Issuu on Google+

IBRAHIM K. KAKO

TEACHING, CREATIVE & PROFESSIONAL


table of contents

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY RESUME / CURRICULUM VITAE TEACHING

AAE 280 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I Getting Real - digital photography Straight Ahead - physical modeling Turning the Corner - physical modeling The Big Picture - Computer Modeling AAE 282 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II Callida Junctura - Ingenious Joint Hybrid House - Live / Work / Live 21st Century Bookshop - Keep the Dream Alive DIGITAL FABRICATION WORKSHOP

CREATIVE WORK

Biodegradable Park Bench UNLV School of Architecture British Airway - U.S. West Coast Headquarter Sculpture

PROFESSIONAL WORK

Henderson Space & Science Center Juliet Restaurant Christian Street Residence II Taylor Residence


DESIGN PHILOSOPHY After completing my Master of Architecture at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) in 2009, I have been interested in the symbiotic relationship that exists between architecture practice and educational research. My goal is to pursue environmentally and culturally responsible design through the use of appropriate technologies. While having a very diverse background I find it very important to be in a place that promotes diversity; therefore, it gives me the ambition and motivation to be part of a team that encourages collaboration.

As I mentioned at the beginning of my letter, I have been fortunate to simultaneously work in the profession and education. I started my teaching career at the College of Southern Nevada, Advanced Technologies Department as an Adjunct Professor. This position allowed me to investigate the profound connections between teaching and practice. At CSN I was asked to teach multiple courses dealing with design, technologies, and sustainability in architecture. Most importantly, I was involved in the Green Initiative Curriculum Committee that led to the creation of the “Fundamentals of Green Architecture” class. I taught this course for the My design philosophy is best summarized through a statement made by first three years and now multiple programs have adopted the class as a Thom Mayne during his acceptance speech of the Pritzker Prize: “Architecture required course. After my successful experience at CSN, I was invited to the is a way of seeing, thinking and questioning our world and our place in it. It UNLV School of Architecture as an Adjunct Faculty to teach design studio requires a natural inquisitiveness, an openness in our observations, and a will during the 2011-12. Thereafter, I was offered an opportunity as Visiting to act in affirmation.” I believe one has to approach design by questioning Faculty during the 2012-13 to lead the implementation of digital fabrication the place and context of a project while also recognizing future challenges and prototyping process into the design studios through UNLV Simulation and changing conditions. Challenging myself to constantly question the Laboratory. Also, I had the opportunity to teach multiple design studios and current paradigms both actively and open-mindedly. As a designer, my goal represent the UNLV School of Architecture in a multidisciplinary course in is to develop a model that addresses the challenges we face by studying collaboration with Art, Dance, Film and Theater department in the College of the convergence of well-understood design principles and traditions with Fine Arts. contemporary and future technologies. It is my belief that the study of this integration vis-à-vis the learning styles of next generation will result in a As the SimLab Coordinator I was responsible for all the daily operation new foundational understanding of architecture. of SimLab, student workers, and the safety procedures implementation (including training). Additionally, 6 hours teaching Architecture Studio My research interests are associated with the investigation and development and 3 hours teaching computational courses. Also, teaching workshops of new design and professional practice approaches that include historically on interfaces with digital tools (digitizing arm, laser cutter, 3d printer and developed principles and traditional media and construction methods with CNC). Collaborating with SoA IT Manager to establish and maintain written the use of today’s most advanced technologies such as digital fabrication. protocol for digital equipment maintenance and operations, researching While it may appear that this research interest is detached from my new software releases and features of software updates and providing graduate research and thesis (Empirically Derived Formulas to Predict Indoor purchase recommendations to SimLab Director and Technology Committee. Maximum, Average, and Minimum Temperatures in Roofpond Buildings Representing the SoA at academic and professional conferences regarding Using Minimum Climatic Information), my graduate work in fact provides advanced computation in architecture and report to faculty on advances a good foundation and an example of how one can investigate the use of a and proceedings, advocating/facilitating future collaborative educational traditional strategy for heating and cooling and combine that information opportunities in robotics and future collaborative educational opportunities with advanced computer modeling to extend the validity of the study to in creation of post-script software and scriptwriting for special design or other conditions, thus making the information accessible for architects and fabrication applications designers in other parts of the world. Complementing these teaching experiences, I have worked over the past As a graduate student, I had the opportunity to work in the Natural Energies eight years in several architecture firms in Las Vegas on a variety of projects Advanced Technologies Laboratory (NEAT Lab) where I was able to do in Nevada and other states ranging from commercial, interiors, public, empirical research that responds to the NEAT Lab’s mission of integrating hospitality, residential and branding. Additionally, I have been actively “natural phenomena and local resources and traditions into the design and involved in the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and currently hold the operation of buildings.” Being part of the NEAT Lab allowed me to be a part position of “Emerging Professionals Director” on the AIA Nevada Executive of several research projects that resulted in peer-reviewed publications and Committee; I was also honored as the 2011 AIA Associate of the Year and reports. I also was fortunate to work as a Graduate Assistant in the UNLV have won multiple AIA design awards. I have also fulfilled NCARB’s Intern Downtown Design Center, where I was able to acquire important skills Development Program (IDP) requirements, and I am currently in the process associated with the connection to the profession and the community. of taking the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) in pursuit of licensure.


