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CLUP of Baguio City

I.

2012-2020

BRIEF PROFILE OF BAGUIO CITY A.

Brief History

During the Spanish Era, Benguet was not a remote area for the Spaniards to explore. The vastness and promising economic potential of the place lured the Spaniards to conduct series of expeditions. Early explorers included Juan Salcedo in 1572 and Don Q.M. Quirante in 1664. Series of attempts were made to pacify the "Igorots" but failed. Finally in 1846, Commandante de Galvey established his Commandancia at La Trinidad, Benguet (named after his wife). Galvey went to establish the province of Benguet with 31 rancherias. The first Kapitan of Benguet was Pulito of Kafagway, now Baguio, a minor rancheria of about 20 houses. The presidentia of Baguio was first established in the house of the Campulet at the top of the new Tabacalera road at the lower end of Guisad Valley. Later, the presidentia of Baguio was moved to the present site of the Baguio City Hall. The Spaniards were able to establish order, built churches and schools, made trails and introduced coffee during their long occupation of the area. The Americans came early in 1900 and established their government with Mr. H. Phelps Whitmarsh as the appointed Governor of Benguet and Baguio as the capital. This was the first provincial government to be established in the Philippines and this happened in a year prior to the inauguration of the civil government of the Philippines. Their best administrators and teachers were fervent boosters and promoters: Dean C. Worcester, Governor General Luke Wright, Cameron Forbes and others who together with Filipinos committed to make the place haven. Renowned architect and city planner Daniel H. Burnham, the top choice of both William H. Taft and Cameron Forbes together with his assistant Pierce Anderson arrived in the Philippines from San Francisco on October 13, 1904. A brief period of only nine (9) days for necessary field work, Burnham interviewed numerous government officials, studied available maps, hiked and rode horses to most parts of the Baguio reservation and was really impressed by the topographical layout of the proposed urban site and the spectacular scenery of the surrounding mountain area. During his trip back home to Chicago, Burnham was able to prepare a rough layout of Baguio called the “Plan of Baguio”, using his personal notes and materials provided by the insular government. This was presented to Secretary Taft on October 5, 1905, adopting the Garden City concept of city planning, a dominant and prevailing concept of urban development during the Beautiful City Movement era. Even with the evolution of the Baguio Plan by William E. Parsons, Warwick Greene and others who were responsible for actual layout and construction of streets, residences and public buildings, the Burnham Plan served as a powerful blueprint for the organization of space within Baguio City, and one of the pioneering endeavors in the country. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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CLUP of Baguio City

2012-2020

Beginning 1909, a government fleet of Stanley steam autos brought up more than 2,000 passengers a season. The city was well governed and well kept.

The mines near Baguio were developed and productive. Business in the city flourished with commercial centers put up. Recreation facilities were installed. The city was growing before the outbreak of the war. History will tell us that the war in the Philippines began and ended at Camp John Hay. During the early part of the Second World War, Baguio was among the first places to be attacked by the Japanese Imperial Army. Camp John Hay was bombed on the morning of December 8, 1941. The city government continued to function even after the evacuation of Camp John Hay by the US Army on December 23, 1941. Japanese civilians were interned in Camp John Hay. Not long afterwards, on December 27, 1941, the Japanese columns arrived on Naguilian Road. Baguio was then declared an open city under the leadership of the Chief of Police Keith. The occupation of the city by the Japanese is affected without the firing of a single shot. The first Headquarters was set up at the Japanese school on Trinidad Road, then at the Baguio Hotel, and later at the Masonic Temple. The Nippon forces immediately organized the military police administration and third degree chambers. They also converted Camp John Hay into their Garrison and a part of it was used as a concentration camp. Most of the people of Baguio took to the hills for survival. The guerilla movement figured prominently at this time. While the Japanese atrocities were mounting, the people’s hatred was steadily reaching its breaking point. In 1944, when the American Forces lead by Gen. Douglas MacArthur landed in Leyte, Gen. Yamashita moved his headquarters to Baguio. The puppet Philippine Government under Pres. Jose Laurel was also set up in the city. Finally on January 8, 1945, American and Filipino forces advanced toward Baguio to liberate it from the Japanese force. In the process, Baguio suffered intensive artillery shelling and aerial bombardment. The city was destroyed as the liberating forces were flushing out Gen. Yamashita and his army. Many of the residents of Baguio lost their homes and took shelter for about two months at the Baguio Cathedral. Since there was an acute food shortage, Yamashita eventually allowed thousands of Baguio residents to leave the city. The American forces advanced toward the city from the south by way of Kennon Road and also from the North West through Naguilian Road. There was intense fighting along their way. When the Japanese defensive positions started to fall, General Yamashita quickly retreated north from Baguio. However, he left a small delaying force to cover his withdrawal from the city.

VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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CLUP of Baguio City

2012-2020

Not aware of the withdrawal of the Japanese Forces and still expecting a counter attack, the Americans and Filipino soldiers waited several days before their final assault of Baguio that led to its total liberation on April 27, 1945. Somehow Gen. Yamashita and his 10,000-strong army made good their retreat from the city. It was about 5 months later that the Japanese lost the war in the Philippines. The Americans and Filipino soldiers pursued Gen. Yamashita and they captured him on September 2, 1945 in Kiangan, Ifugao. He was escorted by Col. F.M. Smith back to Baguio and on September 3, 1945 he signed the unconditional surrender of the Japanese army. The honorable surrender took place at the residence of the US ambassador at Camp John Hay. Upon their arrival at Camp John Hay, Major General Tomiyuki Yamashita and Vice Admiral Denhichi Okoochi handed over there samurai swords to Colonel George H. Bishop, G-2 of the armed forces in the western pacific (AFWESPAC). In equally fine fashion Colonel F.M. Smith, the commander of Camp John Hay honored the rank of his prisoner by billeting ten of the ranking officers at the High Commissioner’s Residence. When the surrendered ceremonies had ended the Japanese were escorted to the New Bilibid Prison, as prisoners of war (POWs). Baguio experienced a memorable event in its history when it was made the site of the final surrender of the Japanese Forces. Allied dignitaries, soldiers and Baguio residents held a Cañao to celebrate the liberation of the city. A liberation festival was even held in April 27, 1946 to show the gratitude that every peace loving citizen of this wonderful city feel. From the ruins of World War II, the city of Baguio steadily grew into the commercial, educational, and recreational center of the Cordilleras and northern Luzon. Although Baguio ceased to be the official summer capital in 1976, people still continued referring to it as the summer capital of the Philippines.

At exactly 4:26 p.m. on a Monday, 16 July 1990, that a killer earthquake unexpectedly hit and extensively devastated the City of Baguio. The powerful temblor measured 7.7 in the open-ended Richter scale and lasted for 45 seconds. It was said to be the most destructive earthquake on record within the Cordillera Region. There were numerous aftershocks that followed and the strongest, which occurred at 3:15 a.m. of July 18, lasted for eight seconds and measured 5.3 on the Ritcher Scale.

Baguio Cathedral

Nevada Hotel

Hyatt Hotel

Years after the great earthquake, Baguio City has recovered and is standing firm and proud for its restored heritage. Until today, Baguio City as the Summer Capital of the Philippines, is the most frequented destination in Northern Luzon by local and foreign tourists alike.

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CLUP of Baguio City

B.

2012-2020

HUMAN RESOURCE 1.

2.

Highlights of the Population Sector a.

Population will continue to increase at 2.36 percent for the next five (2015) to ten (2020) years.

b.

City’s population as of May 1, 2010 is 318,676, it represents 20 percent of CAR population.

c.

At its present rate, the population is expected to reach 334,562 in 2015 and double in thirty (30) years. Unemployment rate decreased from 10.1 to 6.3 percent.

d.

The Services sector continues to be the major employment generator in the City.

e.

Annual per capita poverty threshold for a family of 5 increased from Php 15,820.00 to Php 12,944.00.

f.

Baguio City’s population as of 2010 represents 20 percent of the Regional Population and 0.34 percent of the National Population.

g.

Baguio City had the highest density at 5,251 persons per square kilometer in 2010 which is 63 times that of the region.

h.

Baguio City has 129 barangays

i.

Of the total household population of Baguio City, there were 145,030 males and 153,497 females, which resulted to a sex ratio of 94 males for every 100 females. In 2000, the sex ratio was 97 males for every 100 females.

Population Size and Growth Rate

The City of Baguio registered a total population of 318,676 persons as of May 1, 2010. This registered an increase of 16,750 persons over the total population of 301,926 persons in August 1, 2007 as reference date, giving the city an annual population growth rate of 2.36 percent. The number of households rose to 87,501 or an increase of 14,933 households over the 2007 figure which is 72,568. The average household size decreased from 4.8 persons in 2000 to 4.1 persons in 2007. Table 1. POPULATION PROFILE 2007 – 2010, BAGUIO CITY CHARACTERISTIC Total Population (AC) 2007 and 2010 Growth Rate Household Population Percent of HH Population to Total Population Total Households Average Household Size Population Density (Density Per Hectare) Most Populated Barangays

DATA 301,926 318,676 2.36 298,527 98.87% 72,568 87,501 4.11 56.68 Irisan, Asin, Camp 7, Fairview and Loakan Proper

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CLUP of Baguio City Most Dense Barangays Young Population Structure – Percent below 30 years old Specific Age Group with largest proportion 15-19 years old 14 years old and below 15-49 years old (Reproductive Age Group) 65 and over (Elderly/Senior Citizens Group) 15-64 years old (Potential Labor Force) Not in the Labor Force (Participation Rate) Labor Force Participation Rate (%) Employment Rate Unemployment Rate Visible Underemployment Gender Distribution: Males Females Dominant Industries: Services Trade Construction Annual per capita poverty threshold (in Php) Mother Tongue: Ilocano Tagalog Pangasinense Ibaloi Bontok Ifugao

2012-2020

Kayang-Hilltop, City Camp Central and Brookspoint 64.39 % 13.37 % 28.67 % 59.87 % 3.18 % 68.13 % 35.67 % 64.32% 93.7 % 6.3% 3.1% 3.9% 48.58 % 51.42 % 60 % 14.49% 10.4 % 17,483.00 50.00% 22.74% 4.02% 3.44% 3.02% 1.60%

Baguio City is composed of 129 barangays. Barangay Irisan had the largest population with 24,064 persons or eight percent of the total population of the entire city. This was followed by barangay Asin Road with 3.7 percent and barangay Fairview Village with 3.0 percent. Baguio City is composed of 129 barangays. Barangay Irisan had the largest population with 24,064 persons or eight percent of the total population of the entire city. This was followed by barangay Asin Road with 3.7 percent and barangay Fairview Village with 3.0 percent.

Table 2. Labor Force Population by Employment Status, 1995 – 2007, Baguio City. PARTICULARS Population 15 years + In the Labor Force Labor Force Part'n. Rate Employment Rate Unemployment Rate Underemployment Rate Not in the Labor Force

1995 42,770 28,040 65.6 91.6 8.4 19.8 14,730

2000 48,076 30,908 64.3 89.9 10.1 19.9 17,167

2003

67.1 89.8 10.2 15.8

2007 58,663 37,736 63.2 93.7 6.3 18.1 20,928

G.R. 2.88 2.89 (0.24) 0.59 (6.52) (1.34) 2.87

Data Source: Labor Force Survey, NSO.

The employment rate in 2007 is 93.7 percent and unemployment is 6.3 percent. This indicates a fair performance in the employment sector.

Table 3. Labor Force Population Projection, 2008 - 2011 PARTICULARS Total Household Pop’n. Population 15 to 64 years old In the Labor Force Employed Unemployed Not in the Labor Force

2008 307,159 205,135 129,235 120,188 9,047 75,900

2009 316,041 206,879 130,333 121,209 9,124 76,546

2010 325,180 208,637 131,441 122,240 9,201 77,196

2011 334,583 210,411 132,577 123,296 9,281 77,834

Data Source: Labor Force Survey, NSO.

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Table 4. Average Family Income and Expenditure, 1991, 1994, 1997 and 2000. PARTICULARS TOTAL NUMBER OF FAMILIES Baguio City AVERAGE INCOME Baguio City AVERAGE EXPENDITURE Baguio City AVERAGE SAVINGS Baguio City

2000

1997

1994

1991

G.R

60,364

40,599

36,009

33,402

3.31

233,701

211,236

131,950

127,429

8.79

181,480

155,331

105,416

83,463

10.91

22.35

26.46

20.11

34.5

(4.33)

Data Source: National Statistics Office, 2000 Family Income & Expenditures Survey.

Table 5. Average Family Income and Expenditure by Income Class INCOME CLASS PER YEAR Under 10,000 10,000 to 19,999 20,000-29,999 30,000-39,999 40,000-49,999 50,000-59,999 60,000-79,999 80,000-99,999 100,000-149,999 150,000-249,999 250,000-499,999 500,000 & 0ver TOTAL

TOTAL FAMILIES 141 307 314 455 2,711 3,774 13,583 19,565 17,034 2,479 60,364 Average Percent

INCOME

EXPENDITURE 2,869 12,424 15,181 23,145 202,807 327,404 1,734,650 3,303,398 4,202,276 1,130,707 10,954,862 181,480 77.65

2,604 11,843 14,123 25,155 189,048 333,248 1,703,248 3,714,336 5,642,454 2,471,056 14,107,114 233,701

SAVINGS (265) (581) (1,058) 2,010 (13,759) 5,844 (31,402) 410,938 1,440,178 1,340,349 3,152,252 52,221 22.35

Data Source: National Statistics Office

By income class, majority or 32 percent of the families in the City had an average Php 233,701.00 income in 2000. Savings are only realized among the higher bracket incomes where they post 85 percent savings of their incomes while 22.7 percent of families incurred deficits in their income and expenditure patterns over the period. This of course arises from the fact that prices of goods and services are increasing rapidly compared to income derived from their sources.

Table 6. Population Per Barangay BARANGAY

2010 (ACTUAL) 318,676

Baguio City

2011 (PROJECTED) 321,129

986

929

Alfonso Tabora

1,462

1,371

Ambiong

2,477

2,546

A. Bonifacio-Caguioa-Rimando (ABCR)

1,226

1,205

Asin Road

11,454

11,502

Atok Trail

1,516

1,524

Aurora Hill Proper (Malvar -Sgt. Floresca)

819

837

Aurora Hill, North Central

472

486

Aurora Hill, South Central

1,142

1,120

515

495

10

7

Andres Bonifacio (Lower Bokawkan)

AZKCO Bagong Lipunan

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CLUP of Baguio City

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Bakakeng Central

7,695

8,168

Bakakeng North

8,542

8,907

660

642

Balsigan

2,547

2,569

Bayan Park East

1,151

1,185

848

841

Bayan Park West (Bayan Park)

1,763

1,799

BGH Compound

1,468

1,507

Brookside

1,965

1,965

Brookspoint

2,299

2,332

Cabinet Hill - Teacher's Camp

3,297

3,183

Camdas Subdivision

1,401

1,448

Camp 7

9,726

9,867

Camp 8

2,665

2,672

Camp Allen

2,196

2,204

Campo Filipino

1,738

1,748

City Camp Central

2,009

1,989

City Camp Proper

2,013

2,036

Country Club Village

1,972

1,979

Cresencia Village

1,504

1,463

Dagsian, Lower

1,159

1,152

Dagsian, Upper

637

646

Dizon Subdivision

1,770

1,832

Dominican-Mirador Hill

4,035

4,015

Dontogan

4,579

4,572

DPS Area

1,029

1,034

East Quirino Hill

3,020

3,035

Engineer's Hill

2,102

2,021

Fairview Village

7,409

7,193

Ferdinand (Happy Homes-Campo Sioco)

1,665

1,738

Fort del Pilar

3,331

3,261

Gabriela Silang

2,899

2,919

Gen. Emilio F. Aguinaldo (Quirino)

2,126

2,070

General Luna, Lower

673

664

General Luna, Upper

941

983

Gibraltar

7,066

7,204

Greenwater Village

1,728

1,720

Guisad Central

1,919

1,907

Guisad Surong

1,749

1,765

Happy Hollow

2,157

2,175

Happy Homes (Happy Homes-Lucban)

1,433

1,398

291

280

Hillside

1,539

1,514

Holy Ghost Extension

2,993

3,022

Holy Ghost Proper

2,046

2,028

Honeymoon (Honeymoon-Holyghost)

3,314

3,296

Imelda R. Marcos

1,022

1,016

Imelda Village

1,314

1,261

Bal- Marcoville

Bayan Park Village

Harrison-Claudio Carantes

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CLUP of Baguio City

2012-2020

28,357

29,026

Kabayanihan

141

150

Kagitingan

471

514

Kayang - Hilltop

1,136

1,132

Kayang Extension

1,222

1,188

Kias

5,247

5,234

968

958

Liwanag - Loakan

3316

3,470

Loakan - Apugan

2,599

2,705

Loakan Proper

9,158

9,319

Lopez Jaena

1,370

1,445

Lourdes Subdivision Extension

1,093

1,085

Lourdes Subdivision Lower

192

178

Lourdes Subdivision, Proper

788

750

Lualhati

984

1,003

Lucnab

1,866

1,954

Magsaysay Private Road

1,065

1,041

Magsaysay, Lower

528

502

Magsaysay, Upper

104

97

73

74

746

763

Market Subdivision Upper

1,035

1,011

Middle Quezon Hill Subdivision

3,388

3,364

Military Cut-off

1,786

1,886

Mines View Park

1,392

1,378

Modern Site, East

2,749

2,796

Modern Site, West

1,137

1,101

MRR-Queen of Peace

1,740

1,734

New Lucban

2,286

2,221

Outlook Drive

1,735

1,813

Pacdal

5,441

5,506

Padre Burgos

3,188

3,286

Padre Zamora

2,257

2,278

Palma-Urbano (Cariño-Palma)

1,144

1,136

402

384

Pinget

6,669

6,879

Pinsao Pilot Project

3,521

3,528

Pinsao Proper

5,257

5,346

Poliwes

3,658

3,892

676

699

Quezon Hill Proper

1,200

1,208

Quezon Hill, Upper

2,344

2,328

Quirino Hill, Lower

1,932

1,936

Quirino Hill, middle

2,544

2,585

Quirino Hill, West

1,740

1,744

Quirino Magsaysay-Upper

2,432

2,523

68

61

1,818

1,824

Irisan

Legarda-Burnham-Kisad

Malcolm Square-Perfecto (J. A. Santos) Manuel A. Roxas

Phil-Am

Pucsusan

Rizal Monument Area Rock Quarry , Upper

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Rock Quarry Lower

1,518

1,529

Rock Quarry Middle

1,251

1,230

Saint Joseph Village

3,785

3,804

Salud Mitra

1,065

1,022

San Antonio Village

1,401

1,383

San Luis Village

7,199

7,284

700

682

San Vicente

4,574

4,520

Sanitary Camp South

1,473

1,431

Sanitary Camp, north

2,668

2,768

Santa Escolastica

1,400

1,400

Santo Rosario

2,230

2,275

Santo Tomas proper

5,640

6,001

Santo Tomas School Area

1,109

1,162

Scout Barrio

1,276

1,267

San Roque Village

85

80

Slaughter House Area

2,249

2,340

SLU-SVP Housing Village

1,851

1,846

373

373

Teodora Alonzo

1,201

1,149

Trancoville

2,197

2,085

Victoria Village

2,984

3,079

Session Road Area

South Drive

Table 7. Poverty Indicators, Baguio City, 2000, 2003 and 2007. SOCIAL INDICATOR Incidence of Poor Families Monthly Per Capita Poverty Threshold

2007 8.2 17,483

2003 11.0 14,447

2000 13.4 17,453

GROWTH RATE (7.8) (98.9)

Data Source: NSCB

Based on the above table, the City has a total of 7,267 poor families. The situation presents a very significant reduction of 44 percent from its 13.4 percent level in 2000. Despite the economic global recession, there had been better opportunities for the marginal households in the City. The incidence of poor families in the City has improved considerably compared with the regional standing that was pegged at 51 percent in 2007 and 36.9 percent last year. The monthly per capita poverty threshold for a family of 4 increased from Php 14,447.00 in 2003 to Php 17,483.00 in 2007. Philhealth Para Sa Masa – A total of 5,095 benefitted the free Philhealth Para sa Masa with sponsorship of the City Government of Baguio; DSWD Central Office and DOH-CAR (4Ps beneficiaries and from the NHTS-PR Data) and from the PDAF of Hon. Bernardo M. Vergara.

C.

Major Industries

Baguio’s economy thrives on tertiary economic activities particularly dependent on commerce and services that equally support the growing tourism industry. These activities generate substantial income for the city from business taxes as well as employment. The latest recorded number of legitimate economic and business establishments is 12,137 in 2011. The three (3) most dominant economic activities are as follows, 6,755 are in the retail trade; followed by real estate lessor/boarding houses with 3,065 and 2,317 for services/contractors. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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D.

2012-2020

Small and Medium Scale Industries

There are also small and medium scale industries and various handicrafts in the city. These are distinctive crafts that provide economic opportunities for various ethnic groups. These indigenous products continue to lure tourists because of the superior craftsmanship and personal touch in production. Some of these crafts are wood-carving, basketry and textile weaving. Expansion of the medium scale production of other products as metal craft, particularly of brass and silver wares, garments’ production especially of knitted items, food processing that includes strawberries, peanuts, and pastry products. Ceramic making is also finding its niche in the city’s growing economy.

E.

Peace and Order

Table 8. Crime Statistics, 2010 and 2011 INDICATORS

2011 4,521 994 3,001 9 23 1,118 417 1,358 37 1,520 18.69 113.05 75.04

Crime Volume Number of Crimes Solved Number of Index Crimes Committed Murder Homicide Physical Injuries Robbery Theft Rape Number of Non-Index Crimes Committed Crime Solution Efficiency (%) Average Monthly Crime Rate Average Monthly Index Crime Rate

2010 4,883 777 3,162 7 25 1,409 452 1,200 41 1,721 15.91 125.15 81.04

% Change (7.41) 27.93 (5.09) 5.09 (28.57) (20.65) (7.74) 13.17 (9.76) (11.68) 2.78 (12.10) (6.00)

Data Source: Baguio City Police Office

The total Crime Volume for 2011 is 4,521 with a noticeable decrease of 362 incidents or 7.41%. Index Crimes has decrease by 161 or 5.09% from 3,162 to 3,001 while Non-index Crimes decrease by 201 or 11.68%. Among the Index Crimes, theft, physical injury and robbery are the most prevalent in the city, while murder and homicide are least. Average Monthly Crime Rate is 113.05%, Total Crime Solved Efficiency is 18.69% and Crime Cleared Efficiency is 27.93% With population expected to follow an upward trend, the need to intensify socio-economic mitigations to buffer the proportionate increase of the incidence of poor families in the City. Table 9. Comparative Vital Health Statistics, 2010 and 2011 INDICATORS BIRTHS DEATHS INFANT DEATHS FETAL DEATHS MATERNAL DEATHS NEONATAL DEATHS PERINATAL

2011 NUMBER 6,085 1,367 43 21 3 34 33

2010 R/1000 18.94 4.25 7.07 3.47 0.49 5.59 5.42

Number 7,413 1,337 81 19 3 58

R/1000 22.67 4.24 11.33 3.92 0.42 8.12

% Change (21.82) 2.19 (88.37) 9.52 (70.59)

Data Source: Health Services Office

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Figure 1. Population Density Map

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Figure 2. Barangay Boundary Map

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2012-2020

LOCATION AND LAND AREA 1.

Geographical Location, Boundaries and Land Area

Baguio City, approximately 250 kilometers north of Manila, is situated in the Province of Benguet. It has an area of 57.49 square kilometers enclosed in a perimeter of 30.6 kilometers. The developed portion of the city corresponds to a plateau that rises to an elevation of 1,400 meters. Most of it lies in the northern half of the city. The City is landlocked within the province of Benguet, thus bounding it on all sides by its different municipalities, on the North by the capital town of La Trinidad, on the East by Itogon and to the South and West by Tuba. With City Hall as reference point, it extends 8.2 kilometers from East to West and 7.2 kilometers from North to South. It has a perimeter of 30.98 kilometers. The City has twenty administrative districts among where its 128 barangays are divided. There are two great valleys found in the south and north of the city. The more famous GuisadLucban Valley has an elevation that ranges from 1,300 to 1,400 meters and is centrally located towards the north. The southern valley is composed of long and narrow vales surrounded by low hills and transected by a network of hills. Some of the more important vales are Camp 7, Loakan, Bakakeng and Crystal Cave. These valleys are arable as they are rich with alluvial deposits. The summits on the plateau offer panoramic views. The summits that face the west: Quezon Hill, Mirador-Dominican Hill and the Bureau of Animal Industry Stock Farm at Sto. Tomas offers splendid view of the Ilocos Coastal Plain, Lingayen Gulf and the South China Sea during cloudless days. Another famous promontory is Mines View Park which overlooks the mining towns of Itogon and offers a glimpse of the Amburayan Valley. All over the city, however are sporadically scattered steep hillsides and mountains. About half the area of the City has a slope of 25% or more.

Figure 3. Location Map of Baguio City

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2012-2020

Physical Infrastructure 1.

Road Network a.

Transportation

As a major urban center in the North, there must be a smooth flow of goods and people. Public transport is relatively convenient with at least seven (7) major bus companies operating in the city. These provide transport services mostly in Metro Manila, Ilocos Region, Cordilleras and Cagayan Valley to as far as Zambales and Quezon Province. Licensed public utility vehicles that operate specific intra municipality and intercity routes complement existing bus lines. Within the city, the usual route is from a specific neighborhood or Barangay to the Central Business District and vice versa. Out of town destination reach as far as La Trinidad and other adjoining towns of Itogon, Sablan, Tuba and Tublay all in Benguet. Minibuses have regular schedules mostly to Pangasinan, La Union and recently extending to as far as Ilocos and Abra provinces. Taxicabs and rent-a-car companies are also available. They provide a more convenient mode of transportation within and outside of the city. They offer various car types and models with competitive rates. As of year 2011, the city’s road system total 345.591 kilometers, of which 27.574 percent are classified as national roads and bridges, 41.292 percent are city roads and the remaining 31.134 percent are barangay roads.

