__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 34

B Y S OH U M D O S H I ( W ‘ 14)

US-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS:

Vintage cars in Havana, Cuba.

THE BIG DOWNTURN F or nearly two centuries, the United

could strengthen regional relations, but a desire

States has had a sphere of infl uence

to protect “recovering” U.S. industries from an

in Latin America. Starting in 1823

infl ux of foreign goods, alongside trade deficit

with the Monroe Doctrine, which emphasized

concerns and the President’s goal to double

freedom of the newly independent Latin

exports in 5 years, is preventing their passage. Second,

American colonies from European intervention

34

111210 hq.indd 34

there

are

political-historical

(and thereforeensured U.S. dominance in the

complexities that have impacted US-Latin

region), this relationship would eventually be

American relations. Many countries in Latin

defined by the superpower status of the United

America have not forgotten a history of US

States. Abastion of democratic governance,

imperialism in the region. The 21st century

free market success, and protector of human

has seen the rise of the “Pink Tide” in Latin

rights, the United States has long tried to stand

America

as an example to Latin America. But things are

political ideology is a source of friction

changing quickly in what has characteristically

between them and the United States. This

been called America’s “backyard”, as America’s

problem exists beyond just the inflammatory

credibility and influence are slowly atrophying

language of the governments of Hugo Chavez

in the region.

(Venezuela) and the Castro regime (Cuba).

of

leftist

governments

whose

There are three reasons why the United

Even moderate countries such as Brazil,

States is losing influence in Latin America.

Bolivia, and Nicaraguahave adopted more

The first reason is a fluttering of protectionist

socialist

sentiment in the U.S. that is preventing the

“anti-imperialist” in a clear denunciation of the

passage of US-Latin American free trade

United States. Moreover, the rise of Brazil as

agreements (FTAs). A number of tentative

a regional and world power is also impacting

FTA agreements started during the Bush

US-

administration,

allies

perceived to be a leader among its fellow

Colombia and Panama, have yet to be concluded

developing countries and therefore outside

by the Obama administration. These pacts

the scope of U.S. control and infl uence.

including

I N T E R N AT I O N A L B U S I N E S S R E V I E W

those

with

policies

Latin

and

American

labeled

themselves

interactions.

Brazilis

FA L L 2 0 1 0

11/27/2010 3:13:12 PM

Profile for Daniel Hellwig

International Business Review - Fall 2015  

Fall edition of the IBR magazine at the Wharton School.

International Business Review - Fall 2015  

Fall edition of the IBR magazine at the Wharton School.

Advertisement