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Table of Contents p. 02-03 I Representation as an Outcome of Architectural Thought Diploma Research Thesis I 9th Semester I Fall 2017

p. 04-15 I Exploded Section, A Mediatheque in the Centre of Athens Diploma Design Thesis I 10th Semester I Fall 2019 I A New Typology

p. 16-19 I Em. Mpenaki Street Architectural Competition I Spring 2018 I Expo 2018

p. 20-23 I Romance Contemporaine, House 102 Internship I 314 architecture studio I Fall 2017 I Renovation of a House

p. 24-27 I Seaside Residential Mechanism Architectural Design Studio I 8th Semester I Spring 2017 I Seaside Design

p. 28-31 I Museum for the Development & Promotion of Art Architectural Design Studio I 6th Semester I Spring 2016 I Museum Design

p. 32-35 I Landscape “Revival� Urban Design Studio I 6th Semester I Spring 2016 I Intervention in the Area of Olympia

p. 36-39 I City in the City Architectural Design Studio I 5th Semester I Fall 2015 I Educational Building Design

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Representation as an Outcome of Architectural Thought A criticalΩΣreview of 2D representations from the early Η ΠΑΡΑΣΤΑΣΗ ΑΠΟΤΕΛΕΣΜΑ ΤΗΣ ΑΡXΙΤΕΚΤΟΝΙΚΗΣ ΣKΕΨΗΣ α

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The contemporary reality is characterized by the integration of computer technologies into an increasing number of fields. How does an architect use these new means for the creation of representations, and especially those which follow the compositional procedure at the same time?

20th century till now

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Diploma Research Thesis I Fall 2017 I Grade: 10/10 Hardcopy Publication: 17 X 21, 137 pages Supervisor: Prof. Alcestis Rodi Collaborator: N. Kourti Shared responsibilities for Research. Personal ΑΠΟΤΕΛΕΣΜΑ ΤΗΣ ΑΡXΙΤΕΚΤΟΝΙΚΗΣ ΣKΕΨΗΣ respnonsibility for the final page editing. α

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Le Corbusier

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Superstudio

Palais de la Société des Nations Geneva, Switzerland, 1927

This research analyzes the characteristics and interprets the details of five representations from the beginning of the 20th century until today: Le Corbusier’s axonometric for the League of Nations, Superstudio’s collage for the Continuous Monument, Zaha Hadid’s painting for the Peak, Peter Eisenman’s drawing for the Staten Island Institute for Arts and Sciences, and BIG Architects’ photorealistic for the W57 building.

Zaha Hadid

Continuous Monument 1969

Peter Eisenman

BIG

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The Peak Hong Kong, 1982

Staten Island Institute for Arts and Sciences 1997 α π α

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VIA 57 West Επ New York 2011 Τ α

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Each one of the above representations is investigated in accordance with the available tools, but also according to a wider frame of art, technology and the meanings derived from them. Thus, having the past as a reference point, we try to deep-fundamental understanding α achieve α of technologies and representations of today, α: . ό attempting to predict the progress of the field 2018 in the future.

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Selected Bibliography: Frampton, K. (2007). Modern architecture. London: Thames & Hudson, Beitin, E. F. (2017). Mies van de Rohe Montage Collage. London: Koenig Books Ltd., Betsky, A. (1998). Zaha Hadid: The complete buildings and projects. London: Thames & Hudson., Cohen, B. (2008). Le Corbusier: Le Grand. Phaidon., Corbusier, L. (2004). Vers une Architecture, (Tournikiotis,ΕP. Trans.) Ekkremes., Editors of Phaidon Press. (2001). The 20th Century Artbook. London: Phaidon Ε α α Press.,, Eisenman, P. (2013, September 23). Eisenman’s Evolution: Architecture, Syntax, and New Subjectivity. (Interviewed by I. Ansari), Moma. (n.d.). The Moma Glosα Επ π α α α: . ό sary of Art Terms. Recovery December 7, 2017, από Moma: https://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/glossary, Papadakis, A. P.-A. (2005). Zaha Hadid testing the α π α Τ α ό α 2018 boundaries. London: Papadakis Publisher., Pertigkiozoglou, E. (2017, February 20). Nicholas Negroponte and Architecture Machine Group MIT. Recovery March 1, 2018, από DesignScience: https://medium.com/designscience/1973-a1b835e87d1c, Porter, T. (1993). Architectural Drawing Masterclass. London: Studio Vista., Porter, T. (2013). The Architect’s Eye. New York: Routledge., Shields, J. (2014). Collage and Architecture. New York: Routledge., Amerikanou, Ε. (1997). The Representation in Architecture. Athens: National Technical University of Athens, Department of Architecture., Lefkaditis, G. (2006). Methods of Representation. Athens: Private Publishing. Ε