Table 10. Road Network, 2011 TYPE OF PAVEMENT (in kilometers) TYPE OF ROAD

CONCRETE

ASPHALT

GRAVEL / EARTH

National/Bridge

TOTAL

PERCENT

95.292

27.574

142.703

41.292

City

82.704

59.999

Barangay

54.270

35.606

17.720

107.596

31.134

TOTAL

136.974

95.605

17.720

345.591

100.000

PERCENT

59.670

35.150

5.180

100.000

Data Source: City Engineer’s Office & DPWH – CAR/Baguio City District Engineering Office

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Figure 4. Road Network VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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CLUP of Baguio City

2.

2012-2020

Utilities a.

Power

Electricity, which is generated outside the city, is mainly distributed by the Benguet Electric Cooperative Inc. Power sources for the city comes from Sual and Ambuclao through the National Power Corporation and the Mini-Hydro at Asin. All the 128 barangays of the City are reached by the distribution system, although electricity is not yet available to some houses. According to the BENECO, there is enough supply of electricity for the city. Table 11. Electric Consumption in Kilo-Watt-Hour Used by Sector, Baguio City, 2006-2011 SECTOR

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

111,127,042

114,152,530

96,265,362

113,215,573 10,474,899

Residential Commercial

87,286,152 74,260,556

90,961,601 82,866,289

99,018,090 86,005,898

106,185,827 86,944,769

Public Building

11,261,210

10,993,486

29,682,402

27,142,480

3,292,794

5,461,574

5,039,259

5,525,903

829,120

866,200

1,242,880

1,251,562

26,996,313 Streetlights

5,823,655 5,744,606

Industrial

1,315,444 1,299,188

Military Hospital Barangay Power Association TOTAL

209,113 751,467 308,041

175,505 927,749 320,135

300,951

212,520

19,551

178,198,453

192,572,539

221,289.480

227,263,061

241,452,062

244,982,101

Data Source: Benguet Electric Cooperative, Inc.

Table 12. Number of Concessionaires Served, 2006-2011 TYPE Residential Commercial Public Building Streetlights Industrial Military Hospital Barangay Power Association (BAPA) TOTAL

2006 737,786 81,994 7,212 1,356 23 994 209 107

2007 766,767 81,143 7,772 1,636 24 938 236 108

2008 801,950 81,156 9,601 1,713 24

2009 815,083 80,486 8,873 1,857 34

2010 847,408 80,260 9,688 1,919 36

107

53

4

829,681

858,624

894,551

906,386

939,315

2011 893,089 80,512 9,244 2,112 36

984,993

Data Source: Benguet Electric Cooperative, Inc.

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b.

2012-2020

Water

The Baguio Water District, a quasi-government entity, administers the water supply system for the City of Baguio. BWD operates an extensive water production & distribution system consisting of 60 deep wells but with limited storage facilities. Owing to Baguio’s rugged topography, water distribution has been technically difficult and expensive. Table 13. Waterworks System, Baguio City, 2011 LOCATION OF WATER SOURCE Amparo Hts., Camp 7 Amparo Hts., Camp 7 Amparo Hts., Camp 7 Amparo Hts., Camp 7 Amparo Hts., Camp 7 Shangrila Subdivision, Asin Road Athletic Bowl, Burnham Athletic Bowl, Burnham

LOCATION (Pumps / Deepwell)

CAPACITY (LPS)

Amparo 1

BARANGAY SERVED

(GPM)

129.7

2,056

2.46

39

Amparo 2 Amparo 3 Amparo 4

Camp 7, Loakan-Apugan, Loakan -Liwanag, Loakan-Proper, Balsigan, BGH, Burnham-Legarda-Kisad, City Camp Central, City Camp Proper, Gen. Luna - Upper and Lower, Bayanihan (Gen. Luna), Magsaysay Private Road, Magsaysay - Upper, Malcolm SquarePerfecto, MRR- Queen of Peace, New Lucban (Upper), Palma-Urbano, Poliwes, Rizal Monument, Session Road, Teodora Alonzo, AZCKO

Amparo 5 Asin Shangrila

/

Athletic Bowl 1 Athletic Bowl 2

8.51

135

15.2

241

Shangrila

Harrison - Carantes, Magsaysay-Private Road, ABCR (A. Bonifacio, Caguioa, Rimando), BGH, Kisad

Camp 7

Camp 7-1

Camp 7

Camp 7-2

Camp 8

Camp 8

32.8

520

City Camp

6.43

102

City Camp Lagoon

7.76

123

Harrison Road, Patriotic

Harrison

4.79

76

Harrison - Carantes, Magsaysay-Private Road, ABCR (A. Bonifacio, Caguioa, Rimando)

Hilltop, Market

Hilltop

4.73

75

Hilltop, Private Road-Magsaysay, Kayang-Hilltop, Sto Nino Slaughter

Kisad

Kisad

8.83

140

For Water delivery fetching point

Lower Labsan

Labsan

4.16

66

Labsan Area

Kayang Street

Market 2

9.33

148

Milo Street, Camp 7

Milo

32.48

515

Queen of Peace

MRR

Market (Bagong Lipunan), Kayang Extension Camp 7, Loakan-Apugan, Loakan -Liwanag, Loakan-Proper, Balsigan, BGH, Burnham-Legarda-Kisad, City Camp Central, City Camp Proper, Gen. Luna - Upper and Lower, Bayanihan (Gen. Luna), Magsaysay Private Road, Magsaysay - Upper, Malcolm Square-Perfecto, MRRQueen of Peace, New Lucban (Upper), Palma-Urbano, Poliwes, Rizal Monument, Session Road, Teodora Alonzo, AZCKO, Lucnab Naguilian Road, Queen of Peace

P. Burgos Street

P Burgos 2

2.27

36

P. Burgos Area

Evangelista, Lower Q.M.

Q.M.

City Proper

Camp

City Lagoon

Camp

Camp 7, Loakan-Apugan, Loakan -Liwanag, Loakan-Proper, Balsigan, BGH, Burnham-Legarda-Kisad, City Camp Central, City Camp Proper, Gen. Luna - Upper and Lower, Bayanihan (Gen. Luna), Magsaysay Private Road, Magsaysay - Upper, Malcolm SquarePerfecto, MRR- Queen of Peace, New Lucban (Upper), Palma-Urbano, Poliwes, Rizal Monument, Session Road, Teodora Alonzo, AZCKO Dagsian-Lower, Dagsian-Upper, DPS Compound, Gabriela Silang, Greenwater Village Hillside, Marcoville, Military Cut-off, South Drive, Sta. Escolastica Asin, Lourdes Subdivision Extension, Lourdes Subdivision-Lower, Lourdes Subdivision-Proper, Dominican Hill, Mirador Hill, Rock Quarry-Middle, Queen of Angels / Apostle, Ferguson-Upper, Upper Naguilian

North Sanitary Camp

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CLUP of Baguio City Bakakeng, Site Bakakeng

Old

2012-2020

Bakakeng Central, Bakakeng Norte/Sur, SLU-SVP Housing Project, Campo Sioco, Legarda

Ramsey River Well

Lower Kitma

Rich View

Skating Rink, Burnham

Skating Rink 2

Busol, Ambiong

Ambiong 1

11.16

177

Busol, Ambiong

Ambiong 2

14.25

226

Busol, Ambiong

Ambiong 3

19.17

304

Busol, Ambiong

Ambiong 4

19.8

314

Pacdal

Amsing 1

Sanitary Camp Lower Quirino Hill Cabinet Hill

BSTP

3.15

50

Buyog

13.56

215

South Sanitary Camp Quirino Hill East, Quirino Hill Lower, Quirino Hill Middle, Quirino Hill West, Dizon Subdivision, Pinget Cabinet Hill

Brookside

CBL 2

10.09

160

Brookside, Imelda Village

CM Recto

16.9

268

Saint Joseph Village

Ferguson

Easter 2

14.82

235

Gen. Emilio, F. Aguinaldo, Guisad Central, Guisad Surong, Badihoy

Engineers Hill Evangelista Street Ferguson Road

Engineers Hill

10.47

166

Engineers Hill

Evangelista

2.83

45

North Sanitary Camp

Ferguson

4.73

75

Gen. Emilio, F. Aguinaldo, Guisad Central, Guisad Surong, Badihoy

Gibraltar Road

Gibraltar

4.1

65

Pacdal, Mines View, Lualhati, Gibraltar

Guisad Road Happy Glenn, Salud Mitra Honeymoon Road

Guisad

4.28

68

Gen. Emilio, F. Aguinaldo, Guisad Central, Guisad Surong, Badihoy

Happy Glen

10.53

167

Upper General Luna

Honeymoon

13.62

216

Holyghost Extension, Holyghost Proper, Honeymoon-Holyghost

Bakakeng Site

Old

35.32

560

Kitma, Crystal Cave Harrison - Carantes, Magsaysay-Private Road, ABCR (A. Bonifacio, Caguioa, Rimando) Ambiong, Aurora Hill North-Central, Aurora Hill South Central, Bayan Park-East Bayan Park, Bayan Park Village, Bayan Park-West Bayan, Brookside, Brookspoint, Lopez Jaena, Modern Site-East Modern Site, Modern Site-West Modern Site, San Antonio Village Siapno, Part of Navy Base

Cabinet

Ambiong

Idisan 2

4.16

66

M. Roxas Street

M. Roxas 1

23.34

370

Pacdal

Pacdal

7.88

125

Ambiong, Aurora Hill North-Central, Aurora Hill South Central, Bayan Park-East Bayan Park, Bayan Park Village, Bayan Park-West Bayan, Brookside, Brookspoint, Lopez Jaena, Modern Site-East Modern Site, Modern Site-West Modern Site, San Antonio Village Alfonso Tabora, New Lucban-Lower, Trancoville, Camdas Subdivision, Happy Homes-Old Lucban Pacdal, Mines View, Lualhati, Gibraltar

Tacay, Pinsao

Pinsao 1

12.49

198

Pinsao Pilot Project, Pinsao Proper

Tacay Road

Pinsao 2

10.59

168

Quezon Hill, Tam-awan, Upper San Carlos, Fairview, Victoria Village

Teachers Camp

Teachers Camp 2

17.28

274

Cabinet Teachers Camp, Outlook Drive, Country Club Village

Wright Pacdal

Wright Park

1.89

30

Pacdal, Mines View, Lualhati, Gibraltar

BGH Deepwell

5.36

85

BGH Area

Park,

BGH Compound Sofia de Veyra, corner Naguilian Road Bakakeng

Sofia Veyra

de

Quezon Hill, Sanggalang, 2nd Road Quezon Hill, Ponce Bakakeng Central, Bakakeng Norte/Sur, SLU-SVP Housing Project, Campo Sioco, Legarda

Lagman 1

18.67

296

Lagman 2

38.22

606

Dairy Farm

8.51

135

Marcos Highway

Pinesville

7.88

125

Pinesville

City Hall

City Hall DW

11.92

189

Cresencia Village

Naguilian Road

Irisan 1

37.09

588

San Carlos, Irisan Area, Asin Road, San Luis extension

Naguilian Road

Irisan 2

Bakakeng Dairy Farm, Sto Tomas Pinesville Subdivision

Data Source: Baguio Water District

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Table 14. Water Consumption (CU.M.), 2006-2011 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Residential A

TYPE

3,658,528

3,743,721

3,856,426

4,082,710

4,182,812

4,376,221

Residential B

1,560,413

1,504,275

1,516,442

1,425,976

1,403,719

1,424,309

Residential C

63,776

98,980

81,043

101,093

123,545

106,948

262,494

267,202

103,319

105,596

403,506

401,443

National Government City Government Commercial A

237,467

244,562

270,622

291,100

2011

Commercial B

91,914

89,091

84,859

100,005

1,349,695

1,368,290

Commercial C

446,815

460,129

471,557

430,721

17,967

18,018

1,409,217

1,463,278

1,518,165

1,404,626

4,392

3,901

8,137

18,911

17,278

14,318

69,653

58,283

5,095

4,988

5,203

4,930

56,456

56,915

Recovery

87,733

74,790

73,153

84,778

6,436

12,701

Flat Rate

21,176

23,738

61,032

57,205

Flushing

63,650

60,103

22,674

22,604

1,191

66

-

63,979

48,582

46,351

57,366

52,298

28,044

22,263

22,929

23,359

23,520

7,857,037

8,059,245

8,095,884

8,076,017

8,270,672

Wholesale Metered Deepwell Pinesville Fire Hydrants

EPZA Water Deliveries Water Hauling TOTAL

18,440

7,672,361

Data Source: Baguio Water District.

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Figure 5. Water Distribution

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CLUP of Baguio City

c.

2012-2020

Communication

Being an urban center and only City in the Cordillera, urban amenities continue to improve and flourish. Transportation and communication services in the city are extensive. State of the art communication facilities are now available that link the city locally and internationally. PLDT operates the major long distance facility while the PILTEL operates the citywide telephone system DIGITEL and SMART Communications have acquired franchises to operate in the city, thus increasing local telephone franchises to three. For telecommunication services, PT&T, RCPI, Telecom, Bayantel, Eastern Telecoms and Globe Mackay are present. The Postal Services Office provides postal services with its main located at the top of the Session Road eight (8) postal sub-stations located in various schools and other strategic areas of the city complement the services of the main Post Office. Services of JRS, FEDEX, LBC, etc. and other postal service delivery enterprises augment and facilitate postal services in the city. Telex, Fax, Radiotelephone, and internet services are new additions to the array of communication facilities in the city. Twelve (12) local newspapers are published in the city, which are circulated in the Cordillera areas & Regions I/II. National dailies and various magazines and gazettes are also available in the local newsstands and even in restaurants. They are classified in Table 17 below.

Table 15. Type of Print Media Available, 2011 PUBLICATION

FREQUENCY

CIRCULATION 17,000

AREA OF COVERAGE Cordillera Region

Baguio Midland Courier

Weekly

Baguio Sunstar Daily

Daily

8,000

Baguio Reporter

Weekly

4,500

Zigzag Weekly

Weekly

3,500

Baguio City, Benguet Baguio City, Benguet, Ifugao, Mt. Province Cordillera Region

Cordillera Today

Weekly

950

Northern Philippine Times

Weekly

12,000

Pulso ng Bayan

Weekly

1,000

Northern Dispatch (Nordis)

Weekly

1,500

High Plains Journal

Weekly

1,500

The Junction

Weekly

3,000

Midweek Northlandia

Weekly

Perlas ng Pilipinas

Weekly

PUBLISHER

EDITOR

Hamada Publishing Corporation Sunstar Baguio Inc.

Cecile Afable

Felix “Eliral” Refuerzo

Felix “Eliral” Refuerzo

Atty. Antonio Pekas

Atty. Antonio Pekas

Cordillera Region

Atty. Raul Molintas

Atty. Raul Molintas

Baguio City Cordillera Region Ilocos Prov. Cordillera Region, Regions 1 & 2 Cordillera Region Ilocos, Cagayan Valley Cordillera Region Ilocos Region Baguio City, La Trinidad Baguio City Benguet Baguio City Benguet

Alfred Dizon

Alfred Dizon

Sam Bautista

Pulso Publishing, Inc. Northern Media and Information Network

Elina Ramo

Junida Domingo

Victor Luacan

Farco Trimedia Ventures Inc. MPS Printing Press

Bing Diwang Caissa DomilesTimay

Perlas ng Pilipinas

Data Source: Public Information Office, Baguio City

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H.

2012-2020

Social Services Facilities / Utilities / Amenities 1.

Education a.

Situationer

Baguio City is the educational center of the North. Various schools in the City, both private and public, have always maintained giving quality standards of education among their pupils and students. Basic educational facilities, manpower, equipments and resources for all levels of learning are well provided thereby, making Baguio residents known for their high literacy.

b.

Formal Education

Baguio City has maintained a high simple literacy rate placed at Ninety Eight percent (98%). The majority of the populace attributes this laudable state of literacy rate in the City to easy access to educational services and facilities. The number of universities, colleges and other educational institutions in the city is worth mentioning. With its 45 public elementary schools, (that includes 5 primary schools) 3 public national high schools with 17 annexes, 77 private pre-school, 76 private elementary/primary schools, 54 private secondary schools, and 20 universities and colleges.

c.

Educational Facilities

Table 16. Number of Schools by Type and Level of Education, 2010 LEVEL

PUBLIC 35 45 9 main, 12 annexes 2 2** 105

Pre-elementary School Elementary Secondary Post-Secondary Tertiary/higher education Total

PRIVATE 77 76

TOTAL 112 121

54

75

15 20 242

17 22 347

Data Source: Division Office-DECS and CHED, 2010 ** - Include one SCU and one Military School

There are 347 educational institutions in all levels including their annexes in the City operated and run by both the government and the private sector. Most schools or 70 percent are owned by the private sector while 30 percent is by the government. Of the total educational institutions, 17 postsecondary facilities offer alternative courses and training to high school graduates other than the regular college degree courses. Seven of these schools offer contemporary curriculum on computer technology.

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2012-2020

Figure 6. Location Map of Elementary Schools VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

23


CLUP of Baguio City

2012-2020

Figure 7. Location Map of Secondary Schools VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

24


CLUP of Baguio City

2012-2020

Figure 8. Location Map of Tertiary Schools VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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CLUP of Baguio City

2.

2012-2020

Health Facilities

Baguio City has two government (DOH retained) hospitals and five private Table 17. Hospitals in Baguio City Hospitals Level hospitals. There are two level IV hospitals A. Government Hospitals namely, Baguio General Hospital and Baguio General Hospital and Medical Center 4 Medical Center (BGHMC), a government Fort Del Pilar Station Hospital(PMA) 2 hospital and the Saint Louis University (SLU) B. Private Hospitals - Hospital of the Sacred Heart, a private SLU-Hospital of the Sacred Heart 4 institution. The BGHMC is the only level IV Notre Dame de Chartres Hospital 3 government hospital in the CAR and serves Baguio Medical Center 2 as the end referral government in CAR. It Pines City Hospital 3 has a 400 bed capacity with a plan to Baguio-Filipino Chinese Gen. Hospital 2 become a 500 bed capacity hospital. The Roseville Rehabilitation Complex Company Special hospitals in Baguio do not only cater to the local population but also serve the provinces of CAR and nearby provinces of Region 1 and III. Considering the number of these hospitals operating in the city, the bed to population would be less than 1 bed to every 400 persons. However considering that these hospitals serve not only the Baguio city population, the very low bed to population ratio is irrelevant. Aside from the hospitals, there are a number of private medical clinics and dental clinics that provide services to the public. There are also three private diagnostic laboratories in addition to the hospital based laboratories serving the different clinics and hospitals. BGHMC has a bed occupancy rate of 95.21 percent in 2009 with the highest rate of 108 percent in 2004. The average percentage of patients based on the a six year data from 2004 to 2009 are a) charity patients 68.54 percent; b) Philhealth patients - 22.82 percent and b) paying patients- 8.64 percent. The implementation of the universal health care resulting to increased Philhealth enrolment and the implementation of the no balance billing in the hospital is expected to increase Philhealth patients and decrease charity patients as all indigents will then be Philhealth patients. Table 18. Occupancy Rate and Percentage by Type of Patients, 2004-2009, BGHMC, Baguio City Year Bed Occupancy rate Charity patients Medicare/Philhealth patients Pay patients

2004 108.14% 69.66% 21.20% 9.4%

2005 103.37% 70.74% 21.35% 7.91%

2006 83.04% 66.73% 23.89% 9.38%

2007 88.28% 69.20% 22.71% 8.08%

2008 94.20% 68.12% 22.51% 9.39%

2009 95.21% 66.78% 25.24% 7.98%

Baguio City has two government (DOH retained) hospitals and five private hospitals. There are two level IV hospitals namely, Baguio General Hospital and Medical Center (BGHMC), a government hospital and the Saint Louis University (SLU) - Hospital of the Sacred Heart, a private institution. The BGHMC is the only level IV government hospital in the CAR and serves as the end referral government in CAR. The City maintains a main health center, 16 Health Centers and 15 satellite clinics. The sizes of the catchment areas are relatively small and would not require barangay health stations as the health centers are very accessible physically. The catchment area per health center varies with the Atok trail having lowest catchment population of 10,680 and Lucban having the highest of 42,203. At an average, there is one health center for every 19,700 population. One medical officer takes charge of two health centers except for Asin, Irisan and Lucban with one medical officer each. Moreover, Baguio City has sixteen (16) Health Centers established in each of the sixteen health districts grouped according to geographical locations, servicing all the 128 Barangays. To augment the health services, fifteen (15) satellite clinics are strategically distributed in the City including the clinic at City Hall. The health services offered on weekly schedules of visit includes the following: Consultation, treatment and management of all illnesses; Prenatal/postnatal/neonatal,wellchildcare; Family planning services/counseling; Immunization with BCG, Hep B, OPV, DPT, Anti-measles, TT; Pap smear, gram stain, VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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CLUP of Baguio City

2012-2020

breast examination and other laboratory examinations; TB DOTS; Micronutrient supplementation (Vitamin A, Iron) ; Referral to clinics and hospitals. Baguio City also has eight (8) burial grounds, three (3) of which are government operated (Baguio City Cemetery, Bakakeng Norte/Sur Cemetery and Loakan Proper Cemetery). The other five (5) cemeteries belong to private sector (Baguio Memorial Park, Heaven’s Garden, Pyramid Memorial Park, Everlasting Memorial Park, Pinsao Proper Cemetery). Although Baguio City has no crematorium, some residents of Baguio are availing of the cremation services being offered by a private cemetery at Tuba municipality adjacent to Irisan Barangay.

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Figure 9. Location Map of Hospitals VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

28


CLUP of Baguio City

3.

2012-2020

Locations of Other Public Services Facilities a.

Government Offices/Agencies

Figure 10. Location Map of Government Offices VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

29


CLUP of Baguio City

b.

2012-2020

Churches

Figure 11. Location Map of Churches VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

30


CLUP of Baguio City

c.

2012-2020

Police Stations

Figure 12. Police Stations/Sub-Stations Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

31


CLUP of Baguio City

d.

2012-2020

TV Stations

Figure 13. TV Stations Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

32


CLUP of Baguio City

e.

2012-2020

Tourism

Figure 14. Tourism Map

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CLUP of Baguio City

f.

2012-2020

Communication Facilities

Figure 15. Communication Facility Map

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g.

2012-2020

Financial Institutions

There are 175 banks all located within the commercial zones and other financial institutions that cater to the need of both residents and tourists. Table 19. List of Banks Operating in Baguio City NAME OF BANK BANCO DE ORO

CENTENNIAL SAVINGS BANK COOPERATIVE BANK OF BENGUET PHILIPPINE POSTAL SAVINGS BANK RURAL BANK OF BAGUIO RURAL BANK OF ITOGON SECURITY BANK CORPORATION LAND BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

BPI FAMILY SAVINGS BANK BANCO BAKUN (SERVICE CENTER) BANKO SENTRAL NG PILIPINAS CHINA BANK (CHINA BANKING CORP) RANG-AY BANK RCBC SAVINGS BANK ROBINSON’S SAVINGS BANK RURAL BANK OF LINGAYEN, INC. RURAL BANK OF ROSALES (ROSBANK) UNION BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES METROPOLITAN BANK AND TRUST CO.

AMA RURAL BANK DIAMOND BANK DBP PRODUCERS BANK PHILIPPINE BUSINESS BANK VETERAN’S BANK PHILIPPINE NATIONAL BANK PHILIPPINE SAVINGS BANK PLANTERS DEVELOPMENT BANK EXPORT BANK UCPB SUMMIT BANK EAST WEST BANK ALLIED BANK BHF BANK

ADDRESS/ES ABANAO SQUARE F. YANDOC STREET SESSION ROAD SM CITY BAGUIO NARDAS BUILDING, UPPER SESSION ROAD LAKANDULA STREET POST OFFICE BUILDING, POST OFFICE LOOP 91 SESSION ROAD UNIVERSITY OF BAGUIO SQUARE ABANAO STREET 85 HARRISON ROAD BUILDING NAGUILIAN BRANCH, MARCONS BUILDING BURNHAM PARK HARRISON ROAD SESSION ROAD ABANAO STREET PERFECTO LEGARDA ROAD COOYEESAN MALCOLM SQUARE REYES BUILDING RCBC BUILDING, SESSION ROAD BONIFACIO STREET MAHARLIKA LIVELIHOOD CENTER RCBC BUILDING, SESSION ROAD JUNIPER BUILDING GAMAPHEL BUILDING, CALDERON STREET 1 HONEYMOON ROAD 603 CABINET HILL 26 A BONIFACIO STREET ANTIPOLO BUILDING ANNEX BURNHAM SUITES, KISAD ROAD MAGSAYSAY AVENUE BONIFACIO STREET PORTA VAGA COMMERCIAL BUILDING KISAD ROAD KAYANG STREET COR. ZANDUETA STREET DBP BUILDING, SESSION ROAD F. YANDOC STREET KISAD ROAD KISAD ROAD ABANAO STREET SESSION ROAD MALCOLM SQUARE SESSION ROAD SESSION ROAD CALDERON STREET HARRISON ROAD ABANAO STREET CENTER MALL- MAGSAYSAY BONIFACIO STREET VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Figure 16. Location Map of Banks VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Table 20. List of Pawnshops, Baguio City. NAME OF PAWNSHOP DEJON PAWNSHOP CORPORATION MC TAYAO PAWNSHOP CEBUANA LHUILLIER PAWNSHOP M LHUILLIER PAWNSHOP

ISLAND PHIL SANGLAAN PAWNSHOP ROYAL HOUSE JEWELRY AND PAWNSHOP BEST KNOWN PAWNSHOP VILLA RICA PAWNSHOP TABORA PAWNSHOP

ADDRESS/ES SESSION THEATRE BUILDING BAGUIO CENTERMALL 7 ABANAO STREET 45 ZANDUETA EXTENSION ADIVAY BUILDING CUESTA BUILDING PORTA VAGA COMMERCIAL BUILDING MABINI STREET MABINI STREET KAYANG STREET HILLTOP KAYANG STREET HILLTOP KAYANG STREET MABINI STREET

Baguio is also home to one of the country’s most profitable Philippine Economic Zone Authority areas (PEZA), called the Baguio City Economic Zone (BCEZ), located in the southern part of the city between the Camp John Hay leisure resort and the Philippine Military Academy. Firms located in the BCEZ mostly produce and export knitted clothing, transistors, small components for vehicles, electronics and other computer parts. Notable firms include Texas Instruments Philippines, MOOG and Sitel.