RESUME | CURRICULUM VITAE Education 2009 | Master of Architecture, (MArch) | University of Nevada, Las Vegas. 2006 | Bachelor of Science, Architecture | University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Architect Registration

Intern Development Program (IDP): Completed Architect Registration Exam (ARE): Currently In-Progress

Professional Work

2013-Present | YWS International | Las Vegas, NV Designer Leading the development of multiple Hospitality projects design through conceptual stage, Diagrams, Schematic Design, Design Development, renderings, interior Design, specifications, finishes, sustainability, furniture, Construction Documents, shop drawings and Construction Administration. 2012-2013 | [N]Site Studios | Las Vegas, NV Sustainability / Digital Fabrication Specialist Leading [N]Site Studios sustainable initiatives and custom digital fabrication efforts. Exploration of sustainable materials, building process and research into sustainable roof strategies providing [N]Site Studios with a valuable knowledge base. 2011-12 | RAFI Architecture / Fielden & Partners Interiors Design | Las Vegas, NV Senior Project Designer Leading the development of the project design through conceptual stage, Diagrams, Schematic Design, Design Development, renderings, interior Design, specifications, finishes, sustainability, furniture, Construction Documents, shop drawings and Construction Administration. 2011 | Tate Snyder Kimsey + RAFI | EHDD| SMM | Joint Venture | Las Vegas, NV Project Designer Representing RAFI Architecture during the joint venture between TSKA + RAFI, EHDD, SMM as Project Designer for the Henderson Space and Science Center Design Team. 2009-10 | PLUS One Design and Construction | Baton Rouge, LA Designer Leading the development of Design-Built projects through Conceptual Stage, Diagrams, Schematic Design, Design Development, renderings and interior Design. 2007-08 | RAFI Architecture | Las Vegas, NV Designer Part of the design team developing Schematic Design, Design Development, renderings, interior Design, finishes, sustainability, furniture and Construction Documents. 2006 | TAL Studio (Avery-Brooks Associates) | Las Vegas, NV Summer Intern Part of the design team developing Conceptual high-end Interior Design, Schematic Design and Design Development. 2003-06 | Melvin Green Architect | Las Vegas, NV Intern Part of the design team developing Schematic Design, Design Development and Construction Documents.


Teaching | Research | Publication

University of Nevada, Las Vegas | School of Architecture

2012-Current | Professional Faculty / SimLab Coordinator: CFA 100 College of Fine Arts First Year Seminar AAD 180 Fundamentals of Design I AAE 282 Fundamentals of Architecture Design II 2011-12 | Adjunct Faculty in Architecture: AAE 280 Fundamentals of Architecture Design I AAE 282 Fundamentals of Architecture Design II AAE 711L - Graduate Design I: Design and Communication 2010 | Research Associate: Rebranding School of Architecture 2007-09 | Graduate Assistant: AAE/AAI/AAL 100 Introduction to Architecture/Interior Architecture/Landscape Architecture AAE 480 Architectural Design III AAE 482 Architectural Design IV AAE 789 Architectural Research Studio AEE 790 Professional Project Studio 2006-07 | Graduate Assistant: AAE/AAI/AAL 100 Introduction to Architecture/interior Architecture/Landscape Architecture UNLV SoA Model Shop 2006-08 | Research Assistant: Integrating the WWW into a Visual Research Assignment: Impact on Student Learning Outcomes and Experiences Grant 2004-06 | Research Assistant: Natural Energies Advanced Technologies Laboratory

College of Southern Nevada | Advanced Technologies Department 2008-2011 | Adjunct Professor in Architecture: AAE 100 Introduction to Architecture ADT 100B Introduction to Drafting Theory ADT 130B Fundamentals of Green Architecture ADT 205B Architectural Environmental Control Systems

Publication | Thesis Research

2009-10 | Empirically Derived Formulas to Predict Indoor Maximum, Average, and Minimum Temperatures in Roofpond Buildings Using Minimum Climatic Information (2009) UNLV Theses/Dissertations/Professional Papers/Capstones. Paper 172. American Solar Energy Society - Published in the SOLAR 2010 Conference Proceedings


Awards / Leadership

2012-13 | Emerging Professionals Director (AIA Nevada Executive Board) 2012 | AIA Nevada Unbuilt Merit Award 2011 | AIA Nevada Associate Award 2009 | Graduate Student: Top of the Class with Honors in Architecture - Fielden Medal Award 2007 | Freedom by Design Project Manager 2004 | Learning Enhancement Services Recognition 2003-09 | NOMAS President , VP, Active Member 2003-09 | AIAS VP, Active Member 2003-04 | Dean’s List 2002-09 | Volunteer for AIA products show, AIA Christmas Party, AIA National Convention 2005 in Las Vegas 2002-06 | Millennium Scholar 2002-06 | America’s Inspiring Students - Distinguished Service Award 2002 | Top 20% Graduate Galena High School 2001 | AIA Northern Nevada best design award

Skills / Abilities

Architecture Project Management Meeting with Clients | Schematic Design | Design Development | Code Analysis Zoning | Construction Documents | Consultants Coordination | Submittals | Construction Administration Computer / Digital Fabrication Adobe Illustrator | Adobe InDesign | Adobe Acrobat Professional | Adobe Photoshop | Adobe After Effects | Adobe Premier | Adobe Dreamweaver | Adobe Muse | Autodesk Revit | Autodesk AutoCAD | Autodesk 3D Studio Max | VRay | Rhino 3D | Grasshopper | SketchUp | Microsoft Excel | Microsoft Outlook | Microsoft PowerPoint | Microsoft Word | Microsoft Projects | Computer Numerical Control Machine (CNC) | Plasma Cutter CNC | Laser Cutter | 3D Printers

Fluent Languages

English | Arabic | Assyrian


TEACHING


AAE 280 - Fall 2011 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I

Getting Real - digital photography locate a metal building within a 5 mile radius of the s.o.a.. document the building with digital photographs. focus your attention on modifications that have been made to the “box” -- extensions, overhangs etc. also examine how other materials/ building systems are used in combination with the metal building system. document corner conditions, eave details and how the system meets the ground or other materials etc. examine metal building manuals and compare these conditions with “standard manufacturers details.” images should not only be interesting but should be strategically composed to communicate a critical observation that was made. work must be pinned up in hallway for each class.


