure, and there may be electronics before the inverter to regulate the input voltage.

Tower

Dump Load

A wind generator tower is very often more expensive than the turbine. The tower puts the turbine up in the "fuel"— the smooth strong winds that give the most energy. Wind turbines should be sited at least 30 feet (9 m) higher than anything within 500 feet (152 m). Three common types of towers are tiltup, fixed-guyed, and freestanding. Towers must be specifically engineered for the lateral thrust and weight of the turbine, and should be adequately grounded to protect your equipment against lightning damage.

Diversion Load, Shunt Load Solar-electric modules can be turned off—open circuited—with no damage. Most wind generators should not run

Brake Emergency Shutdown Mechanism Most wind turbines have some means of stopping the turbine for repairs, in an emergency, for routine maintenance,

unloaded. They will run too fast and too loud, and may selfdestruct. They must be connected to a battery bank or load. So normally, a charge Muhammad controller that has Yakoob Gaziani t he c apa bilit y o f being a diversion controller is used. A diversion controller takes surplus energy from the battery bank and sends it to a dump load. In contrast, a series controller (commonly used in PV systems), actually opens the circuit. A dump load is an electrical resistance heater, and it must be sized to handle the full generating capacity of the wind generator used. These dump loads can be air or water heaters, and are activated by the charge controller whenever the batteries or the grid cannot accept the energy being produced.

Battery Bank Storage Battery Your wind generator will produce electricity whenever the wind blows above the cut-in speed. If your system is off grid, you will need a battery bank— a group of batteries wired together—to store energy so you can have electricity when it is not windy. For off-grid systems, battery banks are typically sized to keep household electricity running for one to three calm days. Grid-intertied systems also can include battery banks to provide emergency backup during blackouts—perfect for keeping critical electric loads operating until the grid is up again. Use only deep-cycle batteries in windelectric systems. Lead-acid batteries are the most common battery type. Flooded lead-acid batteries are usually the least expensive, but require adding distilled water occasionally to replenish water lost during the normal charging process. Sealed absorbent glass mat (AGM) batteries are maintenance free and designed for grid-tied systems where the batteries are typically kept at a full state of charge. Sealed gel-cell batteries can be a good choice to use in unheated spaces due to their freeze-resistant

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Alternative Energy - Exclusive Article Grid-tie inverters are either designed to operate with or without batteries. Battery-based inverters for off-grid or grid-tie systems often include a battery charger, which is capable of charging a battery bank from either the grid or a backup generator during cloudy weather.

AC Breaker Panel

qualities.

System Meter Battery Monitor, Amp-Hour Meter, Watt-Hour Meter System meters can measure and display several different aspects of your windelectric system´s performance and status—tracking how full your battery bank is, how much electricity your wind generator is producing or has produced, and how much electricity is in use. Operating your system without metering is like running your car without any gauges—although possible to do, it is always better to know how much fuel is in the tank.

Main DC Disconnect B a t t er y / I n v er t er Dis co n n ec t In battery-based systems, a disconnect between the batteries and inverter is required. This disconnect is typically a large, DC-rated breaker mounted in a metal enclosure. This breaker allows the inverter to be quickly disconnected from the batteries for service, and protects the inverter-to-battery wiring against electrical fires.

Inverter DC-to-AC converter Inverters transform the electricity produced by your wind generator into the AC electricity commonly used in most homes for powering lights and a pp lia n c es . G rid -t ied in v ert er s synchronize the electricity they produce with the grid´s "utility grade" AC electricity, allowing the system to feed wind elec tricity to the utility grid.