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Part One: The Characteristics of Representations 1.1. Representations: Meaning and Definition 1.2 Representation Types 1.3 Context: Representations and Drawing tools until the 20th century Part Two: The Five Selected Representations Α Drawing tools in the beginning of the 20th century Α Axonometric drawing: the paradigm of Le Corbusier for the Palais de la Société des Nations, 1927 Photography and the evolution of its use in architecture Collage: Superstudio’s utopian compositions for the Continuous Monument, 1969 2.C1. Acrylics and watercolors in architectural drawings 2.C2. Zaha Hadid’s paintings: the example of The Peak, Hong Kong, 1982 2.D1. Computer and computer programs 2.D2. Staten Island Institute for Arts and Sciences, Eisenman architects, 1997-2001 2.D3. Render: VIA 57 West, BIG architects, 2011-2016 Part Three: The Future of the Architectural Representations

The power of the image - in all its forms, uses and purposes - has always been important. It is, of course, an international language which has different vocabulary but contains meanings that can be interpreted - even subjectively - by all. If architecture is paralleled with language , then final representations are identified with rhetoric : rhetoric is a field of study and technique that deals with the composition of speech in order to become a means of convincing. Accordingly, the creation of the final representations is a strategy of synthesis and presentation of data in order to prove the quality and meaning of the proposal.

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Exploded Section A Mediatheque in the Centre of Athens A New Typology Diploma Design Thesis I Fall 2019 I Grade: 10/10 Supervisor: Prof. Alcestis Rodi Collaborator: N. Kourti Shared responsibilities for concept and design. Personal respnonsibility for the creation of the final renders and drawings.

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This proposal concerns the creation of a mediatheque in the center of Athens. Its concept is based upon three starting points. First, Athens is seen as a continuous, gray layer that has been placed upon the natural landscape. The second observation concerns the existing, three-dimensional building fragmentation by which Athens is characterized: the city has been divided horizontally in private sites- then every building is divided in numerous floors, and then each floor is divided in apartments. Consequently, we can see a set of different tangential functions. This phenomenon arose with the construction of the first block of flats in the 1950s.

Building Fragmentation

Thirdly, certainly every building is a proof of its designer’s thoughts and beliefs, and it represents the technological knowledge and the values that characterized the years of its construction. Yet what is left when we remove all this information, or in other words, its identity? Nothing but its bearing structure, an actual Corbusier’s Domino System. In this way, Athens can be seen as a three-dimensional grid which is made of reinforced concrete, reminding us of Kenneth Frampton, who described the Greek capital as the absolute modernistic city.

Vertical Movements (Trees)

Domino System

Athens from Above

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Having these as our staring points, we envisioned the creation of a building, the ground of which is the Athenian built environment; a space that runs through many of the existing ones; a network that breaks down the building boundaries and overcomes the shell restrictions. We envisioned a construction that reflects the needs of every moment, a new typology which is expandable, and that it can adopt to factors that can and cannot yet be foreseen. The mediatheque is designed in an area of Athens that has been broadly studied in the past 150 years. The area’s buildings and planning is in fact a complex and contradictory collage of different architecture eras and morphologies. Among all, the neoclassical Athenian trilogy (the National Library, the Academy and the University of Athens) is one of the most important landmarks. Designed in the 19th century by Hansen brothers, it aimed to improve the production of new civilization.

Vision

The Old City’s Relationship with the Neoclassical Vision

19th Date of the Buildings

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21th Aerial View of the Study Area


75% of the existing spaces are being used, containing functions like shops, offices, and an increasing amount of Air BnBs. The most important factor, however, is that there is a 25% of apartments that remains unused. We are thus focusing on empty “sites” which are found on different levels and buildings, so it is crucial to study the city not only through plans, but also through sections. The mediatheque is placed opposite of the Athenian trilogy. If the production of civilization in the 19th century was held in the strict limits of three neoclassical structures, the contemporary civilization is exploded, and infuses in every unoccupied space. In Use Spaces

Position of the Mediatheque

Unused Spaces

Mediatheque’s Relationship with the Athenian Trilogy

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library

study rooms

meeting rooms

shop Plan 1

exhibition venues entrance

restaurant technology laboratories

plantations

restaurant’s kitchen Plan 2 warehouses and wc

staff spaces

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Functions of the Mediatheque

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20 m

Plan 3


The mediatheque’s bearing structure is not hidden and its walls disappear: in the interior they are torn down, and in the exterior they become transparent. In this way, the building’s façade changes constantly, throughout the day, the seasons, and the people’s activities. Thanks to the transparency, the functions are shown to the city, inviting the Athenians to participate. The common point between the various functions is the enhancement and the promotion of the contemporary knowledge and civilization. More specifically, the mediatheque consists of a library with visual technologies, study rooms, meeting rooms, exhibition spaces, and media labs, restaurants, and plantation spaces.