AAE 280 - Fall 2011 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I

Straight Ahead - physical modeling Produce a minimum of 3 section models that explore the expressive potential of metal building system. You must use standard metal building components. One model is due every class period until the three models are complete. Focus on a middle bay. These 3 models should explore structure, enclosure and relationship to ground plane. Section models should be built at 1/4” = 1-0” and not exceed 6” x 6” x 12” tall. They should have a 3” thick base to allow for ground plane articulation and include at least one complete structural bay. Each model should incorporate a human figure that is 1.5 inches tall

TEACHING


AAE 280 - Fall 2011 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I

Turning the Corner - physical modeling Produce a minimum of 3 models that explore the expressive potential of metal building systems. You must use standard metal building components. One model is due every class period until the three models are complete. (You will be given extra time to complete your final model.) Focus on a corner bay. These 3 models should explore structure, enclosure and relationship to ground plane. Section models should be built at 1/4” = 1-0” and not exceed 6” x 6” x 12” tall. They should have a 3” thick base to allow for ground plane articulation and include at least one complete structural bay. Each model should incorporate a human figure that is 1 1/2 inches tall.

TEACHING


PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

This method of energy production converts solar radiation into direct current electricity using semiconductors that exhibit the photovoltaic effect. These panels will power the rental shop as well as the training and repair station. The panels are on hydraulics and move with the sun’s position.

WATER TROMBE WALL

To allow for the south -facing wall to be a wall of glass, a trombe wall was added. The trombe will slow down the amount of heat traveling in during the summer and act as an indirect gain heating source in the winter.

Process

CROSS VENTILATION

To take advantage of the strong winds that travel through the mountains in bootleg the north, west and east walls fully open to allow for cross ventilation. This cooling strategy is not only simple but effective. The north wall will be an all glass nana wall that full retracts. The east and west walls are sliding glass panels.

EARTH COOLING TUBES

This cooling strategy brings outdoor air into an interior space through underground pipes. As the hot air travels through the tubes, the cooler underground soil cools the air. The support columns will house the cooling tubes.

interiorPERSPECTIVE

SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES From the early stages the building had separate spaces that divided the program into parts. This idea was carried throughout the design process and the end result was two separate parts that where connected that utilizes the canopy ideas in the previous concepts. The end result is a box with a double skin composed of random patterns that provide interesting shade patterns and protect the main skin from direct sunlight. The box can be open or closed depeneding on the weather

Bathroom

Training Area

Storage Room

Repair Area

Bathroom

PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

TRA

METAL SKIN ROOF “SPOKE’ SKIN

s

EXTERIOR GLAZING

AAE 280 - Fall 2011 METAL FRAME

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I

REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR

From the early stages the building had separate spaces that divided the program into parts. This idea was carried throughout the design process and the end result was two separate parts that where connected that utilizes the canopy ideas in the previous concepts. The end result is a box with a double skin composed of random patterns that provide interesting shade patterns and protect the main skin from direct sunlight. The box can be open or closed depeneding on the weather

TEACHING

The Big Picture - Computer Modeling ENTRY/EXIT RAMPS

This project requires the development of a design that responds to specific home based businesses. The goal of the hybrid home SUPPORT COLUMNS is to encourage and nurture small businesses as well as flexible living/working situations. Unlike live/work environments, the FOUNDATION essential spaces in a hybrid house can function in a commercial and/or residential capacity. This strategy should permeate the site development as well. The lot should be viewed as providing additional opportunities to generate income without compromising the quality BUILDING COMPONENTS of life or neighborhood integrity. Rather than imposing an abstract ideal on a community, the hybrid house seeks to validate, encourage and conform to existing family situations and entrepreneurial endeavors. The house should be designed for a wood working artist.


Located right next to the beginner trails makes this location perfect for the Training and Repair Station. The building is outfitted with two restrooms and a large storage room for training and repair equipment.

AINING & REPAIR STATION

S

explodedAXON

solar panels

roof

skin (corrugated fiberglass) secondary structure

BIKE RENTAL SHOP

bicycle rental / storage track

primary structure

PROGRAM & MASSING concrete floor

mountain bicycles (holds 185 units)

INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE


AAE 282 - Spring 2012 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

Callida Junctura - Ingenious Joint For two weeks students will be involved in a design-construction project. Student must choose at least two of the following materials (wood, glass/plexi-glass, cardboard, neoprene, aluminum and/or concrete) to create a cup holder for their studio desk. The Cup Holder must not exceed 12 inches in any direction. Student must not spend more than $50 on the cup holder.

