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Editor’s Report Summary

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ach year we strive to provide the best expert content in the areas of business growth, content marketing and social media strategies for women influencers to grow their businesses and their online brand. Year over year we continue to see progress with influencers that commit to learning the tools necessary to grow their businesses through both online content creation as well as through offline channels like working with brands, selling products or providing social media services. To track how women influencers are progressing in their business journey, we developed the Women’s Influencer Industry & Business Survey. Our survey is an intensive 52 questions divided into the categories covering influencer’s work life, demographics, time invested in pursuing business education and growth, social media channels they utilize, how they earn money and their relationship with brands and agencies.

Matt Cherry Founder & Publisher @iBlogmag

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iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

Just as social media changes daily, so do the opportunities for women influencers to create diverse revenue streams and business opportunities. Our report’s major findings provide a snapshot into influencers business strategies and the direction they are heading in 2016. To see annual progress, we call on leading industry experts from social media agencies, influencer networks, tech providers and top bloggers to provide us with their expert insights and opinions about the major findings uncovered by our report. Their commentary provides a unique and in depth analysis that elevates the information provided in the findings so we can understand the true impact of our survey results. In this second year of our report, we begin to see trends evolve and slight changes to business strategies taking place. We are excited to provide you with the results and major trends from the influencers that participated in our survey and develop your own interpretations of our findings. One size does not fit all in this industry and influencers in all niches have different goals as to where they want their businesses to take them. Please use this report as a starting point to see if you share some of the characteristics of our survey participants and learn from their responses so that you can grow the business of your dreams. Thanks to all of our survey participants, supporters and industry experts that contributed to this year’s 2016 iBlog Women Influencer’s Industry & Business Report.


CONTENTS 04

INDUSTRY EXPERTS

06

INDUSTRY SUPPORTERS

11

BLOGGER DEMOGRAPHICS

12

MAJOR FINDING #1: Influencer income is not increasing

14

MAJOR FINDING #2: Influencers get bogged down in operations

16

MAJOR FINDING #3: Influencers are disinterested in video

18

MAJOR FINDING #4: Influencers value SEO and content marketing

20 22

MAJOR FINDING #5: Facebook rules traffic driving

24

MAJOR FINDING #7: Understand ROI or continue to be undervalued

26

MAJOR FINDING #8: Influencers need more brand/agency investment

28

MAJOR FINDING #9: Influencers are happy with their compensation

30

MAJOR FINDING #10: Influencers know how to grow, but still struggle

32

SURVEY QUESTIONS: Blogger Bio

36

SURVEY QUESTIONS: Time Investment

40

SURVEY QUESTIONS: Social Media

44

SURVEY QUESTIONS: Income & Earnings

48

SURVEY QUESTIONS: Brands & Agencies

MAJOR FINDING #6: Instagram and Pinterest use are on the rise


INDUSTRY EXPERTS These 15 amazing industry experts are business leaders and thought leaders in the women's influencer industry. Their insight and feedback on this year's survey will guide you to making smart business decisions in your social media and blogging business career.

Amy Callahan

Co-Founder & CCO

Collective Bias

Stacy DeBroff

Founder & CEO Influence Central

Stefania Pomponi

Founder & President Clever Girls

Stacey Ferguson Chief Curator

Blogalicious

Rohit Vashisht President

Activate by Bloglovin’

Aliza Freud

Founder & CEO She Speaks

Elisa Camahort Page

Chief Community Officer

SheKnows Media

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As Chief Client Officer, Amy oversees CB’s client service department and our community. Amy has over 10 years of experience in shopper marketing, working with national retailers and brands. Honored on the Arkansas Business and NWA Business Journal‘s “40 under 40” lists, Amy has also appeared on Forbes’ list of one of 11 female entrepreneurs who started amazing companies in their annual coverage of “America’s Most Promising Companies.”

Stacy DeBroff, founder and CEO of Mom Central Consulting, the leading social media consulting firm focused on Moms, brings more than a decade of award-winning experience, expertise, and insight to the nation’s top brands, agencies, and organizations. Stacy writes and speaks on a wide range of topics, including Mom-focused parenting topics and trends, Marketing to Moms, and Social Media and Influencer Marketing.

Stefania Pomponi is the Founder, President & Chief Evangelist of Clever Girls, an award-winning, multimillion-dollar influencer marketing agency headquartered in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is also a board member of WOMMA.org and a pioneer in the world of scalable influencer marketing, best exemplified by the viral #Batkid social media phenomenon spearheaded by Clever Girls. She is an ally to content creators and believes that authenticity rules and that great stories deserve great storytelling.

Stacey is a sought-after media personality, digital brand strategist, content creator, public speaker, freelance writer, advisory board member, and Chief Curator of the Be Blogalicious community and conferences celebrating diversity among women in social media. As Founder of Justice Fergie Lifestyle Media, she combines media, publishing, consulting events to inspire women to live richly with strategies for life design and turning personal passions into viable brands. 

Rohit is the current President of Activate (formerly Sverve) and a board member at Bloglovin’. Rohit co-founded Sverve, an influencer marketplace, that was successfully acquired by Bloglovin’ in 2016 and renamed to Activate. Activate is the leading influencer marketing platform, connecting 100K+ active influencers to brands for social campaigns. In his current role, Rohit leads business strategy, product and platform growth at Activate. Rohit is a savvy entrepreneur with years of experience in building successful businesses and technology platforms.

Aliza Freud, the founder and CEO of SheSpeaks Inc., launched the award-winning influencer marketing and media platform with one goal in mind: to build a stage for women and help amplify their voices. SheSpeaks is now the largest female influencer platform with a network reach of over 100 million consumers. With the recent addition of SheSpeaksTV a video platform with original content targeting women 25+, she has blazed a new trail for influencer video content.

Elisa Camahort Page is Chief Community Officer at SheKnows Media and was one of the three co-founders of BlogHer, Inc. In her role as CCO, Elisa oversees the BlogHer conference business, leads the company’s expanded consumer insights activities, and helps drive corporate strategy to achieve social community traction, conversation, and participation. She’s host of the new SheKnows podcast, Who SheKnows.

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report


Maria Sipka

Co-Founder & President Linqia

Ana Flores

Founder & CEO

Latina Bloggers Connect

Danica Kombol

President

Everywhere Agency

Holly Hamann Co-Founder

Tap Influence

Kyle Ivins

Co-Founder & CMO Monumetric

Angela Sustaita-Ruiz Co-Founder & Partner

Hispanicize Media/DiMe Media

Tracey McCoy

Chief Operating Officer MtoM Consulting LLC

Holly Homer

Founder & Owner

Kids Activities Blog

Recognized as one of the leading women in technology by Forbes, Maria Sipka is the president and co-founder of Linqia, the first performance-based influencer marketing platform. Linqia works with over 200 leading national brands including Kimberly Clark, NBC, Nestle, Samsung, Unilever, and Walmart. Prior to Linqia, Maria was the founding COO at XING, Europe’s leading business network.

Ana Flores is founder and CEO of #WeAllGrow Events and Latina Bloggers Connect, the first and largest network of digital Latina influencers in the United States. Ana has been recognized by the prestigious Holmes Report among their 2015 Innovator 25 and in 2016 was invited to speak on two occasions at the White House, including the United State of Women Summit, presenting on breaking down gender stereotypes.

Danica Kombol is the CEO of the Everywhere Agency, a leading social media and content marketing firm that works with clients like Macy’s, Cox Communications, Carter’s and others. She founded the influencer network, Everywhere Society.

Holly Hamann is an entrepreneur and tech start-up veteran specializing in rapid market launch, growth, and customer acquisition for enterprise and web-based technology companies. She is co-founder of TapInfluence, a cloud-based influencer marketing platform serving brands and agencies. She has helped launch six tech companies in the social media, content, video, and software industries.

Kyle Ivins is one of the founding members of Monumetric and currently serves as the Chief Marketing Officer. His background comes from the the Social Media Marketing and Advertising Agency world. He has helped grow bloggers and businesses online through social media and paid advertising for over 6 years. His true passion is in entrepreneurship which is why he’s gets so excited helping publishers succeed as entrepreneurs by empowering them reach their site’s potential!

Angela is chief brand officer and managing partner of Hispanicize Media Group, LLC, and works with leading brands and advertisers to help them navigate the rapidly evolving, trillion dollar U.S. Hispanic market by offering branded media opportunities, premium advertising, video integrations, digital marketing and social influencer management through its on and offline platforms that include the annual Hispanicize Event, DiMe Media and Hispanic Kitchen.

Tracey Harrington McCoy is the COO of MtoM Consulting, a digital marketing agency that specializes in influencer marketing. McCoy has spent more than 18 years working in the digital space. During that time, she oversaw all of Justin Timberlake’s online properties, ran editorial at Mode Media (formerly Glam Media,) managed the Aol Homepage, and was a staff reporter for People Magazine. She also currently freelances for several publications including Newsweek and Aol/HuffPo.

Holly Homer is a professional blogger who runs Kids Activities Blog & the Quirky Momma FB page. She loves to share what she learns at HollyHomer.com and is a frequent speaker at conferences on organic FB growth strategies and blog monetization. She lives with her husband, three boys and a dog named Panda in the suburbs of Dallas, TX.

INDUSTRY EXPERTS


INDUSTRY SUPPORTERS The following companies have provided numerous insights and phenomenal support in the distribution, analysis, and publication of the 2016 Annual Women’s Influencer Industry & Business Report.

Activate by Bloglovin An advertising platform that connects businesses and social media influencers to online marketing, enabling businesses to work with influential people and measure campaign results. www.bloglovin.com/activate

BeBlogalicious An online resource for influential, multicultural, women social media enthusiasts from all over the world, providing the opportunity to collaborate, connect and uplift one another. www.beblogalicious.com

BlogHer The #1 women’s lifestyle digital media company, operating a family of leading media properties that include SheKnows.com, BlogHer.com, HelloFlo.com and STYLECASTER.com. www.blogher.com

Clever Girls A WBENC-certified, award-winning influencer marketing agency launched in 2009 to connect brands with influential bloggers who create engaging, authentic, brand content across all social channels. www.clevergirls.com

Collective Bias A leader in influencer-generated content marketing, developing retail campaigns through a state-ofthe-art Shopper Social Media Platform leveraging data, tech and targeting capabilities. www.collectivebias.com

DiMe Media A national network of nearly 2,000 multicultural digital influencers that develop tailored and culturally relevant campaigns that engage U.S. Hispanic consumers. www.dimemedia.net

Everywhere An agency that specializes in all things social media, mastering the art of creating engaging content and developing strategic social media plans and award-winning campaigns for big brands. www.everywhereagency.com

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iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report


Influence Central A company that delivers cutting-edge social media and digital campaigns that create powerful and meaningful ROI, working with more than 200 national brands annually. www.influence-central.com

Kids Activites Blog A blog dedicated to children’s activities—a great resource for recipes, games, crafts, helpful parenting tips, printables, organizational ideas and more. www.kidsactivitiesblog.com

Latina Bloggers Connect A place where Latina bloggers (or “blogueras”) and Latina creators can connect and build a community of authentic voices, uplifting and educating one another. www.latinabloggersconnect.com

Linqia A platform that matches brands with Influencers using demographic, geographic and interest graph data to find the perfect fit. An “always on” content lab for brands. www.linqia.com

MonuMetric An advertising network that provides bloggers with ad solutions that favor the website owner, with servies that include quality reporting in addition to quality performance. www.monumetric.com

MtoM Consulting An industry-leading digital agency specializing in influencer marketing, content creation, social media, and digital advertising, while prioritizing research and measurement in every single campaign. www.mtomconsulting.com

SheSpeaks A platform designed to help elevate and amplify women’s voices. Members test and review products, weigh-in on important topics, and even attend VIP events. www.shespeaks.com

Tap Influence An influencer marketing platform built on creating authentic and meaningful relationships between consumers, influencers, and marketers. www.tapinfluence.com

INDUSTRY SUPPORTERS


FACEBOOK GROUP SUPPORTERS These Facebook groups assisted in publicizing the Annual Women’s Influencer Industry and Business Report survey for 2016, allowing us to collect and provide quality data to women influencers about the blogging industry.