3.

WASTE MANAGEMENT a.

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 

The City of Baguio continues to provide solid waste management as a basic urban service. It is carried out by the Solid Waste Management Division of the General Services Office. The SWMD is composed of 161 warm bodies and divided into four sections.

The City Generates 288-300 tons/day

The City collects and hauls out on the average 160-220/TPD

Collection covers 127 of 128 barangays on a weekly basis. National Highways and the Institutional areas are served twice a week, while at the Central Business District and the City Market is done twice a day.

The system of collection is on designated curb sides and Barangay pick-up points.

Table 21. Solid Waste Generation by Source: 2007-2011 Item/Description Solid Waste Generation/capita/day (kg) Average Solid Waste Density/kgs/m3 Estimated Ave. MT collected/vehicle/day

2007 0.31-0.40 300

2008 0.32-.40 300

2009 0.39-.40 300

2010 0.39-0.40 300

2011 0.39-0.40 300

136.59

137.70

140.95

142.98

146.66

Data Source: CEPMO

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b.

2012-2020

LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT 

The City Sewerage System of Baguio is managed by the Wastewater, Water & Ambient Air Management Division (WAMD) of CEPMO. Its service is focused in the Central Business District (CBD) and the adjoining Barangays.

It covers a service area of about 65 out of 128 barangays of the city. Management is governed by the Sanitation Code of the Philippines (PD856), DENR Administrative Orders 34 & 35, the Clean Water Act (RA 9275), and the Plumbing Code (R.A. 137) , the Building Code (P.D 1096) and other relevant national laws and local ordinances.

As of 2011, sixty five (65) barangays are either fully or partially connected to the City’s sanitary sewer piping network. Most of the barangays connected are found in the central business district (CBD.)

Domestic wastewater collected through the sewage piping network is transported to the Baguio Sewage Treatment Plant (BSTP) for treatment. In 2011, an average of 10,809.43 cum/day of wastewater were received as influent to the BSTP, 126.63% more than the designed capacity of 8,600 cum/day.

Ten (10) barangays are either fully or partially served by nine (9) communal septic or Imhoff tanks.

Areas outside of the coverage areas of the BSTP or the communal waste water treatment system utilize onsite individual septic tank for treatment of their domestic sewage.

The City Government continues to bring the system closer to the prospective concessionaires by installing additional sewer lines and maintenance manholes. It also rehabilitate/improvement of pre-war sewer lines which are found serviceable and which can be interconnected to the new sewer network.

Table 22. Inflow, Outflow, Dry Sludge Volume and Power Consumption at BSTP (2007-2011) Parameters Average Inflow (cu. m/day) Inflow Rated Capacity (%)based on designed capacity of 8,600 cu. m/day Average Treated water (cu. m/d) Outflow Rated Capacity (%) Average BSTP Power Consumption(kwh/day)

2007 9,101

2008 9,878

2009 10,389

2010 12,434.2

2011 10,889.43

2010 vs. 2011 12.4 % decrease

106

115

121

144.58

9,065

9,689

10,214

12,189.34

10,709.22

12.1 % decrease

105

113

119

141.74

124.53

24.5 % over capacity

1,733

1,801

1,844

1,784.95

1,860.4

26.62 % over capacity

4

% increase

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I.

2012-2020

ECONOMIC 1.

2.

TRADE AND INDUSTRY a.

Statistics reveal that the trade sector in the City has become increasingly important to the city’s economy. There is an increasing trend toward commercial retail and the commercial sector’s growth is much faster compared to the other industrial sectors. Most of these enterprises are located within the Central Business District (CBD).

b.

Industry is of prime importance to a community in terms of employment, as a source of a variety of goods, services and revenue taxes.

c.

Baguio City is included in the Next Wave Cities in the Philippines as declared by the Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT) in 2010. It ranked number 9 among the preferred sites for Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) business. The City Government is pursuing its goal to entice leaders in the industry to situate in Baguio to generate employment for our graduates and opening up other business opportunities for local businessmen.

d.

As business operations continue to operate in competitive and borderless environments, demands continue to be high for ICT to support not only SMEs but also BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) services.

EXPORTS a.

The combined total exports for the past year amounted to $ 2.856B. Non-PEZA exports shared 0.28 percent and the remaining 99.72 percent were for PEZA exports.

Table 23. EXPORTS (in US $), 2007-2011 PARTICULARS PEZA NON-PEZA TOTAL Jobs Created

2007 3,373,489,081.86 26,478,000.00 3,399,967,081.86 8,972

2008 2,740,023,485.64 2,719,129,000.00 5,459,152,485.64 12,374

2009 2,856,150,730.42 1,431,950,000.00 3,297,011,730.42 11,466

2010 3,445,353,244.96 1,270,000,000.00 4,715,353,244.96 11,872

2011 2,833,843,495.01 1,658,066,000.00 4,491,909,495.01 9,498

b.

PEZA exports recorded an over-all increase of 4.23 percent or $2.856B compared to the previous year. The Electronics sector continuous to have the lion’s share in the value of its export products pegged at $ 2.736B for the period. This is explained by the expansion of production capacities of the companies located at the economic zone to address the demands of the global market. Machinery except electrical machines exported a total of $ 6.880M or 90.92 percent lower than last year, while wearing apparel exports also decreased by (18.85) percent or a total value of $9.303M.

c.

Non-PEZA exports posted an increase of 47.33 percent. This was attributed to the conduct of market matching and trade fairs focused on product design and quality control. Top exports identified were wood products, silver crafts and the traditional native cloths or apparels. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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d.

3.

2012-2020

There is a decrease of 7.33 percent in jobs created by the various industries currently operating, compared to the previous year while new registered investments reached Php 104,865 Million. Bulk of the new investments is from the transport sector and professional services including CPAs, doctors, real estate brokers.

TOURISM a.

Undoubtedly, Baguio City remains a prime tourist destination area in North Luzon. The City has accounted for almost 89 percent of tourist arrivals to the Cordillera Region since the region’s inception. Baguio City is also the gateway to other tourist destinations in the North. Almost always, tourists either come to the City only or pass through on their way to other places in the Cordillera. This highlights the strategic role that Baguio City plays in the region’s tourism industry.

b.

The cool climate and fresh green and peaceful environment, not elsewhere found in other tourist destinations in the Philippines and of which the city is noted for, makes it a favorite destination especially for those who would like to relax and stay away from the excessive heat of the lowlands. This is the strongest selling point of the city that makes it also the favorite venue of seminars and conferences.

c.

Aside from its climate and green environment, the City also boasts of tourist attractions which include historical landmarks, cultural heritages, natural, religious and man-made spots. Parks and gardens also abound in the City as shown in the tourism map. Most of these are developed and maintained by the City Government. The City also hosts events and festivals that continue to attract visitors to the City, most notably the annual Flower Festival or Panagbenga that is celebrated in February.

Table 24. Tourist Arrivals: Baguio City, 2007-2011 TYPE Domestic Foreign Balikbayan B.C. TOTAL % CHANGE TOURIST RECEIPTS

2007 750,237 34,810 9,501 794,548 11.96 4,965,925,000

2008 765,853 45,460 3,662 814,975 2.57 5,093,593,750

2009 729,429 32,385 8,373 770,187 (5.49) 4,813,668,750

2010 702,629 32,403 3,358 738,390 (4.30) 4,614,937,500

2011 523,116 25,106 4,275 552,497 33.64 3,453,106,250

Data Source: DOT-CAR.

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2012-2020

TOURIST DESTINATIONS

Aside from its climate and green environment, the city also boasts of tourist attractions which include historical land works, cultural heritages, natural, religious and man-made tourism spots. Parks and gardens are also abundant in the City which are developed and maintained by the City Government. The City oftentimes hosts events and festivals to attract visitors most notably, the annual Flower Festival or Panagbenga in February.

a. 

Historical

Marker of the Philippine Commission's First Session in Baguio - This marks the site of the building where the members of the Philippine Commission met from April 22 to June 11, 1904 and officially initiated the use of Baguio as the Philippine Summer Capital. The Baden Powell Hall was where the sessions were held The Commission was composed of Governor General Luke Wright, president, and Commissioners Henry Ide, Dan C. Worcester, T. Pardo de Tavera, Benito Legarda, Jose de Luzuriaga, James Smith and Cameron Forbes. To celebrate the 75th Anniversary of Baguio the marker was relocated, cleaned and properly identified as among the significant historical markers in the City.

Kennon Road and its builder - Named after Col. Lyman W. Kennon who was the final builder of the famous Benguet road, with the help of the industrious Cordilleras and foreign workers. Kennon road is the shortest and the most scenic highway linking Baguio and the lowlands. The Lion's head can be found along the way. Final construction of this road was finished in 1903. Col. L. Kennon first ascended to Baguio in 1905. Of the original workers, the Igorots and Japanese were admired for their trustworthiness and willingness to work. Kennon was closed to traffic after the July 16, 1990 earthquake. It is now open to light vehicles.

Diplomat Hotel on Dominican Hill - In May 1911, the councils of the Province of the Dominican Order voted to construct a vacation house in Baguio on a 17 hectare property they had acquired when the American authorities were encouraging people to come here. Actual work started in 1913 under Fr. Roque Ruano and the building was inaugurated on May 23, 1915. To take advantage of the tax exemptions a school called Collegio del Santissimo Rosario was opened in June 1915 but due to the very small enrollment the school closed in 1917, reverting the building to the original vacation house sanitarium. During WWII it was first occupied by refugees. Later the Japanese Army Liberation Forces had to bomb out the refugees from the buildings. The five direct hits left very extensive damage and for a time it was left unrepaired. Reconstruction was started in 1947 and completed in 1948 with most of its pre-war grandeur and beauty restored.

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In 1973, Diplomat Hotels, Inc. acquired ownership, remodeled the interior into a 33 bedroom hotel with modern facilities, but retained the unique and distinct personality of the Dominican Hill. In the 80's the hotel ceased operations due to the death of one of its majority stockholders. Plans are underway to develop this historical religious landmark into a tourist resort as a nature and heritage park. 

Philippine Military Academy - The Philippine Commission promulgated Act No. 175 which became the basis for the creation of the Philippine Constabulary in August 8, 1905. The school for the officers of the constabulary was first located in Sta. Lucia Barracks in Manila. Later in 1908, it was relocated in Baguio on the site known as Constabulary Hill later renamed Camp Henry T. Allen, in honor of the first chief of the Philippine Constabulary. With the passage of the Jones Law, the school was later changed to "Academy for officers of the Philippine Constabulary" with a two-year curriculum. In 1908, the course was raised to collegiate level and later lengthened to three years with class 1938 as having the least graduates of that course. When the commonwealth government was established in 1935, the Philippine Military Academy was created in place of the Philippine Constabulary Academy. Under the National Defense Act, the PMA was authorized to maintain a cadet strength of 350. Because of increased population, the academy transferred to Teachers Camp in June 1936 where it remained until WWII broke out. After the war the PMA headquarters was temporarily relocated at Camp Murphy and later at Alabang, while Camp Allen was being rehabilitated. In April 1947 the PMA was back to its original home in Camp Allen. Again they had to transfer to Loakan because of overcrowding. Since May 1950 the Philippine Military Academy has found its permanent home at Fort del Pilar, Loakan, Baguio City.

The Presidential Mansion – The Philippine President’s summer residence. This imposing and majestic Baguio mansion house has a long list of Filipino presidents and American governor-generals. It has an elegantly structured building and guesthouse. Its gate is patterned after that of London's Buckingham Palace. The Mansion has also been the site of several international conferences and a working office of the President of the Philippines during visits to the City.

Camp John Hay - Camp John Hay used to be the rest and recreational facility for employees of the military and Department of Defense of the United States. This 690hectare property was turned over to the Philippine government in July 1, 1991 and was initially administered by the Philippine Tourism Authority and then turned over to the Bases Conversion Development. The facility, which was named after U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt's secretary of war, was used by the Japanese as a concentration camp for American and British soldiers during the war. Its name was changed to Club John Hay after it was turned over to the Philippine government. For the first time in its history the facility was open to the public in 1991 and VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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converted into a recreational complex. It used to be off-limits to Filipinos, except for the privileged few who could get entry passes from its former American administrators. 

Teachers Camp - It was through the vacation normal school which began in Teacher's Camp 1908, that not only teachers from all over the islands were able to have a respite and some more time for studies, but the city became nationally popularized. In a letter to the Secretary of Public Instruction, Governor William Pack outlines his plan to set up a camp in Baguio where teachers can be accommodated. The plan was approved on January 8, 1908 and the camp was opened on April 6, 1908. For a start, four assembly tents were put up for kitchen, dining and storage purposes and two other large tents were set aside for class purposes. Later on, the "KURSAAK" was constructed in 1909 as a permanent structure and took over the functions of the mess tent, aside from being the social center for assemblies. The next year, other buildings were added, the road traversing the vast hectarage leveled and the athletic field out in its hollow. In 1912, Benitez Hall , Ladies Hall, the Secretary's Cottage, the Under-Secretary's Cottage the Director and the Assistant's Cottages were built. Several more appropriations were passed to construct the Teacher's Hall, the Tavera Hall and the White Hall in 1927. In 1937, General Luna Hall was built by the Philippine Military Academy. It now caters to conferences, meetings seminars and social functions sponsored by the government sector.

b.

CULTURAL / HISTORICAL

Easter Weaving Room - This school was built in 1905 under Samuel Drury with funds donated by Bishop Brent of the Episcopalian Church of the Philippines. It opened in 1906 as a church school with "eight homesick malaria-infested Igorot students" one of whom was the famous Dr. Hilary Clapp. In 1909 Deaconess Hargreaves admitted girls but it was during the administration of Dr. Benjamin Platt that Easter School Weaving Room was started as industrial work in the curriculum. By 1924 there were five buildings and in 1928 they inaugurated the Chapel of the Holy Innocents. Before World War II the Easter School Compound which had nine buildings were razed to the ground by the American Liberation Forces. With only the headquarters and the Nurses cottages standing, then rehabilitation started to complete the compound as it is now. It is the right place to visit for those who are interested in native fabrics and other handicrafts. Her one can witness the actual process of cloth weaving as practiced by the natives of the mountain provinces for ages. The basic material for woven products can be bought in an adjunct of the Easter School established in 1908 by the Philippine Episcopalian Church.

Ibay’s Silver Shop - A handicraft shop specializing in silver jewelry and other filigree products.

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Baguio Tourism Complex - Within the complex along Gov. Pack Road are the Baguio Sunshine Park, the Regional Office of the Department of Tourism and Secretary's guest house. The Sunshine Park features flowering gardens piped in music and covered stage with ethnic designs which is often used for cultural presentations. The park itself is designed after a shield.

Baguio Convention Center - Situated across the University of the Philippines exudes an ethnic flavor, considered the most modern and spacious edifice North of Manila, the BCC initially gained prominence when it became the site of 1978 internationally renowned chess championship series between Anatoly Karpov and Victor Korchnoi. It was inaugurated by former Pres. Ferdinand Marcos on July 7, 1978 during the opening of the series. It continues to cater to conferences, conventions, meetings and other social functions in the City.

Educational Institutions - There are six (6) colleges and universities in Baguio. These are the University of the Philippines College, University of Baguio, Saint Louis University, University of the Cordilleras (Baguio Colleges Foundation), Baguio Central University and Brent International School.

SLU Museum - Located in the premise of the school (SLU), it showcases the different culture heritages of the Cordilleras and some lowland amenities. Artifacts and relics including an ancient coffin can be seen on display. A curator is always stationed for the convenience of visitors to explain the artifacts and the culture of the Cordilleras.

Ifugao Woodcarvers Village - Along the way to Asin, about 5 kms. From the city, is an Ifugao wood carving village which produces and sells beautiful hand-carved items at very low prices.

Maryknoll Ecological Sanctuary - The devastation wrought by the July 1990 earthquake in Baguio City became a discerning force which inspired a new educational role. In the light of a growing awareness of the earth's fragility, the Maryknoll Sisters were compelled to make decision to dedicate their resources in Baguio into an alternative environmental education. With this new mission defined, the rebuilding of Maryknoll commenced a year after the earthquake. The "Cosmic Journey" became the major undertaking within the Maryknoll Ecological Sanctuary. Described as "a nature walk of play and discovery into the earth's deep interconnectedness." There are fourteen different stations created to portray "the magnificence of the unfolding of the cosmos." The 1st station is about the coming into being of the Universe. The 5th and 8th stations portray the arrival of the mammals and the coming forth of the primates, respectively. The last two stations portray the Earth's religious tradition and a Bioshelter.

The Tam-Awan Village - A number of Igorot huts within the village which will allow you to see how the homes of the mountain people really look like. You do get a chance to climb up the wooden ladder and see what is inside each hut. This will give you a feel what it is like to be living in one of these huts. Since these huts were set up on different locations on a hillside, visitors have to climb up the steep pathways to go from one hut to another. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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The Aguinaldo Museum - This museum was erected to house personal memorabilia of Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo which include the different uniforms and barong tagalogs he once wore, his photographs and those of his family, a work desk, and the wheelchair which he used when he was confined at the Veterans Memorial Hospital. Also on display is a three-dimensional miniature scene depicting his inauguration as president and a replica of the Philippine flag which was originally designed by the general with revolutionary words embroidered on it. Gen. Aguinaldo, the first elected president of the Provisional Philippine Republic, is best remembered for the proclamation of Philippine independence from Spain on June 12, 1898 in Kawit, Cavite. It was on this day that a huge crowd gathered around Aguinaldo's mansion in Kawit. On the balcony of his home Aguinaldo had the decree of independence read by Ambrosio R. Bautista, an older and respected leader of the revolution.

c.

NATURAL

Asin Hot Spring - Located 16 kilometers northwest of Baguio. The resort's main feature is a swimming pool surrounded by thermal springs, lush vegetation and several hanging bridges. It is an ideal respite. This is now eyed to be redeveloped into a Tourism resort along with the adjoining tourist attractions of Tuba and Baguio.

Mt. Sto. Tomas - A trek up to the Mount Sto. Tomas is a hiker’s delight. The peak is 7,500 feet high and commands a majestic view mountain sea and valley. The mountain can be reached by foot or by vehicle.

b.

RELIGIOUS

Baguio is an ideal location for meditation, contemplation and spiritual renewal hence the existence of no less religious denominations that run churches, seminaries, convents and other institutions such as hospitals and schools. 

Lourdes Grotto - This is religious shrine housing the image of the Lady of Lourdes. About 252 steps lead to this shrine where pilgrims brave the steep climb to offer sacrifices, devotions and prayers. One is also regarded with a beautiful panoramic view of the city.

Baguio Cathedral - One of the familiar landmarks in Baguio. The structure with its twin spires and one hundred steps sits on top of a hill in the heart of the city, offering church goers and visitors a chance to get a bird’s eye view of the entire commercial hub. It was opened to the public last November 25, 1990 during the Christ the King celebration.

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Bell Church - This cluster of temples is located on the border of Baguio City and Trinidad Valley. Its exotic oriental architecture, pagoda roof, ornate gateway, dragon ornaments and Buddha guarded windows gaze from atop a hill. The Bell Temple priest practices mixture of Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Christianity. One may even try having his fortune told.

c. 

2012-2020

MAN-MADE

Burnham Park - It is the oldest of all Baguio Parks. One can unwind from the tension of the day-to-day bustle of biking, skating or simply reflecting on the day's experiences amid a soothing garden backdrop of colorful flowers. It is thickly wooded and is a great place to have picnics and concerts. There are tennis and basketball courts, athletic oval and an orchidarium.

Botanical Garden - It is also called the Imelda Park which features an Igorot village showing native huts typical of Cordillera architecture. This village within a village captures the ethnic spirit and cultural legacy of the Igorot dweller.

Mines View Park - Appropriately named for its breathtaking view of mountain ranges and Baguio's "mineral bowl" where gold, silver and other curio items.

Wright Park - It is sometimes mistakenly called "Ride Park" by some who identify this pine tree park reserve for its kiddy horse rides. A long stairway leads to the "Pool of the Pines", a 100 meter long pool of water lined on both sides by the famous Baguio towering pine.

Baguio Country Club - This club was organized with funds which were privately contributed. They built tennis courts and cottages. Today Baguio Country Club has 182 guest rooms and suites in a new building. It also boasts a beautiful 18-hole golf course for its members and guests.

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Session Road / Market - The first Commissioner came to Baguio on horses from Bauang up to a place which is now called Sablan. With their horses they went down the mountain trails to the valley of Trinidad and to Baguio. In Baguio City teetered their horses at the water trough which is still intact at its original site until 1984 when it was demolished to give way to the Diamond (75th) Jubilee marker right in the confluence of Session Road and the roads going to Pines Hotel, YMCA and Teachers Camp. During the early years of Baguio, Session Road was occupied by buildings only on the left side opposite the hill on which the church was built. The lowest portion of the road was crossed by a big stream spanned by wooden bridge. Beyond this bridge was the swampland where bull carts parked and congregated thereby starting what is now called the market. Many of the open air stalls spreads out towards Lucban following the banks of the steam and thus determined the direction of the market expansion.

Pine Trees of the World Park - This Park is a collection of several varieties of pine tree species from all over the world. A ceremonial planting was done on July 22, 1997 with the President, Fidel V. Ramos and Ambassadors of donor countries planting pine trees themselves. This park is a recreational area and is conceived to become a research center for pine tree study in Asia. This encompasses the Tower of Peace monument which was build by the Lionism Movement which was dedicated for world peace and understanding.

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J.

2012-2020

Summary of the City’s Annual Budget from 2007-2011 1.

CITY INCOME

Income generation by the City comes tax and non-tax revenues and the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) coming from the national government. Over the Five year period as reflected in the table below, the city income increased by an average 5.35 percent annually. There was a decrease of Php 37,777,857.30 in 2008 compared to 2007 budget and the highest increase in the budget was in 2007 which amounted to Php 116,563,060.27.

Table 25. Local Government Income, 2007-2011 PARTICULARS INTERNAL REVENUE ALLOTMENT TAX AND NON TAX REVENUE TOTAL

2007 302,118,408.00

2008 323,315,956.00

2009 400,662,435.00

2010 432,501,513.00

2011 463,924,274.00

588,901,628.81

532,321,006.16

519,451,118.77

557,730,264.65

623,461,835.23

893,327,097.81

855,682,887.16

920,113,553.77

990,231,777.65

1,087,386,109.23

DATA SOURCE: Accounting Office and Treasury Office

The Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) of the City Government increased by an average of 7.40 percent annually. There was a decreased in 2008 while the rest have an average increase of 10 percent annually.

Figure 17. Local Government Income, 2007-2011

Table 26. TAX AND NON TAX REVENUE, 2007-2011 PARTICULARS Local Taxes Permits and Licenses Service Income Business Income Gain/Loss Accounts TOTAL

2007 269,739,782.96 15,055,278.62

2008 267,896,841.78 14,879,931.53

2009 284,640,434.16 16,031,399.99

2010 304,850,924.38 17,314,198.76

2011 318,144,719.90 17,003,780.98

36,854,751.53 267,403,382.31 (151,566.61)

39,637,898.37 210,154,395.67 (248,061.19)

38,444,887.93 180,295,535.69 38,861.00

41,878,031.27 193,913,523.21 (226,412.97)

45,384,886.89 242,954,559.46 (26,112.00)

588,901,628.81

532,321,006.16

519,451,118.77

557,730,264.65

623,461,835.23

DATA SOURCE: Accounting Office and Treasury Office

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Figure 18. Tax and Non-Tax Revenue, 2007-2011

The high collection efficiency can be attributed to the Social Marketing Strategy adopted by the City, where taxpayers are provided incentives when they pay their taxes early and on a regular basis.

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II.

2012-2020

Baguio City’s Existing Land Use

Residential area (59.10 percent) occupies the largest land use and is therefore the most dominant among all the urban uses. A very common residential design is the single detached dwelling rather than multi-level housing which is widespread in mountain cities like Hong Kong. The preference towards single detached housing is probably attributed more to culture and affordability rather than on the City’s vulnerability to disasters like earthquakes and landslides. The rapid growth in the construction of residential units all over the City resulted from the influx of migrants from nearby provinces that began in the early 1960s and is true until today. The need to provide affordable shelter for students coming from nearby provinces to avail of the City’s tertiary education services is also another reason for the sudden rise in housing requirements in the City. Commercial areas occupy some 258.03 has. or approximately 4.49 percent of the City’s total land area. These are found mostly at the Central Business District and along major thorough fares in the City like Magsaysay Avenue, Bokawkan Road, Naguilian Road, Marcos Highway and Kennon Road. Recently however, some residential areas along inner city roads have gradually converted into commercial areas. Situations like these can be readily observed along Bonifacio Street, Rimando Road, Trancoville and others. Various private and public institutions operating in the City take up some 416.27 has. (7.24 percent). These institutions include schools, hospitals, churches, military reservations, and government facilities. Among the military reservations are the Philippine Military Academy, Navy Base and Camp Allen. Moreover, national government occupies a wide tract of land along Engineer’s Hill and Cabinet Hill. Inside these areas are the staff houses of the Department of Labor, Department of Tourism, Department of Budget and Management, Department of Justice and others. Industrial area takes up a small portion of the City’s land at only 42.86 has. or 0.75 percent. Although insubstantial when compared with other land uses, over the past three decades, manufacturing tops the City’s economic drivers, much more than services, retail or trade. The Philippine Export Zone Authority in Loakan is the largest industrial estate in the Baguio and is home to multinational companies like Texas Instruments, Moog Controls Corporation and others. With its current urban form, it can be said that Baguio plays the major role of a residential town serving the purposes of its other important functions as education center in the north, premier tourist destination, regional government center, trade and commercial hub as well as regional industrial center. Given the City’s limited space for expansion, key interventions for providing adequate and affordable housing, infrastructure services and for improving its current state of environmental degradation must be explored. Housing alternatives such as multi-level development, resettlement plans for informal settlers, rehabilitation of forest and watersheds and forging inter-local cooperation among the BLISTT LGUs for the provision of utilities and infrastructure are among the key measures that the City might want to consider for the pursuit of a progressive economy that also ensures sustainability.