TEACHING


HYBRID HOUSE

EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE 2

TEACHING


AAE 282 - Spring 2012 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

Hybrid House - Live / Work / Live This project requires the development of a design that responds to specific home based businesses. The goal of the hybrid home is to encourage and nurture small businesses as well as flexible living/working situations. Unlike live/work environments, the essential spaces in a hybrid house can function in a commercial and/or residential capacity. This strategy should permeate the site development as well. The lot should be viewed as providing additional opportunities to generate income without compromising the quality of life or neighborhood integrity. Rather than imposing an abstract ideal on a community, the hybrid house seeks to validate, encourage and conform to existing family situations and entrepreneurial endeavors. The house should be designed for a wood working artist.

HYBRID HOUSE

EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE 1

HYBRID HOUSE

INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE 1


TEACHING


AAE 282 - Spring 2012 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

21st Century Bookshop - Keep the Dream Alive In 2009, the Prairie Avenue Bookshop in Chicago closed its doors after Being in Business for nearly 50 years. The Prairie Avenue Bookshop Specialized in books on architecture, landscape architecture and interior design and was nationally and internationally renowned for its comprehensive offerings. The London Financial Times newspaper called it the “best architecture bookstore in the world.� In a city known for its architecture, the closing of Prairie Avenue Bookshop is still being mourned. In our final project of the semester, we will explore the possibility of creating a new architecture bookstore that will cater to the changing times in the 21st century. You have been entrusted with creating this new kind of bookstore. In addition to offering books and periodicals for sale, the new Chicago Architecture Bookshop will offer a venue for architectural and design exhibits, lectures and discussions as well as multimedia events that support the understanding and appreciating the built environment.


TEACHING


JUMP START FABRICATION WORKSHOP 1.0

Digital fabrication is becoming more predominant in architecture, bridging a gap between digital design, materiality and form. Re-integrating craft and understating how fabricated processes can influence and advance standard construction methods. This workshop focuses on the manipulation of digital media (rhinoceros/grasshopper/Cam) and rapid prototyping tooling to generate speculative physical prototypes that will be exhibited at the end of the workshop.


Biodegradable Park Bench Furniture Design

A NEW ROAD FOR TOMORROW “Almost every product we buy is wrapped in plastic. It’s cheap to manufacture and durable. And that’s the problem. It’s too durable. Once disposed of, it can take hundreds of years to break down.” Dr Malcolm Jenkins, CSIRO

CREATIVE WORK


UNLV School of Architecture Graduate Studies: 5th year design Studio

Culture, is defined as the quality in a person or society that arises from a concern for what is regarded as excellent in arts, letters, manners, scholarly pursuits, etc. The main objective is the quality of a person. This school of architecture is set on principles of solid relationships. By providing small enrollment levels, a work space for each student, and communal computers, intimate interaction between teacher-student and studentstudent will become thoroughly apparent. This school of architecture will provide students with the ability to become involved with research, traveling lectures, workshops, and design competitions. Small numbers and more effective communication will be the mission of the school. Building strong individuals will push for a stronger culture.

CREATIVE WORK


British Airways

Undergraduate Studies: 4th year Structures British Airways, A major international airline, has commissioned design for their U.S. West Coast Headquarters, to be established in Las Vegas, NV. The client has asked for a contemporary office building, with approximately 6,000 sq. ft. of office space, and a unique/creatively approached steel structure that will reflect the company’s soaring aspirations and goals. The form of the structure follows the sweeping logo of the company, allowing a visual and iconic connection from the near-by McCarran International Airport. To create a more close-nit complex of employees, the spaces have been kept as open as possible, creating compelling visuals of the structure, while connecting the central/main atrium lobby, 2nd floor balcony that overlooks the airport, and the interior lounge that connects throughout the entire building’s first floor.

CREATIVE WORK


Sculpture

Undergraduate Studies: 3rd year design Studio

CREATIVE WORK


shaping the Future the Henderson space & science center represents a historic opportunity to educate and empower the youth of southern nevada. fostering a love of science, mathematics and technology will not only strengthen our children but also help to establish Henderson and southern nevada as a new capital for technology, industry, and innovation.

PROFESSIONAL WORK


Henderson Space & Science Center Tate Snyder Kimsey + RAFI: Designer

the new Henderson space & science center will be a place where people get to make things and make things happen. designed to be an interactive place of wonder, excitement, and the hands on exploration of science, mathematics, and technology, this 87,892 square foot facility will feature a mix of both permanent and traveling exhibits, multi-purpose educational and event spaces, a dining venue, and an outdoor exhibit courtyard. architecturally the building must be compelling and memorable. the form of the building is striking yet approachable. a seemingly floating roof plane reaches out towards the parking lot creating a visual pull while shading the visitor approach. an interplay of building masses and elements creates depth. the juxtaposition of solidity and transparency in materials builds anticipation and piques curiosity by offering visitors glimpses of the exhibits within. a 75 foot tall Led sign tower located on the southwest corner of the site will anchor the new Henderson space & science center within the Union Village development and act as a beacon and visual icon for the city of Henderson and southern nevada communities. operationally the building will be as advanced as the exhibits it houses. a focus on sustainability, conservation, and environmental responsiveness will be crucial to the design. the building systems and the emerging green technologies that fuel them will also be used to raise awareness and educate visitors.