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Mom Blog Society Blogger Support

Blogger Connection Support and Promotions

Food Blogger Friends

Food Bloggers Network

Blogger Perks

Bloggers Worldwide

Blogger Resources & Opps

Entertainment New Media Network

Blogger Opportunities

Mommyhood Media Bloggers

Blogger Opportunities

Mom Bloggers Giveaway Group

Blog Giveaways

Florida Social Media Group

Premier Blogger Network

Ultimate Blog Challenge

Latina Bloggers

Blogger Love

Bloggertunities

SMM Promotions Group

Bloggers United

Social Media Moms & Dads

Women in Business

Blogger and Brands Connection

BlogHer16 Speakers Group

Creative Bloggers Collective

Affiliate Marketing for Bloggers

Blogging with Becky and Paula

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report


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WOMEN'S INFLUENCER INDUSTRY & BUSINESS REPORT 2016 MAJOR FINDINGS 10

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report


LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT OUR WOMEN’S BLOGGING SURVEY PARTICIPANTS DEMOGRAPHICS iBlog Magazine reached out to women bloggers in over twenty niches and partnered with our advisory committee members, blog networks, conference organizers and social media group administrators to ensure a wide reach and a diverse respondent

pool of bloggers to participate in the survey. This is the 2nd Annual iBlog Magazine Women’s Blogging and Business Industry Report. Here are the demographic breakdowns of the bloggers that participated in the survey.

WHO ARE TODAY’S BLOGGERS?

68.9% are Caucasian

80.6% do it all by themselves, with no employees or assistants

14.4% Hispanic or Latino 8.4% African American 3.5% Asian

60% blog about Lifestyle, Food, or Parenting & Family

DIY, Fashion, and Reviews make up the next 11.6% of bloggers’ niches

48.9% have 2 or more kids

63.5% are between ages 30-50

27.5% have full-time jobs outside of blogging

22.4% stay-at-home parents 13.2% full-time bloggers

62.8% have been blogging for 3-6+ years

Only 9.8% make $30,000 or more annually

26.8% 1-3 years 10.4% 0-1 year

HOW DO THEY DO BUSINESS?


MAJOR FINDING #1 Influencer income is not increasing in 2016. 75% of influencers are making less than $10,000 annually and 90% make less than $30,000 annually. This response is within .5% of the 2015 report findings. Writing sponsored blog posts is still the primary way influencers earn money.

Related Survey Question Indicate your annual income from blogging and other revenue sources derived from your blogging career? (Reported on your 2015 tax return from blog related jobs)

LESS THAN $2,500

51.5%

$2,500 - $5,000

15.2%

$5,000 - $10,000

7.9%

$10,000 - $15,000

5.6%

$15,000 - $20,000

5.1%

$20,000 - $30,000

4.8%

$30,000 - $40,000

2.5%

$40,000 - $50,000

1.7%

$50,000 - $60,000

1.1%

$60,000+

4.5%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

Earnings reported are nearly identical to those reported in 2015. Many different variables affect this as more influencers enter the industry daily in various social media platforms.

Expert Opinion...

Stacy DeBroff Founder & CEO Influence Central

What we’ve seen in the marketplace has been a diffusion of opportunities given a huge growth in the sheer number of influencers. Moreover, brands have started to hyper-focus on specific platform expertise and reach, particularly with emergent platforms such as

Instagram and YouTube, influencer content that closely maps to their brand story, and influencers who reach a very specific consumer demographic that the brand has targeted for a particular campaign. Also, as compensation has gone up for brand advocacy engagements (hence why we see in finding 9 that the vast majority of influencers report being happy with the compensation received for engagements), brands overall have started to engage less influencers within a specific campaign at these higher price points. This all results in more limited opportunities for an influencer,

thus causing their total income from content engagements to stagnate. But what has proven true across the rise of the influencer space centers on the key that the influencers making the most money tend to make it from activities auxiliary to their platforms, such as: spokesperson, social media consultant, campaign runner, book author, community manager, speaker, part-time agency employee, branded content creator, or small business owner. The key to increased income comes from leveraging your platform foundation and expertise into other sources of lucrative revenue.

You need to know ... 5-10 30.1%

HOW MANY HOURS A WEEK IS YOUR TYPICAL BLOGGING WORK WEEK?

10-15 13.7% 15-20 10.7% 20-25 13.9% 25-30 10.2% 30-35 8.0% 35+ 13.4%

This survey question is related to the major report finding.

12

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35


Expert Opinion...

Maria Sipka

Co-Founder & President Linqia

Nearly 70% of marketers pay per post, making it the most common pricing model for influencer marketing. In this model, individual influencers are paid a flat rate for creating and publishing a piece of content, regardless of how it performs. This means that quality in-

Expert Opinion...

Angela Sustaita-Ruiz Co-Founder & Partner

Hispanicize Media & DiMe Media

Most content creators begin or are still working in social media part time. Since that’s the case, it makes sense that most influencers are generating around $10,000 a year, so that stat is not surprising. Based on our experience, creators who work full time in social media routinely make $20,000, $30,000 or much

fluencers, whose content is proven to inspire action and is often of professional quality, are limited to the same preset earning amount as influencers who do not deliver similar results. Influencers who work with a pay-for-performance model are empowered to take control of their earning potential. Rather than being paid simply for creating a piece of content, influencers are compensated based on how well that content performs. Those who have a vested interest in the brand’s business objectives and create quality content that is designed to inspire audience action have a higher earning

potential. The better their content performs, the higher the compensation. Paying for performance also benefits brands as it’s a surefire way to guarantee a return on their program investment. In this model, brands only pay for consumers who have taken an action after being influenced by influencer content (typically clicking through to visit a brand’s landing page). As a result, they generate significantly more reach and engagement as influencers test different approaches until they determine what drives the best results.

more. We’ve noticed that a growing number of top Latina and Latino influencers we work with can earn between $75,000 to $150,000 a year, and the reason is because they are upping their game constantly. The most important thing that influencers can do to improve their income is to make sure they evolve beyond blogging. Brands are becoming more interested in visual storytelling, so those influencers who have been able to evolve and diversify their platform to include more video are in higher demand and command bigger fees. Top-tier influencers who create quality and

relevant content that generates organic engagement can demand $6,000 and up per video. Theoretically, influencers today can make more money than ever because, unlike the days when you only got sponsored interest for a blog post, today you can monetize across Facebook, Facebook Live, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Periscope, Pinterest and more. It’s true that there are so many platforms and not enough time to “feed them,” but we find that when influencers put the time and effort to monetize—and when they especially get serious about video—their business thrives!

"Influencers who work with a pay-forperformance model are empowered to take control of their earning potential. Rather than being paid simply for creating a piece of content ..." MARIA SIPKA

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #2 Influencers get bogged down in operations while not marketing or learning. 82% of bloggers perform all blog related tasks themselves and spend less than 3 hours per week researching paying jobs. 66% spend less than 4 hours per month on learning social media or business skills for growth.

Related Survey Question Which best describes your current blog operations status? I BLOG FULL TIME - I DO EVERYTHING MYSELF 30.9% I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE 1-2 OTHERS THAT ASSIST ME OCCASIONALLY

8.8%

I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE 1-3 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

3.2%

I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE 3-5 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

0.7%

I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE FULL TIME EMPLOYEES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS YEAR ROUND

0.9%

I BLOG PART TIME - I DO EVERYTHING MYSELF

49.7%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE 1-2 OTHERS THAT ASSIST ME OCCASIONALLY

3.9%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE 1-3 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

1.2%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE 3-5 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

0.5%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE FULL TIME EMPLOYEES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS YEAR ROUND

0.2%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

One-person influencer operations have increased from 76% to 80% in the past year, leading to a decrease in time available to invest in learning new tools to monetize their businesses.

Expert Opinion...

Kyle Ivins

Co-Founder & CMO Monumetric

One important factor when projecting how much traffic a blogger can grow to in 12 months, how quickly they will grow, and how much they will earn is by how much time they spend distributing their content. From my ex-

perience, most publishers spend more time creating their content than they do marketing their content. Each piece of content should receive at least twice as much time distributing the content as it took to create the content. Your traffic will be directly proportionate to the amount of time you spend distributing your content. Traffic is the currency of digital publishing. Higher traffic can demand more for sponsored posts, more volume for ads, and more opportunity to sell products. Key ways to focus on

growing your traffic quickly are working with other influencers (not just other bloggers) to share content, and spread your posts around the web. These can be shares, guest posts, contributions, etc. The more links you’re able to share will create referral traffic and improve organic traffic. Using paid social media advertising can be daunting, but if your advertising team understands important metrics like your revenue for every session, you can calculate what you’re able to profitably pay for clicks, which can enable you to grow quickly.

Related Survey Question How many hours a month do you spend on learning and education? (Including social media, blogging, and business education directly related to growing your business and earning revenue)

NONE

6.2%

0-1 HOUR

11.9%

1-2 HOURS

18.9%

2-3 HOURS

17.4%

3-4 HOURS

11.2%

4-6 HOURS

11.2%

6+ HOURS 23.3%

PERCENTAGE

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iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50


Expert Opinion...

Holly Hamann Co-Founder

Tap Influence

For bloggers and influencers who depend on their content for income, blogging is as much a business as any other entrepreneurial effort.

That means they have operational needs that involve standard business areas like sales, marketing, development, accounting, and management. Keeping a pipeline of opportunities requires being visible to brands (marketing), closing deals and being competitive with pricing, content or influence (sales), creating stellar content (development) and keeping track of income and expenses (accounting). This is arguably the hardest stage of any busi-

ness—when business owners do everything themselves until the business scales enough to fund staffing. Most entrepreneurs excel at one or two specific areas and learn the rest as best they can. An encouraging stat in the survey, though, was the finding that 23% spend six or more hours per month on education. For those influencers, this reflects a priority on learning, which is critical to success in an ever-evolving digital industry.

Related Survey Question How many hours a week do you spend prospecting and contacting brands/agencies/ firms for new paying jobs/projects?

0-1 HOUR 49.6% 1-2 HOURS

19.9%

2-3 HOURS

12.4%

3-4 HOURS

7.2%

4-6 HOURS

5.2%

6+ HOURS

5.7%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

Related Survey Question How many hours a week do you outsource tasks related to your blog to an administrative or virtual assistant?

DO NOT USE 82.0% 1-5 HOURS

9.5%

5-10 HOURS

3.7%

10-20 HOURS

2.2%

20+ HOURS

2.5%

PERCENTAGE

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

"Keeping a pipeline of opportunities requires being visible to brands (marketing), closing deals and being competitive with pricing, content or influence." HOLLY HAMANN

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #3 Video still ranks near the top of the “disinterested” list (beat only by podcasting). Video and YouTube ranked as the least important for business and 2nd least in time investment to learn how to monetize by influencers monthly. (Podcasting retained its title as the tool that’s of least interest to influencers.)

Related Survey Question How many hours* a month do you spend on learning to use and monetize the following to grow your business: *These influencers stated that only spent "0-3 hours" per month on the following tools.

SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLS

9.3%

VIDEO 40.8% EMAIL MARKETING 36.4% SOCIAL MEDIA ADS 38.2% AUDIO & PODCASTING 69.0% AFFILIATE MARKETING

31.7%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

Interest by influencers in learning how to utilize and maximize the power of video is stagnant. Brands are willing to pay more for premium video content, but it’s not driving influencers to get on camera.