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Table 27. Existing Land Use Categories Land Uses Residential

Class

Existing Land Area

Percent to Total Area

R1

1,727.71

30.05

R2

552.56

9.61

R3

1,117.19

19.43

C1

127.92

2.22

C2

76.92

1.34

C3

53.19

0.92

42.86

0.75

416.27

7.24

70.68

1.23

521.23

9.07

94.13

1.64

Vacant Forested Area

599.39

10.43

John Hay Special Economic Zone

288.10

5.01

Abattoir

4.43

0.08

Cemetery

12.78

0.22

Airport

27.90

0.49

Utility

15.74

0.27

5,749.00

100.00

Commercial

Industrial Institutional Parks Forest/Watershed Reserves BAI Reservation

Total

Because of the high demand for housing, some high density residential areas are congested and are not in their good condition especially those at the central and northern parts of the City. Housing has also expanded towards protected areas, encroaching on watersheds and forest reservations, with the forest cover currently in a state of rapid decline thus threatening the City’s water supply sources, natural landscape and beauty. Moreover, the high population growth rate has also resulted in water shortage, traffic congestion, environmental degradation and has raised capacity concerns for solid waste, sewerage and other infrastructure facilities. Table 38 lists the forest and watershed reservations in the City. Most of these reservations are already encroached upon by settlers. Though already dwindling, pockets of pine forested areas remain visible in the City’s landscape. The remaining forested area accounts for about 19.49 percent of the total land area. Pine forests are found mostly at the outskirts of the City, close to the City boundary.

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Figure 19. Existing Land Use Map

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Figure 20. Existing Land Use (Satellite Image)

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 Watershed Reservations/Protected Areas: The urban forest is another critical means of preserving and protecting the natural environment and, in particular, helping to improve the air quality and supply of water in the city. These are mostly found within forest/watershed reservations. Aside from this, planting and growing of trees along streets and roadways, as well as on private lands is encouraged. All forest/watershed reserves will be maintained. Forest reserves have an aggregate area of 599.39 hectares. Some portions of Forbes Park have been released to actual occupants for residential

purposes. Republic Act No. 8963, which is entitled “An act excluding from the Baguio Townsite Reservation and from the operation of Proclamation No. 10 dated February 9, 1924, and Proclamation No. 63 dated August 6, 1925, which established the Forbes Forest Reservation and the Government Center, respectively, all situated in the City of Baguio, Island of Luzon, certain portions of land within lots 1,2,3,4,5 and 6 embraced therein and declaring the same alienable and disposable lands for disposition to qualified applicants under Republic Act. No. 730.” This has decreased the area by approximately 4.68 hectares. Proclamation 198 dated June 29, 1993 provided the transfer of the John Hay Air Station to the Bases Conversion and Development Authority, renaming it as Club John Hay, and declaring it for tourism, human resource development center and multiple use forest watershed reservation. This has an area of 570 hectares, more or less. Presidential Proclamation No. 420 dated July 5, 1994, likewise, designated portion (288.1 hectares) of the former Camp John Hay as the John Hay Special Economic Zone pursuant to Republic Act 7227. Likewise, Executive Order No. 64 was issued by President Ramos, declaring the property of the Bases Conversion and Development Authority located in Scout Barrio, Baguio City as housing site and providing for its disposition to bonafide occupants. All developments therein shall conform to their designated functions as specified under the laws that amended the same. Development shall likewise conform to the city’s approved CLUP and zoning ordinance. The table below presents the list of watershed reservations covered by Presidential Proclamation and Sangguniang Panlungsod Resolution.

Table 28. List of Reservations FOREST RESERVATIONS PROC. NO.

DATE ISSUED

PURPOSE

10

9-Feb-24

Forbes Park Forest Reserve

AREA (has.)

12-Apr-13

Camp 8 Watershed Reserve

15

27-Apr-22

Busol Forest

16

27-Apr-22

Crystal Cave Forest Reserve

93

5-Nov-92

Buyog Forest/watershed

178

12-May93 8-Jul-40

Lucnab Watershed/Forest Reserve Sto. Tomas Forest Reserve

581

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

REMAIN -ING AREA

443

10.2137

56

1.0653

Proc. 773 Marcoville Barangay

108

1.2478

Proc. 773 Engineer's Hill Barangay

114

2.3082

Proc. 773 Cabinet Hill Barangay

35

0.54

63

1.749

DPS Compound Proc. 773

36

1.36

DPS Compound R.A. 8963

123

2.1222

R.A. 8963 Cabinet Hill Barangay

8.2138

Proc. 202 Series of 1987

14

0.2873

Crystal Cave Owner's Association

1

0.6109

Proc. 492 S-2003 Crystal Cave Elem. School

REMARKS

67.9391

(Amended by R.A. 8963)

12

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

Parcel III Gibraltar Barangay

Proc. 773 M. Roxas Barangay

27.5 61.0787 4.0728

21.9312

4.8153

17.1159

SWO-131102-000238

5.9816 3113.8186

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Amended by 2035

6-Apr-10

Pucsusan Watershed Reserve

0.9593

EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE PROC. NO.

DATE ISSUED

290

18-Jul-88

291

AREA (has.)

PURPOSE

23.7209

28-Apr-56

Teachers Camp Reservation Aurora Elem. School Site

379

17-May-03

BCNHS Irisan Annex

3.6761

401

27-Jun-53

1.1801

492

23-Oct-03

693

24-May-34

Baguio City High School Site Bakakeng Central Elem. School School & Other Purposes

733

6-Oct-34

2.2661

821

27-Jun-35

Lucban Elementary School School Purposes

807

19-Dec-61

University of the Philippines Quezon Elem. School

8.0998

450

8-Sep-39

PCNHS-Bonifacio Annex

1.6033

1221

4-Jan-74

Saint Louis University

1.9198

1228

31-Jan-74

New Lucban School Site

1.0404

820

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS 222

AREA SEGREGATED (has.) 3.4229

REMAINING AREA 20.298

REMARKS Proc. 613 of 2004

1.3483

0.6109

Amending Proc. 16

2.925

0.8587

SETTLEMENT PURPOSES PROC. NO.

DATE ISSUED

7

15-Feb-01

232

14-Jun-67

364

27-Jan-53

396

AREA (has.)

PURPOSE Quezon Hill

44.5763

Lower Quirino Hill

4.8153 97.6829

31-Mar-89

Housing Project Purposes Rec. Site Baguio Workingmen's Village Mansion House

475

28-Dec-53

Housing Project Purposes

23.5962

1875

25-Jul-79

BLISS Site

63.1881

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

1

3.6761

185

3.0745

REMAIN ING AREA

REMARKS

49.1916 0.8981

BMC Lime Kilns TOTAL

283.948 5

BCNH Irisan Annex Proc.379 S2003 Lot 3 Irisan Lime Kiln Decesdant Portion of lot 2&3 Elsie Pucay Ancestral Claim

TRANSPORTATION / COMMUNICATION PURPOSES PROC. NO. 109 248 354 501 1358

DATE ISSUED

PURPOSE

AREA (has.)

15-May87 3-Apr-51

Railroad Purposes (PNR)

1.0465

Weather Bureau Site

0.828

11-Oct56 21-Dec39 9-Dec-74

Radio Transmitting Station Radio Transmitting Station Airport

3.5709

TOTAL

37.6032

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

REMAIN ING AREA

70

0.3281

3.2428

41

1.2305

REMARKS

TELOF Pacdal forwarded to C.O.Feb.2004 TELOF Proc.No. 573

32.1578 1.5586

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PARK SITE (OUTDOOR AND RECREATIONAL PURPOSES) PROC. NO. E.O. 1907

DATE ISSUED

Camp John Hay Reservation Amended by Proc. 198,420,RA7227 as amended by RA 7916 &E.O.62

446.088 6

12-Jul-77

Tourism Dev't. Purposes

0.9056

6-Jan-81

Phil. Tourism Authority

32.8394

64

6-Aug-25

Burnham Park Site

32.8394

148

18-Apr-11

Information Tech Center

0.06

217

19-Mar-64

Park Site

0.7462

240

5-Jul-29

Public Park Purposes

1.1213

706

19-Jun-70

Tourism Site

4.5

2144

9-Dec-31

Tourism Purposes

2.9513

P.D.11 72 P.D.17 62

18-May07

AREA (has.)

PURPOSE

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

REMAIN ING AREA

REMARKS

13 barangays 1

30

ERDS (approx.30 has. Per MOA)

1

2.1115

Proc. 603 S-2004 NFA Loakan

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSES PROC. NO.

DATE ISSUED

3

12-Jan-26

623

26-Sep-40

794

AREA (has.)

PURPOSE

0.2446

7-Oct-61

Ice and Electric Light Plant Baguio General Hospital Site Phil. Mental Health Assn.(DOH)

124

24-Jun-63

Motor Pool

2.6329

267

7-Apr-38

Phil. Tuberculosis Society

292 743 765

23-Oct-67 25-Oct-34 23-Jan-35

Health Resort Semi-Temperate Station Semi-Temperate Station Cottages of Secretaries

REMAIN ING AREA

REMARKS

0.5377 0.1045

5.7246 Fruit 5.9756 Fruit 36.0719

0.9

Proc.360 s-2003 NHA

Dept.

Under DPWH

1.3223

62

6-Aug-25

City Hall

1.9687

63

6-Aug-25

Government Center

37.3072

Amended by RA 8963 103

8-May-87

GSP Building Site

0.1348

126

10-Oct-27

Government Building

5.7999

141

29-Jul-63

0.3994

142

29-Jul-63

Court of Appeal site Office of the Supreme Court

151

Phil. Nat'l Red Cross Bldg.

0.0383

166

21-Apr-55 19-May28

Not Indicated

0.2632

205

26-Aug-50

Pines Hotel site

3.4762

285

31-Oct-51

Cemetery Site

0.72

376

3-Feb-39

Mansion House

2.1858

395

28-Jul-71

0.4178

396

27-Feb-74

458

23-Dec-53

Mansion House Grounds Nat'l Convention Center Bldg. Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Bldg

0.7808

5.9562

0.4945

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11-Sep-69

DSWD Bldg. Site

0.2

630

8-Oct-40

PNB Bldg. Site

0.0621

776

4-Sep-61

COMELEC Bldg. Site

0.7

936

19-Nov-71

DBP Bldg. Site

0.1021

2254

2-Jan-83

0.25

1825

27-Feb-79

SSS Bldg. Site Export Processing Zone Area

33

30-Aug-30

Road right of way

35

6-Aug-25

Hospital Purposes

2.925

152

17-Mar-28

Cemetery Purposes

0.0383

198

29-Jun-93

208

20-Oct-95

235

19-Dec-95

Club John Hay to BCDA Open to disposition parcels of BPI Open to disposition(Brookside Subd)

240

5-Jul-29

241

5-Jul-29

1561

21-Jul-08

312

23-Apr-30

Public Park Purposes Official Residential Purposes Proc. 815 con Proc. 217 Inclusion to the existing BCEZ Sanitary Camp 7 & Nursery Site

358

17-Dec-38

Workingmen's Village

408

16-Jul-95

SSS Bldg. Site

0.25

441

4-Sep-57

Labor Hall Site

0.05

53.0616

2012-2020

E.O. 1907 s. OF 1907

Revoked by Proc. 467 s. 153 Amending E.O. 1907

42.533 11.213

4.827 0.6349

Amended by Proc. 2254

OTHER LAND USES / PURPOSES PROC. NO.

DATE ISSUED

AREA (has.)

PURPOSE

74

25-Jan-63

Open to Disposition

0.4

123

24-Jun-63

Open to Disposition

21.7452

131

28-Nov-57

not indicated

202

21-Dec-87

Jungle Town Open to Disposition

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

82

8.3283

180

28.1083

264

10.4087

REMAINING AREA

REMARKS

8.2138

Excluded from Proc. 15 318

17-Jul-56

Open to Disposition

not indicated

348

22-Feb-68

Open to Disposition

0.9323

414

6-May-57

Open to Disposition

380.5725

467

23-Dec-53

Open to Disposition

0.0323

471

1-Oct-68

Maryknoll sisters

0.401

472

1-Oct-68

Open to Disposition

0.0096

488

8-Nov-65

0.9472

490 510

8-Nov-65 21-May58

Open to Disposition MRR Open to Disposition

5.9756

518

27-Dec-65

Open to Disposition

5.7349

571

11-Apr-33

Lot 8-B, Res. Sec. "L"

not indicated

572

8-Apr-59

Gibraltar, Mines View

101.598

578

21-Apr-59

Open to Disposition

1.8708

Pucsusan Barangay Mines View Barangay Gibraltar Barangay

0.1005

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9-Aug-40

Open to Disposition

143.98

441

4-Sep-57

Open to Disposition

0.05

529

14-Mar-40

1.3414

638

14-Jan-60

Open to Disposition Open to Disposition/Igorot Claims

773

17-Nov-70

Open to Disposition

8.089

815

29-Dec-61

Open to Disposition

0.7462

1150

5-Jun-73

Excluded from Proc. 63

0.1157

1228

31-Jan-74

Open to Disposition Residential & New Lucban Sch.Site

1.0404

603

5-Aug-40

Animal Breeding Station

81.9721

2012-2020

141.3439

1.8109

DENR-DA Housing Built-uparea

0.6

Mines View Barangay

22.8674

4

2-Jan-26

Garage Purposes (DPWH)

1.3775

8

23-Jan-23 15-May06

Cemetery Site (Loakan)

0.16

Not Indicated DOST

not indicated

107

19-Nov-36

Water Supply Purposes

14.3612

285

17-Jan-30

Cemetery Site (lot 56)

0.72

298

24-Feb-30

Road-right-of-way

0.265

331

30-Aug-30

Road-right-of-way

0.7481

646

19-Jan-34

Public Purposes

0.4729

E.O.15

9-Feb-14

Road Purposes

not indicated

67 243

MILITARY RESERVATIONS PROC. NO. 254

424

DATE ISSUED 5-Aug-29

27-Jun-68

AREA (has.)

PURPOSE Bureau of Constabulary(Camp Allen)

Headquarters-USAFIP-NL

NO. OF ACTUAL OCCUPANTS

AREA SEGREGATED (has.)

3.4008

REMAIN ING AREA

REMARKS

N 106

2.0573

Camp H.T. Allen Proc. 254

127

2.9485

Camp H.T. Allen OCT 1390

411

10.2897

0.3

(Excluded from Proc. 254) 2313

21-Sep-83

Naval Base Reservation

2405

22-Mar-85

397

11-Apr-39

PMA-Fort Del Pilar Military Site (Revoked by Proc. 364 declared A&D & further amended by Proc. 235 to be sold thru R.A. 730

114

15-Dec-10

29.8361 373.139 9

3.3149

Proc. 520 S. 2003

0.1382 29.0283

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Figure 21. Forest Reservations

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III. MAINSTREAMING DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT / CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION A.

Vulnerability Profile 1.

General Climatic Type

Following the modified Coronas classification, Baguio City has Type 1 climate (Fig. 3). The dry season from November to April is affected by the northeast monsoon (Amihan). The wet season from May to October is affected by the southwest monsoon (Habagat). Figure 22. Climograph for 1970-2010

For the period 1970-2010, the average annual temperature is 19.5oC. The lowest is 18 oC in January; the highest is 20.7oC in April (Figure 22). The lowest recorded for the day was 6.8oC on January 8, 1986 (Dickerson, 1923). The highest recorded was 30.4oC on March 15, 1988. Compared to the lowlands, Baguio temperature is generally cooler by 9oC. This natural cool climate makes the city an ideal destination especially during the summer months. In the 1930’s, the seat of national government would be transferred during summer from Manila to Baguio; hence the latter gained the title “Summer Capital of the Philippines” (Reed, 1976). However, recent years have not exempted the city from temperature rise. For period 1970-2010, the highest monthly rainfall average of 914 mm happens in August (Figure 22). The lowest monthly rainfall average of 15 mm happens in January. The annual rainfall average for the 41-year period is 3900 mm. It is commonly in Baguio which registers the highest annual rainfall among all PAGASA synoptic stations. The rainiest month is August showing an average of 27 rainy days. The driest are January and February, showing only 3 days with rainfall.

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It is in Baguio where the highest 24-hour rainfall for the country has been consistently observed (Figure 22). The highest 24-hour rainfall of 1085.8 mm is the record highest for all PAGASA stations since 1948. In addition to the monsoons, climate in the city -like the rest of the Philippines- is affected by the Intertropical Convergence Zone, El Niño/ La Niña, and tropical cyclones. It is further affected by orographic lifting and subsequent formation of fog and rain clouds which bring strong rain and winds even during the summer months (Olinares, unpublished data). ). The passage of typhoons, which happen during the Habagat, is estimated to bring approximately 60% of the annual rainfall in the city. Of the 20 typhoons that enter the PAR in a year, an average of 9 make landfall, and three are of typhoon level strength. (Abastillas, 2009; PAGASA, 2011). PAGASA records indicate that an average of 6 extreme typhoons enter the PAR every year. 1

2.

Topography and Slope

Baguio is the highest City in the Philippines. Elevations range from 900 m. along the Bued River to 1600 m. at Pacdal. Majority of the slopes (about 78% of total area) are gentle to moderately steep with slope of less than 30%. Only about 22% of city’s land area has steep slopes greater than 30%. The distribution of slopes, in hectares and percentage terms is shown in the table below. The topographic features of the area exhibit the rugged topography of the Cordilleras. The variety of natural landforms in the city with its pine covering makes the city’s towering landscape interesting. Rough mountainous lands are to be found in the northwestern part of the study area. They can also be found in the south, at the Kennon gorge. These lands are very rough and irregular and may be best utilized for wildlife, forest, and watershed. Examples of these cliffs whose slopes sometimes approach 100 percent are found along Asin, Tuba, Kennon, and Naguilian Roads.

1

Baguio City Towards Climate Change Adaptation Asian Cities Adapt Project by Prof. Dee

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Figure 23. Slope Map

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Table 29. Slope Categories, Baguio City. DESCRIPTION

SLOPE GRADE

Level to gently sloping

AREA (HAS.)

PERCENT

0- 8%

722

12.56

9- 18%

109

1.89

Undulating to moderately steep

19- 30%

3,771

65.59

Moderately steep to steep

31- 50%

699

12.16

>50%

448

7.80

5,749

100.00

Gently sloping to undulating

Very Steep Total

3.

Soils

There are three (3) main types of soil in the study area: Bakakeng Sandy Clay Loam, Mirador Clay Loam, and Tacdian Loam. Almost half of the study area is covered by the Bakakeng Sandy Loam, which incidentally is the second largest soil group in southern Benguet. It cuts across the area from the north to southeast and extends eastward to Itogon. Mirador Clay Loam is found in the southwestern part of the study area. The smallest soil group, Tacdian Loam, lies in the mid-north of the area. The physical characteristic of these soils types; their structure, consistency, and texture per horizon can be seen in the table below. Of the three- (3) soil types, Tacdian has the thinnest surface soil, being 5 to 10 centimeters from the surface. Cultivation of this type of soil along steep slopes may, without adequate control of surface run-off, result to its erosion down slope. Bakakeng Sandy Clay Loam and Mirador Clay Loam have thicker topsoil. If however, they are cultivated along steep slopes, and no adequate measures are undertaken to control slope erosion, the topsoil will gradually be washed away by running water. This eventually exposes the subsoil, which is unproductive for plant growth. The external drainage of these soils is of the utmost importance. The terrain where these soils are located can be best described as moderately steep to very steep. Without adequate measures to regulate drainage’s, these soils will be excessively drained, thus resulting to massive erosion.

Table 30. Drainage of Soil Types SOIL TYPE

excessive

INTERNAL DRAINAGE Fair for drainage

PARENT MATERIAL Igneous rock

excessive

Poor for drainage

Limestone

excessive

Fair for drainage

Limestone Gravel

EXTERNAL DRAINAGE

Bakakeng Sandy Loam Mirador Sandy Loam Tacdian

Good for drainage Good for drainage Good for drainage

SLOPE Mostly 25% and over Mostly below 25% Mostly below 25%

In general, soils within the city are classified as clay loam. Soil materials for embankment or fill purposes can be found in almost any place in the area. Most of the hillsides can be tapped to yield unlimited materials for construction purposes.

4.

River System

The city is criss crossed by several rivers among which are the Bued, Balili, Galiano –Camp-Asin, Naguilian Rivers and Ambalanga. The widest river is the Bued River followed by the Balili River.

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Figure 24. River Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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5.

2012-2020

Drainage System

Surface water drains through the rivers; 1) to the east is the Ambalanga which follows a southeasterly to easterly course and drains into the Agno River, 2) to the north is Balili River, which follows a general northerly course and converges with the Bauang River basin to the north-northwest, 3) to the west is the Galiano River which drains into the Aringay River; and 4) to the south is the Bued River which drains into the Patalan River and the Lingayen Gulf. Drainage facility at the Central Business District is through an underground drainage system along Magsaysay Avenue constructed by the Department of Public Works and Highways and drains towards the Balili River.

Figure 25. Drainage Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Faults

The faults, contributing for the seismic activities experienced in the BLISTT area during the crustal movement are summarized below. a.

Earthquake generators surrounding Baguio City a.1 Segments of the Philippine Fault - extending from Laoag in the north to Mindanao in the South (1,600 Km long). The fault in Luzon divides the mountainous Central Cordillera from the lowlands of the Central Valley Basin in the South. Three Earthquakes occurred in 1937, 1973 and 1975 that resulted to left lateral movements of the fault. Eight similar strong earthquakes that happened in 1893, 1902, 1922, 1924, 1937, 1941, 1947 and 1948 had their epicenters along or very near this fault zone. a.2 Digdig Fault - is a branch of the Philippine Fault, extending from Dingalan Bay, and turning northwards near Santa Fe/San Quintin, passing Baguio City at about 40 km to east. Prior to the July 16, 1990 earthquake, documented evidence reveals movement of the digdig fault. There were two (2) earthquakes that occurred on July 16, 1990. Initially the epicenter was located at 13 Km NNE of Cabanatuan City or about 90 Km SSE of Baguio while the other occurred 20 Km east of Baguio. The horizontal crustal shift, along the surveyed 135 km long inferred fault rupture, exceeded 3 m, with 6.2 m as the largest displacement measured so far. Larger displacements may have occurred in the unexplored mountain regions further northeast. The vertical displacements, measured along the surveyed fault rupture, varied from 0 to a maximum of 1.5 m. a.3 San Manuel Fault (80 km) - extending from near Lupao, Nueva Ecija up to Lingayen Gulf. It is predominantly a left lateral strike-slip fault. a.4 Tebbo Fault (70 km) – located approximately 10 km. southeast of Baguio City. a.5 Tuba – west of Baguio City. Approximately 5 km away with shortest 50 km long, NW trending. a.6

Local Faults

Although they are not active faults, the Mirador, San Vicente, Burnham, Loakan and Bued Faults are local faults traversing through the built-up areas of Baguio City. Among the numerous faults intersecting the city (Mirador, San Vicente, Burnham, Bued and Loakan faults) only the N45W trending San Vicente Fault exhibited pronounced surface manifestations, such as landslides at the San Vicente area and displacements at the Baguio Cemetery. These are zones of weaknesses with thicker soil cover, highly fractured rxs; where energy is released during earthquake therefore causing amplified ground shaking. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Figure 26. Faultine Map

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2012-2020

Geologic Hazard

The presence of several faults and lineaments in the City is aggravated by continuing denudation of its vegetative cover resulting to soil exposure. The remaining vegetative cover, mostly cogon or grass serves as replacements and can only protect a thin layer of soil that are very susceptible to erosion and downgrading process. There are two types of mass movement prevailing in the city, earthquake induced, and rain induced erosions. Landslides occur from several centimeters to hundreds of meters in area dimension. It varies from soil to rock fall where huge boulders fall from steep slopes.