Restaurant at the Palms Casino Resort

24

01 02 03 04 05

06

07

08 09 10

Casino Level Host | Podium Restaurant Entry | Stair | Elevator Vestibule 2nd Floor Entry Vestibule Antique Mirrored Walls/Ceiling w/ Lacquer Lattice Framework Overlay 2nd Floor Host | Podium Antique Baroque Podium w/Table Lights Lounge Custom Biscuit Tufted Couches w/Antique Cocktail Tables, Interlay Glass Backdrop Panels w/Sheer Drapery Panels & Custom French Love Letter Ceiling Collage H Bar Three Station Bar w/9 Barstools, Cantilever Liquor Display, Backdrop Drapery Panels & Custom Lit Glass Bar Top Main Dining Room Custom Banquets, Seating for 62, Aged Black “Ash Patina” Brick Walls, Reclaimed Wood Plank Flooring, Custom “Parisian” Cast Ceiling Medallions/Moldings Wine Display Back Lit Custom Wine Display Terrace Bar J Two Station Bar w/5 Barstools, Back Bar “Rose Garden” Terrace Dining Room Stair Access to Palm Pool Area Seating for 28, Overhead Lighting, Cooling/Heating For Seasonal Usage, Large Scale Pots w/ Forsythia Flowering Trees

Concept Presentation 09.28.2010

Juliet Restaurant @ Palms 102 7 Design Group: Designer

lettre d’amour

lettre d’amour

Restaurant Terrace

PROFESSIONAL WORK

25

01

02 03

04


26

27

24

28

25

H

09

26

27

28

01

4 06

02

05

07

10

03

J

04

08

Floor Plan

Reflected Ceiling Plan

NTS

NTS

01

02

Lower Entry Vestibule Ceiling @ 7’-9”AFF Antique Mirrored Ceiling w/ Lacquer Lattice Framework Overlay Lounge/Bar Ceiling @ 8’-6” AFF (Lower Plaster Ceiling w/4 “French Love Letter” Ceiling Coffers

03

04

Main Dining Room Ceiling @ 10’-6” AFF Upper Ceiling w/Custom “Parisian” Cast Ceiling Medallions/Moldings Terrace Dining Room Ceiling @ 9’-0” AFF Existing Terrace Structure To Remain w/Overhead “String Lights”

Casino Level Entry

Restaurant Entry

Lounge / Dining


without sacrificing openness, and escape the mosquitoes and insects that tend to hover close to the ground. On this particular site, this design move

any time of the day, dur spaces allows this sma

CHRISTIAN STREET RESIDENCE II Positioned on along a narrow lot measuring 50’ x 200’ in an historic Baton Rouge neighborhood, this 1200-square foot home sits comfortably within its modest surroundings. This commissioned design is the latest in a series of affordable, contemporary homes designed to fit the long narrow lots typically found in southern Louisiana. Sustainable strategies, efficient space planning, the strategic utilization of the site’s assets, a low-maintenance material palette and the use of vernacular design traditions are all hallmarks of this design.

has the added benefit of placing the living spaces in the canopy of the majestic oak trees that flank the lot. The continuous living space on the second floor terminates with a deck that steals peek-a-boo views through the adjacent properties to the lakes beyond. The dining area is flanked by a series of sliding glass doors that flow on to a raised porch. An exterior stair allows guests to circulate down into the spacious back yard as well as utilize a covered porch created by the second floor cantilever.

CHRISTIAN STREET RESIDENCE II

Embracing a clean, unpretentious aesthetic, the second floor is wrapped with an indigenous cypress wood rain-screen punctuated with large expanses of glass. The second floor cantilevers beyond a concrete block courtyard wall and base. Set back from the street, the home is experienced in layers. The first experience is an intentionally sparse grass-crete front yard and drive Positioned on along a narrow lot measuring 50’ x 200’ in an historic Baton that accommodates guest parking. Visitors then pass through a block wall Rouge neighborhood, this 1200-square foot home sits comfortably within its that defines an open courtyard and carport that can double as an outdoor modest surroundings. This commissioned design is the latest in a series of entertaining area. affordable, contemporary homes designed to fit the long narrow lots typically

“I entertain often, having wine tastings every couple of months, and needed a home that can accommodate this, and flow easily between inside and outside,” explained the client.

The an architect did living not require squareoffootage for hasclient, the added benefit ofherself, placing the spaces ainlot theofcanopy the her daily life, need majestic oak but treesshe thatdid flank the the lot. ability to entertain large groups of people at different times of the year. To accomplish this the home was designed to The continuous space on the second flooraterminates a deck that create a numberliving of outdoor rooms that have variety ofwith solar orientations. steals peek-a-boo views through the adjacent properties to the lakes beyond. found in southern Louisiana. Sustainable strategies, efficient space planning, Key spaces in the house have large sliding glass panels that access these Passing through the courtyard to the front door, visitors immediately enter The dining area is flanked by a series of sliding glass doors that flow on the strategic utilization of the site’s assets, a low-maintenance material outdoor rooms. The design also capitalized on the site’s mature trees a small vestibule with guestdesign room,traditions home office stair that to a raised porch. An exterior stair allows guests to circulate down into the to palette and the an useadjacent of vernacular are alland hallmarks of this ample sunlight in these spaces. This leads to design. the second floor. Placing the main living spaces on the second floor provide spacious back shade yard asand well filtered as utilize a covered porch outdoor created by the second enhances the owner’s ability to find a comfortable, outdoor space at almost floor cantilever. is a vernacular tradition that allows one to capture breezes, provide privacy Embracing openness, a clean, unpretentious aesthetic, the second floor is wrapped without sacrificing and escape the mosquitoes and insects that with any time of the day, during every season of the year. Leveraging the outdoor “I entertain often, tastings every of months, and needed allows thishaving small,wine modest house to couple live big. an indigenous woodOn rain-screen punctuated expanses tend to hover close tocypress the ground. this particular site, with this large design move of spaces a home that can accommodate this, and flow easily between inside and glass. The second floor cantilevers beyond a concrete block courtyard wall and base. Set back from the street, the home is experienced in layers. The first experience is an intentionally sparse grass-crete front yard and drive that accommodates guest parking. Visitors then pass through a block wall that defines an open courtyard and carport that can double as an outdoor entertaining area.