Expert Opinion...

Amy Callahan

Co-Founder & CCO Collective Bias

It’s a shame that influencers are disinterested because video is where the industry is heading. Even Facebook is predicting they will be mostly video content in the coming years. Looking to take advantage of over 100 hours of daily video consumption, Face-

Expert Opinion...

Angela Sustaita Ruiz Co-Founder & Partner

Hispanicize Media & DiMe Media

Let’s keep it real: Video is intimidating because it requires more work, more time and, in some cases, more creativity to produce. Whether we like it or not, there’s no denying that video is here to stay, because brands 16

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

book just launched Canvas, which leverages storytelling with video content to showcase brands. Brands are clamoring for video content to reach the all-important millennial audience, who a reported 80% say video content is the first place they turn for help in making purchase decisions. We are in the age of visual content. Whether it’s unboxing, how to, haul videos or simply humorous video content, video is playing an important role for brands in the spectrum of visual content. While influencers are taking great photos and even creating infographics,

video content is so easy for audiences to consume ... you just sit back and enjoy the show. There is more money to be made for influencers who can produce great video content. Not only will video help influencers monetarily, but it can help drive engagement and traffic to their blog. Video is also a great way for an influencer to build their personal brand. As more traditional media outlets begin to look to influencers as hosts or simply to integrate influencers into their shows, the ability to show on camera capabilities will become very important.

are increasingly interested in incorporating visual storytelling that includes video and/ or live streaming. That said, as with any business, it’s important for influencers to constantly evolve and look for new ways to diversify their business. A huge reason video has risen to the pole position is because brands are trying to engage audiences that are younger, more visual, and more tech savvy than the generation that was around for the original wave of bloggers. Video is king right now, so in-

fluencers who want to continue to be relevant will need to determine not if they are going to do this but rather which video or live streaming platform best suits them and their audience. With social media trending toward more visual storytelling, it’s now vital that the current and future generation of content creators utilize various types of content pieces to strategically connect with their audiences on multiple platforms, including Facebook Live and Periscope, among others.

iBlog magazine JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report 2016 Women’s


Expert Opinion...

Aliza Freud

Founder & CEO She Speaks

I'm surprised by this finding, given the growth of video. Look, video is definitely not for every influencer, but there is no denying the power of video and the compensation opportunities

Expert Opinion...

Kyle Ivins

Co-Founder & CMO Monumetric

Video truly is the future of content. It may be disheartening, it may be hard to hear, but it’s just the truth. There will always be an audience for written posts and excellent imagery, but there

Expert Opinion...

Stacy DeBroff Founder & CEO Influence Central

This one proves simple and completely understandable: Despite brands clamoring for video, the truth is that it’s super hard to create great video yourself with your phone or camera without access to a studio, professional

for influencers who create strong video content. Brands love video as it is a compelling storytelling medium and there is a recognition for the potential engagement and sales conversion from great brand sponsored videos. Also, think about how many people you know scroll their social feeds and only stop if there is a video in the post. So, there is interest in video content from both brands and consumers. It's important to note that video does not mean just YouTube. Video can be Facebook

video, Snapchat, Instagram, Vine, Twitter, Facebook Live etc. Also, videos do not have to include the influencer. We are seeing some influencers creating great DIY or recipe content without even being in a frame of the video— well, maybe their hands! So, if an influencer is not comfortable with traditional YouTube video format, remember that the medium has evolved so quickly and there are other types of valuable video content that can be created based on the influencer's content forte.

simply isn’t enough video content to satisfy what readers and advertisers want. They both want more videos. Video is intimidating, and it takes an investment in time and resources, but so did photography when you first started blogging. That same camera you learned to shoot with probably takes video too, so now all you need is a lighting kit, and basic video editing software and you can at least get started. Facebook is hungry for videos being uploaded directly to their platform and so

is Instagram. CPM’s for video advertising is 5-10 times more lucrative than display ads. Start creating video content early, and you’ll enjoy your pick of advertising before everyone else hops on board the video train. Even if you start with your smartphone leaned up on a pile of books, you’ll be miles ahead of everyone else in a year or two if you start now. Remember to directly upload your videos to each platform, including your site, instead of just sharing or embedding a YouTube link.

camera operator, and post-production services. When you look at the powerful emergent videographers such as the up-and-coming YouTube stars, they all have scripting, professional lighting, cameras, and post-production editing and enhancing to sharpen the video shot. So while brands ask for video all the time, they often end up dissatisfied with its amateur quality, or find one nit that they don’t like and ask the influencer to do another video that does not include this correction—which could range from pronunciation to inaccurate product mes-

saging to possible competitors appearing in a background shot such as in one’s kitchen. Moreover, brands have not been willing to pay enough for influencers to professionalize their video creation and have not been willing to pay for post-production editing. Hence the frustration around its creation, and why influencers report video as topping their disinterested list. As to podcasting, brands simply never ask for it. So while influencers can do it, it seldom features as a campaign ask, and thus comes in second.

"Brands are clamoring for video content to reach the all-important millennial audience, who a reported 80% say video content is the first place they turn for help in making purchase decisions." AMY CALLAHAN

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #4 Influencers view SEO and content marketing as integral to their business growth. 89% of influencers see SEO as the most important tool for their business growth and content marketing as a close second at 83%, email marketing came in third at 68% and video placed fourth.

Related Survey Question Rate how important the following will be to your business growth in 2016.

SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION CONTENT MARKETING EMAIL MARKETING VIDEO PODCASTING

The Trend:

Interest in SEO and content marketing are on the rise. This is a great indicator that influencers take their business seriously and are working on tools that will generate better results for their business.

Expert Opinion...

Stacy DeBroff Founder & CEO Influence Central

These findings in Trend 4, which emphasize influencer focus on SEO and content marketing, have to be looked at in tandem with the key findings in Trend 7: that influencers struggle to understand how to measure their ROI (return on investment) in the work they do for brands. The influencers’ predominant focus on SEO and content marketing stems from their primary focus on building and maintaining their platform and audience reach: to

Expert Opinion...

Maria Sipka

Co-Founder & President Linqia

Quality influencers take pride in their work— they tell stories that inspire, take captivating photos, and create authentic, credible content. It’s these kinds of posts that draw audiences in and keep them coming back for more. If an influencer is not genuine about the content they cre18

MOST SECOND MOST MODERATE SECOND LEAST LEAST

ensure that their written and visual content gets seen, picked up by search engines such as Google and by content accelerators such as BuzzFeed. Without reach and audience, influencers lose the very threshold of being selected by brands to work on campaigns. But ultimately, brands have a very different focus in the changing landscape of influencer marketing: driving specific ROI dependent on their business goals of the moment. This often includes having influencers drive consumer actions: clicks to a website, leading e-commerce purchases, getting sign-ups in contests or sweepstakes that help them capture new customers in their selling funnel, changing brand perception, getting a new audience of consumers such as Millennials to pay attention

to the brand, driving retail purchases at specific retail stores, and ultimately creating great content that the brand can amplify across its social channels, as well as paid social advertising to reach its targeted consumer demographic. In this ROI landscape, brands look for great writing, storytelling, and visuals—all with the ability to gain traction that they can then amplify—organic content engagement (shares, comments, re-tweets), click-throughs, share of voice across social, and ultimately the power of persuasion to keep existing customers loyal, answer brand negators, and attract new customers. So a key focus for an influencer should be on showcasing how the content they create or social actions they take in a campaign roll-up to these key brand goals.

ate, SEO will stagnate or drop. Moreover, if influencers are not genuine about the sponsored content they create, they’re inclined to remove the post after program conclusion because they don’t truly believe in or stand by the message. It’s important to understand that SEO depends on content relevance. Rather than writing about various topics sparsely, influencers who focus on their themes or expertise can create content that truly adds value and enriches the lives of others. The more valuable the content is, the more discoverable and shareable it becomes over time. Well-written sponsored posts con-

tinue to surface in search results even after a program ends, which is why it’s important to for influencers to only accept programs they’re passionate about. Seventy-five percent of marketers say that finding the right influencers is their biggest challenge. Blogs with higher SEO indicate influencers that brands may potentially want to work with. And because sponsored posts continue to drive traffic to brand landing pages, brands seek influencers who create content that has long-term value, not content that’s taken down after a payout.

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report


Expert Opinion...

Danica Kombol President

Everywhere Agency

I wish it wasn’t true, but great writing alone will not get a blogger widespread readership. Not using SEO tactics for your blog is like hosting a party and forgetting to send out invites! We actively seek out influencers who show

Expert Opinion...

Rohit Vashisht President

Activate by Bloglovin'

We like to encourage our influencers to consider an 80/20 rule. They should devote 20% of their time to content creation and the other 80% to promotion of that content. Therefore, I’m not surprised that influencers

Expert Opinion...

Stacey Ferguson Chief Curator Blogalicious

This finding doesn’t come as a surprise at all. I am personally guilty of this! Because we are often working with very limited budgets, influencers tend to tackle the operations and administrative tasks themselves. Truth be told, outsourcing those operational items and focusing on rev-

Expert Opinion...

Tracey McCoy

Chief Operating Officer MtoM Consulting LLC

The single, most effective way influencers are driving traffic (both repeat and new) is by optimizing every last piece of content for search. Many influencers report a significant chunk of their traffic is generated by search, and what

they’re adept at SEO. We love well-written blog posts, but we love great content even more. A simple truth: blogs that are keyword-savvy and SEO-friendly will get the brand more exposure in the long run, and that’s always a win. I will confess, I’m still surprised when I see that some bloggers don’t even own their own domain and rely on free blog set-ups. Bloggers who own their own domains lend an extra level of credibility and authority to what they’re creating. On top of that, your own domain can tie into personal branding to create a whole

new level of legitimacy. As for email marketing coming in at third, who doesn’t suffer from an out-of-control inbox? That said, I do wish more influencers were better skilled at email marketing, and I don’t mean the spammy kind that looks like a mass email where you’re trying to sell me something. I love getting quick email updates from influencers letting me know what they’re up to and recent successes with brands. It helps me keep them top of mind when we have new campaigns.

view SEO and content marketing as integral to their business growth. I couldn't agree more with them. SEO and content marketing are the best areas for influencers to focus on when trying to grow their businesses. Simply put, if an influencer has great SEO, it bodes well for them and their future success. Good SEO increases their chances of doing potential work on campaigns, as brands want to work with influencers whose SEO is high-ranking. The same holds true for content marketing. We see that the most in-demand influenc-

ers are savvy and know how to market their content. For many, this might mean marketing on social media. For some, this might mean teaming up with other influencers to promote their content together. Similarly, for others, good content promotion might mean well-crafted emails or email newsletters. Sometimes this technique is underrated. In my opinion, a well-crafted email is a great way to increase the visibility of your content. In short, when in doubt, influencers should market and promote.

enue generation would be a better business move—but the psychology of it can be difficult to overcome. Over the years, I have found this filter question to be extremely helpful: “Is this a task that only Stacey can complete?” If the answer is “no,” then I try to delegate or outsource it. Part of coming to this realization is understanding that I have a special set of skills and ‘wasting’ time on things that don’t require my special skills is a business #FAIL. Also consider that, more often than not, there is someone out there who is actually skilled at those operational tasks and will do them far more efficiently and better than you

would. Some low-cost options for outsourcing include: hiring an intern; using online sites like Fiverr.com and retaining a virtual assistant for a set number of hours each month. Freeing up time for not only revenue generating activities, but also marketing and learning, is critical for any influencer. Our industry changes at a rapid rate and relationships are everything. Therefore, making time for attending conferences, networking events, online broadcasts and the like are an important part of our businesses. Ask yourself: “Where would my time better served?” It’s probably not formatting a slideshow!

was previously an afterthought is now one of the most important pieces of their business plan. So, it’s no surprise that 89% of influencers see SEO as the most important tool for their business growth. Investing in SEO is a no-brainer, particularly if an influencer’s site is generating revenue via banner ads and/or affiliate links. This is particularly true for food and recipe influencers who rely heavily on search traffic. While the study shows that video isn’t a top priority for many influencers, I predict this will change in 2016 and 2017. As social platform

algorithms continue to reward video content with higher and more consistent placement in their newsfeeds, I believe influencers will start to see the value in creating video content. Many influencers say that video creation seems intimidating and simply isn’t cost efficient for them. But every day a new tool or app is released that makes high quality video content creation easier and cheaper—and pretty soon influencers are going to lean more and more on video. Brands are getting savvier too—we’re seeing more businesses ask influencers for video content.