Mains Panel, Breaker Box, Fuse Box The AC breaker panel is the point at which all of a home’s electrical wiring meets with the provider of the electricity, whether that’s the grid or a solar-electric system. This wall-mounted panel or box is usually installed in a utility room, basement, garage, or on the exterior of the building. It contains a number of labeled circuit breakers that route electricity t o the va rious room s throughout a house. These breakers allow electricity to be disconnected for servicing, and also protect the building’s w ir in g a g ai n s t e lect ri ca l fir es . Just like the electrical circuits in your home or office, an inverter’s electrical output needs to be routed through an AC circuit breaker. This breaker is usually mounted inside the building’s mains panel, which enables the inverter to be disconnected from either the grid or from electrical loads if servicing is necessary, and also safeguards the circuit’s electrical wiring. Additionally, for their use, utilities usually require an AC disconnect between the inverter and the grid that is for their use. These are usually located near the utility KWH meter.

Kilowatt-Hour Meter KWH Meter, Utility Meter Most homes with a grid-tied windelectric system will have AC electricity both coming from and going to the electric utility grid. A bidirectional KWH meter can simultaneously keep track of how much electricity you are using and how much your system is producing. The utility company often provides intert ie-c ap a ble me ter s a t n o c os t .

Backup Generator Gas-Guzzler, "the Noise" Off-grid wind-electric systems can be sized to provide electricity during calm periods when the wind does not blow. But sizing a system to cover a worstcase scenario, like several calm weeks during the summer, can result in a very large, expensive system that will rarely get used to its capacity and will run a huge surplus in windy times. To spare your pocketbook, go with at least two sources of energy. Wind-PV hybrid systems are often an excellent fit with local renewable resources. But a backup, fuel-powered generator still may be necessary. Engine-generators can be fueled with bio-diesel, petroleum diesel, gasoline, or propane, depending on the design. Most generators produce AC electricity that a battery charger (either standalone or incorporated into an inverter) converts to DC energy, which is stored in batteries . Like mos t internal combustion engines, generators tend to be loud and stinky, but a well-designed renewable energy system will require running them only 50 to 200 hours a year or less. Source: Solar Bridge Technologies

Backup Generator

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Exclusive Car Care - Article

By: Mohammad Shahzad S.A.E; D.M.P.

OIL.....The life blood of your engine! The importance of oil in the engine is just like blood in your body. Blood flows through all your veins to vital organs to keep them healthy and alive. Just imagine what would happen if you suffer very low blood pressure or heavy bleeding due to serious injury or accident that could jeopardize your health and life. Now consider the fact with your engine, the heart of your car. At 88 km/h, each piston in your engine moves up and d ow n 3 5 ti me s a s ec on d. T he combustion chamber can get as high as 2500°C with the bearing pressure exceeding over 1,000 PSI. Then think about the reality that the only thing that keeps your engine from self–destructing is a film of motor oil thinner than a page of newspaper. Remember that 93% of engine wear happens with each time you start your engine. Keeping your engine lubricated properly will help your engine run better with less emission and last longer.

What does oil do? Your engine oil plays an important role in keeping your car running smoothly.

It performs multi task and number of functions which are vital to the life and performance of your engine. First of all, it red uces frictio n an d w ear by lubricating internal moving parts, minimizing power loss. It helps in cooling by flowing between the parts carrying much of the destructive heat away. It prevents rust and corrosion of metal surfaces by enveloping the water and acid. It reduces emission, sludge, gunk and debris. It cleans by washing away abrasive materials from the friction surfaces. It seals by filling gaps between the moving parts such as the pistons, the rings, and the cylinders. It absorbs shocks between bearings and other parts, reducing engin e noise and extending engine operational life. It improves engine performance and fuel economy.

are moving inside, alongside, over or around other parts, and this movement produces friction and heat. That’s why lubricating oil is so important. Without oil, the moving parts would seize up and cease to function. Try a little experiment to see how this works. First, rub your dry hands together. Now put a little lotion over your hands. Rub them together and see how much more easily they move. The lotion acts as a lubricant film and makes your hands move easier this is similar to what oil does for your engine’s moving parts. Engine oil doesn’t wear out but it does become contaminated with carbon, mo ist ure, blow -by ga ses an d microscopic metallic girt. All of these harmful contaminates accumulate in the oil and it eventually clogs the oil passages and filter. High engine heat or under freezing temperature reduces oil effectiveness. Low sub zero temperature causes condensation and during cold start rich/unburned fuel ends up in the o il s u mp, th ereby re duc in g it s lubrication quality. Importance of engine oil filter is just like kidney in your