Passing through the courtyard to the front door, visitors immediately enter a small vestibule with an adjacent guest room, home office and stair that leads to the second floor. Placing the main living spaces on the second floor is a vernacular tradition that allows one to capture breezes, provide privacy without sacrificing openness, and escape the mosquitoes and insects that tend to hover close to the ground. On this particular site, this design move

outside,” explained the client.

The client, an architect herself, did not require a lot of square footage for her daily life, but she did need the ability to entertain large groups of people at different times of the year. To accomplish this the home was designed to create a number of outdoor rooms that have a variety of solar orientations. Key spaces in the house have large sliding glass panels that access these outdoor rooms. The design also capitalized on the site’s mature trees to provide ample shade and filtered sunlight in these outdoor spaces. This enhances the owner’s ability to find a comfortable, outdoor space at almost any time of the day, during every season of the year. Leveraging the outdoor spaces allows this small, modest house to live big.

CHRISTIAN S

Positioned on along a narrow lot measuring 50’ x 200’ in Rouge neighborhood, this 1200-square foot home sits co modest surroundings. This commissioned design is the l affordable, contemporary homes designed to fit the long found in southern Louisiana. Sustainable strategies, effic the strategic utilization of the site’s assets, a low-mainten palette and the use of vernacular design traditions are a design.

Embracing a clean, unpretentious aesthetic, the second an indigenous cypress wood rain-screen punctuated with glass. The second floor cantilevers beyond a concrete b and base. Set back from the street, the home is experien first experience is an intentionally sparse grass-crete fro that accommodates guest parking. Visitors then pass th that defines an open courtyard and carport that can doub entertaining area.

Passing through the courtyard to the front door, visitors i a small vestibule with an adjacent guest room, home offi leads to the second floor. Placing the main living spaces is a vernacular tradition that allows one to capture breez without sacrificing openness, and escape the mosquitoe tend to hover close to the ground. On this particular site,

Christian Street Residence II +one Design and Construction: Designer

1

3

Positioned on along a narrow lot measuring 50’ x 200’ in an historic Baton Rouge neighborhood, this 1200-square foot home sits comfortably within its modest surroundings. This commissioned design is the latest in a series of affordable, contemporary homes designed to fit the long narrow lots typically found in southern Louisiana. Sustainable strategies, efficient space planning, the strategic utilization of the site’s assets, a lowmaintenance material palette and the use of vernacular design traditions are all hallmarks 16 16 of this design. 11

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

PROFESSIONAL WORK

Drive Way Guest Parking Gate Coverd Parkin Coverd Front E Patio Living / Dinning Kitchen Bath


ring every season of the year. Leveraging the outdoor all, modest house to live big.

STREET RESIDENCE II

n an historic Baton omfortably within its latest in a series of g narrow lots typically cient space planning, nance material all hallmarks of this

floor is wrapped with h large expanses of block courtyard wall nced in layers. The ont yard and drive hrough a block wall ble as an outdoor

immediately enter fice and stair that s on the second floor zes, provide privacy es and insects that , this design move

has the added benefit of placing the living spaces in the canopy of the majestic oak trees that flank the lot. The continuous living space on the second floor terminates with a deck that steals peek-a-boo views through the adjacent properties to the lakes beyond. The dining area is flanked by a series of sliding glass doors that flow on to a raised porch. An exterior stair allows guests to circulate down into the spacious back yard as well as utilize a covered porch created by the second floor cantilever. “I entertain often, having wine tastings every couple of months, and needed a home that can accommodate this, and flow easily between inside and outside,” explained the client.

ng Entry

g

2

3

The client, an architect herself, did not require a lot of square footage for her daily life, but she did need the ability to entertain large groups of people at different times of the year. To accomplish this the home was designed to create a number of outdoor rooms that have a variety of solar orientations. Key spaces in the house have large sliding glass panels that access these outdoor rooms. The design also capitalized on the site’s mature trees to provide ample shade and filtered sunlight in these outdoor spaces. This enhances the owner’s ability to find a comfortable, outdoor space at almost any time of the day, during every season of the year. Leveraging the outdoor spaces allows this small, modest house to live big.

1

3 3

4

5 1

13

2

3

3

16

16

16

13

16

3

8

4

14

9

6

10

12

11 9

17

5 16

16

16

6 10

6

10

12

11

6

7

13 6

6 Drive Way Guest Parking Gate Coverd Parking Coverd Front Entry Patio Living / Dinning Kitchen Bath

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Office Guest Bedroom Utilities Balcony Foyer Master Bedroom Closet Storage / Laundry

7

9

9

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

16 14

5

12

17 8

7

8

14

9

6

16 16

11

15

16

16

16

17

15

5 16 4

13

9

9 3

3

10

12

112

1

2

16

14

15

4

6

g

1

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Office Guest Bedroom Utilities Balcony Foyer Master Bedroom Closet Storage / Laundry

13

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Drive Way 6. Guest Parking Gate 7. Coverd Parking Coverd Front8. Entry Patio Living / Dinning 9.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Kitchen 9. Bath