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #5 Facebook rules for business importance & driving traffic, Pinterest is a close second. Facebook rules as the most important for influencers businesses and Pinterest comes in third behind and influencer’s own blog. Pinterest does however take second place in driving traffic to an influencer’s website.

Related Survey Question What is the single most important social platform for your business?

LINKEDIN

1%

GOOGLE+

1%

YOUTUBE

0.8%

INSTAGRAM

14.7%

PINTEREST

16.5%

FACEBOOK 29.3% TWITTER

12.1%

YOUR BLOG

24.7%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

Regardless of platform changes, influencers still see Facebook as the most important social platform for businesses, with zero change from last year's survey. Instagram passed Twitter in the #4 spot.

Expert Opinion...

Holly Homer

Founder & Owner Kids Activities Blog

The only way to have control over your online business is to base it on a platform you own (a website or blog) and then drive traffic to that platform. Bloggers can create a foundation of revenue by monetizing traffic through ad net-

Expert Opinion...

Danica Kombol President

Everywhere Agency

When it comes to driving referral traffic to any site, Facebook and Pinterest rule the roost. With the average American logging on to Facebook at least 20 minutes per day, what we read and see there has influence over all of our decisions: what to eat, what to wear,

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works creating passive income—the catch is that they are being paid a few dollars per 1000 visitors to the site. Facebook and Pinterest are way ahead of the other social networks in driving traffic, due to the ability to post direct links to content. A disturbing trend in new social networks is there are no direct links. Snapchat has no links and Instagram has a general link in the profile. Relying on traffic from an indirect link, general link or the potential reader’s ability to remember and follow through with typing in a URL is never going to deliver the traffic re-

quired for ad network monetization. While we all complain about algorithm changes on both Facebook and Pinterest, they remain the most efficient way to promote content that can be accessed with one click. Sites relying on traffic for income are seeing the writing on the wall. It is unlikely that being paid a few dollars per thousand visitors is going to be a viable strategy in a few years. The challenge for bloggers is to find ways to increase the pay per visitor to a point where using paid strategies on Facebook and Pinterest is an option.

what to do and where to go for more information. Influencers have the opportunity to be a phenomenal source of curated news on their Facebook page, and we encourage them to use their own voice in any Facebook content they publish. However, some influencers risk over-sharing on their Facebook pages or appearing overly promotional with their content. The surest way to lose followers is to constantly try to sell them something. We’re also seeing huge successes driving traffic with Instagram. The many brands we work with are opting for more Instagram-focused

campaigns. Yes, there’s the annoying challenge of “link in bio,” but with or without a link, this visual platform goes a long way toward telling a brand’s story. Much like Pinterest, the visual appeal of this platform can’t be beat. And let’s not forget the new kid on the block! We’re getting a tremendous amount of interest in Snapchat. With Snapchat, we face the challenge of limited analytics; however, a brand’s goal is not always traffic. Building awareness, buzz and creating FOMO can oftentimes be more powerful than traffic in terms of creating a meaningful relationship with customers.

JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s


Related Survey Question What is your single most important social platform driving traffic to your blog?

FACEBOOK 38.4% TWITTER

17.1%

PINTEREST 34.5% INSTAGRAM

7.5%

YOUTUBE

0.8%

LINKEDIN

0.5%

GOOGLE+

1.0%

PERCENTAGE

Expert Opinion...

Stefania Pomponi Founder & President Clever Girls

Clever Girls was surprised by this finding. With most of our programs, Pinterest is the

Expert Opinion...

Ana Flores

Founder & CEO

Latina Bloggers Connect

I’m not surprised that Facebook still rules for influencers, as it is the social platform where it’s the easiest to engage and share with authentic

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number one traffic driver back to blogs according to our own data analysis. This is especially true with food campaigns that may not have a required Pinterest amplification component. Savvy influencers already know to amplify their visual blog posts via Pinterest to reach a wider viewing audience. Many of our influencers are also using Facebook as an amplification tool, but not nec-

essarily to share original content. Because of Facebook’s algorithm change—which is arguably a new form of ad blocking since it’s limiting the amount of content users will see from brands—influencers posting original sponsored content will be more valuable than ever. There’s also lots of untapped potential in Facebook Live, especially as Facebook gears up to take on Snapchat.

communities. Keeping an engaged community on Facebook has been getting harder and harder, but bloggers that get how to create shareable and clickable content on Facebook, plus that are willing to invest a little on boosting posts (and you should!), will definitely see the results. 2016 has been an incredible year for Facebook users and brands that have transitioned to including more video and livestreaming content. The viewability and virality

of Facebook videos is hard to match and video is one of the best ways to share your story online. Also, we’ve seen an increased interest in brands wanting to collaborate with influencers in co-creating content, especially video, gifs and cinemagraphs, and also invest in boosting those posts either on their own pages or on the influencer’s to be able to reach new audiences and with the added bonus of being able to easily access those insights.

"Relying on traffic from an indirect link, general link or the potential reader’s ability to remember and follow through with typing in a URL is never going to deliver the traffic required for ad network monetization." HOLLY HOMER

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #6 Influencers are increasing use of Instagram & Pinterest over blogs and Facebook. Bloggers indicated, by importance to their businesses, that they will increase usage of Instagram in 2016 while choosing Instagram as the #1 platform to learn more about over Pinterest, Blogging, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Related Survey Question Which social media platform do you want to learn the most about in 2015 for your business?

FACEBOOK

10.6%

TWITTER

4.4%

BLOGGING

11.7%

PINTEREST

19.9%

INSTAGRAM 30.3% YOUTUBE

17.4%

GOOGLE+

2.1%

LINKEDIN

3.6%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

There’s been a 10% increase in influencers' interest in learning more about Instagram, while Pinterest is a close second and still the leading tool influencers use to drive traffic.

Expert Opinion...

Stacey Ferguson Chief Curator Blogalicious

Visual is where it’s at. There’s no questioning this finding. The amount of time spent on Instagram and Pinterest by influencers has exploded in recent months. The ability to brand yourself using colors, filters, flat lays and hashtags on

Expert Opinion...

Maria Sipka

Co-Founder & President Linqia

In a successful influencer marketing program, it’s not about which social platform is used most. Rather, success depends on which platforms are used most effectively. Influencers that understand the specific role each channel plays in influencer marketing will be 22

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Instagram makes it a very attractive platform for influencers. Additionally, we’ve all seen the rise in the number and kinds of products that influencers are selling via Instagram. The body wraps, the detox teas, and of course the clothing items with affiliate links. Instagram caters to a broad audience with minimal resources needed to post up an image. As for Pinterest, we know that’s been a steady source of traffic and because of its visual nature—and business accounts—is still a major contender for those influencers wanting to drive users

to their affiliate links and other online content. As a general matter, and perhaps this goes without saying, influencers in 2016 may feel like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest are old hat. There’s not a ton of new features being rolled out on those platforms, whereas the possibilities for Instagram are still being discovered. I think that Instagram combines the best of each of the platforms: the ability to post images and video; the ability to leverage hashtags; the openness of the platform; and the semi-fleeting nature of the stream.

the standout performers. Brands are drawn to Instagram’s ability to capture an audience’s attention with a single photo. It’s up to the influencer to draw the audience in with a visual story and take them on an emotional journey. But it’s more than just increasing the number of photos posted—influencers must also be up-to-date with any updates or changes to the platform. For instance, Instagram recently rolled out a new algorithm system-wide that no longer populates feeds chronologically. Instead, they are now ordered by photos and videos the app

believes users care about most. As a result, influencers must earn the right to pop up in their followers’ feeds. Simply posting more photos does not guarantee an audience. Posting quality photos that inspire engagement, however, does. Additionally, influencers will be doing themselves a disservice if they ignore or disregard blogs, Facebook, YouTube, etc. Brands and marketers understand the value each platform brings to an influencer program and will seek individuals who work proficiently across multiple social channels.

JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s


Related Survey Question Indicate how you will change your social media use in 2016. *These influencers stated that they planned to "increase" their use of the following social media platforms. INSTAGRAM

83%

PINTEREST

74%

BLOGGING

67%

FACEBOOK

62%

TWITTER

59%

YOUTUBE

56%

LINKEDIN

32%

GOOGLE+

26%

PODCASTING

22%

Expert Opinion...

Ana Flores

Founder & CEO

Latina Bloggers Connect

We work with many influencers who have a relatively small reach on their blogs but are killing it with followers and engagement on Instagram. It’s definitely necessary to invest time in understanding the nature of engaging content on Instagram and creating a strategy for your brand that’s specific to this platform.

Instagram has become a platform of influence in and of itself, so these findings totally make sense. Both YouTubers and bloggers have found that to be able to be successful on Instagram, it’s not about using the platform to amplify content on their blogs or channels, but to create content specifically for Instagram to expand their current audience.

Expert Opinion... Expert Opinion...

Stacy DeBroff Founder & CEO Influence Central

Kyle Ivins

Co-Founder & CMO Monumetric

Instagram is a fantastic tool for building community, building loyalty and selling products. The platform currently does not offer the same type traffic growth opportunities as other platforms like Pinterest, Facebook, working with other influencers, and search engines. Influencers need to understand if those 3 things (community, loyalty, and selling products) are a profitable priority for their blog. Maybe the brands they work with prefer Instagram likes or views above other social platforms. In that case, Instagram can be very lucrative for them. However, if there’s no distinct and clear opportunity for bloggers to be very focused on Instagram, I would recommend they put their focus somewhere else. Don’t follow the buzz and the crowd, but do what’s best for your site.

There will always be some outlier who can drive crazy traffic on Instagram, but 90% of publishers gain most of their traffic from Pinterest, Facebook, referral links, and organic traffic. Focus on improving those “bell cow” platforms before diving into a new platform like Instagram, which doesn’t support outside links in posts. If influencers need to focus on gaining more traffic, they should spend the majority of their time on platforms that are traffic-gen friendly until their traffic is at their ideal level. Once you create a consistent process for creating consistent traffic that earns you the money you need to be a full-time blogger, then I would recommend learning about platforms like Instagram or Snapchat. Traffic cures almost all ills, and should be the top priority for most bloggers.

These findings track with what we’ve seen over the past several years in the Influencer Space. With the emergence of visual platforms such as Instagram and Pinterest, we now see the rise of a new generation of storytellers that I call “Visual Influencers.” They reflect today’s increasing shift from written posts to ones centered solely on images. Despite the fact that many of these

visuals do not have a narrative platform and create posts without words, they still share powerful and authentic storytelling, convey heartfelt emotion, and generate significant followings—all through visual imagery. Mostly importantly, influencers find that posts on the emergent visual platforms gain them the most traction in terms of audience build.

"Visual is where it's at. There's no questioning this finding." STACEY FERGUSON

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #7 Influencers need to understand their ROI better or continue to be undervalued. Over 83% of influencers surveyed feel they have average, below average or are completely unqualified to measure their ROI from social media activities to prove their value.