Why change oil and filter? The modern engine has many moving parts-hundreds of them- and the most common trait to those parts is that they

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Exclusive Car Care - Article When to change oil? There are many factors to be considered when changing the oil, such as time period, mileage, driving, road and weather conditions. Engine oil is just like all other chemicals with an expiry life period. If you have 2 bottles of milk in your refrigerator, one is fresh as 2 days old and other is 2 months old, milk in both bottles looks white and feels cold, but when you take a small sip you could feel the difference. body to cleans and filter your blood, similarly when you change oil and filter, you get rid of the contaminants, and the new oil has fresh performance additives for your engine’s protection. Make sure when change oil and filter also lubricate chassis, tie rods ends, ball joints, all doors, locks, hinges and top up all fluid level. It’s better to confirm all lights, clean or replace air filter, check all tires for leak or damage and adjust air pressure for your safe and economical motoring.

How to choose the right grade of oil? Selection of engine oil depends on many factors. Your car’s maintenance hand book is a right guide to select type and grade of oil recommended for your engine. There are two common types of engine oil in the market, conventional and synthetic. Conventional oil is natural base oil and most commonly used in the engines. The synthetic oil is specially formulated using non-petroleum oil, un-natural chemical based stocks-polyaphaolefin and esters. Synthetic oil has much better qu a l i t y co m p a r ed t o co m m o n conventional oil, such as fast flow for longer engine life, better fuel economy with less emission. However, synthetic oil is more costly than conventional oil. There are two main criteria of engine oil specifications, such as viscosity and performance grade. The thickness of oil, or its resistance flow, is called viscosity. The standard procedure, established by SAE the Society of Automotive Engineers USA, is the number oils according to viscosity and available in single SAE-30 or multi grades such as SAE 10W-30. Multi viscosity is a highly desirable characteristic, the lower the number as 10 thinner the oil, which will flow easily to reach engine’s moving parts quickly and this is also good for cold starting that’s why in SAE10W-30 the “W” stands for winter and as the engine gets hot the oil becomes thick as 30. The performance rating is classified by

API (American Petroleum Institute) this is labelled with a ser ies of letters indicates its classification as commercial coded by C mostly for diesel engines (API-CF) or S for service for petrol engine(API-SM). Selected oils carry both S grading and the C grading, indicating they are suitable for use in petrol and dies el eng in es, both service and commercial. Most passenger-car’s with diesel engine requires oil with both the S an d C gradin gs. You may find recommended oil grade number on the oil filler cap on your engine or in your car’s manual.

How to check engine oil level? The engine oil should be checked for leak and level more frequently especially with the high kilometres engines. Oil should be kept at the FULL mark on dipstick, although it is safe to drive when oil level is between FULL and ADD mark, do not drive at low or without oil. And do not wait until low oil pressure

warning light comes on the dash, which could be too late to save engine from destruction. First of all, make sure your car is on a level ground and engine has been shut off for at least few minutes. This will allows oil in various parts of the engine enough time to drain down in the sump. Now pull the dipstick out, wipe out and re insert. Pull again straight and check level, if it is low check for leak or excessive consumption and add as per recommended oil grade on filler cap or in your manual. Do not over fill, this may cause blue smoke, hard starting and could damage your engine. Oil should be kept at the FULL mark on dipstick, although it is safe to drive when oil level is between FULL and ADD mark, do not drive at low or without oil. And do not wait until oil warning light comes on the dash, which could be too late to save engine from destruction. If your oil light comes on while you’re driv in g , T his is th e au tomo tive equivalent of a 911 emergency, pull the vehicle off the road as quickly and as you safely can. A delayed reaction could kill your engine. Make sure to add enough oil before driving to a nearest dealer or auto shop for finding root cause such as leak or oil burning and get it fixed to reduce emission and save expensive engine.