Figure 27. Geologic Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Baguio is periodically visited by earthquake. Temblors and tremors induced many of the present slides. Most of these mass movements occur in unstable slopes while some can be attributed to ground shaking and surface faulting and non-uniform movement of rock blocks along lines of weaknesses. Landslides are likely to occur in faulted zones where unstable slope is dominant in the formations (Klondyke and Zigzag). The July 16, 1990 earthquake resulted to an over abundance of landslides that caused numerous deaths and massive destruction of properties. These losses could have been mitigated or minimized by engineering and geologic investigation or by a hazard assessment and zonation of the City. Rain induced mass movement occurs during heavy rains. Man-made factors are highly contributory to this type of mass movement. The demand for housing due to a rapidly increasing population resulted to uncontrolled land development, i.e. excavations, and settlement along unstable slopes and the dissipation of the vegetative cover leaves the soil exposed to over saturation that ultimately results to erosion and landslides. These natural processes led to the alteration of city’s natural drainage system. On the other hand, the drainage system established in the developed areas is now very inadequate due to clogging. Many spoil banks slides are attributed to the changes in the drainage system due to road and building/house constructions. Considering Baguio’s high relief and steep slopes, water discharge travel fast and with improper drainage this will scour road banks, residential areas with steep and unstable slopes resulting to the weakening of base. Indiscriminate concreting of city roads has resulted in the increased volume of run-off that caused flooding in some areas of the city. With all these types of hazards facing the city, the Bureau of Mines and Geosciences Bureau in CAR prepared a geo hazard map considering these various factors and classified the areas of the city into high, moderate, low landslide susceptibility. (See Figure 28). Only the central part of Baguio was mapped covering about 30 square kilometers of land or about half of the city’s total land area. (See Table 31 below)

Table 31. Landslide Susceptibility, Baguio City LEVEL HIGH LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY AND CRITICAL AREA

Area in sq.km. 5.96

% share

Description

20.00

Unstable areas a significant portion is affected by mass movements

17.60

59.07

MODERATE LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY

5.60

18.80

LOW LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY

0.63

2.12

Unstable areas, highly susceptible to mass movements Stable areas with occasional an d localized mass movement Stable areas with no identified landslide

29.79

100.0

HIGH LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY

TOTAL AREAS MAPPED Source of Basic Data: MGB-CAR

Of the almost 30 hectares mapped, 60% or about 18 hectares have unstable areas while only 2 % or less than one hectare has low landslide susceptibility. Areas with high landslide susceptibility are considered unstable areas with highly susceptible mass movements. Part of Baguio lies atop a limestone formation, which explains the numerous sinkholes underneath some parts of the City. Sinkholes develop when the limestone formation is dissolved as a result of weathering due to exposure to running water. According to the Bureau of Mines there are four (4) major sinkholes in City, namely; City Camp Proper, Crystal Cave, Dominican and Green Valley. These areas are classified as high-risk areas. The exposure of the underground streams through karst windows may result in time due to gradual caving. Primarily, the failure or collapse of the roof or crown pillars that could induce surface ground subsidence and sinkhole formation particularly in areas above caverns and galleries where roof/crown pillars are not strong enough may not support the overlying load.

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Figure 28. Landslide Susceptibility VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Recent mapping of the MGB –CAR last year showed that there are about 25 sinkholes (including minor ones) mapped across Baguio City. The barangays most affected are Dontogan, Asin, Lourdes and Quezon Hill.

Figure 29. Sinkholes Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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In addition to the dangers of sinkhole where some residential areas are located, there are also some residential houses located near or on drainage areas thereby posing hazard to lives and properties. This situation necessitates the preparation of a more detailed and exhaustive geological underground and surface mapping of the entire city that will guide the local government prepare the necessary mitigating policies and measures that will guide legislators and executives in their decisionmaking processes. Buffer zones should be provided along waterways or residents existing therein should be required to establish mitigating measures to protect lives and properties. There is also a need for the strict enforcement of the law on easement on waterways.

B.

HISTORY OF DISASTERS IN BAGUIO CITY AND ITS IMPACT 1.

2.

Year 1911 a.

Torrential rains for 3 days, 15 hours July 14 – 17, 1911

b.

2,238.7 mm rainfall recorded at the Mirador Observatory

c.

Extraordinary drought from October 01 to May 31, 1912

YEAR 1974

Tropical Cyclone

Date

Death

Bising

January 8 – 11

65

Lliang

July 18 - 21

21

Susang

October 8 - 12

26

Tering

October 14 - 17

13

Wening

October 25 - 28

23

TOTALS

Cost of Damage

148

299 Million

Note: Regions affected to include Baguio are I, II, III, IV, V, VI & VII

3.

YEAR 1989

Tropical Cyclone

Date

Death

Cost of Damage

Goring

July 14 - 17

90

1.363 B

Openg

September 7 -12

41

0.580 B

Rubing

October 2 - 7

119

0.192 B

Tasing

October 14 - 20

47

0.883 B

297

3 Billion

TOTALS Note: Regions affected to include Baguio are CAR, NCR, I II, III, IV, V, VIII

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1990 July 16 Earthquake

Aftershocks of the 1990 July 16 earthquake Ms=7.8 Impact: DEAD – 1,666 INJURED – 3,500

a.

Historical Seismicity of Baguio City and Vicinity

The PHIVOLCS earthquake and catalogue seismicity maps show so far, seven (7) historically and instrumentally recorded destructive earthquakes (Intensity VII-IX in the adapted Rossi-Forel scale) have affected Baguio City for the past 356 years ( 1645-2001). These roughly translate into a return period of at least one destructive earthquake (Intensity VII to IX) for every 50 years. In addition, there were four very destructive earthquakes during the 356-year period for a return period of at least one very destructive earthquake (Intensity VIII to IX) for every 89 years. In comparison, regional probabilistic seismic hazard calculations by Thenhaus (1994) yielded annual probability rates of Ms 6.4 to <7.0 (1 in 23 years), 7.0 to <7.3 (1 in 62 years), Ms <8.2 (1 in 166 years)

5.

Tropical Storm “Ondoy” (September 24 – 27, 2009)

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Super Typhoon “Pepeng” (September 30 – October 10, 2009)

2009 Tropical storm Ondoy was quickly followed by typhoon Pepeng (Oct 2 - 10). 195 km/hr and gusts of up to 230 km/hr Baguio City received 640 mm of rain during the 12-hour period starting 8:00 am on October 8

Track of Typhoon Pepeng from September 30 to October 10, 2009 Typhoon PEPENG enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility on 5 PM Wednesday, September 30, 2009

2009 INCIDENTS

TOTAL NUMBER OF INCIDENTS

ERODED RIPRAP

25

FALLEN TREE / IN DANGER OF FALLING

19

SOIL EROSION / LANDSLIDE

97

FLOOD

41

VEHICULAR ACCIDENT

1

CASUALTIES: A) Deaths 1) Landslide 2) Accident

58 2

B) Missing

5

C) Injured

27

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CLUP of Baguio City City Camp Flood Date: 08 October 2009 Reported: 2:55 PM Cause: Heavy volume of rainfall could not be contained by the drainage.

Taloy Sur, Marcos Highway (Benguet) Road cut Date: 08 October 2009 Reported 9:31 PM Caused Closure of the Highway towards Baguio City

Landslide at Pinsao Proper Barangay

2012-2020

Landslide at Cresencia Village Date: 08 October 2009 Reported: 8:00 PM Cause: Heavy volume of rainfall saturated the soil. Casualties: 23

Fallen rocks along Kennon Road – Benguet Road leading to Baguio City

Landslide at Upper Rock Quarry Date: 09 October 2009 Reported: 6:30 AM Cause: Heavy volume of rainfall saturated the soil. Casualties: 4

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Landslide at Lower Kitma Date: 09 October 2009 Reported: 9:56 AM Cause: Heavy volume of rainfall saturated the soil. Casualties: 8

2012-2020

Landslide at Purok 1, Irisan Date: 09 October 2009 Cause: Heavy volume of rainfall saturated the soil. Casualties: 16

Landslide at Purok 1, Irisan Date: 09 October 2009 Cause: Heavy volume of rainfall saturated the soil. Casualties: 16

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2012-2020

DISASTER RISK ASSESSMENT BY BARANGAY

Table 32. Barangay Disaster Risk Assessment

1 2

DIST. NO. I I

3

I

PACDAL

4

I

PUCSUSAN

5

I

ST. JOSEPH VILLAGE

6

II

BAL MARCOVILLE

7

II

3,297

-

0-8%, 19-30%

low, moderate

8

II

CABINET HILL-TEACHER'S CAMP D.P.S. COMPOUND

1,029

-

19-30%

moderate, high

9

II

ENGINEER'S HILL

7,409

-

0-8%, 19-30%

low, moderate

10

II

GREEN WATER VILLAGE

1,728

-

19-30%

11

III

GABRIELA SILANG

2,102

-

19-30%

12

III

HILLSIDE

1,539

-

19-30%

13

III

LOWER DAGSIAN

1,159

-

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high

14

III

SCOUT BARRIO

1,276

-

19-30%

high

15

III

STA. ESCOLASTICA

1,400

-

19-30%

16

III

UPPER DAGSIAN

637

-

19-30%

high, high and critical area high

17

IV

B.G.H. COMPOUND

1,468

-

18

IV

BALSIGAN SAN LUIS

2,547

-

19-30%, 3150% 31-50%

19

IV

3,331

-

20

IV

FERDINAND-CAMPO SIOCO FIL-AM COMPOUND

2,899

-

19-30%, 3150% 31-50%

21

IV

IMELDA MARCOS

1,022

-

31-50%

22

IV

KISAD-LEGARDA

968

-

23

IV

STO. ROSARIO VALLEY

2,230

-

0-8%, 19-30%, 31-50% 31-50%

24

IX

AMBIONG

2,477

-

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high

25

IX

BAYAN PARK VILLAGE

848

-

19-30%

moderate, high

26

IX

EAST BAYAN PARK

1,151

-

19-30%

moderate, high

27

IX

472

-

19-30%

moderate, high

28

IX

NORTH CENTRAL AURORA HILL SAN ANTONIO VILLAGE

1,401

-

19-30%

high

29

IX

1,142

-

19-30%

high

30

IX

1,763

-

19-30%

moderate, high

31

V

SOUTH CENTRAL AURORA HILL WEST BAYAN PARKLEONILA HILL CITY CAMP CENTRAL

19-30%

32

V

CITY CAMP PROPER

2,013

high, high and critical area moderate, high, high and critical area

NO.

NAME OF BARANGAY GIBRALTAR MINES VIEW PARK

POPULATION (2010 A.C.) 7,066 1,392

SINKHOLE -

0-8%, 19-30% 0-8%, 19-30%

LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTABILITY low, moderate, high moderate, high

5,441

-

0-8%, 19-30%

low, moderate, high

676

-

0-8%, 19-30%

moderate, high

3,785

-

0-8%, 19-30%

660

-

19-30%

low, moderate, high and critical area moderate, high

2,009 -

SLOPE

19-30%

low, moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area moderate, high, high and critical area moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area low, moderate

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V

LOWER QM

-

27

V

LOWER ROCK QUARRY

1518

28

V

MIDDLE ROCK QUARRY

1,251

29

V

PALMA-URBANO

30

V

31

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high and critical area

-

19-30%

high and critical area

1,144

-

19-30%

UPPER Q.M.

2,432

-

0-8%, 19-30%

V

UPPER ROCK QUARRY

1,818

-

19-30%

32

VI

ANDRES BONIFACIO

1,226

-

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high

33

VI

CAMP HENRY ALLEN

2,196

-

0-8%, 19-30%

34

VI

CAMPO FILIPINO

1,738

-

19-30%

35

VI

FAIRVIEW

1,665

-

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high

36

VI

KAYANG EXTENSION

1,222

-

19-30%

moderate, high

37

VI

QUEEN OF PEACE

1,740

-

19-30%

38

VI

1,035

-

0-8%

39

VII

UPPER MARKET SUBDIVISION CRESENCIA VILLAGE

moderate, high, high and critical area moderate, high

1,504

-

19-30%

moderate, high

40

VII

GUISAD CENTRAL

1,919

-

19-30%

high, moderate

41

VII

GUISAD SURONG

1,749

-

19-30%

moderate, high

42

VII

LOWER MAGSAYSAY

528

-

0-8%, 19-30%

moderate, high

43

VII

PADRE BURGOZ

3,188

-

0-8%, 19-30%

moderate, high

44

VII

PADRE ZAMORA

2,257

-

0-8%, 19-30%

moderate, high

45

VII

PINSAO PILOT PROJECT

3,521

-

19-30%

46

VII

SLAUGHTER COMPOUNDSTO. NINO

2,249

-

0-8%, 19-30%

47

VIII

CAMDAS

1,401

-

19-30%

moderate, high

48

VIII

DIZON SUBDIVISION

1,770

-

19-30%

moderate, high

49

VIII

EAST QUIRINO HILL

2,102

-

19-30%

50

VIII

1,433

-

19-30%

51

VIII

HAPPY HOMES-OLD LUCBAN LOWER QUIRINO HILL

1,932

-

19-30%

52

VIII

MIDDLE QUIRINO HILL

2,544

-

19-30%

53

VIII

PINGET

6,669

54

VIII

WEST QUIRINO HILL

1,740

-

19-30%

62

X

HARRISON-CARANTES

291

-

0-8%

high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area low, moderate

63

X

LOWER GENERAL LUNA

673

-

0-8%

64

X

73

-

0-8%

65

X

MALCOLM PERFECTO SALUD MITRA

1,065

-

0-8%, 19-30%

low

66

X

SESSION ROADGOVERNOR PACK ROAD

85

-

0-8%, 19-30%

low, moderate

67

X

UPPER GENERAL LUNA ROAD

941

-

0-8%

SQUARE-

-

19-30%

2012-2020

19-30%

moderate, high

moderate, high, high and critical area moderate, high

moderate, high critical area moderate

and

low, moderate, high and critical area

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XI

COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE

1,972

-

69

XI

HAPPY HOLLOW

2,157

70

XI

LUALHATI

71

XI

72

2012-2020

-

0-8%, 9-18%, 19-30% 19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high

984

-

0-8%, 19-30%

low, moderate, high

LUCNAB

1,866

-

19-30%

high

XI

OUTLOOK DRIVE

1,735

-

19-30%

moderate, high

73

XI

SOUTH DRIVE

373

-

0-8%, 19-30%

moderate, high

74

XII

ATOK TRAIL

1,516

-

moderate, high

75

XII

FORT DEL PILAR

3,020

-

0-8%, 9-18%, 19-30%, >50 19-30%, >50

76

XII

KIAS

5,247

-

19-30%, >51

moderate, high

77

XII

LOAKAN PROPER

9,158

-

low, moderate, high

78

XII

LOAKAN-APUGAN

2,599

-

0-8%, 19-30%, >50 0-8%, 9-18%

79

XII

LOAKAN-LIWANAG

3316

-

low, moderate, high

80

XIII

CAMP 7

9,726

-

81

XIII

CAMP 8

2,665

-

82

XIII

MILITARY CUT-OFF

1,786

-

83

XIII

PULIWES

3,658

-

0-8%, 19-30%, >50 0-8%, 19-30%, >51 19-30%, 3150% 19-30%, 3150% 19-30%

84

XIII

SAN VICENTE

4,574

-

85

XIV

BAKAKENG CENTRAL

7,695

86

XIV

BAKAKENG NORTE/ SUR

8,542

-

118

XIV

BROOKSIDE

1,965

-

19-30%, 3150% 19-30%, 3150% 19-30%, 3150%, >50 19-30%

119

XIV

BROOKSPOINT

2,299

-

19-30%

87

XIV

DONTOGAN

4,579

120

XIV

3,020

-

121

XIV

EAST MODERN SITE-GIL PUYAT LOPEZ JAENA

19-30%, 3150% 19-30%

1,370

-

19-30%

moderate, high

122

XIV

MALVAR SGT. FORESCA

-

-

19-30%

high

88

XIV

1,109

-

XIV

123

XIV

WEST MODERN SITE

1,137

19-30%, 3150% 19-30%, 3150% 19-30%

high

89

STO. TOMAS SCHOOL AREA STO.TOMAS PROPER

90

XV

ASIN

91

XV

DOMINICAN MIRADOR

4,035

92

XV

1,093

high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high and critical area

93

XV

LOURDES SUBDIVISION EXTENSION LOURDES PROPER

19-30%, 3150%, >50 19-30%, 3150% 19-30%

94

XV

95 96

5,640 -

11,454

moderate, high

moderate, high

moderate, high high low, moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area moderate, high high high, high and critical area moderate, high

high, high and critical area high

788

-

19-30%

high and critical area

LOWER LOURDES

192

-

19-30%

high and critical area

XV

SAN LUIS VILLAGE

7,199

-

19-30%

XV

SAN ROQUE VILLAGE

high, high and critical area high, high and critical area

700

19-30%

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XVI

IRISAN

98

XVI

99

2012-2020

28,357

19-30%

MIDDLE QUEZON HILL

3,388

19-30%

XVI

PINSAO PROPER

5,257

100

XVI

QUEZON HILL PROPER

1,200

19-30%

101

XVI

UPPER QUEZON HILL

2,344

19-30%

102

XVI

VICTORIA VILLAGE

2,984

-

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high and critical area

103

XVII

ALFONSO TABORA

1,462

-

19-30%

high

104

XVII

1,065

-

19-30%

moderate, high

105

XVII

MAGSAYSAY ROAD NEW LUCBAN

2,286

-

19-30%

106

XVII

NORTH SANITARY CAMP

2,668

-

19-30%

107

XVII

SOUTH SANITARY CAMP

1,473

-

19-30%

high, high and critical area high, high and critical area high

108

XVII

TRANCOVILLE

2,197

-

19-30%

high

109

XVIII

ABCR

986

-

0-8%, 19-30%

110

XVIII

AZCKO

515

-

0-8%, 19-30%

111

XVIII

BAGONG LIPUNAN

10

-

0-8%

low, moderate

112

XVIII

KABAYANIHAN

141

-

0-8%

moderate

113

XVIII

KAGITINGAN

471

-

0-8%

moderate

114

XVIII

KAYANG-HILLTOP

1,136

-

0-8%

moderate, high

115

XVIII

RIZAL MONUMENT

68

-

19-30%

low, moderate

116

XVIII

TEODORA ALONZO

1,201

-

0-8%, 19-30%

117 124

XVIII XX

UPPER MAGSAYSAY HOLY GHOST EXTENSION

104 2,993

-

0-8% 0-8%, 19-30%

125

XX

HOLY GHOST HILL PROPER

2,046

-

0-8%, 19-30%

126

XX

HONEYMOON

3,314

-

0-8%, 19-30%

127

XX

IMELDA VILLAGE

1,314

-

0-8%, 19-30%

128

XX

MANUEL ROXAS

716

-

0-8%

PRIVATE

-

19-30%

moderate, high, high and critical area high and critical area

moderate, high, high and critical area low, moderate

moderate, high, high and critical area moderate, high low, moderate, high and critical area low, moderate, high and critical area high, high and critical area low, moderate, high and critical area moderate, high and critical area

VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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D.

RECOMMENDATIONS 1.

Familiarize residents with hazard map of their area

2.

Role of Barangay and City Government of Baguio a. b. c. d. e.

E.

2012-2020

Ensure compliance with zoning Put up appropriate signages at critical areas Install appropriate drainage infrastructure / engineering measures Encourage barangay-based rainfall monitoring station Integrate curriculum on hazards and disaster mitigation

3.

Sinkholes should be unbuildable

4.

Forest reservations shall be preserved and enhanced

5.

Rivers, waterways easement shall be observed/imposed

6.

Flood prone areas should not be buildable

7.

The City shall come up with a citywide drainage system master plan

8.

Slope protection measures shall be introduced especially in areas with steep slopes

9.

Continuous Information Education Campaign on Disaster Risk Reduction and Management.

MAINSTREAMING THE DISASTER RISK REDUCTION MANAGEMENT / CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN THE PLAN

Table 33. Proposed Land Use per Barangay 1

DISTRICT I

2 3

NO.

BARANGAY

PROPOSED LAND USE

PACDAL

Watershed Zone, R2, R3, C1

I

PUCSUSAN

R1, R3, Watershed Zone, Vacant Forested Area,

I

GIBRALTAR

C1, Institutional Zone, Watershed Zone, R3, Vacant Forested Area

4

I

MINES VIEW PARK

Utility Zone, Vacant Forested Area, Institutional Zone, R1, R2, C1, Park Zone

5

I

ST. JOSEPH VILLAGE

R2, R3, Institutional Zone, Watershed Zone

6

II

R2, Institutional Zone, Watershed Zone

7

II

CABINET HILL - TEACHER'S CAMP ENGINEER'S HILL

8

II

GREEN WATER VILLAGE

R2, C1, CJH Economic Zone

C1, R2, Institutional Zone

9

II

MARCOVILLE

C1, Vacant Forested Area

10

II

D.P.S. COMPOUND

Watershed Zone, R2

11

III

STA. ESCOLASTICA VILLAGE

R1, R2

12

III

UPPER DAGSIAN

R2, CJH Economic Zone

13

III

HILLSIDE

R2, CJH Economic Zone

14

III

LOWER DAGSIAN

R2

15

III

SCOUT BARRIO

R2

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III

GABRIELA SILANG

R1, R2

17

IV

IMELDA MARCOS

R1, C1, C2, Institutional Zone

18

IV

BALSIGAN

R1, R3, C1

19

IV

FIL-AM COMPOUND

R1, R3, C2, Institutional Zone

20

IV

STO. ROSARIO VALLEY

R1, R3, C2, Institutional Zone

21

IV

B.G.H. COMPOUND

R1, Institutional Zone

22

IV

FERDINAND

R1, R2, R3, C1, Institutional Zone

23

IV

KISAD - LEGARDA

R3, C1, Institutional Zone, Park Zone

24

IX

R2

25

IX

LEONILA HILL (WEST BAYAN PARK) EAST BAYAN PARK

26

IX

SAN ANTONIO VILLAGE

R2

27

IX

AMBIONG

R2, Watershed Zone

28

IX

BAYAN PARK PROPER

R2, Park Zone

29

IX

NORTH CENTRAL AURORA HILL

R2, Institutional Zone

30

IX

SOUTH CENTRAL AURORA HILL

R2, Watershed Zone

31

V

CITY CAMP CENTRAL

R2

32

V

LOWER ROCK QUARRY

R2, Institutional Zone

33

V

MIDDLE ROCK QUARRY

R1, R2

34

V

R1, R2, R3

35

V

UPPER Q.M.-QUIRINO MAGSAYSAY CITY CAMP PROPER

36

V

PALMA-URBANO

R2, R3, C1, Institutional Zone

37

V

UPPER ROCK QUARRY

R1, R2

38

V

(GEFA) LOWER QM

R2, R3, Institutional Zone

39

VI

CAMPO FILIPINO

R1, R3, C1, C2, Institutional Zone

40

VI

FAIRVIEW

R1

41

VI

QUEEN OF PEACE

R2, R3, C2

42

VI

UPPER CITY MARKET

R2, C1, Institutional Zone

43

VI

ANDRES BONIFACIO

R1, R3, C1

44

VI

KAYANG EXTENSION

C1, R3

45

VI

CAMP HENRY ALLEN

R1, R2, C1, Institutional Zone

46

VII

PADRE BURGOS

R2, C1, Institutional Zone

47

VII

GUISAD CENTRAL

R1, R2, Institutional Zone, Bureau of Plant and Industry

48

VII

GUISAD SURONG

R1

49

VII

PADRE ZAMORA

R1, R2, C1, Institutional Support Zone

50

VII

PINSAO PILOT PROJECT

R1

51

VII

CRESENCIA VILLAGE

R1, R3, C1, Institutional Zone, Bureau of Plant and Industry

52

VII

LOWER MAGSAYSAY

R2, C1, Institutional Zone

53

VII

STO. NINO - SLAUGHTER

R2, C1, Institutional Support Zone, Abattoir Zone

54

VIII

PINGET

R1, R2, Watershed Zone, Institutional Zone

55

VIII

EAST QUIRINO HILL

R2, R3, C2

56

VIII

LOWER QUIRINO HILL

R2, R3, C2

57

VIII

HAPPY HOMES - LUCBAN

R2, R3, C2, Institutional Zone

58

VIII

CAMDAS SUBDIVISION

R2, R3, C1, Institutional Zone

59

VIII

MIDDLE QUIRINO HILL

R2, R3, C1

60

VIII

WEST QUIRINO HILL

R2

61

VIII

DIZON SUBDIVISION

R2, R3, C1, Institutional Zone

62

X

SALUD MITRA

R2,C1, Institutional Zone, Park Zone

63

X

LOWER GENERAL LUNA

C1, Institutional Zone

64

X

UPPER GENERAL LUNA

R2, C1

2012-2020

R2, Watershed Zone

R2, R3, C1

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X

66

2012-2020

C1, Institutional Zone

X

HARRISON - CLAUDIO CARANTES MALCOLM SQUARE

67

X

SESSION ROAD

C1, Institutional Zone, Park Zone

68

XI

SOUTH DRIVE

R2, R3, CJH Economic Zone, Watershed Zone

69

XI

COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE

70

XI

LUCNAB

CJH Economic Zone, CJH Reservation, Vacant Forested Area, Watershed Zone, Park Zone, R1, R3, C3 R1, Watershed Zone, Memorial Park

71

XI

OUTLOOK DRIVE

R1, R3, Memorial Park

72

XI

HAPPY HOLLOW

R1, Institutional Zone, CJH Reservation, Vacant Forested Area

73

XI

LUALHATI

Park Zone, Institutional Zone

74

XII

LOAKAN PROPER

75

XII

KIAS

R1, C1, Vacant Forested Area, CJH Reservation, Airport Zone, Institutional Zone, Industrial Zone, Cemetery Zone R1, Institutional Zone

76

XII

LOAKAN-LIWANAG

R1, CJH Economic Zone, CJH Reservation, Institutional Zone

77

XII

LOAKAN-APUGAN

R1, Industrial Zone, CJH Reservation

78

XII

ATOK TRAIL

R1, CJH Reservation, Vacant Forested Area

79

XII

PMA FORT DEL PILAR

R1, Institutional Zone

80

XIII

PULIWES

R1

81

XIII

MILITARY CUT-OFF

R1, R2, C1, Institutional Zone, Park Zone, Watershed Zone, GSIS Tree Park

82

XIII

CAMP 8

R1, R2

83

XIII

CAMP 7

R1, R2, C1, CJH Reservation, Multi-use Zone

84

XIII

SAN VICENTE

R1

85

XIV

BAKAKENG CENTRAL

R3, C1, C2, Watershed Zone

86

XIV

DONTOGAN

87

XIV

STO.TOMAS PROPER

R1, R3, Bureau of Animal Industry Reservation, Institutional Zone, Watershed Zone R2

88

XIV

AURORA HILL PROPER

R2

89

XIV

BROOKSIDE

R2, C1

90

XIV

WEST MODERN SITE

R2

91

XIV

STO. TOMAS SCHOOL AREA

R2, Institutional Zone, Vacant Forested Area, Multi-use Zone

92

XIV

BAKAKENG NORTE/ SUR

93

XIV

EAST MODERN SITE-GIL PUYAT

R1, R3, C1, Institutional Support Zone, Vacant Forested Area, Multi-use Zone, Institutional Zone R2, Institutional Zone

94

XIV

LOPEZ JAENA

R2

95

XIV

BROOKSPOINT

R2, Watershed Zone

96

XIV

SLU - SVP

R1

97

XV

LOWER LOURDES SUBDIVISION

R2, R3, C2

98

XV

ASIN

R1, R3, Vacant Forested Area, Hazard Zone and Dumpsite

99

XV

SAN ROQUE VILLAGE

R3, Institutional Zone

100

XV

DOMINICAN MIRADOR

R1, Institutional Zone, Heritage Site

101

XV

C1, R2, R3, Institutional Zone

102

XV

103

XV

LOURDES SUBDIVISION EXTENSION LOURDES SUBDIVISION PROPER SAN LUIS VILLAGE

104

XVI

QUEZON HILL PROPER

R1, R3, C2

105

XVI

UPPER QUEZON HILL

R1

106

XVI

IRISAN

R3, C2, Institutional Zone, Vacant Forested Area

107

XVI

MIDDLE QUEZON HILL

R1, R3

108

XVI

PINSAO PROPER

R1, R3, Vacant Forested Area

109

XVI

VICTORIA VILLAGE

R1, R3, C2

110

XVII

NEW LUCBAN

R2, C1

111

XVII

ALFONSO TABORA

R2, C1

C1

R1, R2, R3, C2 R1, R3, Vacant Forested Area, Cemetery Zone

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CLUP of Baguio City 112

XVII

SOUTH SANITARY CAMP

R2, Institutional Zone

113

XVII

TRANCOVILLE

R2, R3, C1, Institutional Zone

114

XVII

MAGSAYSAY PRIVATE ROAD

R2, C1, Institutional Zone

115

XVII

NORTH SANITARY CAMP

R2, R3, C2, Institutional Zone, Sewerage Treatment Plant

116

XVIII

ABCR

C1, Institutional Zone

117

XVIII

RIZAL MONUMENT

C1, Park Zone, Institutional Zone

118

XVIII

KAGITINGAN

C1, Institutional Zone

119

XVIII

UPPER MAGSAYSAY

C1

120

XVIII

KABAYANIHAN

C1, Institutional Zone

121

XVIII

KAYANG-HILLTOP

C1

122

XVIII

AZCKO

C1,Institutional Zone, Park Zone

123

XVIII

TEODORA ALONZO

C1, Institutional Zone, Abattoir Zone

124

XX

HOLY GHOST PROPER

R2, C1, Institutional Zone

125

XX

HOLY GHOST EXTENSION

R2, Institutional Zone

126

XX

HONEYMOON - HOLYGHOST

R2, C1

127

XX

MANUEL ROXAS

R2, Institutional Zone

128

XX

IMELDA VILLAGE

R2, Institutional Zone

F.