Related Survey Question Rate your level of expertise in relation to this statement; “I am able to measure ROI (revenue generated or leads generated) from my social media activities.”

EXPERT

4.1%

ABOVE AVERAGE

12.9%

AVERAGE

33.1%

BELOW AVERAGE 29.2% UNQUALIFIED

20.7%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

From 2015 to 2016, the same percentage of influencers shared that they still struggle to quantify the true value of their social media marketing efforts for brands and agencies.

Expert Opinion...

Aliza Freud

Founder & CEO She Speaks

Influencers should be their own best advocates. However, they should also expect that the agencies and networks with who they work are helping to articulate their value. This is important for both the influencer and the agency/network. Their interests are aligned. In terms of the value question, I think influ-

Expert Opinion...

Angela Sustaita Ruiz Co-Founder & Partner

Hispanicize Media & DiMe Media

It is imperative that influencers be able to explain the unique value proposition of their platform, and that they learn how to routinely show prospective brand and agency partners how they are continuously growing their audiences and engagement. Influencers should keep in mind that when it comes to selecting the best influencers to work 24

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encers should consider their value in two key ways: 1) Content Creation: At the heart of the power of influencer marketing is fantastic user-generated content from the influencer. If the content is great and helps tell the brand story in a way that is compelling to other consumers, then you have a very valuable asset. This is a bit harder to value and is typically based on what the brand can do with the content. I recommend that influencers encourage brands to use their content on multiple platforms, including the brand's owned social channels. Stopping short on usage of great influencer content is one the biggest reductions

in ROI that a brand can make. 2) Reach/Audience: This is an easier metric for brands and agencies to understand and put value to. An influencer should have an easy-to-read one-pager that has their key stats (and examples of great content) available and updated. An influencer should look at not only their social footprint, i.e., Twitter followers, blog uniques etc., but also how much engagement they typically see from their posts. Have they ever had a post or piece of content go viral? These are great numbers to have at the ready and will help brands and agencies better understand the influencer's value.

with, marketers and their agencies are much more savvy than they were just a few years ago. Today brands are armed with deeper digital expertise, case studies, and cutting edge measurement tools that did not exist before. This reality is what shapes the sometimes subjective judgment calls marketers make about who they will and won’t engage with for their campaigns. Most of the savvy influencers know this, and frankly, this is part of the competitive edge they have over other influencers who may be just as good as them but don’t take ROI measurement seriously. We know it may seem intimidating to focus so much on your numbers, but it’s never been

easier for influencers to measure how their platforms are performing. Today, it’s no longer just about Google Analytics thanks to Facebook Insights and other analytics tools that are rolling out across Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Periscope, and beyond. Some wonder if the standards are different for niche communities like the Latinas and Latinos that we work with. While there may be some language nuances that can impact how certain tools measure Spanish-language or bilingual content, multicultural influencers have the same opportunities to showcase their ROI and how they can connect brands with diverse audiences.

JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s


Expert Opinion...

Ana Flores

Founder & CEO

Latina Bloggers Connect

The social media business is all about ROI. Period. You can create compelling, beautiful and engaging content, but if you don’t know

Expert Opinion...

Holly Homer

Founder & Owner Kids Activities Blog

I believe bloggers completely underestimate their skill set. A blogger has to know a little about a lot of things. When you know a little about a lot of things, it is easy to discount the value of that little bit! Perspective

Expert Opinion...

Elisa Camahort Page Chief Community Officer SheKnows Media

Unless you’re talking about affiliate sales, it’s very hard for most social influencers to demonstrate transactional ROI. And we’re long past the days when page views and clickthroughs are the kind of metrics brands care most about. (Don’t get me wrong, they

Expert Opinion...

Holly Hamann Co-Founder

Tap Influence

Proving value and ROI on an individual basis can be difficult for influencers at this stage of influencer marketing. Here’s one of the reasons why. Like Amazon, eBay, Airbnb and even Uber, influencer marketing is a double-sided marketplace, meaning that there are two distinct networks that rely on

how to measure it and make a case for its worth, then you won’t be able to successfully monetize it. Not only is it key to know and understand your metrics and insights on your main platforms in order to monetize and prove your ROI, but it’s also the blueprint for your growth. It’s how you know what content works or doesn’t. It’s how you know which keywords to expand on. It’s how you know if your videos should be shorter or longer, and

so on. While it’s still the Wild West in terms of putting actual value to your content and persona’s worth online, the only way to be able to back up your fees is by being able to prove key metrics such as reach and engagement. Engagement has become by far the most valuable metric, so influencers need to make sure they are actively engaged with their content themselves and measuring the impact of it.

is key. Step back and look at the massive chain of knowledge required to run a blog— writing, photography, layout, website basics, editorial calendar, and so much more. Then look at what it takes to drive traffic to that site—social media on multiple platforms, marketing, advertising, and so much more. The funny thing is, brands get it. They can’t do what bloggers do. But part of our responsibility when asking for money for what we do is to prove that it is worth the cost. Every single sponsored post client should be get-

ting a summary after the fact of what type of reach that budget got them from that blog. It can be as simple as a list of numbers related to page views, shares, tweets, pins, likes, comments, and clicks to sponsor. For the blogger, this information should be compiled over time and clients so a clear prediction can be made for future campaigns. This allows the blogger to set realistic expectations and the ability to over-deliver on every sponsored program.

still care, but it’s not enough.) So what matters? Reach matters, but results matter more. The scary thing is that every marketer answers to a different brief, and may define positive results differently. You will never know if you don’t ask. Ask explicitly. Brazenly. “What will a successful campaign look like to you?” You may find out that it is the scale of your direct reach. You may find out that it’s more about the network effect … how many people shared and re-shared beyond your initial reach? You may find out it’s conversation and positive feedback on their product. You may

find out it’s a few great testimonials or brand advocates. You may find out it’s something I’m not even thinking about. But until you find out, you can’t strategize on how to deliver it, knowing your audience best as you do. And until you deliver it, you can’t quantify the ROI you’re delivering to your customer. And until you can do that, you’re going to churn through customers, always working hard to land that first sale (the hardest sale) with new clients, instead of building a loyal, returning client base. Ask what ROI looks like, because it may look different every single time.

each other for benefits. Content creators are searched and filtered by brands wanting to better reach consumers, and influencers need the sponsorship of relevant brand products for revenue. One big difference between marketplaces like eBay and influencer marketing, though, is the transparency of pricing and metrics on results. Right now, it is hard for bloggers and influencers to access much data on what other content creators get paid and, even more importantly, their own performance metrics. ROI depends on many factors, including quality of content, reach, vertical industry, and the

performance and engagement that content generated for the brand. If bloggers don’t know how much brands spent on a program or what the results were, it would be hard to calculate their ROI. If you were a home-owner posting on Airbnb, you’d be able to see exactly what comparable properties rent for and their availability, which allows you to price competitively and quantify your value. Right now, brands have access to more ROI factors than influencers do, but the evolution of more automated platforms is helping to solve this problem by providing necessary transparency to influencers as well.

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #8 Brands and agencies need to invest more in influencers success. 83% of influencers feel feedback is important to extremely important, yet 84% of brands and agencies provide feedback less than 20% of the time to influencers. 73% of influencers surveyed chose receiving feedback as the #1 area for brand improvement.

Related Survey Question How many brand/agency/firm projects that you worked on in the past 12 months provided specific and detailed feedback about your blogging and social media efforts?

NONE 35.4% 0-10% 35.4% 10%-20% 13.6% 20%-30% 5.6% 30%-50% 5.3% 50%-70% 1.7% 70%-90% 1.0% 90%+ 2.0%

PERCENTAGE

The Trend:

There’s been a slight increase by brands delivering feedback to influencers on campaign contributions. However, 80% of brands still provide little feedback for influencers to evaluate their success.

Expert Opinion...

Aliza Freud

Founder & CEO She Speaks

This is an important finding and a huge opportunity for influencers. Influencers need to remember that they have a unique perspective that brands and agencies do not have.

Expert Opinion...

Tracey McCoy

Chief Operating Officer MtoM Consulting LLC

At the end of every campaign, we send a quick note to all participating influencers sharing high-level stats from the final campaign report. Influencers tell us that after posting a blog or Instagram post, many brands and agencies never share any feedback. They have no real insight into whether the content they created actually 26

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

Influencers have a direct communication line with their followers. Good influencers know what content and messaging will work best with their audience when working on brand sponsored programs. Bringing this perspective to the table will help influencers build equity with the brand. Influencers should not be a afraid to say that they understand the brand's brief and have a perspective on the best and most compelling way for them to develop their posts. In short, influencers should

not just be order takers. By providing their unique perspective and input to the brands, influencers are building relationships that will pay dividends in the future. By the same token, once posts are completed, influencers position themselves for future projects by requesting feedback from the brand, to determine if the brand or agency has any specific ideas for how the influencer might enhance and evolve their content.

helped the client reach their campaign goals or if the client even liked their contribution. This feedback is incredibly helpful to the influencers as they craft future sponsored content. Without knowing what worked (or what didn’t) they have no real way to set up best practices. At the end of the day, these influencer campaigns are collaborations between influencers and agency or brands—and both parties want to see and enjoy the success of great campaigns. (Or learn from the mis-steps of an underperforming campaign.) Influencers aren’t the only ones who are looking for feedback. As an agency, every time an

influencer declines a campaign, we always follow up to find out why. Was the compensation too low? Is the client or product not a great fit for their site? Is there a brand conflict? And interestingly enough, influencers are thrilled to be asked! It shows that we as an agency are invested and interested in them on the whole— not just for a specific one-off campaign. Following up with influencers—during the outreach phase AND at the conclusion of a campaign—is worth the time investment. It’s a win/ win situation—influencers learn what worked and what didn’t, and this results in even higher quality content for their future campaigns.

iBlog magazine JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report 2016 Women’s


Expert Opinion...

Rohit Vashisht President

Activate by Bloglovin'

We have heard similar sentiments from our influencers. They say that brand and agency investment in them is integral to their success. More often than not, our influencers say that they want brands to offer them more

Expert Opinion...

Amy Callahan

Co-Founder & CCO Collective Bias

This is so important and something we have invested in for years. The feedback we’ve gotten from influencers on how education pays back tenfold not only from the influencer’s perspec-

Expert Opinion...

Stefania Pomponi Founder & President Clever Girls

We agree! We believe Clever Girls provides continuous feedback in more ways better than any other agency. Personalized attention to “care and feeding” of our network is what sets us apart from influencer marketers who rely on fully automated platforms. Our clients want to reach humans, therefore we'd never let an algorithm decide which influencer is right for a brand. It's why we have a dedicated membership team who works closely with our client ser-

Expert Opinion...

Danica Kombol President

Everywhere Agency

Proof that the oft repeated quote “Feedback is the breakfast of champions” is true! How can you measure success if you don’t know how well you’ve done? As an agency, we be-

feedback on how they can improve the quality of their content and how they can make their future content more relevant. Again, I am very much in line with their concerns. It’s important that brands offer influencers feedback. It benefits both parties. Feedback allows both sides to explore what worked well, what didn’t, and how they can do better next time. Moreover, feedback and subsequently, dialogue, create the opportunity to build a brand-influencer relationship. One thing that our influencers say time and time again is

that brands don't spend much time building influencer relationships. Many feel that currently the process is very transactional. The brands collaborate with them, successfully or not, and then move on. If brands were to spend more time nurturing relationships with their influencers, both sides could stand to gain a lot. We see the value in this so we try to facilitate bonds between the two. We want our brands to not only give our influencers feedback but also use that feedback to establish something greater.

tive, but it has a direct impact on the influencer’s audience growth and engagement, which is exactly what brands and agencies are looking for. All too often, the industry doesn’t take the time to provide feedback to the influencer. They want the feedback, not only because they want to work with you more, but because they want to improve and know what their clients are looking for. For the best influencers, this is a business, not a hobby, and they take their working relationships very seriously.