Tissue Test Tips The color and texture of the oil can be an indicator of the engine’s internal health. Just like a doctor can tell a lot about your health by taking a blood sample test. Take a clean napkin, put a few drops of oil and watch its condition and spreading circle. If the oil is spreading smoothly, is clean and transparent, this is normal and most likely doesn’t require immediate changing. However, over the time the oil becomes black and thick. Now put the same napkin in front of your headlight with the high beams on, and see through it for black/dark, dirty, milky and metal particles in the oil. You can also use a small magnet to check for metal shavings and other debris which are often indicators of impending engine

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Automotive Sector - Update

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EDB to finalise proposals for budget The Engineering Development Board (EDB) has constituted six sectoral committees for examining budget proposals received from industry, trade bodies and business houses. The selected sectors are auto, steel, ch em ica l, elec tri ca l ma ch in ery , consumers electron ics and heavy engineering. The conveners of the committees have been selected from the industry, EDB announced here on Friday. The EDB has asked stakeholders to send their proposals regarding amendments in the Customs Act 1969, Sale Tax Act 1990 and Federal Excise Act 2005, the Schedule relating thereto and the notifica-tions issued there-under to their

respective sectoral committees by March 11 for evaluation. The committees have been assigned to redress the tariff and other related issues of the concerned local industry effecting their competitiveness, further expansion and entrance in the global market. The EDB has made it clear that proposals requiring administrative actions would not be entertained. Any proposal received after the deadline would not be considered and forwarded to FBR. Th e in itia tive h as been na m ed `co mpetitiv enes s a nd efficien cy improvement exercise` for achieving the objective of competitiveness and productivity...

internal problems. If you find any of these conditions - your engine might not last for long. See your dealer or repair shop for further inspection to avoid major repairs or breakdown. Spotting oil leak before gets worse Without a doubt, engine oil is the mostly likely fluid you’ll find underneath your engine especially from old high mileage car. Used oil is commonly light to dark brown or black in colour. Engine oil feels slippery and has a dirty burnt-rubber or slightly gassy smell. It soaks into concrete slowly and leaves a dark residue behind. Watch for oil leaks or stains periodically under the car on your driveway/parking spot. If there is a persistent oil leak that you are sure is coming from your engine, top up the oil level if it’s low before driving to dealer or repair shop for further inspection and get it fix before level goes down below the minimum mark to avoid serious engine damage.

life period. If you have 2 bottles of milk in your refrigerator, one is fresh as 2 days old and other is 2 months old, milk in both bottles looks white and feels cold, but when you take a small sip you could feel the difference. Over the period the oil additives depletes and loss its lubrication effectiveness. Therefore the quality of engine oil is depending on its useful life period. Another important factor is your travel mileage. Short trips combined with frequent idling for long periods of time, such as stop–and–go driving in heavy traffic adds more wear time to your engine. Remember, the travel kilometer on the odometer is only a reading of when your car is moving, not when your engine is running at idle. Therefore, an average of 25% of the odometer reading should be added to calculate actual kilometers for oil change interval due to prolong engine wear period, especially when driving in the congested city. For example, if you have 4,000 km on dash, your engine has 5,000 km and as your car ages; it n eeds more frequent lubrication service. Consequently, 5,000 km or 4 months (which ever comes first) is the best interval, it is better to be safer now, than sorry later! Check your car

When to change oil? There are many factors to be considered when changing the oil, such as time period, mileage, driving, road and weather conditions. Engine oil is just like all other chemicals with an expiry