2012-2020

PROGRAMS/PROJECTS/ACTIVITIES (P/P/As) 1.

First Thematic Area a.

Goal

:

:

Prevention and Mitigation

Identify hazards and mitigate & prevent potential impacts by reducing vulnerabilities and exposure thru enhancing capabilities of communities

Objective 1: To locate on site hazardous areas in the city. Programs/Projects/ Activities 1.

2.

To conduct assessment and 1. surveys on a. Subsidence/ unstable slopes b. Waterways  Drainage  Creeks and gulleys  Sewer lines c. Major earthquake faults d. Utilities  Water  Telephone  Electric  Cables  Fire Hydrants To identify the hazardous 2. areas for titling under the name of the city government of Baguio to be converted as open areas /green parks

OUTPUT Digitized survey maps a.

Budget (with Source) (City and National/ International)D RRM Fund

Subsidence/ unstable slopes b. Waterways Initial (25M)  Drainage  Creeks and gulleys  Sewer lines c. Major earthquake faults d. Utilities  Water  Telephone  Electric  Cables  Fire Hydrants Hazardous lots converted to open/green parks titled under the name of the City Government of Baguio

Time Frame

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH Utility Companies

2013– 2016

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Objective 2: To identify and construct critical infrastructures to mitigate and prevent disasters. Programs/Projects/ Activities

OUTPUT

Budget (with Source) (City and National/ International)DR RM Fund

To construct: Constructed a. Slope protection a. Slope protection b. Drainage System b. Drainage System c. Sewer lines c. Sewer lines d. Fencing on Hazardous d. Fencing on Hazardous Areas particularly on Areas particularly on Initial (100M) vents and sinkholes vents and sinkholes e. Stabilization of unstable e. Stabilization of unstable slopes by planting of slopes by planting of deep rooted trees and deep rooted trees and vegetation with fibber vegetation with fibber matting matting

Time Frame 2013 2023

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH Utility Companies

Objective 3: To strictly enforce the implementation of existing national laws (building code, fire code, water code, sanitation code, environmental code etc.) local policies & ordinance (zoning and others). Programs/Projects/ Activities a.

To identify and purchase a. relocation sites;

b.

Inform the b. contractors/developers about the location hazardous areas; c. To compile database of national and local laws and ordinances pertaining to development

c.

Budget (with Source) Relocated affected houses (City and National/ International)D Mandatory compliance of RRM Fund contractors; Initial (100M) Updated database of national and local laws and ordinances pertaining to development OUTPUT

Time Frame 2013 -

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH Utility Companies

2 0 1 8

Objective 4: To integrate the DRRM and CCA in all IEC activities and development plans. Programs/Projects/ Activities a.

b.

c.

To enact ordinance a. institutionalizing DRRM and CCA in all development plans; To include in the treasure b. hunting ordinance the illegal excavation and quarrying that will cause unstable slopes and subsidence; To properly inform c. developers on DRRM and CCA.

OUTPUT

Budget (with Source) (City and National/ Internation al)DRRM Fund

Enacted ordinance institutionalizing DRRM and CCA in all development plans; Inclusion in the treasure hunting ordinance the illegal excavation and Initial (5M) quarrying that will cause unstable slopes and subsidence; Properly informed developers on DRRM and CCA.

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH Utility Companies

Time Frame 2013 2015

Objective 5: To establish and sustain early warning devices (audible and visible) in all hazardous areas. Programs/Projects/ Activities a.

b.

To install warning and a. monitoring (audible and visible)systems on all critical/ main water ways b. To install signage on all hazardous areas

Budget (with Source) Installed warning and (City and monitoring system on all National/ critical/ main water ways International)DR Installed signage on all RM Fund hazardous areas Initial (10M) OUTPUT

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH Utility Companies

Time Frame 20132016

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Objective 6: To intensify information dissemination and monitoring campaign. Programs/Projects/ Activities a.

b.

OUTPUT

To prepare modules, a. primers, visual aids/ video clips in the conduct of IEC To conduct IEC among b. stakeholders

Increased awareness of the public on the different risks and hazards Conducted IEC among stakeholders

Budget (with Source) (City and National/ Internation al)DRRM Fund Initial (5M)

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH Utility Companies

Time Frame 2013 2014

Objective 7: To enhance the capability of the barangay disaster risk and reduction committee and private sectors. Programs/Projects/ Activities a.

b.

Budget Time Lead Agencies (with Source) Frame Trainings and Seminars (City and CDRRMO 2013 conducted National/ CPDO 2016 International CEO )DRRM Fund CBAO Competent and well CASS prepared BDRRM Initial (5M) CEPMO Committee/Well equipped DENR BDRRMC DPWH Utility Companies OUTPUT

To enhance and strengthen a. the BDRRM Committee and private sectors through trainings, seminars and workshops b. To equip BDRRMC with responders kit etc.

Objective 8: To strengthen management and utilization of hazard monitoring equipment/ devices Programs/Projects/ Activities a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

To conduct regular meetings and maintenance of the equipments and devices; To purchase and upgrade equipment(emergency lighting tower)exclusive for CDRRM Identification of lot and construction of DRRM facility To design and construct gender sensitive permanent evacuation/ multi-purpose facility To put up multi sector radio transmitter/ communication system

Budget (with Source) To conduct regular (City and meetings and maintenance National/ of the equipments and International) devices; DRRM Fund To purchase and upgrade equipment(emergency Initial (150M) lighting tower)exclusive for CDRRM Identification of lot and construction of DRRM facility To design and construct gender sensitive permanent evacuation/ multi-purpose facility To put up multi sector radio transmitter/ communication system OUTPUT

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

Lead Agencies CDRRMO CPDO CEO CBAO CASS CEPMO DENR DPWH

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Time Frame 2013 2 0 1 8

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2.

2012-2020

Second Thematic Area: Preparedness

Goal: To ensure minimal impact to lives, properties and environment in the event of a disaster. Objective 1: Strengthen the CDRRM Office Programs/Projects/ Budget OUTPUT Lead Agencies Time Frame Activities (with Source) Realign the existing CDRRM 1. Established Office 8 Million from CMO/City Ad Oct 2012 to 2013 Office with the NDRRM located beside the BFD CMO/OCD CMO/City Ad Oct – Dec 2012 Office and BCEMS CMO 2. Fill up the appointment of CDRRM Officer and 3. Staff as mandated in RA 10121

Objective 2 : Prepare a master plan for disaster risk reduction and management Programs/Projects/ Activities Review and Consolidate existing CDRRM and BDRRM Disaster Plans

Prepare and Publish a City Disaster Preparedness Manual

OUTPUT CDRRM Master Plan

CDRRM Manual

Enhance CDRRM capability Upgraded ICS for Information and Communication System

Budget Lead Agencies Time Frame (with Source) P 500,000.00 CMO/City Ad Oct – Dec 2012 CDRRM Fund Planning Office OCD Council Representative 500,000.00 CDRRM Office December 2012 City Planning Office OCD 2 million City MIS November 2012 CDRRM Fund CDRRM Office OCD

Objective 3: Enhance the existing awareness of the citizenry to respond to disasters. Programs/Projects/ OUTPUT Activities Establish a website and Social network accounts social network for City Disaster Bulletin Institutionalization of DRRM Training Syllabus in the curriculum Student Handbook

Inclusion of Disaster Preparedness in PreEmployment Orientation

Orientation Modules/Kits

Celebration of Disaster Preparedness Month

Programs and List of Activities

Budget (with Source)

Lead Agencies MIS Office CDRRM Office

Time Frame December 2012

120,000.00 CDRRM Fund OCD Fund

Council for June 2013 Education DepEd, CHED, Tesda PMA, Napolcom OCD (for monitoring) DOLE June 2013 CSC HR of all institutions/ establishments

P 100,000.00

City July 2013 Administrator OCD DOH All gov't., nongov’t. agencies

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CLUP of Baguio City Design Templates for IEC

IEC Leaflets/Brochures/ Checklist

300,000.00 CDRRM Funds

Distribute disaster preparedness leaflets Conduct massive IEC through quad media

Establish a website and social network for City Disaster Bulletin

Audio-taped/Videorecorded advertisements in terminals ABC meetings, Kapihan, Weekly Ugnayan, Radio stations and networks Social network accounts

2012-2020

CDRRM Staff OCD Association of Barangay Councils CDRRM Staff Public Information Office OCD

December 2012

MIS Office CDRRM Office

December 2012

December 2012

June 2013

Objective 4: Build the capacity of the: a) city, b) the barangays c) the families, and d) each individual to effectively and efficiently prepare for any disaster. Programs/Projects/ OUTPUT Activities Conduct continuing Disaster Number of Trained Preparedness Training (First Barangay Disaster Aid Training, BLS Training, Responders EMT) in the City and Barangays Strengthen hospital Enhance the capabilities of capacity to manage disaster personnel in all trauma survivors units of different Hospitals

Budget (with Source) 2 Million CDRRM Funds DOH OCD

Lead Agencies

Time Frame

CDRRMC Continuing DOH, BFP, OCD, NEDA, etc. BH Services Office DOH

June 2013

Objective 5: Ensure availability of structures, materials and equipments to be used. Programs/Projects/ Activities Inventory of existing disaster resources from different stakeholders

OUTPUT

Master list of Available Resources (human, equipments, materials, supplies, etc.) Upgrading and purchase of List of equipment additional equipments purchased and upgraded Construct evacuation Evacuation Center in centers for vulnerable areas Vulnerable Areas

Budget (with Source)

Lead Agencies

Time Frame

CDRRM Staff

December 2012

CDRRMO Funds Logistic Staff CDRRMO CCRRMO Funds CBAO 20 million CSWD

December 2012 2012-2013

Objective 6: Develop and install early warning systems and devices for any type of disaster. Programs/Projects/ Activities Identification and installation of early warning systems and devices in every barangay Conduct regular inspection of EWS

OUTPUT EWS installed in all barangays

Budget Lead Agencies Time Frame (with Source) Barangay BDRRMC December 2012 budget

Inspection and Assessment CDRRM Funds Reports

DRRMO

Quarterly

Objective 7: Conduct monitoring and evaluation of disaster preparedness. Programs/Projects/ Budget OUTPUT Lead Agencies Time Frame Activities (with Source) Conduct performance Annual Disaster CDRRM funds CDRRMO January 2013 implementation review of Implementation Report Disaster Master Plan Seal of Disaster Preparedness VOLUME 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Objective 8: Ensure financial risk protection of the citizenry primarily the vulnerable groups. Programs/Projects/ Budget OUTPUT Lead Agencies Time Frame Activities (with Source) Identify vulnerable groups List of identified vulnerable ABC Office November 2012 and families groups/families/ CDRRMO communities Distribution of Sponsored Number of beneficiaries Sponsored CSWDO December 2012 PhilHealth Cards to PDAF vulnerable indigent groups

3.

Third Thematic Area: Response

Goal: To ensure timely response to preserve life and meet the basic subsistence needs of the affected constituents based on quality care and acceptable standards during and immediately after disaster. Objective 1: To conduct safe and organized search and rescue operations in times of calamities. Ex. Implement ICS - Augmentation from other agencies Programs/Projects/ Activities Identify all response teams (NGO’s) in terms of their skills, capabilities and equipment. Convention of all responders/Summit SOP(ICS) >Incident Command System, Search And Rescue, Basic Life/Trauma Support, Standard First Aid, Ropemanship, Mass Casualty Incident, Land navigation, Water Safety, Firefighting, To conduct trainings on: a. Evacuation Management b. Community Kitchen Management (FCDP) c. Livelihood

Objective 2:

Budget Lead Agencies (with Source) Complete lists of accredited CDRRM Funds CDRRMO, OCD response teams and NGO’s, number of Manpower and functional Equipment RE-Activation of TAMBULI 200,000 CDRRMO, OCD CDRRM Competent responders 500,000 CDRRMO,OCD Upgraded skills and 250, 000 CDRRMO, OCD equipment OUTPUT

Organized Evacuation System

150,000

OCSWADO

Time Frame ASAP

January 2013 March-December 2013

March-December 2013

To provide immediate medical aid, nutritional assessment, psycho-social care and temporary livelihood activities to affected constituents.

Example of short term livelihood: handicraft Management of the Evacuation center, security, gender related services Programs/Projects/ Budget OUTPUT Lead Agencies Time Frame Activities (with Source) Listing/identification of Properly Identified victims CDRRMO, CDRRMC(task 2013-2018 affected/victims/survivors/I for intervention OCSWADO agencies EMS, 2013-2018 nternally displaced persons Assisted Victims 1 million yearly CDRRMC 2013 , casualties Activated pre and post 8 Million Operations Provision of Relief Evacuation centers set-up Center, HSO, Assistance Construction of new Hosp., PNP, NBI, Setting Up and activation of Evacuation Centers BFP Evacuation Camps/Centers CSWDO DEP-ED LGU-Baguio VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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CLUP of Baguio City Operation of Evacuation Evacuation Centers are Camps /Centers available • Issuance of family Evacuees properly Access Card documented • Master listing of Relocation sites Identified evacuees • Organization of committees among survivor/IDP’s • Identification of relocation sites Provision of Psycho-social Psycho-social first aid Support Interventions provided Mass Feeding Food provided

500 000. 00 yearly

2012-2020

CSWDO, HSO, 2013-2018 Barangay’s, 2013-2018 NGO’S OCSWADO, CHO, NGO’S CPDO, CEO, Assessor’s Office, Brgy.

200 000 yearly DSWD, CSWDO, Hospitals, Civic Orgs. PRC CSWDO, DSWD, HSO, NGO’s Financial Assistance for Security and insurance for 500,000 CDRRMO , Responders (Food , Medical, responders 1 million CWSDO Insurance, Gas Centralized keeping of CDRRMO Allowance/Transportation) purchased equipment Purchase of basic equipments: megaphone, stretcher, full body harness, body bags, chain saw and others

2013-2018 HSO(Nutrition Office)

2013-2018 2013-2015

Objective 3: To conduct reliable damage assessment and needs analysis in order to determine the actual needs of affected constituents Programs/Projects/ Activities Assessment of

Budget (with Source)

OUTPUT Complete lists of Damaged Facilities and Private Facilities

A. Damaged Government Facilities

Time Frame

CDRRMO, Brgy, 2013-2018 CEO, BFP, CWDO, BCPO other agencies, e.g. international agencies, etc.

B. Private Facilities

4.

Lead Agencies

Fourth Thematic Area: Rehabilitation and Recovery

Based on the objectives that would address the gaps in the Rehabilitation and Recovery core area of DRRM, projects, programs and activities (PAPs) were identified. The implementation of these PAPs would ensure a responsive and effective recovery program. Objective No. 1:

Provide basic needs in terms of emergency feeding, housing, clothing and other essential services to disaster victims.

Programs/Projects/Activities 1. Emergency Feeding Program 2. Food for Work Program 3. Core shelter Program 4. Provision of Medical Services

Output Number of individuals or families fed

Budget/Source Baguio City DRRMF

Lead Office/ Partners CSWD, CEO, CBAO, BHD, CPDO Partners: DSWD, Red Cross, WFO, AFP, PNP, BFP, NHA, NGOs

Timeframe 3 days 15 days to 1 month 6 months to 1 year 2 weeks to 1 month

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Objective No. 2:

2012-2020

Restore vital infrastructure based on disaster-resilient standards and services such as electricity, water, transportation and communication

1. Conduct damage assessment and prepare rehabilitation plan

Damage report Rehab plan

Lead Office/ Partners CEO, CBAO, Partners: BENECO, BWD

2. Repair or reconstruction of vital infrastructure based on disaster-resilient standards

Vital infrastructure and services restored

CEO, CBAO Partner: DPWH

Programs/Projects/Activities

Objective No. 3:

Output

Budget/Source DRRMF

Timeframe 6 months

1 year DRRMF DPWH

Ensure the availability of prime and basic commodities including fuel in local markets at the suggested retail price (SRP).

Programs/Projects/Activities

Source of Budget CDRRMF DTI

Output

1. Mobilization of price monitoring teams and consumer networks

Prices stabilized, price monitoring teams mobilized

2. Conduct inventory of prime and basic commodities including fuel (gasoline, LPG) in consumer outlets

Inventory; basic commodities including fuel are available

Lead Agency LGU, DTI

Timeframe Immediately after disaster 3 months

CDRRMF DTI

LGU, DTI

Objective No. 4: Provide livelihood programs to affected communities Programs/Projects/Activities 1. Livelihood Activities

Output No. of households

Budget/Source CDRRMF

2. Capital Assistance 3. Practical Skills Development Training

Lead Office/ Partners CSWDO, PESO Partners: DSWD, TESDA, DOLE, DTI, OWWA, DepEd, NGOs

Timeframe 6 months to 1 year

Objective No. 5: Assist disaster victims in the evaluation and processing of their claims Programs/Projects/Activities 1. Financial Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situation (AICS)

Output No. of families assisted

Budget/Source DRRMF

Lead Office/ Partners CSWDO

Timeframe 1 week to 1 month

Partners: DSWD, OCD

2. Balik Probinsiya Program 3. Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) 4. Burial Assistance

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Objective No. 6 Regular monitoring and evaluation of programs Programs/Projects/Activities

Output

1. Activation of Project Monitoring Team (PMT)

Activated PMT

2. Conduct of regular monitoring and assessment

Monitoring and evaluation reports

3. Conduct of consultations with local officials and beneficiaries

Problem-solving/ consultation meetings

Budget/Source CDRRMF

Lead Office/ Partners CDRRMO

Timeframe 6 months to 1 year

Objective No. 7: Encourage the spirit of “bayanihan” especially in the implementation of Rehabilitation and Recovery programs. Lead Office/ Programs/Projects/Activities Output Budget/Source Timeframe Partners Networking to tap “bayanihan DRRMF BDC, 2 weeks to 1 stakeholders, volunteers and spirit” instilled BDRRMC month donors to assist in the and rehabilitation program institutionalized Objective No. 8: Maintain peace and order during the rehabilitation process Lead Office/ PAPs Output Budget/Source Partners Conduct of regular patrols by Police and BPAI CDRRMF BCPO, BPAI the BCPO/PNP and BPAI visibility

Timeframe Response and rehab periods/ continuing

Objective No. 9: Identify safe relocation sites for resettlement of displaced families, ensure the construction of disaster-resilient housing and provide needed basic services PAPs

Output

1. Identification of suitable sites for resettlement of displaced disaster victims.

Available sites that are safe and suitable for relocation Disaster resilient housing in resettlement areas with basic services provided

2. Implement Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)

DRRMF

Lead Office/ Partners CBAO, CEO

NHA, DRRMF

Partners: NHA, HUDCC, HLURB

Budget/Source

Timeframe 1 month

6 months- 1 year

Objective No. 10: Institutionalize child, gender-sensitive, elderly and differently abled individuals focused policy guidelines on disaster management including the operations of evacuation centers PAPs Installation of gendersensitive facilities and protection of the rights and dignity of the vulnerable individual

Output Secure evacuation centers Separate restrooms for male and female and appropriate facilities for differently abled persons

Budget/Source DRRMF

Lead Office/ Partners CSWD

Timeframe 2 weeks to 1 month

Partners: CBAO

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Objective No. 11: Ensure the psychosocial well-being of disaster victims and emergency responders. PAPs

Output

Provide psychosocial support to disaster victims and emergency responders

Budget/Source

Psychosocial services

DRRMF

Lead Office/ Partners CSWDO Partners: DSWD, DOH, Red Cross

Timeframe 6 months

Objective No. 12: Ensure proper handling, distribution and accounting of external support and donations for disaster assistance and recovery. PAPs 1. Inventory and accounting of donations 2. Efficient coordination of the lead agency with NGOs and other partners for the proper handling and distribution of donations

Output Systematic distribution of goods and other donations

Budget/ Source ODA, donations

Lead Office/ Partners CSWDO, CDRRMO

Timeframe 3 months-1 year/ rehab period

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IV. SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths Active tourism sector: core engine of local economy Seat of sub-national government agencies Active business sector & export industry (high value/low volume) Active civil society groups High literacy rate Functional city/barangay governance Peaceful environment

Opportunities Rich Natural Environment (topography, scenic views, pine trees, historical sites) Tourism haven: home to diverse cultural heritage, cool climate Baguio City as gateway to the rest of the Cordilleras & potential economic growth center Education Center of the North Top Ten Next Wave Cities Baguio City (as part of Cordillera) form part of the north Luzon Agribusiness quadrangle

Weaknesses  Inadequate (quality/quantity) tourismsupport facilities  Limited city LGU financial resources to implement critical projects  Congestion/overdevelopment in some areas  Presence of physical constraints (sinkholes, steep slopes, landslide susceptibility, karst topography)  Inadequate solid/liquid waste management system  Inadequate implementation of national and local laws/rules/regulations/policies  Uncontrolled settlements into nondisposable areas (road-right-of-way, reservations, watersheds, etc.)

Threats Stiff competition of tourism destination areas Inadequate access facilities to Baguio Need to cope with the requirements for rapid urbanization Occurrence of natural calamities Limited water source Limited areas for habitation/development

V.

    

DEVELOPMENT THRUSTS A. B.

Preservation of nature’s best Ecological Balance

VI. FUNCTIONAL ROLE OF THE CITY A. B. C. D. E. F. G.

Garden / Flower City Summer Capital of the Philippines Regional Government Center Tourists Center Education Center of the North Center for Health Services Top Ten Next Wave Cities VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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VII. Comprehensive Land Use Plan A.

Vision: The City of Baguio envisions itself to be:

“ A breath taking City of Pines a living stage of culture and arts in harmony with nature , a prime tourist destination and center of quality education with secured, responsible, empowered and united people.” This vision underscores the importance of conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of Baguio City with its pine clad mountainous landscape and cool temperate climate. It is the preservation and enhancement of this unique incomparable natural beauty of the city that shall make Baguio City breathtaking to everyone, visitors and residents alike. The city is a melting pot of various cultures from the Cordillera highlands to the lowlands of Luzon and even from outside the country. The city shall be a living stage of the way of life of different cultures as they contribute to city development. The city’s role in regional and national development as prime tourist destination and center of quality education is also recognized. These two functions will continue to be the cornerstone of the city’s development in many years to come. The city’s tourism development hinges to a great deal on the proper management, preservation and enhancement of the city’s natural tourism assets namely its beautiful mountainous wooded landscape. Such natural assets will be complemented by the provision of world class tourist amenities and facilities. On the other hand, the city’s foothold in the educational service sector will continue to be strengthened with the continued provision of quality education (e.g. excellent facilities, competent instructors and upgraded curriculum) particularly in the tertiary level. Aside from traditional courses, the city’s colleges and universities will provide various courses attune to the changing needs of the society. The “security” of the city’s residents is an important element of the vision. This means a city where peace and order reigns and criminality is very minimal, if not eradicated. Basic needs in education and health and other social facilities are provided adequately to empower the people, thus, making them productive and active participants in the economic and social development activities of the city. While the government provides for the security and needs of its residents, the city residents including the government officials themselves will possess the positive traits of responsible citizenship and be united in city building following the vision agreed upon. This vision is a product of various consultations from the grassroots (barangay) then to city wide level. Citizens from all sectors, government and private, contributed their own inputs to the city’s development vision. This vision has been finally adopted by a multisectoral group in a conference held on December 11, 2009 at Hotel Supreme, Baguio City.