Influencers carry a heavy workload and we need to help them keep up on the latest changes from FTC disclosures, changes in algorithms to best practices and more. Influencers look to us for advice on everything from Google’s latest edict on “no follow” links and its impact on SEO to affiliate links and disclosures. There are so many tips, tricks and tools available to help today’s influencers streamline their work to get more done, and we need to be their valued partner.”

vices team to ensure the exact right influencers are selected for every campaign. Our membership team’s primary focus is on developing our network and helping them to be the most professional, most qualified content creators in the industry. Two examples of ways we provide direct, individualized feedback are by checking each campaign post thoroughly and providing feedback to the influencer, whether to make suggestions for improvement or simply complimenting their gorgeous work. We also highlight influencers and their posts in our weekly influencer network newsletter and on our social media channels. This lets everyone in our network—and our clients­—see the extremely high bar we set for stellar work. We believe there is a huge opportunity here

for learning. The better influencers and brands get at delivering quality campaigns for the influencer’s audiences, the stronger influencer marketing becomes as a marketing tool. Our talented influencers are adept at taking a brand’s key message and translating it into written and/or visual content that appeals to their unique audiences—audiences who have the potential to be fans of the brand as well. We are experts at keeping both a brand’s and an influencer’s interests in mind with the goal of helping target audiences experience a brand’s messaging in emotional, compelling new ways. Our membership team provides personalized attention to our network everyday because we know quality influencers are the key to our continued success.

lieve that a feedback loop has to be in place throughout the entire campaign. There’s a tendency to think that technology drives influencer marketing, but the truth is that running a successful campaign is all about communication between the influencers and agency or brand. We have to be in constant contact with the influencer to provide input, and that conversation should continue once the campaign has wrapped up. When we’ve had an extraordinarily successful campaign, we think

the influencers should celebrate that win with us! Feedback should be a two-way street. If a campaign is poorly conceived or the mission is not well communicated, the influencer should not shy away from letting brands and agencies know. There’s nothing worse than working on a campaign with an ill-defined concept or vague goals. The best campaigns are the ones that take into account the needs of the brands and the authentic nature of the influencer’s channels.

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #9 Influencers are happy with their compensation, especially when writing posts. Over 85%-88% of influencers surveyed show they are happy to completely happy with the compensation they receive for writing a standard, one time, sponsored post or compensation for posts in a long term sponsored campaign.

Related Survey Question Please indicate your level of happiness with the typical compensation you receive from a brand/agency/firm for the following opportunities:

ONE TIME, SPONSORED POST

88%

LONG TERM POST CAMPAIGN

86%

REVIEW POST - NO SPECIFIC BRAND INFO TO BE INCLUDED

76%

REVIEW POST - SPECIFIC BRAND INFO TO BE INCLUDED

76%

AMBASSADORSHIP

84%

*These influencers stated that they were either "happy," "very happy," or "completely happy."

The Trend:

81%

COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT

84%

SPOKESPERSON

85%

GIVEAWAYS

73%

Overall influencers are happy with the compensation they receive. However, they may be missing opportunity to increase their compensation by increasing their knowledge of ROI for their efforts.

Expert Opinion...

Amy Callahan

Co-Founder & CCO Collective Bias

This is great news. It reflects the value put on influencer content by brands and agencies. There was a time influencers didn’t know how to value their time and would do things for free, which only hurts the industry as a whole. Every now and then I’m asked if influencer market-

Expert Opinion...

Tracey McCoy

Chief Operating Officer MtoM Consulting LLC

I want to work with the best, most engaged influencers on every single campaign—and I’m happy to report that I’m able to do that no matter my client’s budget. This is because most influencers, no matter how long they’ve been in business, take what they do very seriously and want 28

SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS

ing is here to stay. The answer is a resounding yes as long as we all keep an eye to quality content and fair compensation. That compensation has to be commensurate for their work required. Influencers are today’s online tastemakers. They need to be valued not just for their ability to write compelling stories but for the personal brand’s they have built. You don’t become an influencer overnight. It takes time to grow trust and an engaged following. That trust should be rewarded with fair compensation. Brands and agencies should expect to pay up for blog posts, videos, social posts,

event attendance, live broadcasts and anything else that requires them to take time out of their day to give your brand the exposure you’re desiring. We even reimburse gas if we require the influencer to travel on our behalf. It’s only fair. The industry is evolving rapidly and there will be changes ahead that reward those influencers for their efforts. Data will play an important role in uncovering the true value and impact of influencers and their content that we believe will lead to changes in compensation for those who really are influential.

to create the best content possible for the client. After five years of negotiating with influencers, I’ve learned a few things. And perhaps the most important is: always, ALWAYS, offer fair compensation. Don’t go in low, hoping for a deal. It’s a horrible way to start a business relationship. Don’t underestimate the time they put into their posts and content creation—this is their business and in my experience, almost never disappoint. And the best part is, if you offer a fair compensation, influencers not only accept the campaign, they’ll be happy with the rate you’re paying them. Over 85%-88% of influencers sur-

veyed say they are happy to completely happy with the compensation. Especially when we’re talking about blog posts. I’ll still reach out to an influencer even if I see a rate higher than what my budget allows, and sometimes it’s worked out. Maybe the influencer has been hoping to try the product we’re offering or maybe it’s a top tier brand they want to partner with—either way, it never hurts to ask. Just be respectful and transparent about your motives. You don’t want to inadvertently insult them by offering a rate significantly lower than what they charge.

iBlog magazine JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report 2016 Women’s


Expert Opinion...

Danica Kombol President

Everywhere Agency

Word of mouth impacts up to 50% of purchasing decisions (according to McKinsey). Friends who tout a product on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter drive and inspire today’s

Expert Opinion...

Holly Homer

Founder & Owner Kids Activities Blog

I am happily surprised at these results and it demonstrates a positive shift for the profession of blogging. It shows that bloggers are only taking projects that are a good fit for them both

conversation around brands. That “friend” might be an influencer you’ve never actually met, but you’re still swayed by their opinion because you check out their posts every single day and trust their taste. That’s where the ROI lies for brands in influencer marketing, and marketers are finally getting the message loud and clear. It’s heartening to know that nearly 60% of brand marketers have plans to increase their influencer marketing spend this year. Parallel to that increase in spend should

be the amount of dollars allotted to paying for both influencers’ content creation and access to their carefully curated audiences, which allow brands to target their desired demographic. In the seven-plus years we’ve been in the influencer marketing business, we’ve seen a greater understanding from brands around compensation. I’m glad that brands are embracing the value of influencers in the marketplace and that influencers feel they are being compensated fairly—as they should be!

editorially and financially. When you take on a sponsored post that turns out to be a stretch for your readers, it never ends well. In fact, one thing that often goes through a blogger’s thoughts are “I will never do this again ... even for “X” dollars. When you take on a sponsored post that you don’t feel like you are paid enough for, it can lead to resentment and lack of enthusiasm for promoting the post. When a sponsored post is a good fit for the blog and the pay is right, it is a win-win for both the blogger and

client. The blogger receives payment to spend more time and effort on a blog post that readers can embrace. The client has their product and service placed in front of just the right people. No matter the size of your blog, you need to start with a price that makes it worthwhile to do your best. There are occasional times I have taken on projects for benefits other than money, but even then I try to make sure that what I am receiving will make it worthwhile even if the client turns out to be high-maintenance!

"Data will play an important role in uncovering the true value and impact of influencers and their content that we believe will lead to changes in compensation for those who really are influential." AMY CALLAHAN

MAJOR FINDINGS


MAJOR FINDING #10 Influencers want to grow but often get trapped in non-revenue generating operations Our survey shows repeated interest in learning but little or no time invested in it. There’s interest in reaching out to brands and learning about processes like email marketing but year over year we see more time invested in operations and content creation. Time management and outsourcing would be investments that would benefit influencers significantly.

Related Survey Question Rank in order the top 3 activities you will try to accomplish 2016. REACH OUT DIRECTLY TO MORE BRANDS FOR PAYING JOBS LEARN MORE ABOUT LIST BUILDING AND EMAIL MARKETING LEARN MORE ABOUT BUSINESS, MARKETING, FINANCES, SELLING PRODUCTS, ETC.

The Trend:

Survey responses reflect a trend of influencers taking on more work while finding less time to invest in learning ways to make business processes more efficient and marketing efforts more profitable.

Expert Opinion...

Elisa Camahort Page Chief Community Officer SheKnows Media

What are three things you can do right now to break out of your rut and take positive action? 1. Take online courses and webinars. As you may guess, I think going to conferences is an awesome way to get a lot of intense learning in one short period of time, but on-

Expert Opinion...

Stefania Pomponi Founder & President Clever Girls

Any influencer able to cultivate a massive following does so as a result of fantastic marketing skills. Yes, there are some influencers who simply put out such amazing and unique content that they amass a community, but that’s not the norm. One of the most critical things an influencer needs to do to build a following is push out great content on a very 30

FIRST SECOND THIRD

line courses and webinars (even free ones) abound, and you could be learning more about every social, marketing, PR and sales technique ever if you did your research and found some courses. Set a goal. Take one a week, a month, whatever you know you can stick to as you get started. 2. Subscribe to industry newsletters and publications. Not just ones for you the blogger, but ones for your client the marketer. Learn their language, Understand their pain points. Figure out what they most need. You can’t position yourself and your ROI in a vacuum; it must be

in the context of your customers’ objectives. 3. Set aside some specific, calendared time each week to experiment. Maybe one week you devote it to playing with Snapchat. The next you experiment with boosting posts on Facebook. After that you do a Facebook Live video and a Periscope video and compare experiences (and results). You’re not committing to keep doing everything you experiment with. You’re just giving things a shot and seeing what happens. Sort of like the early days of your blog, remember? Start small and steady, and eventually you will break out!

frequent and regular schedule, which is hard to do. Many successful influencers do this by curating content instead of solely creating their own. (In fact, some do this without creating ANY of their own original content.) Knowing where to source content and how to push it out is absolutely a marketing skill. If everyone could do it, everyone would be an influencer. It’s interesting to see that influencers are spending lots of time on operations and content. To learn additional skills such as how to attract clients or use email marketing to build their business shows that influencers truly are entrepreneurs, and they need to wear

a lot of hats to be financially viable in the space. When influencers have relevant business knowledge and marketing skills we’ve seen they can be really successful. But every influencer isn’t suited for this (and we know time is an issue). Some would rather focus on creating content and growing an audience--and monetizing their work--organically. This is where partnering with an agency like Clever Girls can kick-start the process. We can handle the operations part leaving the influencer to focus on content creation and amplification, and if there is time left over, they can spend it on enhancing their marketing skills.

JUL/AUG 2016 Influencer Report iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s


Expert Opinion...

Tracey McCoy

Chief Operating Officer MtoM Consulting LLC

Every time I take an influencer to lunch or out for drinks, we pick each other’s brains. I ask them about their favorite campaigns and their upcoming editorial calendar and they ask me what my team looks for in an influencer as we do campaign research. These conversations are so interesting because there is so much learning happening on both sides of the table. But I’ve noticed during follow up meetings, very few of the takeaways we discussed have been addressed. They haven’t set up Snapchat even though they’ve been talking about it for six months. They haven’t found time to SEO their older posts. They haven’t reached out to those dream brands they’re dying to work with. And the reason why they haven’t is pretty simple— there just isn’t enough time. Sure, there is a level of influencer that comes with agents and a

writing staff and a bookkeeper but many of the mid-tier influencers are one-person shops. Not only are they creating content to populate a site on a daily basis, they’re managing social media, advertising opportunities (and all the back and forth that entails), and running a small business— all by him or herself. For many, it come to down to prioritizing. Tackling a new tasks means they have to actively choose to ignore or shelf something else and that can be a hard choice to make. So how can agencies and brands help? When working with an influencer, make sure the expectations and process are clear. Every minute counts to them, so don’t barrage them with 8 different emails outlining a campaign or asking follow up questions. Streamline your process so you’re easy to work with—if you waste their time, they’ll remember.