Ban on CNG kits reduces car sales Sa le of v ehic les is d rop ped to considerable level after imposition of ban on import and installation of CNG kits. Representatives of Pak Suzuki, Indus Motor Company (IMC), Landi Renzo (LR), Tesla and BRC said OEMs and the C N G k i t m a n u fa c t u r e r s w er e confronting numerous problems after imposition of ban on Dec 15, 2011 by the government. During a meeting with Aziz Ahmad Bilour, Federal Secretary Ministry of I nd ust ries , Pa k Suzuki mem ber informed their company was badly affected by the decision and sales have plummeted. Similar, sentiments were expressed by IMC regarding substantial drop in sales of Toyota and Daih atsu bran ds. It was informed the saving of natural gas due to the imposition of ban was very insignificant, as this would only save 0.26 percent of total gas production annually. owner’s manual for details under severe drivin g con dition s mainten ance. The cheapest form of long mileage insurance you can buy for your engine is to use top quality, proper oil grade and to change it at the correct intervals for your driving. Regular en gine maintenance spares you the expense of avoidable major engine repairs, saves you money and adds more trouble-free years to your car with a peace-of-mind motoring. Have a safe driving… safety always starts with you!

This exclusive article on Tires has been written by Mohammad Shahzad S.A.E., D.M.P (Automotive E ngineer/ Doctor of Motors) He is a Senior Group Manager for Customer Management Operations with The Brimell Group, Brimell Toyota and Brimell Scion in Toronto, Canada. Free advice for Automark readers; please do not hesitate to contact him at shah@bri mellt oyota.com or magazine@automark.pk Next article: The cooling system…your engine’s life saver!

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by Shahzad Tabish

Motorcycle Sector - Exclusive Article

Discussing the Inevitable; Motorcycle Accidents The statistics indicated 19915 minor injuries, 3857 severe injuries & 505 fatalities in total. As we can observe that this survey was conducted in the year 2008 & since then we have seen a 43.7% growth in motorbike production, we can estimate ourselves the increment of injuries to the motorcyclists year by year till present.

Motorbikes have been an affordable & economical means of transportation since their introduction. Being unstable form of transportation, the safety concerns have been always been present. It is a well known fact that motorbike incidents produce far more casualty rate than four wheelers does. With the passage of time improvements have been made primarily to the rider’s attire in order to make him safe in case of accidents, however very little concern has been paid to the motorbike itself in order to make it safer for the people on board. Recently on a global platform motorbike manufacturing giants including Ducati, Kawasaki, KTM, Yamaha, Triumph, Honda, Harley Davidson etc. have joined hands to initiate innovations leading to make the motorbike a safer means of tr an s p or ta t ion . T he in n o v at in g contributions include the implemen tation of advanced ABS system that help to stop the motorbike very effectively while not compromising the ride stability ensuring the motorbike stay’s on two wheels. Fuel Tank mounted air bags as a passive safety feature for front on collisions, Xenon cornering Headlamps to improve night visibility at steep & sharp turns, Tire pressure monitoring elec tronic unit & Inter vehicle communication system (concept) are some of the major innovations considering the global arena.

In Pakistan due to the fact that mo torbike is t he m ean s of th e transportation of the masses so the price had to be kept affordable to attract the consumer, so the design parameters introduced were very simple & have remained more or less very same since the introduction of Honda CD70 in the 1970’s. In the era of early 2000 Chinese manufacturers eyeing the potential growth of demand in the local sector started to invest immensely in this sector & became the source of reducing the price of the locally available motorbike under various different brand names. The local economical financial inflation saw the increment of car prices & the oil crisis played a hand in hand role to make the car a dream for the lower middle & middle class of our society. Hence motorbike production has seen its peaking in the past 2-3 years as the basic source of transportation of masses. From the financial year 2008-2009 to the financial year 2010-2011, the motorbike production has seen a 43.7% growth with the production of 1,610,491 units only in the last year. In the year 2008 an overall survey was conducted by CDGK in collaboration with HEC, NED University & University of Mississippi along with some other medical institutes in order to estimate the severity of traffic accidents in Karachi. The results of the survey clearly indicated that the motorbike was the most hazardous of all the transportation mediums. The statistics indicated 19915 minor injuries, 3857 severe injuries & 505 fatalities in total. As we can observe that this survey was conducted in the year 2008 & since then we have seen a 43.7% growth in motorbike production, we can estimate ourselves the increment of injuries to the motorcyclists year by year till present. Even when the survey was conducted