B.

Mission “We shall create a sustainable and enabling environment that will promote economic stability and ensure the general wellbeing of our citizenry.” VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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The following are the specific development goals of the city consistent with the overall development vision.

C.

Goals 1.

Balanced ecology

This goal underscores the importance of preservation and enhancement of the city’s natural environment while pursuing socio-economic activities. The balance ecology also means causing the least disruption as possible to the natural environment of the city to allow the flourishing of various flora and fauna in an effort to to promote a stable bio-diversity. This goal also includes the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in response to problems brought about by global warming.

2.

Faster economic growth

Economic growth will not only be faster but sustainable as well with the diversification of the citys’ economic base. Tourism and education will still be the main engines of the city’s economic growth but other sectors such as trading and commerce, information and communication technology services and other related businesses/ services will be developed. A low volume, non pollutive, less water consumption will be the preferred industries for the city.

3.

Higher levels and culturally enriched social development

The city aims to provide adequate social services and facilities in areas of education, health, housing, social welfare to attain higher levels of social development. An improved human development index representing literacy rate, income and life expectancy is expected to be attained. Focus will be given to provision of affordable but decent housing to many residents of the city. Respect for diversity in culture among the different peoples in the city shall be an integral part of social development as well.

4.

Efficient and effective development administration and management

Good governance will be manifested in an efficient and effective development administration and management. This means the city officials and staff will strive for transparency, accountability, responsibility, competency, efficiency and effectivity in the performance of their functions to provide better services to the city’s residents. Government funds will be wisely used; bureaucracy shall be lean and responsive to the needs of the people and services rendered effectively with the least cost.

5.

Efficient and effective infrastructure support facilities and utilities

The scale and type of infrastructure to be implemented would shape the future of the city. This goal would provide for adequate and quality road networks with pedestrian sidewalks, high technology communication facilities and utilities and other urban infrastructure which enhances the natural environment. A low scale urban infrastructure is preferable. Drainage, public buildings and other related infrastructure will be upgraded.

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D.

2012-2020

Strategies

The strategies / policies are supportive of the overarching vision of development which is that all activities should be in harmony with nature or enhances the natural environment. All infrastructure development must be undertaken with this in mind considering the fragile ecosystem of the city, the limited space and water shortage. Economic activities shall also follow sustainable development practices which is ensuring that needs of the future generation are provided for while using these resources for the present generation. In order to achieve the development vision and the enunciated development goals and objectives, the following major development strategies/ policies shall be implemented.

1.

To promote balanced ecology and preserve enhance the natural beauty of the city, it shall: a.

b. c. d.

e. f. g. h. i.

j. k.

l.

m. n. o.

Enhance and improve the natural landscape and aesthetics of the city and this shall be the primary consideration in the introduction of any land improvements and in the designing of structures and other developments. Provide pedestrian walkways as a policy in all major and barangay streets to promote healthy lifestyle and save on energy costs. Preserve and enhance existing forest and plant more trees to promote a forested environment and decrease effect of global warming. Preservation of proclaimed reservation areas. In cases, where there is a compelling need for amendment of the proclamation, an intensive review/assessment of the present status of the concerned areas shall be done to guide decision making for their best uses. Strictly enforce laws and regulations on anti-pollution, littering, illegal tree cutting and other related laws. Discourage high density developments through high rise buildings as this will further aggravate the congestion of the city. Promote low density development in the city encouraging developments to spread in the LISTT areas. Proper and strict enforcement of national and local laws/regulations on natural resources/physical and land uses and environment. Designation of special areas of significance strategic to the spatial development of the city with unique and special zoning ordinances such as the Leonard Wood Road to South Drive Corridor, Marcos Highway, Kennon Road Provision for green spaces in strategic areas and encouraging gardens in buildings/structures within the city. Enhance Burnham Park and Botanical Garden Parks with more trees and other diverse ornamental plans, improved existing facilities and picnic grounds. These parks should promote an atmosphere of quietness allow visitors to commune with nature and thus means less commercialization. Establish a true nature park within each barangay with absolutely no vendors. Towards this end, the city should have a working plant nursery to support the city and barangay nature parks. Establish a new engineered land fill site and close Irisan Dumpsite. Explore alternative Solid Waste Management technologies. Collect biodegradable waste separately and establish an operational composting site in every barangay or a city wide composting plant. VOLUME 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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p.

2.

b. c. d.

e.

f. g.

Promote the city as prime tourist destination by preserving and enhancing its natural environment as this is the city’s distinct advantage over other tourist destinations in the country Encourage tourism related establishments to provide world class facilities and services to cater to the needs of tourists. Embark on aggressive marketing of the city as sites or venues for various conferences, golf tournaments, art festivals etc. Continue building up the city as Prime Education Center North of Manila through support to schools and universities in the city. Support can be in the form of better road access and other infrastructure support to schools and universities, provision of awards and incentives to outstanding schools and universities etc. Invite and provide incentives to Information and Communication Technology (ICT) high technology industries such as business process outsourcing to locate to Baguio City given the city’s pool of skilled IT graduates. Provide incentives to other related businesses provided they are non pollutive, low weight /volume and less water consuming industries. Continue providing support to micro and small medium enterprises especially t hose selling souvenir products for tourists.

To attain higher levels and culturally enriched social development, the city shall: a. b. c.

d. e.

4.

Promote a much improved solid waste management system such as providing for mechanized trucks for collecting waste, provision of color coded recycle bins for households, operational material recovery facility etc.

To accelerate economic growth, the city shall: a.

3.

2012-2020

Preserve and restore cultural heritage/historical/scientific sites and resources to their pristine status Mount cultural festivals / exhibits showcasing the various cultures of Filipinos. Support government hospitals in the city by providing more medical facilities/ equipment to enable patients access quality health care at low costs. Provide for low cost but decent housing units for the city’s residents. Provide for operational quality day care centers in each barangay.

Improved Quality of Social Services a.

To achieve efficient and effective development administration and management. 1.

Promote the elements of good governance in all transactions or activities of the city such as accountability, transparency, competency, responsibility predictability, efficiency and effectiveness.

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2.

Explore development complementation with the adjoining LISTT municipalities for a coordinated planning and implementation of required interventions. For example, ensure consistency of Baguio’s land uses with the BLISTT Framework Plan and with other regional and national development plans.

3.

Pursue coordinated planning and implementation of programs/projects of national government agencies and LGUs to avoid duplication and for synchronization of related activities.

4.

Undertake rational clustering of barangays for easier planning, investment programming, implementation and monitoring/ evaluation of programs/ projects.

5.

Promote tripartite partnership between private investors, labor, and public to gain support to the City’s Investment Portfolio.

6.

Intensify revenue sourcing through increased tax collection, identification of new sources of revenue, implementation of fiscal laws and policies with the aim of increasing income to improve quality services of the city.

7.

Reduce cost of local government services without sacrificing its quality to increase fiscal capacity of Baguio City. The funds saved can be used to fund other programs/ projects of the city.

8.

Continue enhancing the organizational and technical competency of city officials and staff through appropriate trainings and seminars. Seek mutually beneficial relationships with other LGUs such as through BLISTT through active participation in various inter LGU networking program or activities.

9.

b.

2012-2020

10.

Explore other alternatives to funding critical big development projects in the city such as Build Operate and Transfer, bond flotation, grants, etc.

11.

Continue promoting technical exchanges with Sister Cities

To achieve efficient and effective infrastructure support facilities and utilities. 1.

Promote the use of public instead of private transport to reduce congestion and save on fuel.

2.

Establish pedestrian walkways in all roads in the city to encourage walking and healthy lifestyle.

3.

Provide efficient and effective circulation/access within the city with the aim of shortening travel, reducing traffic & congestion and lowering transport cost.

4.

Locate urban development services in strategic areas to influence development and reduce congestion/ traffic. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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E.

F.

2012-2020

5.

Provision of equitable distribution/allocation of urban services/facilities/ utilities in all areas following their functional roles to the overall city development

6.

Develop new environmental friendly transportation system that will reduce travel time and save on energy.

7.

Encourage private sector to pour Information and Communication Technology (ICT) investments in the city to support the Business Processing Outsourcing (BPO) and tourism and education industries.

8.

Improve existing drainage facilities.

Overall Policies: 1.

Observance/Maintenance of the Geo-physical integrity of Baguio City pursuing sustainable development at levels following resources carrying capacities.

2.

Enhancement/improvement of the natural landscape and aesthetics of the area should be the primary consideration in the introduction of any land uses/structures and other developments.

3.

Preservation and enhancement of natural resources (air, water, forest) to their best and sustainable uses.

4.

Preservation/Restoration of cultural heritage/historical/scientific sites and resources at their pristine status.

5.

Decongest highly densed areas following standard levels.

6.

Provision of efficient and effective circulation/access and other urban development services/facilities/utilities in all governance units in accordance to their roles and functions in the overall city development.

7.

Baguio’s land uses shall conform/complement the development roles of adjacent LISTT municipalities/Province of Benguet and the region in general.

ALTERNATIVE SPATIAL STRATEGY

This phase aims to determine the most viable spatial strategy to realize the aspirations of the people. This will be done by analyzing at least three alternative spatial strategies considering the development potentials as well as the challenges most specially the availability/unavailability of lands required to sustain the needs of the population. This will involve the projection of supply and demand of urban land requirements, sieve-mapping analysis the generation of preferred urban form.

1.

The Alternative Spatial Strategy

In the selection of the preferred strategy, it is anchored on the city’s vision which is translated into the development thrusts, the preservation of the nature’s best and ecological balance.

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The method used for this purpose is the Goal Achievement Matrix. The goals of this plan that are geared towards the attainment of the vision are assigned weights.

Table 34. Goal Achievement Matrix DEVELOPMENT GOALS

%

TREND EXTENSION

1. BALANCE ECOLOGY a. Forest cover (Area/has.) b. Less traffic (CBD-Decongestion, No. of vehicles) c. Lower air pollution level d. More greenbelts / Community parks established e. Solid waste management sustained 2. FASTER ECONOMIC GROWTH a. No. of employed persons b. Amount of Investment Generated c. No. of Tourists Arrival 3. HIGHER LEVELS AND CULTURALLY ENRICHED SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT a. No. of tertiary students enrolled b. No. of families assisted on housing, health and other social services 4. EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION a. Increase of income of LGU b. Transparency and accountability c. Lean bureaucracy d. High public participation in planning, implementation and monitoring 5. SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE

30 6 6

18 4 2

19 3 3

MULTINODAL URBAN FORM 25 5 5

6 6

2 5

3 5

5 5

2 5

6 20 3 9 8 15

5 12 4 4 4 8

5 12 4 4 4 8

5 15 5 5 5 9

5 12 4 4 4 8

6 9

4 4

4 4

5 4

4 4

20

20

20

21

19

5 5 5 5

5 6 5 4

5 6 5 4

5 6 5 5

4 6 5 4

15

15

15

14

15

a. Roads paved (Km) b. Communication lines established c. % of HH served with potable water TOTAL

5 5 5 100

5 6 4 73

5 6 4 74

4 6 4 84

5 6 4 70

LINEAR URBAN FORM

CONCENTRIC URBAN FORM 16 2 2

The Preferred Spatial Strategy: Multi-Nodal Urban Form

a.

Alternative 1: Trend Extension

Trend extension shows the future urban development as a continuation of the pattern of growth the city has followed over the years. It resembles the Dispersed Sheet urban form of Kevin Lynch, which described as having “maximum flexibility, personal comfort, independence and where local participation is highly possible”. Trend extension is the result of individuals building anywhere according to their own preferences and convenience with minimal government intervention. Development is spread evenly over a wide continuous tract, very accessible to open land, and transportation is designed as a continuous grid. Implication of this type of development: No vivid of memorable image of the city and costly provision of public service.

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b.

2012-2020

Alternative 2: Linear Urban Form

The linear urban form, also known as the ribbon or strip development, characterized by concentration of development along both sides of major transportation routes such as roads, navigable rivers or other form of transport network. It generally starts on a one-lot-deep into a grid system. Residential, commercial, industrial, institutional and mixed-use developments intensify along these areas through time. However, the magnitude of development will be bounded within reasonable distance from the road or river easements. This can also be another form of trend extension. It also resembles what Kevin Lynch refers to as the Urban Star which is characterized by a strong urban core with secondary centers of moderate densities, distributed along main radial roads, Implications: very strong visual image; congestions likely to occur in the urban core and the main radials; provision of circumferential road networks to connect secondary centers can be costly.

c.

Alternative 3: Multi-Nodal Urban Form

The multi-nodal urban form re-directs development away from the urban core or city center toward identified urban growth areas or nodes. It approximates Lynch’s Galaxy form, which is characterized by cluster of development with each cluster having its own specialization. The major center provides specialized facilities and services to its nodes and acts as its external linkage to the other centers of the city or municipality. The nodes support the major center as its captive market while providing neighborhood facilities and services to its area of influence. Under this urban form, a number of additional mixed-use growth areas will be developed outside the Poblacion area or existing center of development. Another related nodal-central type of development is radial and circumferential. It shows a development channel fanning out from a given center where points of activities are interconnected by radial and circumferential road system which are potential development corridors.

d.

Alternative 4: Concentric Urban Form

The concentric urban form reflects an outward expansion of urban development from the city center/core induced by the construction of new circumferential and radial roads. This spatial pattern matches the Core City of Kevin Lynch which has the unique characteristic of concentrating development into one continuous body originating from the center or core. Aiming to maximize land use in the Poblacion or city center to provide more open space outside, this urban form redirects future development in and around the Poblacion/city center, extending to the adjoining barangays or barrios. As a result, the direction of growth enlarges the urban core. Confining development into one continuous body implies high density urban activities that can increase discomfort from noise, pollution, etc. likewise, housing types are limited to high-rise apartments or compact dwelling units to maximize space.

2.

THE PREFERRED SPATIAL STRATEGY

A Multi-Nodal Urban Form concept is recommended in attaining the development goals of the city. It is more advantageous to the Baguio’s unique terrain formation as this will re-direct development away from and decongest the central business district (CBD) toward strategically identified urban growth areas or nodes. The CBD, as the core node, is supported by other strategically located smaller growth nodes along Irisan, Marcos Highway, Camp 7/Loakan and Country Club. The smaller nodes are located near existing settlements to provide convenience in terms of distance and travel time. The city’s CBD have already an intense commercial activities with all the banking and finance centres, the mall centres, the internet services centres, the city’s public market, Hotels and restaurants, the SMEs and the tourist destinations, like Burnham park, Cathedral and even SM. Moreover, VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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institutional buildings, like private schools/universities, regional offices, and residential abodes are found therein. All these activities have congested the CBD and has caused traffic jam, pollution, and problems on peace and order. Hence, there is a need to establish multi-growth nodes in order to sustain a manageable core node while enhancing potential development corridors along these other growth nodes. The other growth nodes, on the other hand, are characterized by clusters of development having its own specialization while providing daily needs and social services that would encourage residents not to ply into the core node for such needed services. Camp 7 node includes a commercial area, an institutional college school towards Bakakeng and PEZA zone at Loakan and thereby can specialize on export products while enhancing the other services needed in the cluster area. The Country Club Node includes the Baguio Country Club and other commercial activities at the satellite market and its vicinity and the existing hotels and restaurants that already exist along GibraltarPacdal area. The Irisan Node along Irisan includes a proposed institutional zone along Irisan (at the former BMI area), existing schools and commercial activities. Along Marcos Highway are existing commercial areas. The growth nodes are interconnected by an outer circumferential road that stretches from the Pico-Lamtang Road (La Trinidad, Benguet) - Naguilian Road - Marcos Highway via Asin Barangay Balacbac-Bakakeng-Camp7-Kadaclan, Happy Hollow –Pacdal – and loops to La Trinidad provides easier access to the adjacent municipalities of La Trinidad, Tuba, Sablan and Itogon. The middle ring passes through Bonifacio Street-North Drive, Governor Pack Road-Kisad RoadLegarda Street-Yandoc Street-Abanao Street-Bonifacio Street. The inner ring passes through Bokawkan-Yandoc-Kisad-Military Cut-Off-South Drive-CircleLeonard Wood Road. Figure 30 shows the growth nodes connected by the circumferential road.

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Figure 30. Growth Nodes Map

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Figure 31. Circumferential Road Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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G.

2012-2020

The Concept/ Structure Plan

The city of Baguio continues to serve as a major urban center in the Northern part of the country because of its unique character and historic significance. It is a major tourist destination, a center for education, trade, employment and Regional Administrative Government. As the city makes every effort to maintain and enhance its environment, the city is faced with negative effects as a result of high population growth and in-migration. The city experiences traffic congestion within the Central Business District (CBD) because of its radial road network and the concentration of commercial activities within this area. Dispersal of activities and services along strategic places will contribute towards minimizing the problems on traffic congestion within the CBD and at the same time reduce pollution load caused by vehicular emission. This would release traffic pressures at the Central Business District more so with the provision of roads connecting all the growth centers. In this regard, the multi-node development strategy is hereby adopted for the city’s spatial growth. Economic activities are expected to be established at the identified barangays providing better opportunities for livelihood. Locating these urban centers near settlements would provide convenience in terms of distance and shorter travel time. The Central Business District serves as the central point of activity. The area is zoned as Commercial C1, which will allow specific uses as identified in the Zoning Ordinance, i.e. retail and personal services. This major growth center is supported by smaller nodes classified as follows:

1.

Commercial C2, which requires larger areas for the allowed activities herein are located at Marcos Highway, Camp 7 and Irisan.

2.

The existing site of the Philippine Export Zone Authority (PEZA) is zoned as Industrial Zone.

3.

Commercial C3. The Baguio Country Club, although caters only to its members, is zoned as C3. The same facility integrates a golf course, restaurant and hotel.

Due to the constraints of land availability for expansion, the multi nodal growth strategy was adopted so that developments are contained in already existing and serviced settlements. With the strategy, no resident will be displaced and their living environment further enhanced by the upgrading of existing facilities and services. A linear type of commercial development along the northern and western road links of the city rationalizes the existing spots of irregularly spaced commercial activities along these areas by putting them into orderly clusters. This trend is the better option to converting already congested residential areas and/or to expanding in the peripheries where commercial activities are likely to be ecologically and economically unsustainable.

H.

Growth Node Linkage

The identified growth nodes are linked by a circumferential road that stretches from the PicoLamtang Road (La Trinidad, Benguet) – Naguilian Road – Marcos Highway via Asin Barangay – Balacbac – Bakakeng – Camp 7 – Kadaclan, Happy Hollow – Pacdal and loops to La Trinidad. Figure 30. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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I.

2012-2020

The Land Use Plan

The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land supply is physically constrained by topography with most of its area having slopes ranging from 0-50%. However, most of these areas have already been developed. Slope protection measures were introduced by landowners making it fit for residential and other purposes. Soil testing is another requirement especially for proposed buildings that are beyond 3 storey to determine the capacity of the soil in terms of holding the structure. Likewise, owners are required to secure an Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The ECC is expected to look on the environmental concerns of any proposed development project. Based on the sieve mapping analysis, there is a very limited vacant land that is available in the city for further development. The rezoning of areas has been arrived at after superimposing the fault lines, sink holes and slope maps. The following table shows the land area per land use category based on the existing and proposed land use maps. The existing land use was based on the satellite image data as provided by the Saint Louis University. The areas were computed using GIS technology.

1.

Demand-Supply Balancing

The City of Baguio registered a total population of 318,676 persons as of actual census 2010. This registered an increase of 16,750 persons over the total population of 301,926 persons in 2007 (with May 1, 2000 as reference date) giving the city an annual population growth rate of 2.36 percent. If the same trend continues, population of the city by year 2020 will be 344,070. The following table presents the projected population. Table 35. Projected Population, Baguio City

3.

YEAR 2011 2012

POPULATION 321,129 323,600

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

326,091 328,601 331,130 333,678 336,246 338,834 341,442 344,070

Built up area

Based on the existing land use map, the built up area is 4,463.57 has. Built up areas comprise lands allocated for residential, commercial, industrial, institutional, special economic zone and utilities such as abattoir, cemetery, airport, utility dumpsite, sewerage treatment plant. Comparing this with the 2010 population of 318,676, the man to land ratio is 71.39. This means that the land requirement of every person is 71.39 hectares. Using this in projecting the needs of the population, assuming the population growth remains the same, an estimated 1,388.46 hectares of new built up area is required. Land Demand (2020)

= Projected Population (2020)/Man-land ratio = 344,070 / 71.39 = 4,819.25 has.

Less existing built-up (2010)

= 4,463.57 has.

New Urban Land Needed

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The existing land use map based on the satellite image of the city, there are only few vacant areas for residential expansion and these are at the peripheries of the city. Additional requirements are expected to be provided through the infill of existing residential zones. It has to be noted that one strategy of this plan is for the development of the adjacent municipalities or the BLISTT (Baguio, La Trinidad, Itogon, Sablan and Tuba) development concept shall be pursued in order to decongest the City.

4.

Sieve Mapping

Using Geographic Information System (GIS) Technology, this process was done by using the various thematic maps to determine the most suitable areas for urban expansion. First, all areas that are reserved for specific use and are covered by Presidential Proclamation are extracted from the land use map as these are to be preserved and therefore cannot be converted into other uses. These are the Forest reservations, parks, institutional and other uses. The following thematic maps were considered: a.

Barangay Boundaries

b.

Existing Land Use

c.

All areas covered by Presidential Proclamations (Reservations)

d.

Hazard map showing the location of sinkholes, fault lines

e.

Slope map

f.

Roads and Drainage System

Next the slope map was overlaid. Areas that have slopes exceeding 30% are proposed to be rezoned as low density residential zones (R1). Congested barangays are proposed to be zoned as medium density residential zones (R2). High density zones are for areas that do not have constraints in terms of slopes, sinkholes and are very accessible. Sinkhole areas where ground subsidence may occur are proposed to be unbuildable areas.

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Figure 32. Proposed Land Use Map VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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Table 36. Proposed Land Use Categories. Land Uses Class Residential R1 R2 R3 Total Commercial

Industrial Institutional Parks Forest/Watershed Reserves BAI Reservation Vacant Forested Area John Hay Special Economic Zone Abattoir Cemetery Airport Utility Multi Land Use Total

C1 C2 C3 Total

Proposed Land Area 1,748.02 555.19 875.08 3,178.29

2012-2020

Percent to Total Area

186.15 91.43 28.50 306.08 42.86 431.80 70.68 521.23 94.13 599.39 288.10 4.43 28.37 27.90 15.74 140.00 5,749.00

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5.32 0.75 7.51 1.23 9.07 1.64 10.43 5.01 0.08 0.49 0.48 0.27 2.44 100.00

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Table 37. Proposed and Existing Land Use Categories. Existing Land Uses Residential

Class

Existing Land Area

PROPOSED Land Area

R1

1,727.71

1,748.02

R2

552.56

555.19

R3

1,117.19

875.08

C1

127.92

186.15

C2

76.92

91.43

C3

53.19

28.50

42.86

42.86

416.27

431.80

70.68

70.68

521.23

521.23

94.13

94.13

Vacant Forested Area

599.39

599.39

John Hay Special Economic Zone

288.10

288.10

Abattoir

4.43

4.43

Cemetery

12.78

28.37

Airport

27.90

27.90

Utility

15.74

15.74

Commercial

Industrial Institutional Parks Forest/Watershed Reserves BAI Reservation

Multi Land Use

140.00 Total

J.

5,749.00

5,749.00

General Land Use Proposals 1.

Residential Areas

The shelter needs of the population will be provided through the infill of existing residential areas. Residential zone is categorized into R1 or low density residential areas, R2 for medium density and R3 for high density residential areas. The area being utilized as residential purposes which is 3,397.46 hectares has decreased to 3,178.29 hectares in the proposed land use plan. This is explained by the existing residential structures that are built within areas that are covered by Presidential Proclamations such as Buyog, Busol and at Camp John Hay (portions of this area however is expected to be released from the reservation for residential purposes as per 19 conditionalities forged between the City Governmant and BCDA). In line with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thrust of preserving our environment, all forest/water reserves will be maintained and shall serve its purpose as per Proclamation.

2.

Growth Centers

Growth Centers are areas that provide employment and service opportunities for the city as a whole and the barangays. These centers are near existing community facilities such as schools, church, VOLUME 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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recreation and others. Utilities such as power, water, transportation facilities are available in these areas. The specific locations of these centers are described in the zoning district boundaries and in the Land Use map.

3.

Commercial C1

The Central Business District which accommodates a cluster of retail and personal services shops has its center at the popular Session Road and extends to the market area including the following areas: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Lot deep along Bokawkan Road Market area including Magsaysay Avenue Session Road; Rizal Monument Barangay; AZCKO Barangay Malcolm Square; Kabayanihan; Kagitingan Barangay Upper and Lower Gen. Luna Road Right Side of Bonifacio St. near St. Louis University T. Alonzo; New Lucban Barangay; Tabora Barangay Lot deep along M. Roxas St., Trancoville Lot deep along Kisad and Legarda Roads Monticello Hotel at Camp 7 Barangay Along Siapno and Ambuclao Road near Pacdal Circle (Existing Satellite Market) Lot deep along portion of Kias Road Lot deep at portion of Loakan Proper Road

4.

Commercial C2

C2 districts allow a wider range of local retail and service establishments than C1. These are specifically located at: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

From Junction Yandoc St. to Naguilian Rd. up to City Cemetery Part of Lourdes Subdivision and San Roque Along left side of M. Ponce St., Quezon Hill Proper Brgy. One lot deep along left side of Trinidad Road Portion of Happy Homes Old Lucban Barangay Marcos Highway (From Police Sub-Station 5 up to Tuba Junction) Part of Atab Road near Tuba municipality One lot deep along Kennon Road Camp 7 (near Camp 7 Satellite market)

5.