Drive Way Guest Parking Gate Coverd Parking Coverd Front Entry 10. Office Patio 11. Guest Bedroom 12. Utilities Living / Dinning 13. Balcony 14. Foyer Kitchen 15. Master Bedroom 16. Closet Bath 17. Storage / Laundry

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Office Guest Bedroom Utilities Balcony Foyer Master Bedroom Closet Storage / Laundry

1. 2.13 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Drive Way Guest Parking Gate Coverd Parking Coverd Front Ent Patio Living / Dinning Kitchen Bath


ly spring. a sweet he region and martini and

acy for the ard, the indows acular underside house in arvest and

ught. easons. The story glass nted with on without

Taylor Residence 18

11

19

20

15

21

21

13

7

Second Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

3 11

2

12

10 9

8

14

4

11 15

16

21

21 6

Residence

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

Drive Way Guest Parking Covered Front Entry Covered Breezeway / Back Entrance Pass-Through Garage Patio Roof Deck Dining / Living Kitchen Pantry Bath Storage / Laundry Green Screen Cover Guest Bedroom Walk-in Closet Painting Studio Solar Panels Living Room Master Bedroom Office Hurricane Screen Organic Kumquat Orchard

The site for this design project is a typical suburban development in Southern Louisiana. The development offers 1-acre lots carved out of what was previously productive farmland. The overarching objective of this project was to reconsider this context and offer an alternative vision for what life in the suburbs could look like. The client for this project had an interest in pursuing a sustainable lifestyle, built around organic farming, and was looking for ways of making the property produce additional income. After much research and several discussions the decision was made to design a pragmatic 2,580-square-foot home situated within an organic kumquat orchard. Kumquats are a citrus fruit native to Asia that were brought to the southern states in the mid-nineteenth century. They are harvested in November and December and in Southern Louisiana can produce fruit into early spring. The kumquat tree is evergreen, stands 10-15 feet tall and produces a tart orange-colored fruit with a sweet rind—about the size of a large olive. The kumquat has found its way into the cooking traditions of the region and is commonly used to produce jelly and marmalade. More exotic uses include being used to garnish a martini and infusing vodka. Placing the house in the center of the orchard makes for efficient harvesting, provides a level of privacy for the family and creates a dramatic approach to the home. Because the first floor is submerged in the orchard, the second floor is the only portion of the structure visible from the street. From selected second-floor windows and the porch located above the garage, one’s view floats above the evergreen canopy and the spectacular landscape beyond. The ground floor opens up into the landscape where one experiences the shaded underside of the canopy. The orchard’s canopy creates a microclimate that cools and directs breezes toward the house in the hot summer months. The pass-through garage was designed to park cars, process the seasonal harvest and accommodate an occasional crawfish boil. The landscape and built structures are designed to collect excess water for use during periods of draught. Windows in the home have been placed to accommodate natural ventilation during the temperate seasons. The home is clad with a cypress rain screen and equipped with photovoltaic panels on the roof. The two-story glass wall facing the back of the property is protected from severe weather events by a super shutter mounted with barn-door hardware. This design introduces a responsible, progressive agricultural vision to the region without evoking the historical baggage of the plantation.

5

First Floor Plan

Drive Way Guest Parking Covered Front Entry Covered Breezeway / Back Entrance Pass-Through Garage Patio Roof Deck Dining / Living Kitchen Pantry Bath Storage / Laundry Green Screen Cover Guest Bedroom Walk-in Closet Painting Studio Solar Panels Living Room Master Bedroom Office Hurricane Screen Organic Kumquat Orchard

First Floor Plan

The site for this design project is a typical suburban development in Southern Louisiana. The development offers 1-acre lots carved out of what was previously productive farmland. The overarching objective of this project was to reconsider this context and offer an alternative vision for what life in the suburbs could look like. The client for this project had an interest in pursuing a sustainable lifestyle, built around organic farming, and was looking for ways of making the property produce additional income. After much research and several discussions the decision was made to design a pragmatic 2,580-square-foot home situated within an organic kumquat orchard. Kumquats are a citrus fruit native to Asia that were brought to the southern states in the mid-nineteenth century. They are harvested in November and December and in Southern Louisiana can produce fruit into early spring. The kumquat tree is evergreen, stands 10-15 feet tall and produces a tart orange-colored fruit with a sweet rind—about the size of a large olive. The kumquat has found its way into the cooking traditions of the region and is commonly used to produce jelly and marmalade. More exotic uses include being used to garnish a martini and 1 2 infusing vodka. Placing the house in the center of the orchard makes for efficient harvesting, provides a level of privacy for the family and creates a dramatic approach to the home. Because the first floor is submerged in the orchard, the second floor is the only portion of the structure visible from the street. From selected second-floor windows and the porch located above the garage, one’s view floats above the evergreen canopy and the spectacular landscape beyond. The ground floor opens up into the landscape where one experiences the shaded underside of the canopy. The orchard’s canopy creates a microclimate that cools and directs breezes toward the house in the hot summer months. The pass-through garage was designed to park cars, process the seasonal harvest and accommodate an occasional crawfish boil.