back in the year 2008, the number of casualties & injuries suffered by motorcyclists were imm en se y et n o stern action w as take n b y the au t hori tie s t o prevent the injury to the rider. The rider very often neglects the preventive measures & the consequences are demonstrated in the rising fatality rates. The noticeable fact here resides in the ignorant behavior of the manufacturers as well. Locally now we have 66 different motorbike brands & none has yet made any attempt to increase the safety parameters of the motorbike itself, preventing the rider in case of a crash or in order to prevent the crash from happening. Concluding the discussion we have to admit the fact that the consumer of the motorbike is ind eed n ot a very financially stable individual, however human lives are not compromise able at any cost, so it is the motorcyclist’s responsibility to ensure that he keeps proper check of his motorbike’s health, rides safely & wears the protective gear including the Helmet in order to have a safer journey towards home where loved ones await. Cheers!

Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 43


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Press Release

Automotive Sector - Update

Pakistani Experts Join CBI conference Inspiration for Development Taking stock of what's been achieved and inspiring participants to surpass themselves in the future, that was the theme of the External Expert conference 'Inspiration for Development' held at CBI's The Hague offices on February 29. External Experts from Pakistan, Imtiaz Rastgar and Zaheeruddin Dar were among the invitees for this event. It started with inspiration, in the welcome given by CBI Man aging Director Hans Klunder. In his opening he presented the inspiring TEDx Amsterdam 2011 clip in which Hassina Sherjan, a participant in the CBI Export Coaching Programme for Home Textiles, talked about her inspiring story as a good example of 'people helping for a better future'. ( http://bit.ly/yWCETt ). Inspiring that's also how it ended, later in the day, with the concluding address of Deputy Managing Director and the day's mod era tor, Dick de Ma n. The conference was organised to bring together CBI's external experts and CBI programme managers and inspire. And it did, in more ways than one, as well over 145 experts from all corners of the world, descended on The Hague to ensure the day was a resounding success. Th re e k ey n ot es sp ea ke rs , ea ch innovative leaders in their respective fields, inspired and interacted with the audience. First, Ruud Lubbers, Prime Minister of the Netherlands between 1982 and 1994 and now Minister of State, Earth Charter Commissioner and founder of World Connectors, spoke of sustainable business on an ethical basis, which is more than markets only' and what he called the "joyful celebration of life". He mentioned five dimensions for de ve lop m en t : in t erd ep en de n ce, sustainability, coping with diversity and that development is the common cause of politicians, the business community & civil society. He added spirituality as the fifth dimension. Then Jane Hart, founder of one of the world's most visited learning websites, explained how modern technology and the Social Learning revolution is influencing, dictating even, how we now

learn from and communicate with one another. Finally, professional adventurer Marc Cornelissen recounted how his many expeditions, including to both poles under his own steam, have shown him first hand the damage we are doing to our world and emphasising the importance of CSR. Audience participation was ramped up considerably in the afternoon in five separate workshops. The themes were "Doing business responsibility or not at all", represented CBI's take on CSR. "A step forward in making CBI's knowledge transfer effective", highlighted social learning initiatives. "CBI's programmes and th e res ult ch ain", explored management for development results. "A peer group operation called the buyer's black box", stressed the importance of market intelligence. And in the worksh op "Private Sector Development 2.0 and CBI" the external experts participated in a roundtable discu ss ion on Priva te Secto r Development. The results of the five workshops, already processed and analysed, were presented by the workshop leaders during de Man's concluding address.

