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Play at St Michael’s Lutheran Primary School March 2011

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


St Michael’s Lutheran Primary School — Reception-­‐Year  7 — 14  classes — 350  children — Junior  Primary  incorporates  Reception-­‐Year  3 — Play  is  programmed  for  in  Reception-­‐Year  3 — In  2011  we  have  2  classes  at  each  year  level  from  R-­‐3.

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Play at St Michael’s Focus  since  2006   Looked  at  ways  to  include   play  into  units  of  inquiry Slow  progress  over  first  few   years  due  to  : •not  enough  information  available   to  teachers   •resources    not    known •the    change  in  teachers  each  year •the  pressure  on  time  for   organising  and  implementing  play.

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What is play? Play  is  – — Intrinsically  motivated  and  therefore  necessarily  involves   choice — Is  process  oriented  rather  than  product  oriented — Non-­‐literal  and  may  remove  children  from  the  here  and  now,   allows  them  to  be  what  they  want  to  be  and  to  use   imagination — Enjoyable  (Johnson,  Christie,  &  Yawkey,  1987  as  cited  in   Stone,  1995)

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What are the types of play? — Functional  play

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Types of play — Constructive  play

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Types of play — Dramatic  play

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Types of play — Games  with  rules

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


How does play help children ? — Cognitive  Development — Social  Development — Emotional  Development — Physical  Development

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Why is play important? Play  is:  -­‐  open-­‐ended  -­‐  may  take  many  forms  -­‐  transdisciplinary

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Why children need to play at school? — Inquiry  involves  the  synthesis,  analysis  and  manipulation  of  

knowledge,  whether  through  play  for  early  childhood   students  or  through  more  formally  structured  learning  in  the   rest  of  the  primary  years.   — The  teachers  of  the  younger  students  need  to  be  mindful  of  

the  role  of  the  learning  environment  when  presenting   provocations  to  the  students,  for  them  to  wonder  at,  and  be   curious  about,  and  to  stimulate  purposeful  play.  

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Why children need to play at school? School  is  for  helping   children  learn  how  to   learn  ,  and  that    play  is  a   central  component  to   active  learning. (Linn,  2008)

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


How play encourages creativity ?

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Fostering creativity — Relaxing  adult  controls — Not  overcrowding  children  with  organised  activities — Allow  time

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What are people saying about play?

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What are people saying about creativity?

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


How can we integrate play into the curriculum? Unit  of  inquiry Stand  alone  units

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


How is the play spiral used in a unit of inquiry?

Moyles,    R.(1989)

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What experiences do children need to play successfully? Children  can’t  play  what  they  don’t know.  They  need  experiences  to draw  upon  which  can  provide  the details  for  their  play  experiences.

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


This  means  constantly  looking  for   opportunities  for  the  children  to have  real  experiences  through: — excursions — objects  that  we  can  bring  into  the  classroom — experts  we  can  bring  into  the  classroom — resources  that  can  be  brought  in  and  shared  from  home. Videos  and  books  are   also  a    great stimulus  for  play.

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What are the benefits of play? As  a  staff  we  compiled  the  benefits  play  provides  opportunities  for: ·∙  Building  on  prior  knowledge ·∙  Fostering  language  development ·∙  Promoting  social  skills ·∙  Helping  children  move  beyond  their  comfort  zones  and  beyond   previously  mastered  learning ·∙  Developing  fine  and  gross  motor  skills ·∙  Developing  critical  thinking  and  problem  solving  skills ·∙  Thinking  creatively  and  flexibly ·∙  Facilitating  meaningful  learning  experiences ·∙  Building  self-­‐esteem  and  resilience ·∙  Reducing  the  stress  associated  with  learning  in  more  conventional   contexts

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What is the adult’s role in play? — Planning  for  play — Encouraging  play — Involve  oneself — Not  a  time  to  do  other  

work  such  as  mark  books   or  listening  to  children   read  

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


What are the advantages and challenges of play based inquiry? Play  based  inquiry Advantages — Particularly  suited  for  early  learners — Non-­‐threatening  and  open  ended  –  allowing  each  child  to  explore  at  their  own  pace  and  level — Promotes  decision  making,  independent  and  small  group  interaction — Can  involve  a  high  level  of  sustained  and  focused  dialogue  between  students,  and  between   teachers  and  students. — Highly  engaging  due  to  the  direct  nature  of  the  play. Challenges — Can  be  limited  by  the  availability  of  stimulating  materials     or  by  teachers’  uncertainty. — Teachers’  questioning  skills  need  to  be  of  a  high  level. — Systematic  monitoring  and  record  keeping  required.   (Murdoch  &  Wilson,  2004)

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


References Bodrova,  E  &  Leong,  D.J  (2001)  Tools  of  the  Mind:  A  case  study  of  implementing  the  Vygotskian  approach  in  American  Early   Childhood  and  Primary  Classrooms.  Switzerland:  International  Bureau  of  Education. Elkind,  D  (2007)  The  Power  of  Play    How  Spontaneous,  Imaginative  Activities  Lead  to  Happier,  Healthier  Children.  Cambridge,   MA:  Da  Capo  Press. International  Baccalaureate  Organization(IBO).  (2007)  Making  the  PYP  happen.  Chippenham,  Wiltshire:  Antony  Rowe  Ltd. Honore,  C  (2008)  Under  Pressure  Putting  the  child  back  in  childhood.  London:  Orion  Books  Ltd. Linn,  S  (2008).  The  Case  for  Make  Believe  Saving  Play  in  a  Commercialized  World.  New  York:  The  New  Press. Moyles,  J.R(1989)  Just  Playing?  The  role  and  status  of  play  in  early  childhood  education.  Berkshire,  U.K:  Open  University  Press. Murdoch  &  Wilson  (2004)  Learning  Links  Strategic    teaching  for  the  learner-­‐centred  classroom.  Carlton  South,  VIC:  Curriculum   Corporation. Stone,  S.J  (1995)  Wanted:  Advocates  for  Play  in  the  Primary  Grades.  Flagstaff  AZ:  Young  Child.

Tuesday, 22 March 2011


Day 3 Using play to help children utilise their creativity in PYP