Taylor Residence 22

+one Design and Construction: Designer

The site for this design project is a typical suburban development in Southern Louisiana. The development offers 1-acre lots carved out of what was previously productive farmland. The overarching objective of this project was to reconsider this context and offer an alternative vision The landscape and built structures are designed to collect excess water for use during periods of draught. for what life in the suburbs could look like. The client for this project had an interest in pursuing a Windows in the home have been placed to accommodate natural ventilation during the temperate seasons. The home is clad with a cypress rain screen and equipped with photovoltaic panels on the roof. The two-story glass sustainable lifestyle, built around organic farming, and was looking for ways of making the property wall facing the back of the property is protected from severe weather events by a super shutter mounted with barn-door hardware. This design introduces a responsible, progressive agricultural vision to the region without produce additional income. After much research and several discussions the decision was made to 2 evoking the historical baggage of the plantation. 17 design a pragmatic 2,580-square-foot home situated within an organic kumquat orchard. 13 6

PROFESSIONAL WORK

7

22


6. Patio 7. Roof Deck 8. Dining / Living 9. Kitchen 10. Pantry 11. Bath 12. Storage / Laundry 13. Green Screen Cover 14. Guest Bedroom 15. Walk-in Closet 16. Painting Studio 17. Solar Panels 18. Living Room 19. Master Bedroom 20. Office 21. Hurricane Screen Drive Way 22. 1.Organic Kumquat Orchard

7

Second Floor Plan Second Floor Plan

The kumquat tree is evergreen, stands 10-15 feet tall and produces a tart orange-colored fruit with a sweet rind—about the size of a large olive. The kumquat has found its way into the cooking traditions of the region and is commonly used to produce jelly and marmalade. More exotic uses include being used to garnish a martini and infusing vodka. Placing the house in the center of the orchard makes for efficient harvesting, provides a level of privacy for the family and creates a dramatic approach to the home. Because the first floor is submerged in the orchard, the second floor is the only portion of the structure visible from the street. From selected second-floor windows and the porch located above the garage, one’s view floats above the evergreen canopy and the spectacular landscape beyond. The ground floor opens up into the landscape where one experiences the shaded underside of the canopy. The orchard’s canopy creates a microclimate that cools and directs breezes toward the house in the hot summer months. The pass-through garage was designed to park cars, process the seasonal harvest and accommodate an occasional crawfish boil.

Taylor Residence 3

11

2

10 9

12

8

14

4

11

16

15

21

21 6

5

18

11

19

20

15

21

21

13

7

First Floor Plan First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

3 11

2

12

10 9

8

14

4

11 15

16

21

21

2. Guest Parking 3. Covered Front Entry 4. Covered Breezeway / Back Entrance 5. Pass-Through Garage 6. Patio 7. Roof Deck 8. Dining / Living 9. Kitchen 10. Pantry 11. Bath 12. Storage / Laundry 13. Green Screen Cover 14. Guest Bedroom 15. Walk-in Closet 16. Painting Studio 17. Solar Panels 18. Living Room 19. Master Bedroom 20. Office 21. Hurricane Screen 22. Organic Kumquat Orchard

6 5

1

22

2

First Floor Plan First Floor Plan

1

2

22

2

17

13 6 7

2

17

13

7

6 22

22

Site Plan

0

Site Plan

5

0

10

5

10

20 Ft

20 Ft

The landscape and built structures are designed to collect excess water for use during periods of draught. Windows in the home have been placed to accommodate natural ventilation during the temperate seasons. The

The site for this design project is a typical suburban development in Southern Louisiana. The development offers is clad a cypress rain screen andfarmland. equipped photovoltaic panels on the 1-acrehome lots carved outwith of what was previously productive The with overarching objective of this project wasroof. The two-story glass wall facing the back of the protected weather events by aclient super to reconsider this context and offer an property alternative isvision for whatfrom life in severe the suburbs could look like. The for shutter mounted with this project had anhardware. interest in pursuing a sustainable lifestyle, built around organic farming, agricultural and was looking for to the region without barn-door This design introduces a responsible, progressive vision waysevoking of makingthe the historical property produce additional income. After much research and several discussions the decision baggage of the plantation. was made to design a pragmatic 2,580-square-foot home situated within an organic kumquat orchard. Kumquats are a citrus fruit native to Asia that were brought to the southern states in the mid-nineteenth century. They are harvested in November and December and in Southern Louisiana can produce fruit into early spring. The kumquat tree is evergreen, stands 10-15 feet tall and produces a tart orange-colored fruit with a sweet rind—about the size of a large olive. The kumquat has found its way into the cooking traditions of the region and is commonly used to produce jelly and marmalade. More exotic uses include being used to garnish a martini and infusing vodka. Placing the house in the center of the orchard makes for efficient harvesting, provides a level of privacy for the family and creates a dramatic approach to the home. Because the first floor is submerged in the orchard, the second floor is the only portion of the structure visible from the street. From selected second-floor windows and the porch located above the garage, one’s view floats above the evergreen canopy and the spectacular landscape beyond. The ground floor opens up into the landscape where one experiences the shaded underside of the canopy. The orchard’s canopy creates a microclimate that cools and directs breezes toward the house in the hot summer months. The pass-through garage was designed to park cars, process the seasonal harvest and accommodate an occasional crawfish boil. The landscape and built structures are designed to collect excess water for use during periods of draught. Windows in the home have been placed to accommodate natural ventilation during the temperate seasons. The home is clad with a cypress rain screen and equipped with photovoltaic panels on the roof. The two-story glass wall facing the back of the property is protected from severe weather events by a super shutter mounted with barn-door hardware. This design introduces a responsible, progressive agricultural vision to the region without evoking the historical baggage of the plantation.


“We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.� T. S. Eliot


Ibrahim Kako