Looking back on the contribution of inspiring keynote speakers and the truly inspiring interaction, De Man appealed to the audien ce to s usta in this ins piration to meet the difficult challenges of everyday on the ground reality and to aim at a 'joyful celebration of work'. He emphasised that the value CBI offers to en t r ep r en eu r s a n d s u p p o rt institutions in the South by sharing our experience, concepts and knowledge and our bridge function with market mechan ism s in Europ e offers a substantial contribution to sustainable economic development. We are polar explorers in our own right. De Man also assured the audience of CBI external experts that his address was not the final word. Follow up and further dialogue on the day's theme and proceedings would be continued on LinkedIn (http://linkd.in/yjCxDy) , while a visual impression of the day would be available on Facebook (http://on.fb.me/xNnolc).

Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 44


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Car / Light Vehicle Price List

SUZUKI

HONDA

Model Model MEHRAN VX 800cc MEHRAN VX (CNG) 800cc MEHRAN VXR MEHRAN VXR (CNG) ALTO VXR ALTO VXR (CNG) SUZUKI SWIFT 1.3L DLX SUZUKI SWIFT 1.3L DX STD CULTUS Efi VXRI CULTUS Efi VXRI (CNG) LIANA 1.3L RXI MT PETROL LIANA 1.3L RXI MT (CNG) RAVI PICKUP ST308R VX RAVI PICKUP ST308R VX CNG BOLAN VAN VX Petrol BOLAN VAN VX CNG BOLAN VAN VXR PETROL BOLAN VAN VXR CNG SUZUKI VAN CARGO APV 1.5L JL SX MT (CBU) APV 1.5L JL DX MT (CBU) JIMNY JLX SX CBU (SN) JIMNY JLX DX CBU (SN)

Price Price Rs. 510,000 Rs. 576,000 Rs. 562,000 Rs. 625,000 Rs. 727,000 Rs. 796,000 Rs. 1,056,000 Rs. 1,156,000 Rs. 925,000 Rs. 990,000 Rs. 1,282,000 Rs. 1,351,000 Rs. 537,000 Rs. 606,000 Rs. 589,000 Rs. 660,000 Rs. 653,000 Rs. 721,000 Rs. 565,000 Rs. 1,999,000 Rs. 2,074,000 Rs. 1,974,000 Rs. 2,123,000

CHEVROLET Model CHEVROLET JOY CNG CHEVROLET JOY Petrol

Price Rs. 569,000 Rs. 539,000

Karakoram Motors Model Chery Standard Petrol Chery Standard CNG Chery Deluxe Petrol Chery Deluxe CNG Gonow Victor Gonow Troy Standard Gonow Troy Deluxe Gilgit (Double Cabin) Pet. Gilgit (Double Cabin) CNG Kaghan XL Petrol Kaghan XL CNG

Price Rs. 7,20,000 Rs. 7,70,000 Rs. 7,70,000 Rs. 8,20,000 Rs. 1,499,000 Rs. 9,99,000 Rs. 1,049,000 Rs. 3,85,000 Rs. 4,20,000 Rs. 1,285,000 Rs. 1,375,000

Model Honda CRV Automatic 2400cc Japan Honda Accord Automatic 2400cc Japan Honda City Manual 1300cc HYUNDAI Honda City Automatic 1300cc Honda Civic VTI Manual 1800cc Honda Civic VTI Manual SR (Oriel) Honda Civic VTI Prosmatec 1800cc Honda Civic VTI Prosmatec SR (Oriel)

Price Rs. 5,599,000 Rs. 6,467,000 Rs. 1,419,000 Rs. 1,560,000 Rs. 1,788,000 Rs. 1,980,000 Rs. 1,908,000 Rs. 2,058,000

TOYOTA COROLLA Model Model XLI VVT-i 1.3 M/T 1299cc Petrol GLI VVT-i 1.3 M/T 1299cc Petrol GLI VVT-i 1.6 A/T 1599cc Petrol XLI VVT-i 1299cc ECOTEC GLI VVT-i 1299cc ECOTEC 2.OD STD 2000cc 2.OD SALOON MT 2.OD SALOON SUNROOF ALTIS 1.6L Dual VVT-i MT ALTIS 1.6L Dual VVT-i MT SUNROOF ALTIS 1.6L Dual VVT-i AT Cruisetronic ALTIS 1.6L Dual VVT-i AT SUNROOF Toyota Avanza (Standard)

Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs.