"Influencers truly are entrepreneurs, and they need to wear a lot of hats to be financially viable in the space." STEFANIA POMPONI

Get the complete Women's Influencer Industry & Business Report at the new iBlogmagazine.com.

MAJOR FINDINGS


“ This is arguably the hardest stage of any business, when business owners do everything themselves . . .” HOLLY HAMANN Tap Influence

Blogger Bio


BLOGGER BIO Survey Question: Age What is your age?

18-20

0.9%

20-25

4.4%

26-30

14.1%

31-35

19.9%

36-40

15.2%

41-45

16.4%

46-50

12.0%

50+

17.1%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Ethnicity What is your ethnicity?

HISPANIC OR LATINO

14.4%

AFRICAN AMERICAN

8.4%

ASIAN

3.5%

AMERICAN INDIAN

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

0.2% 0.5%

PACIFIC ISLANDER WHITE CAUCASIAN 68.9% OTHER 4.2%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Children How many children do you have?

0 34.0% 1 17.0% 2

21.9%

3

17.0%

4 OR MORE

10.0%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Education What is your highest level of education completed?

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

HIGH SCHOOL OR EQUIVALENT

14.2%

ASSOCIATES DEGREE

13.5%

BACHELORS DEGREE

37.1%

SOME POST-GRADUATE

11.1%

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

MASTERS OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE 20.9% DOCTORATE 1.4% POST-DOCTORATE

0.0%

OTHER

1.9%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

QUESTIONS: BLOGGER BIO


BLOGGER BIO Survey Question: Niche

PARENTING & FAMILY

14.3%

LIFESTYLE 32.8%

Which best describes your primary blogging niche?

REVIEWER

3.9%

DIY/CRAFT

6.7%

FOOD & DRINK

12.9%

TRAVEL

2.5%

FASHION OR BEAUTY

6.5%

TECHNOLOGY

1.2%

COUPON OR SAVINGS

1.4%

BUSINESS & CAREER

2.1%

ENTERTAINMENT OR HUMOR

2.6%

HEALTH /FITNESS

4.6%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Years Blogging

0-1 YEARS

How many years have you been blogging?

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

10.4%

1-2 YEARS

11.1%

2-3 YEARS

15.7%

3-4 YEARS

13.9%

4-6 YEARS

19.6%

6+ YEARS

29.3%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

Survey Question: Description Which description do you most closely fit? FULL-TIME JOB (NON-BLOGGING) / PART-TIME BLOGGER

27.5%

PART-TIME JOB (NON-BLOGGING) / PART-TIME BLOGGER

9.0%

BUSINESS OWNER (NON-BLOGGING) / PART-TIME BLOGGER

12.9%

BUSINESS OWNER (NON BLOGGING) / FULL-TIME BLOGGER (25+ HRS/WEEK)

5.8%

STAY-AT-HOME PARENT / PART-TIME BLOGGER

9.2%

STAY-AT-HOME PARENT / FULL-TIME BLOGGER (25+ HRS/WEEK)

13.2%

STUDENT / PART-TIME BLOGGER

1.4%

STUDENT / FULL-TIME BLOGGER (25+ HRS/WEEK)

1.8%

PART-TIME BLOGGER - NOTHING ELSE LISTED ABOVE

6.0%

FULL-TIME BLOGGER (25+ HRS/WEEK) NOTHING ELSE LISTED ABOVE

13.2%

PERCENTAGE

34

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50


BLOGGER BIO Survey Question: Operation Status Which best describes your current blog operations status? I BLOG FULL TIME - I DO EVERYTHING MYSELF 30.9% I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE 1-2 OTHERS THAT ASSIST ME OCCASIONALLY

8.8%

I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE 1-3 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

3.2%

I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE 3-5 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

0.7%

I BLOG FULL TIME - I HAVE FULL TIME EMPLOYEES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS YEAR ROUND

0.9%

I BLOG PART TIME - I DO EVERYTHING MYSELF

49.7%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE 1-2 OTHERS THAT ASSIST ME OCCASIONALLY

3.9%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE 1-3 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

1.2%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE 3-5 ASSISTANTS THAT WORK YEAR ROUND

0.5%

I BLOG PART TIME - I HAVE FULL TIME EMPLOYEES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS YEAR ROUND

0.2%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

"The most important thing that influencers can do to improve their income is to make sure they evolve beyond blogging. Brands are are interested in visual storytelling, so influencers need to evolve and diversify their platform.” ANGELA SUSTAITA-RUIZ

QUESTIONS: BLOGGER BIO


“ Each piece of content should receive at least twice as much time distributing the content as it took to create it.� KYLE IVINS

Monumetric

Time Investment


TIME INVESMENT Survey Question: Post Frequency How frequently do you post to your primary blog?

LESS THAN ONCE/ WEEK

14.5%

0-1 TIME PER WEEK

19.9%

2-4 TIMES PER WEEK 53.2% 5-8 TIMES PER WEEK

8.6%

9+ TIMES PER WEEK

3.9%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Non-Sponsored Posts How many hours do you spend writing a typical original, non-sponsored blog post?

0-1 HOUR

12.3%

1-2 HOURS

42.7%

2-3 HOURS

27.2%

3-4 HOURS

8.6%

4-6 HOURS

4.9%

6+ HOURS

4.2%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Outsourcing

1-5 HOURS

9.5%

5-10 HOURS

3.7%

10-20 HOURS

2.2%

20+ HOURS

2.5%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Work on Paying Projects

0-2 HOURS

Which description most closely fits the way you divide your time?

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

44.7%

2-4 HOURS

16.1%

4-6 HOURS

13.4%

6-12 HOURS

9.9%

12-14 HOURS

4.5%

14+ HOURS

11.4%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Time Division

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

DO NOT USE 82.0%

How many hours a week do you outsource tasks related to your blog to an administrative or virtual assistant?

How many hours a week do you spend working on paying jobs/projects for brands/agencies/firms or others?

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

10% BLOG/90% PAID BLOGGING JOBS

7.4%

30% BLOG/70% PAID BLOGGING JOBS

13.8%

50% BLOG/50% PAID BLOGGING JOBS

20.7%

70% BLOG/30% PAID BLOGGING JOBS

21.2%

90% BLOG/10% PAID BLOGGING JOBS

37.0%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

QUESTIONS: TIME INVESTMENT


TIME INVESMENT Survey Question: Prospecting How many hours a week do you spend prospecting and contacting brands/agencies/firms for new paying jobs/projects?

0-1 HOUR 49.6% 1-2 HOURS

19.9%

2-3 HOURS

12.4%

3-4 HOURS

7.2%

4-6 HOURS

5.2%

6+ HOURS

5.7%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Completed Paying Projects How many paying projects/opportunities would you estimate that you completed in 2014? (Only include projects/gigs/sponsored posts/reviews/ ambassadorships, etc. that stemmed from being a blogger)

0

28.1%

1-20 44.0% 21-40

13.1%

41-60

4.9%

61-80

3.0%

81-100

2.7%

100+

4.2%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Photo Editing How many hours a week do you spend on photos and photo editing for your blog and social media channels? (This includes: taking pictures, searching for stock, image editing, resizing, adding text, uploading and posting)

Survey Question: Blogging Work Week How many hours a week is your typical blogging work week? (Performing activities directly related to growing your for-profit blogging business)

0-1 HOUR

10.2%

1-2 HOURS

21.8%

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

2-3 HOURS 23.3% 3-4 HOURS

11.7%

4-6 HOURS

13.2%

6+ HOURS

19.9%

PERCENTAGE

5-10 HOURS

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

30.1%

10-15 HOURS

13.7%

15-20 HOURS

10.7%

20-25 HOURS

13.9%

25-30 HOURS

10.2%

30-35 HOURS

8.0%

35+ HOURS

13.4%

PERCENTAGE

38

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50


TIME INVESMENT Survey Question: Sponsored Posts How many hours do you spend on an average sponsored blog post? (includes video/crafting/ cooking/reviews/research)

0-1 HOUR

5.2%

1-2 HOURS

13.6%

2-3 HOURS 22.0% 3-4 HOURS

18.6%

4-6 HOURS

12.9%

6+ HOURS

5.2%

NOT APPLICABLE

17.8% 4.7%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Learning and Education How many hours a month do you spend on learning and education? (Including social media, blogging and business education directly related to growing your business and earning revenue?)

NONE

6.2%

0-1 HOUR

11.9%

1-2 HOURS

18.9%

2-3 HOURS

17.4%

3-4 HOURS

11.2%

4-6 HOURS

11.2%

6+ HOURS 23.3%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Montezing Tools How many hours* a month do you spend on learning to use and monetize the following to grow your business: *These influencers stated that only spent "0-3 hours" per month on the following tools.

Survey Question: Recreational Media How many hours a week do you spend on social media for recreational purposes? (Please include all time, this is important to the report findings)

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLS

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

9.3%

VIDEO 40.8% EMAIL MARKETING 36.4% SOCIAL MEDIA ADS 38.2% AUDIO & PODCASTING 69.0% AFFILIATE MARKETING

31.7%

HOURS

0-2 HOUR

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

19.0%

2-4 HOURS

24.1%

4-6 HOURS

15.5%

6-8 HOURS

11.8%

8-10 HOURS

8.4%

10+ HOURS

21.2%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

QUESTIONS: TIME INVESTMENT


“ Bloggers that get how to create shareable and clickable content and are willing to invest a little on boosting posts will definitely see the results.� ANA FLORES

Latina Bloggers Connect

Social Media


SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE Survey Question: Best Business Platform What is the single most important social platform for your business?

LINKEDIN

1%

GOOGLE+

1%

YOUTUBE

0.8%

INSTAGRAM

14.7%

PINTEREST

16.5%

FACEBOOK 29.3% TWITTER

12.1%

YOUR BLOG

24.7%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Traffic Driving What is your single most important social platform driving traffic to your blog?

FACEBOOK 38.4% TWITTER

17.1%

PINTEREST 34.5% INSTAGRAM

7.5%

YOUTUBE

0.8%

LINKEDIN

0.5%

GOOGLE+

1.0%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Future Learning Which social media platform do you want to learn the most about in 2015 for your business?

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

FACEBOOK

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

10.6%

TWITTER

4.4%

BLOGGING

11.7%

PINTEREST

19.9%

INSTAGRAM 30.3% YOUTUBE

17.4%

GOOGLE+

2.1%

LINKEDIN

3.6%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Changing Usage Indicate how you will change your social media use in 2016. *These influencers stated that they planned to "increase" their use of the following social media platforms.

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

BLOGGING 83% FACEBOOK 74% TWITTER 67% YOUTUBE 62% GOOGLE+ 59% PINTEREST 56% LINKEDIN 32% INSTAGRAM 26% PODCASTING 22%

PERCENTAGE

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

QUESTIONS: SOCIAL MEDIA


SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE Survey Question: Expertise Rate your current level of expertise* in utilizing the following social media channels for business growth. (Examples: Drive traffic, lead capture, generate revenues, affiliate sales, product sales) *These influencers described themselves as either “above average” or “experts” in the following utilizing these channels.

BLOGGING 53.0% FACEBOOK 43.8% TWITTER 42.2% YOUTUBE

7.3%

GOOGLE+

11.4%

PINTEREST 34.5% LINKEDIN

11.1%

INSTAGRAM

37.0%

PODCASTING

6.3%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Business Growth Rate how important the following will be to your business growth in 2016.

SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION CONTENT MARKETING EMAIL MARKETING VIDEO PODCASTING

Survey Question: Paid Media Which forms of paid social media do you regularly use. (At least 1-2 times monthly)

What is the primary media you’re including in your blog post content?

MOST SECOND MOST MODERATE SECOND LEAST LEAST

FACEBOOK ADS 74.2% PROMOTED BLOG POSTS

42.7%

TWITTER ADS

13.1%

PINTEREST ADS

9.4%

INSTAGRAM ADS

12.7%

YOUTUBE ADS

4.2%

LINKEDIN ADS

0.9%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Primary Media

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

AN IMAGE (ANY KIND) 27.8% MORE THAN ONE IMAGE 59.3% IMAGE AND VIDEO 11.1% VIDEO 0.0% AUDIO 0.3% A LIST 1.0% OTHER 0.5%

PERCENTAGE

42

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100


SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE Survey Question: ROI Rate your level of expertise in relation to this statement; “I am able to measure ROI (revenue generated or leads generated) from my social media activities.”

EXPERT

4.1%

ABOVE AVERAGE

12.9%

AVERAGE

33.1%

BELOW AVERAGE 29.2% UNQUALIFIED

20.7%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

“While we all complain about algorithm changes on both Facebook and Pinterest, they remain he most efficient way to promote content that can be accessed with one click.” HOLLY HOMER

QUESTIONS: SOCIAL MEDIA


“ The most important thing that influencers can do to improve their income is to make sure they evolve beyond blogging.� ANGELA SUSTAITA-RUIZ

Hispanicize Media & DiMe Media

Income&Earnings


INCOME Survey Question: Annual Income Indicate your annual income from blogging and other revenue sources derived from your blogging career? (Reported on your 2015 tax return from blog related jobs)

LESS THAN $2,500

51.5%

$2,500 - $5,000

15.2%

$5,000 - $10,000

7.9%

$10,000 - $15,000

5.6%

$15,000 - $20,000

5.1%

$20,000 - $30,000

4.8%

$30,000 - $40,000

2.5%

$40,000 - $50,000

1.7%

$50,000 - $60,000

1.1%

$60,000+

4.5%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

Survey Question: Income Sources Where do you typically earn income from your blogging and other blogging related projects geographically? (Where over 50%+ of your typical annual income sources are located in comparison to your home or office.) LOCALLY - TYPICAL SOURCES OF REVENUE EARNED WITHIN A 50 MILE RADIUS OF HOME CITY.

17.3%

REGIONALLY - TYPICAL SOURCES OF REVENUE EARNED WITHIN REGION OF THE U.S. SURROUNDING HOME STATE.

7.8%

NATIONALLY - TYPICAL SOURCES OF REVENUE EARNED FROM VARIOUS SOURCES ACROSS THE U.S. 63.9% INTERNATIONALLY - TYPICAL SOURCES OF REVENUE EARNED FROM VARIOUS SOURCES INTERNATIONALLY.

11.0%

PERCENTAGE

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Survey Question: Motivation What is your primary motivation to blog as a business? TO EARN A FULL TIME INCOME 22.0% TO CONTRIBUTE TO MY FAMILY INCOME

19.7%

TO SUPPLEMENT LOST INCOME FROM A PAST JOB

1.7%

TO BE MY OWN BOSS AND REALIZE MY PERSONAL WORTH

14.4%

TO GROW A LARGE NATIONAL BUSINESS

2.8%

TO GROW A SMALL REGIONAL BUSINESS

0.6%

I AM PASSIONATE ABOUT MY NICHE, SO I DECIDED TO MONETIZE

14.9%

MY BLOG GREW UNEXPECTEDLY, SO I DECIDED TO MONETIZE

1.7%

MAKE SOME FUN MONEY DOING WHAT I LIKE TO DO

16.9%

I DO NOT BLOG TO EARN MONEY OR AS A PART-TIME OR FULL-TIME BUSINESS

5.4%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

QUESTIONS: INCOME & EARNINGS


INCOME Survey Question: Other Compensation Approximately how much in-kind, trade or products & services (non-monetary compensation) did you receive in 2015 for your time or work product? (Include: trips, hotels, flights, event tickets, expenses, products to review, free services, food, meals, households goods, automobiles, clothing, tech products, etc.)

Survey Question: Sponsorships What percentage of your blog posts are sponsored?

LESS THAN $1,000 54.6% $1,000 - $2,000

14.4%

$2,000 - $4,000

13.8%

$4,000 - $7,000

7.9%

$7,000 - $10,000

3.1%

$10,000 - $15,000

2.0%

$15,000 - $20,000

0.8%

$20,000 - $25,000

1.1%

$25,000+

2.3%

PERCENTAGE

0% 24.8% 1-10% 34.9% 10-25%

14.1%

25-50%

16.9%

50-75%

6.2%

75%+

3.1%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Time Until Earning How long were you blogging before you earned $500/month for 6 consecutive months? (Over $3,000+ annually)

The best sources of income, in order, for the year 2016 are ...

46

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

STILL HAVEN’T 60.8% 0-1 YEAR

6.5%

1-2 YEARS

11.1%

2-3 YEARS

9.9%

3-4 YEARS

7.1%

4-5 YEARS

2.8%

5+ YEARS

1.7%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Largest Income Source

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55

BLOG NETWORKS BRANDS LOCAL BUSINESSES DIRECT PUBLIC RELATIONS FIRM ADVERTISING AGENCY

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

FIRST SECOND THIRD FOURTH FIFTH


INCOME Survey Question: Best Scenarios In which scenario have you typically made more income? WORKING WITH A BRAND DIRECTLY ON A BRAND RELATED PROJECT

37.6%

WORKING WITH AN ADVERTISING AGENCY ON A BRAND RELATED PROJECT

11.4%

WORKING WITH A PUBLIC RELATIONS FIRM ON A BRAND RELATED PROJECT

13.4%

WORKING WITH A BLOG NETWORK ON A BRAND RELATED PROJECT

37.6%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

Survey Question: Top Earning Methods Using the choices below, rank in order the top ways you earn money. BLOGGING - WRITING SPONSORED POSTS BLOGGING - WRITING POSTS OF MY CHOOSING AFFILIATE - BANNER ADS (PPC & PPCONV) AD NETWORKS - BLOGHER, GOOGLE ADSENSE, ETC

FIRST SECOND THIRD FOURTH

Survey Question: Future Accomplishments Rank in order the top 3 activities you will try to accomplish 2016. REACH OUT DIRECTLY TO MORE BRANDS FOR PAYING JOBS LEARN MORE ABOUT LIST BUILDING AND EMAIL MARKETING LEARN MORE ABOUT BUSINESS, MARKETING, FINANCES, SELLING PRODUCTS, ETC.

FIRST SECOND THIRD

QUESTIONS: INCOME & EARNINGS


“ Good influencers know what content and messaging will work best with their audience when working on brand-sponsored programs.� ALIZA FREUD She Speaks

Brands&Agencies


BRANDS & AGENCIES Survey Question: Finding Opportunities Rank in order the top 3 ways you typically discover opportunities to work with brands?

Survey Question: Tone Matching When you receive pitches from a brand/agency/ firm, how often are they a good match for your blog’s tone, subject matter and your brand?

BLOG NETWORKS I REACH OUT TO BRANDS BRANDS REACH OUT TO ME

0-10% 23.3% 10%-20%

16.7%

20%-30%

17.0%

30%-50%

16.1%

50%-70%

17.7%

70%+

9.2%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Weekly Pitches How many pitches from a brand/agency/firm/ network do you receive weekly?

What percentage of your annual income is derived from working with a brand/agency/firm/network on sponsored posts or reviews?

10-20

16.1%

25-50

6.7%

50+

4.7%

0-10%

45.6%

10%-20%

13.6%

20%-30%

10.7%

30%-50%

11.0%

50%-70%

10.0%

70%+

What percentage of opportunities you receive from a brand/agency/firm are one-time, short term projects? (Single post, review, ambassadorship, etc.)

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

9.1%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Short Projects

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

1-5 72.5%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Percent Income

FIRST SECOND THIRD

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

0-10% 23.9% 10%-20%

6.1%

20%-30%

4.8%

30%-50%

9.0%

50%-70%

11.9%

70%-90%

16.1%

90%+

28.1%

PERCENTAGE

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

QUESTIONS: BRANDS & AGENCIES


BRANDS & AGENCIES Survey Question: Desired Improvements Please indicate your agreement* to the following statements: When working on a brand/agency/firm project I wish they would improve … *These are the influencers who either “agree” or “strongly agree.”

DEADLINE EXPECTATIONS

51.7%

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SOCIAL MEDIA DISTRIBUTION

57.7%

INSTRUCTIONS ON CONTENT DIRECTION 60.3% FEEDBACK DURING PROJECTS 72.6% COMMUNICATIONS WITH ACCOUNT MANAGER 58.6%

PERCENTAGE 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Survey Question: Expertise of Reps Please indicate the level of expertise* that the typical brand/agency/firm account representatives you work with has in: *These influencers consider themselves “above average” or “experts.”

Survey Question: Feedback Provided How many brand/agency/firm projects that you worked in the past 12 months provided specific and detailed feedback about your blogging and social media efforts?

SOCIAL MEDIA 39.6% BLOGGING 29.2% CONTENT MARKETING 40.4% BUSINESS 46.2% ANALYTICS 30.4% CUSTOMER SERVICE 40.4%

PERCENTAGE

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

NONE 35.4% 0-10% 35.4% 10%-20% 13.6% 20%-30% 5.6% 30%-50% 5.3% 50%-70% 1.7% 70%-90% 1.0% 90%+ 2.0%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Feedback Importance How important do you feel detailed feedback from a brand/agency/firm after a project would be to you and your success on future projects?

UNIMPORTANT

2.3%

SOMEWHAT IMPORTANT

14.7%

IMPORTANT

27.7%

VERY IMPORTANT

27.7%

EXTREMELY IMPORTANT

27.7%

PERCENTAGE

50

iBlog magazine 2016 Women’s Influencer Report

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50


BRANDS & AGENCIES Survey Question: Compensation Satisfaction Please indicate your level of happiness with the typical compensation you receive from a brand/ agency/firm for the following opportunities: *These influencers stated that they were either "happy," "very happy," or "completely happy."

ONE TIME, SPONSORED POST 88% LONG TERM POST CAMPAIGN 86% REVIEW POST - NO SPECIFIC BRAND INFO TO BE INCLUDED 76% REVIEW POST - SPECIFIC BRAND INFO TO BE INCLUDED 76% AMBASSADORSHIP 84% SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS 81% COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT 84% SPOKESPERSON 85% GIVEAWAYS 73%

PERCENTAGE

Survey Question: Social Media Metrics Rank in order the most important social media metrics asked for by brand/agency/firms you have worked with in the past 12 months:

KLOUT SCORE GOOGLE+ FOLLOWERS YOUTUBE SUBSCRIBERS PINTEREST FOLLOWERS INSTAGRAM FOLLOWERS TWITTER FOLLOWERS FACEBOOK FANS BLOG TRAFFIC/UNIQUE VISITORS

Survey Question: Favorite Opportunties Please rank in order your top 3 favorite types of brand/agency/firm opportunities to work on.

LONG-TERM POST CAMPAIGN AMBASSADORSHIP ONE-TIME SPONSORED POST

10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

FIRST SECOND THIRD

QUESTIONS: BRANDS & AGENCIES


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iBlog Magazine 2016 Women's Influencer Industry & Business Report  

The iBlog magazine 2016 Women's Influencer Report is a survey of over 3,000 women influencers in over 20 + niches to learn how influencers u...

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