Commercial C3

C3 districts are zoned for larger commercial activities and the like. These are specifically located at Irisan (Lot deep along Naguilian Road near Junction San Carlos Heights to BMI) and the existing Baguio Country Club. The later, however, which incorporates a hotel, restaurant and golf course, is intended for club members only.

6.

Industrial Zone

All major industrial activities are expected to be contained at the Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA) in Loakan. Only non-pollutive and low water consuming, low volume and high value products are encouraged.

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2012-2020

Institutional Areas

Existing areas for institutional purposes will be increased by 15.6 percent, which is located along Irisan Barangay. Institutional facilities, which are mostly located at the Central Business District, have reached their maximum on-site expansion. Enhancing educational facilities is in line with the role of the city as a center of higher learning in the north.

8.

Watershed Reservations/Protected Areas:

The urban forest is another critical means of preserving and protecting the natural environment and, in particular, helping to improve the air quality and supply of water in the city. These are mostly found within forest/watershed reservations. Aside from this, planting and growing of trees along streets and roadways, as well as on private lands is encouraged. All forest/water reserves will be maintained. Forest/Water reserves have an aggregate area of 599.39 hectares. Some portions of Forbes Park have been released to actual occupants for residential purposes. Republic Act No. 8963, which is entitled “An act excluding from the Baguio Townsite Reservation and from the operation of Proclamation No. 10 dated February 9, 1924, and Proclamation No. 63 dated August 6, 1925, which established the Forbes Forest Reservation and the Government Center, respectively, all situated in the City of Baguio, Island of Luzon, certain portions of land within lots 1,2,3,4,5 and 6 embraced therein and declaring the same alienable and disposable lands for disposition to qualified applicants under Republic Act. No. 730.” Proclamation 198 dated June 29, 1993 provided the transfer of the John Hay Air Station to the Bases Conversion and Development Authority, renaming it as Club John Hay, and declaring it for tourism, human resource development center and multiple use forest watershed reservation. This has an area of 570 hectares, more or less. Presidential Proclamation No. 420 dated July 5, 1994, likewise, designated portion (288.1 hectares) of the former Camp John Hay as the John Hay Special Economic Zone pursuant to Republic Act 7227. Likewise, Executive Order No. 64 was issued by President Ramos, declaring the property of the Bases Conversion and Development Authority located in Scout Barrio, Baguio City as housing site and providing for its disposition to bonafide occupants. All developments therein shall conform with their designated functions as specified under the laws that amended the same. Development shall likewise conform with the city’s approved CLUP and zoning ordinance. The table below presents the list of watershed reservations covered by Presidential Proclamation and Sangguniang Panlungsod Resolution.

Table 38. List of Watershed Reservations PARTICULAR

Crystal Cave Watershed Sto. Tomas Forest Reserve Buyog watershed

PROC. NO. E.O. 1907 amended by Proclamation 198, 420, RA 7227 As amended by RA 7916 and EO 62 Proc. 581 Proc. 93

Busol Watershed

Proc. 15

52.87

Camp 8 Watershed

Proc. 107

14.36

Lucnab Watershed

Proc. 178

5.98

Forbes Park I, II, III

Proc. 10

67.94

Pucsusan watershed Guisad Surong watershed Camp 8 & Poliwes watershed TOTAL

SP. Res. 190, s. 1995 Land ID. SP Res. 399, s. 1997

John Hay Forest Reserve

TOTAL AREA (In hectares)

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413.98 4.07 22.11 17.12

0.84 0.13 599.39 113


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9.

2012-2020

Parks and Gardens

These include all major parks and those parks at the various barangays that are existing and identified by the City Land Needs Identification Committee. The parks offer a wide range of activities such as children play, sports fields and facilities, picnic areas and tourist attractions. While existing parks are comparatively -maintained, more funding is needed for modern equipment, walling, edging, path repair, lighting, maintenance of planting strips, etc. The following parks have been considered for upgrading : Burnham Park, Wright Park, Mines View Park, Sunshine Park, Filipino-Japanese Friendship Garden, Aguinaldo Park and the Botanical Garden.

10.

Green Corridors along Major Thoroughfares

Major highways should be greened by the planting of avenues where space allows. In other places, trees could cluster on unused areas. This should be coordinated with the removal of informal shops (i.e. auto repair shops, woodworks), which disfigure some streets and also congest some traffic flows. Proper boundary fencing, surfacing of footways and margins and the removal of superfluous signs would also help. Key intersections and viewpoints could be celebrated by sculpture or rotundas. Taken together with the avenues, these could create a network of green routes that would unify the urban pattern.

11.

Other Areas

The remaining areas are utilized as airport, abattoir, garbage dumpsite, and utilities zone. a.

The Utilities Zone located at the northeast portion of Mines View Barangay shall accommodate common carriers such as communication towers and antenna.

b.

The plan discourages the location of cell towers in residential areas. These shall be located at a high elevation as designated in the utilities zone. The locational guidelines of the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB) shall govern the establishments of cell towers.

c.

Airport Zone at Loakan shall be maintained and upgraded according to the standards set by the Air Transportation Office (ATO).

d.

Slaughterhouse Area at Brgy. Sto. Nino shall be maintained and upgraded to conform with the standards of a class "A" abattoir as per the standards of the National Meat Inspection Commission.

e.

Cemetery sites. These include the existing public cemetery located along Naguilian Road and the private memorial parks along Naguilian Road, Kias and Loakan Barangays.

f.

The city is open to the establishment of additional cemeteries in suitable areas to augment the need for more resting place for the dead. However, the proposed site and facility shall conform with the locational guidelines/ standards of the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board and the requirements set by the Department of Health.

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g.

Baguio Sewage Treatment Plant. This is the existing Sewage Treatment Plant at Sanitary Camp Road.

h.

Dumping Site. The dumping facility at Irisan Barangay shall be slowly converted into an Ecological Park following the provisions of RA 9003. Alternative waste management system such as composting equipments will be installed at the Irisan dumpsite.

i.

An area at Sto. Tomas has been identified for an Engineered Sanitary Landfill (ESL).

j.

Areas classified as City/Barangay Needs as identified by City Land Needs Identification Committee. Various sites have been identified by the barangays and the city as well for various uses within the different barangays such as parks, alleys, day care centers, barangay halls/health centers, tanod outposts, waiting sheds and other needs for public use. These are however subject to the approval of final survey by the DENR and eventually for titling in the name of the city government of Baguio.

Cultural Heritage

The City of Baguio is of considerable historic significance. This section outlines the basis for a conservation policy. Public education where NGOs/POs would play a lead role shall be sustained over the years in order to create the necessary climate of opinion. The following are the general categories of conservation action (Lifted from BLIST Urban and Regional Development Plan): a.

Fabric Conservation of Buildings

a.1 Grade One Buildings – these may be regarded as significant for the wider region or for the nation. These need to be listed and protected by legislation; public funds should be used to lever private funds in their conservation; major tax concessions should be granted; and the authorities should be pro-active in organizing their restoration. The following key buildings are identified in the Baguio and Dagupan Urban Planning Project as examples as worthy of preservation and/or improvement

b.

Baguio City Hall

The City Hall was built in 1909 at the same time as the City was granted a special charter under the tutelage of American Mayor E.J. Halsema. The original City Hall was bombed in 1945 and subsequently restored after the war. The classical lines of the façade of this institutional building and its imposing location are appropriate for its function and significance. The tower of the city hall stands out from afar to mark and identify the building.

c.

Diplomat Hotel

The Diplomat Hotel is located at the summit of Mirador Hill. Mirador Hill is a vantage point, which allows a bird’s eye view of the entire city. The hotel was designed in classic fashion using a series of arched windows at ground floor level and rectangular windows along the second floor. There is an arched “porte cocehere” at the center of the building with a balconied roof, which breaks the continuous series of windows. The railings of the deck roof crown the building with VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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imposing regality when viewed from the lower portion of the city. The prominent cross belies the religious origins of the building. Unfortunately, the Diplomat Hotel was damaged by the 1990 earthquake. No rehabilitation has been completed on the building to date and it remains closed to the public.

d.

Little Flower Novitiate

The Little Flower Novitiate near the Mansion House is an intersecting three storey building.. The rounded corners of the building soften the overall form while the frequency of the vertical lines provides a fragile visual rhythm. The repeated crossed detailing along the cornice provides an interesting visual break. Canopies at first and second levels break the regularity of the vertical lines.

e.

Old School Buildings

There are many school buildings in Baguio City and the adjoining municipalities. Significant among them are the Quezon Elementary School and the North Baguio Central School.

f.

Baguio General Hospital

This is an old colonial hospital with an imposing façade, arched entrance way and windows. The controlled simplicity of lines and the low elevation of the building blend well with the topography. The value of this institution, its intrinsic significance to the well-being of the people of Baguio, the hope and relief it represents, should encourage preservation of this complex.

g.

Gasiaco Recoletos Seminary Building

The Recoletos Seminary Building is located along Asin Road near the junction of Quirino Highway. The building was remodeled in 1952-53. The elongated lines of the building are punctuated by a “porte cochere” and uniformly placed simple windows. It is fronted by a wide driveway.

h.

Baguio Catholic Cathedral

The Baguio Catholic Cathedral and the Cross of the Saviour was founded by the Scheut Fathers of Belgium. They took advantage of the availability of choice sites during the formation stage of Baguio and selected hilltop overlooking Session Road for the cathedral. The most prominent feature of the cathedral is the two high steeples. The cathedral has a beautiful interior, utilizing narra wood. The natural lighting of the interior comes from stained glass windows. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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i.

2012-2020

Bell Tower Temple

Bell Tower Temple is better known as the Chinese Temple. It is located along La Trinidad Valley Road near the city limits. The complex is an interplay of temple, bell tower and garden. There is an interesting flight of stairs.

j.

Convent of the Most Blessed Sacrament (The Pink Sister’s Convent)

A peaceful place with a lovely garden and remarkable chapel, in the vicinity of General Luna and Leonard Wood Roads, where the sisters adopt a reclusive way of life.

k.

Garden Statuary

Along Marcos Highway the owner of one house has transformed the garden with large concrete figures. It is an interesting example of modern private sculpture in Baguio, which may be an example for future, such individualism in the vicinity.

l.

Various Old Houses to the East of Burnham Park

These are some of the 128 lots sold in 1908 for residential and commercial purposes. In the area are some of the oldest and the most pleasant timber houses in Baguio. As a whole, they constitute an enticing area although many of the properties are in need of restoration and renovation. Remedial work is required such as repairing sidewalks, removing billboards and advertisements, providing suitable street lamps, harmonizing fences, and avoiding inappropriate new construction. The authorities could possibly ensure that the owners qualify for aid to encourage them to restore their houses for the benefit of the community and visitors alike. The strategic location of these houses close to Burnham Park clearly deserves special attention.

m.

Other Old Houses

These generally timber board structures contribute to the hill resort character of Baguio. Unfortunately, lack of maintenance is very apparent. The first step in their preservation could be to catalogue all these buildings, including ownerships, history, construction materials, features, location and setting.

n.

Lourdes Grotto (Dominican Hill)

Dominican Hill gives a bird eye’s view of the city. The Lingayen Gulf at San Fernando, La Union can be seen from this vantage point on clear days. The Jesuits constructed the famous Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes on Dominican Hill. The grotto can be reached by driving up a slope or negotiating a long flight of stairs. The stairs provide an interesting play of horizontal lines identical to the piano keyboard effect. The stairway is topped by the venerated shrine of the grotto at the summit. VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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o.

2012-2020

Aguinaldo Park

Aguinaldo Park is located in Barangay General Luna. In the park is a monument in honour of General Emilio Aguinaldo in the form of a horse-riding image of the hero. Also located at the park is the Aguinaldo \museum built in likeness to a traditional Ifugao house. This museum houses the memorabilia of General Aguinaldo.

p.

The Mansion House

The Mansion House is reserved for the exclusive use of the President. The house faces a huge well-treed garden and an imposing driveway. The mansion is an arched edifice of elegance.

q.

Camp John Hay

Camp John Hay was established in 1903 under Major General J. Franklin Bell as a summer retreat for the enlisted men of the U.S. Army due to the perpetually cool weather. Through the years, under succeeding commanding officers, the camp was developed to provide cottages, hospital dormitories, a golf course, tennis courts and recreation hall. Camp John Hay has witnessed the unfolding of history. Baguio grew in concert with this camp. It was the last stronghold of the resistance, particularly the 45th Infantry and Companies A and B of the Philippine Scouts. During the occupation of the Japanese, it was used as a concentration camp. Camp John Hay was the site of surrender of the Japanese forces under General Yamashita at the residence of the High Commissioner on 3rd September 1945. Plans to intensify the uses in the Club without sacrificing its character are currently being discussed. The Main Club is the central feature and originally accommodated vacationing US Army servicemen. After the camp was transferred to the Government of the Philippines, the club was converted to a first class hotel. Named after General Franklin Bell in 1929, the Bell Auditorium is located near Scout Hill at Club John Hay. It is well-maintained, terraced open-air amphitheater in a semi-circular valley below what used to be the house of the Commanding General. This auditorium is used for open-air concerts and performances and can seat a thousand spectators.

r.

Existing Landmarks

There are a number of existing statues and landmarks, which are listed below: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Roundabout – Camp John Hay Roundabout – Baguio General Hospital Oblation Statue in University of the Philippines College Baguio “Sacred Heart of Jesus” image of Jesus at the top of Session Road Drinking Horse at Abanao Street Dead Soldiers Monument in Harrison Road Aguinaldo Park equestrian statue VOLUME 1 – The COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN of Baguio City

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There are also some interesting buildings that are not considered to be of specific heritage value but they do have some visual prominence in the city: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Baguio Convention Center Holy Family Church at Bakakeng Saint Vincent Church on Naguilian Road Iglesia ni Cristo Church on Magsaysay Avenue The Church of Crusades at Pacdal The Buddhist Temple with an imposing image viewed from the City Market St. Joseph Church in Pacdal Maharlika Livelihood Center, despite its unsightly facade is actually the center of most economic and commercial transactions.

s. Grade Two Buildings – these may be regarded as significant at the local level only. Since the Philippines is not a rich nation, it seems advisable to focus scarce public funds only on “Grade One buildings”. t.

Character Conservation

Buildings are not isolated objects. They often gain importance from their setting, which may be an ensemble of buildings, spaces, groundscape, trees etc. The real issue is to conserve the character of the totality. From this arises the idea of “Conservation Area”. This plan has identified significant areas for preservation. Boundaries should be determined including key features for protection and desired actions and design characters. A detailed Heritage Plan shall be pursued by the City Government.

u.

Special Areas of Significance 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Session Road Leonard Wood Road South Drive Kennon Road Marcos Highway Irisan Harrison Drive North Drive City Hall Area

Session Road

Establish Session Road as promenade area to limit pollution levels in the Central Business District. A thorough study should be undertaken inasmuch as the proposal will affect the traffic flow in the Central Business District. Commercial Buildings in these areas should be encouraged to landscape the rooftops to increase GHG sequestration.

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Leonard Wood Road Greenbelts along this area should be protected and further enhanced.

South Drive Maintain natural forest cover and bar massive developments in the area

Kennon Road

Pursue and support the declaration of Kennon Road as a Heritage Area. Massive tree planting activity is necessary in the area to prevent erosion and improve air ambient quality.

Marcos Highway

Planting of trees of medium height along roadside should be implemented to protect the panoramic vista at the same time control erosion within that area. The New Land Use Plan has identified portion along this area as Commercial C2. Commercial activities as identified in the plan shall strictly comply with the provision of adequate parking spaces and other pertinent laws. Auto repair, welding and related activities shall be contained within the lot boundaries and should not utilize sidewalks for such activities as well as for parking.

Irisan

Planting of trees along roadside should be implemented to protect the panoramic vista at the same time control erosion within that area.

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2012-2020

Proposed Development Controls 1.

General Development Controls a.

Existing Building Heights

The following table sets the maximum building heights: Table 39. Maximum Building Heights CHARACTER USE OR OCCUPANCY 1.

2.

3. 4. 5.

TYPE OF BUILDING / STRUCTURE

NUMBER OF ALLOWABLE STOREYS / FLOORS ABOVE ESTABLISHED GRADE

 3 storey only with maximum of 2 habitable basements  2 storey only if exceeding 2 habitable basements but not to exceed 3 habitable basements R2  4 storey only with maximum of 2 habitable basements  3 storey if exceeding 2 habitable basements R3  6 storey only with maximum of 2 habitable basements  4 storey if exceeding 2 habitable basements Commercial C1 6 C2 6 C3 6 Industrial Industrial 6 Institutional Institutional 6 Height restriction around The Mansion House is limited to a maximum of 3-storey building

Residential

R1

MAXIMUM METERS ABOVE ESTABLISHED GRADE 10 7

12 10 18 12 19.5 19.5 19.5 19.5 19.5 10

CONDITIONAL: Height within Commercial, Industrial and Institutional areas may be allowed up 12 storeys or 37.5 meters, provided the following are complied: 1. 2. 3.

For lot areas with 1,000 sq.m. & above; To provide open space with an area equivalent to the lot area for development or a ratio of 1:1; and Annotation in the title that the area with technical description specifically for open space shall not be converted into any other use being a compliance for the construction of multi-level building

Table 40. Number of Allowable Storeys/Floors/Maximum Meters Above Established Grade CHARACTER USE OR OCCUPANCY 1.

Commercial

2. 3.

Industrial Institutional

TYPE OF BUILDING / STRUCTURE

NUMBER OF ALLOWABLE STOREYS / FLOORS ABOVE ESTABLISHED GRADE

C1 C2 C3 Industrial Institutional

12 12 12 12 12

MAXIMUM METERS ABOVE ESTABLISHED GRADE 37.5 37.5 37.5 37.5 37.5

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NOTE: A.

B.

L.

The following shall govern in the measurement of the building heights: 1.

Building heights shall be measured from the crown of the road or alley fronting the property.

2.

In cases where the buildable portion of the lot is higher than the road, the building height shall be measured from the established natural grade line.

3.

In cases where the road fronting the property is an upgrade or down grade road, the building height shall be measured from the crown of the road located at the middle of the front width of the building.

4.

In cases where the lot is a through lot, the height of the building shall be measured from the road of higher elevation.

The height of the proposed buildings/structures shall also be governed by the following RROW-based limitations: 1.

If only one (1) RROW services a lot and such is only 6.00 to 7.00 meters wide, a BHL of three (3) storeys (or 9.00 meters maximum) shall be observed regardless of use or occupancy, lot size, lot dimensions, lot frontage and like considerations.

2.

If only one (1) RROW services a lot and such is only 4.00 to 5.00 meters wide, a BHL equivalent to 2 Vz storeys (or 7.50 meters maximum) shall be observed regardless of use or occupancy, lot size, lot dimensions, lot frontage and like considerations. If only one (1) RROW services a lot and such is only 3.00 meters wide or less, a BHL equivalent to two (2) storeys (or 6.00 meters maximum shall be observed regardless of use occupancy, lot size, lot dimensions, lot frontage and like considerations.

Specific Development Controls 1.

Landscape Regulations a.

New buildings should provide adequate facility for rainwater capture for flushing, watering of plants and cleaning, especially that the city usually experience a water shortage.

b.

Housing plots fronting roads should be required to plant at least three trees of low height at maturity and further encourage them to include in their landscape the planting of native plants to preserve biodiversity in the City.

c.

Owner of Buildings along the Central Business Districts that no longer allows planting of trees along roadsides should be encourage greening their roof tops to improve air ambient quality in the area.

d.

Housing plots that require fencing must have uniform design and standards.

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e. f.

g.

2.

Grade One Buildings should be totally protected by law from demolition or alteration without permission. Action to demolish, alter or rebuild these buildings and all sites, and trees in conservation areas should be notified to the City Council beforehand, which would then have two months to negotiate with owners a mutually acceptable resolution. Failing this, the owner could proceed as he wished, subject to the provisions of pertinent laws, rules and regulations.

Adopt a green template policy that will integrate energy efficiency in the design of all types of structures within the city and provision of rainwater capture.

Reforestation/Tree Cutting a.

b.

5.

Public utility companies must be required to place the wires underground to preserve the natural aesthetics of the city.

Building Character and Architectural Design a.

4.

Preservation of natural drainage ways and strict enforcement of easement as provided under the Nation Building Code. Designation of billboard areas as well as policies that limits the sizes of billboards/signs must be enacted. Signs and billboards in commercial buildings must be located in one area uniformly sized.

Heritage a.

3.

2012-2020

Cutting of trees in forest, watershed reservations and parks shall not be allowed save under the provisions provided under Ordinances Numbered 54-87, 5-90, 301-58, and 44-88. Strict implementation of the requirements before the issuance of occupancy permits which requires the planting of 10 tree seedlings.

c.

All public lands should be declared for public purposes and developed as parks, open spaces, rest area, save from valid vested rights.

d.

Manage and maintain regenerated and natural forest for slope and soil protection and to increase CO2 sequestration to improve air ambient quality in the City.

Air Quality a.

Promote the use of alternative fuels through partnerships with the transport sector.

b.

Provide greenbelts to increase CO2 sequestration and protect pedestrians from the hazards of vehicle emissions.

c.

Only clean fuels will be promoted in the City.

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6.

2012-2020

d.

Establish greenbelts or green corridors to increase CO2 sequestration in the CBD.

e.

Support the declaration of the BLIST as an Airshed as well as the policies that will be formulated by the governing board of the BLIST.

f.

Rationalize traffic scheme in the City to reduce pollution load at the Central Business District.

Land and Building Management a.

No construction of land and building development shall be allowed which will unnecessarily contribute to the flooding of the area, or deterioration of its physical environment unless provided with appropriate flood and erosion mitigation, drainage system and other safeguards.

b.

All construction of building having a height exceeding three (3) storey including basement is covered by the scope of Philippine Environmental Impact Statement System hence, shall secure first an Environmental Compliance Certificate with the Environmental Management Bureau prior to the processing of its building permit.

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M.

2012-2020

Priority Programs and Projects Sectoral PPAs 1.

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

2.

LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

3.

Community- Based Watershed Management Watersheds protection program Reforestation program Forest Advocacy Program Identification of open areas subject for reforestation (mapping) IEC Campaign on the impacts of Climate Change

PARKS DEVELOPMENT a. b. c. d. e. f.

5.

Construction of septage facility Construction of mini-treatment plant facility Expansion and rehabilitation of the city owned sewage treatment plant Construction of more Communal Septic Tank not covered by BSTP Inventory of septic tank/sewer connections and other alternative waste disposal practices in Baguio City Construction of mini-sewage treatment plant in areas not covered by BSTP Massive STP connection drive Intense IEC on Environment – impacts of Climate Change

FOREST & WATERSHED MANAGEMENT a. b. c. d. e. f.

4.

Waste reduction at source and waste segregation program ESWM Program for Big Establishments and Buildings Cost recovery campaign vis-a-vis Recycling Full Closure of Existing Dumpsite Study of Alternative Technologies on SWM Establishment of Engineered Sanitary Landfill (ESL) Intense IEC on Environment – impacts of Climate Change and integration into the curriculum

Parks Master Development Plan Adopt-A- Park and Adopt -A -Planting Site Program Adopt a nature based policy for parks development highlighting biodiversity conservation Parks Development Program and conduct biodiversity studies Community- Based Park Management (Institute community-based park management system in the barangays) Intense IEC on Environment – impacts of Climate Change and integration into the curriculum

AMBIENT AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT a.

Clean Air Campaign a.1 Vehicle Emission Testing a.2 Number Coding a.3 Training of drivers on preventive maintenance

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b.

6.

b. c. d. e. f. g.

e.

Registration of Potential socialized Housing Beneficiaries Socialized Housing Program Feasibility Study on Livelihood Development Program Housing Program for Transient Students and Workers Local Shelter Plan Preparation Institutionalization of the Local Housing Board Land Banking

Parks and Tourism Sites Development Program a. b. c. d. e.

10.

Multi- hazard Mapping Capability Building Disaster Risk Reduction Management Plan Education on Disaster Risk Reduction Management and Climate Change impacts Research, Technology Development and Knowledge Management

HOUSING a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

9.

Exploration of additional sources of water, either through spring development/rehabilitation and construction of rain water basin The City Water Resources Board be activated Implement the Baguio City water code Water Advocacy Program Feasibility study on the re-charging rate of the underground aquifer Construction of additional rain water impounding structures IEC Campaign on Climate Change impacts and integration into the curriculum

LAND MANAGEMENT a. b. c. d.

8.

Strictly implement the ordinance banning the broiling and vending of street foods along the CBD

WATER SUPPLY/QUALITY MANAGEMENT a.

7.

2012-2020

Tourism Promotions Program Human Resource Development Program Legislative Agenda on Tourism Tourism Statistical Development Program Updating of the City Tourism Master Plan

Revenue Generation Program a. b.

Business Permit Licensing System Tax Ordinance

11.

Trade and Industry Promotions Program

12.

Trade and Industry Legislative Agenda

13.

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14.

Transportation a. b.

15.

2012-2020

Formulation of an Environmentally Sustainable Transport Plan for Baguio City Establishment of a Traffic and Transportation Management Office.

Communication Development Program The program is aimed at improving the services of the communication industry through the expansion of cell site facilities for CMTS and the comprehensive improvement of communication facilities.

16.

Water Quality Improvement Project a. b. c. d. e. f.

17.

Bulk Water Supply project in coordination with private entities Water Resource Development Program Rain Water harvesting program Comprehensive Tree Planting Program Clean and Green project Drainage projects-City Camp Lagoon

Power and Electrification a. b.

Power Generation Program. This includes the establishment of an additional Sub-Station for additional load to cater for future needs. Upgrading/improvement of electric power connection lines Overcrowding of wires within BENECO poles. Not only power lines are attached to BENECO poles but also include other cable lines.

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