Toyota Avanza (Up Specfication)

Rs. 2,160,000

Price Price 1,477,500 1,602,500 1,772,500 1,602,500 1,732,500 1,607,500 1,809,000 1,914,000 1,842,500 1,932,500 1,932,500 2,022,500 1,960,000

Hilux Pickup 4x sc Model

Price

Brand New Toyota Hilux Pickup, 4x2, Single Cabin, (Local Assembled)

Rs. 1,614,500

Hilux Pickup 4x4 D/C Model

Price

Toyota HILUX 2494cc, Diesel Turbo Charger Common Rail Engine, 4x4 Double Cabin - Standard Model

DAIHATSU Model CUORE CX std CX ECO (CNG) CX ECOMATIC Terios 4X2 lwb at Terios 4X4 lwb mt

Price Rs. 8,47,200 Rs. 8,97,200 Rs. 9,58,200 Rs. 2,770,000 Rs. 2,770,000

Rs. 2,489,000

LAND ROVER Model

Price

DEFENDER STATION WAGON 90 Rs. 3,560,000 STATION WAGON 110 Rs. 3,960,000 Soft Top 90 Rs. 3,336,000 Price updated February- 2012


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MADE MADEIN INPAKISTAN PAKISTANMOTORCYCLES MOTORCYCLES PRICE LIST LIST RETAIL PRICE

70cc Motorcycle

Sr./ Product & No. Model Name 1. Aan AI-70 2. Asia Hero AH-70 3. Bionic AS-70 4. Crown Lifan CRLF-70 5. Challenger BA-70 6. Diamond SD-70 7. Dhoom YD-70 8. Eagle DG-70 9. Ghani GI-70 10. Guangta GT-70 11. Grace CT-70 12. Hero RF-70 13. Hero RF-70 Plus 14. Habib HB-70 15. Honda CD-70 16. Hi-Speed SR-70 17. Jinan JN-70 18. Leader LD-70 19. King Hero KH-70 20. Moon Star MT-70 21. Master MD-70 22. Metro Hi-Tech MR-70 23. New Asia NA-70 Price updated Feb-2012

Retail Price Rs. 42,500/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 42,000/= Rs. 40,000/= Rs. 40,000/= Rs. 49,000/= Rs. 39,000/= Rs. 45,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 46,000/= Rs. 47,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 66,500/= Rs. 43,000/= Rs. 40,500/= Rs. 40,500/= Rs. 40,500/= Rs. 40,500/= Rs. 40,500/= Rs. 44,800/= Rs. 40,000/=

Sr./ No. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46.

Product & Model Name Pak Hero PH-70 Raftar KM-70 Ravi Premium R1 Ravi Hamsafar-70 Road Prince RP-70 Royal Star RS-70 Royal RL-70 Racer AS-70 Safari SD-70 Sakai SK-70 Star DL-70 Sohrab JS-70 Sonica SM-70 Super Asia SA-70 Super Star SS-70 Super Power SP-70 Super Power Delux Toyo TG-70 Target TT-70 Unique UD-70 Union Star US-70 United US-70 Zxmco ZX-70

Monthly Automark Magazine | March-2012 | Page 48

Retail Price Rs. 42,500/= Rs. 42,000/= Rs. 47,000/= Rs. 43,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 42,500/= Rs. 41,500/= Rs. 40,000/= Rs. 39,000/= Rs. 39,900/= Rs. 41,500/= Rs. 42,400/= Rs. 39,500/= Rs. 41,500/= Rs. 40,500/= Rs. 45,000/= Rs. 41,000/= Rs. 40,000/= Rs. 42,000/= Rs. 42,000/= Rs. 40,000/= Rs. 42,000/=


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Monthly Automark March 2012