Plan 4

The mediatheque is developed on seven levels, and the built environment which is cut has been represented with a black fill, since we consider it to be a single, compact volume.

Plan 5

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Plan 7

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The mediatheque’s entrance is placed on the site of a neoclassical building. Since the existing building is mostly damaged, we designed a new volume beneath its facade. The visitor walks through a remnant of history, in order to enter the new mediatheque. The coexistence of the two forms makes their opposition seem more intense: after all, it is the façade of a ruin, behind which a new building rises. At the same time, however, the ruin implies that the future of the new building is already prescribed – its decay and its replacement is inevitable. Links become a crucial element of the project. Eight bridges permeate a street and two sidewalks. The bridges are constructed with the exact same materials as the rest of the building, because we want to make clear that this is one building that is exploded, and not numerous separate units.

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The main spaces’ common goal is the removal of boundaries. This is why holes have been made in slabs. Thanks to them, the visitors are allowed to have visual contact between the various levels.

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The library’s slit starts from the roof and continues at all other levels allowing the vertical entry of light. The slit also functions as a boundary between the object of the library and the other activities of the space, such as the reading rooms. The object of the library - that is, the functional nucleus of the space - appears to be unified between the different levels. Likewise the rest of the building, bridges of much smaller size penetrate the slits and intensify the visual contact between the users.

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In the exhibition halls the removal of the slabs allows the gathering of groups of visitors and offers the possibility of housing works with larger dimensions.

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When visitors aim to reach the restaurant, they go through a multi-functional space, where works of art and benches coexist, and from which the entrance, the exhibition space, the restaurant and the whole city is visible. This representation shows the visual relation between the restaurant and the exhibition spaces. The media labs are designed in two levels, in such a way that the equipment are preserved. Under them, there are two levels with plantations.

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There is an inevitable differentiation of the heights of the different existing buildings, yet there has always been a concern for the accessibility of all. The mediatheque is a transparent and flexible building. In the night, its light transforms it into a bright landmark. Our proposal does not erase the past, but exists thanks to it. Memory is promoted and used. If the neoclassical buildings, like the Athenian trilogy, were designed according to the past, our proposal is based on the future. If the Athenian trilogy is based on symmetry, the contemporary space of civilization adopts and takes the shape of the buildings that happen to be unoccupied at that specific moment. If modern architecture and its tabula rasa attempted to remove the existing space in order to construct a utopian dream, our proposal rejects the destruction of any building because it considers everything potentially usable. our proposal represents a parasitic architecture that attempts to deal with randomness , and penetrates into the unused structured environment. It exploits its benefits, while at the same time offers a development of its environment. This mediatheque was designed site specifically. The idea of it, however, has a more general character. We accept the coincidence, and we improve the building piece by piece, gradually, independently.

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Section BB 0

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Section CC 0

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Narration of an Athenian Next stop Panepistimio. I quickly walk on the escalators. A large group of tourists takes photos in front of the trilogy. I enter Praxitelous street. In front of me, I see the bridge. One, two, ten steps. I walk fast on the sideway, the laptop feels heavy on my back. The day is hot. Thirty six, thirty seven, thirty eight. On my right I see the neoclassical building- at last! The glass doors open. Shadow. And in the back, trees. Stairs or elevator? Elevator. Next to me a girl holds a gym mattress. The glass doors close. But where is she going with that mattress? Concrete, neoclassical windows, concrete, we reached higher than the neoclassical building! The doors open. Corridor. Praxitelous street from above. I stand to observe. My favorite part of the building. I continue- the reception. I should ask about that new expedition. But too many people wait. I will come later. I need something to drink. I turn left, I pass the second bridge. I am on top of the restaurant. I walk around it. I walk down the stairs. I choose a table near the windows. In a certain distance, I see the installation of that German artist. So the expedition has started. I will go to visit it, tomorrow maybe. There are children everywhere. They run around the works of art. Maybe they came with their school. 11:50. I should get going. I have so much to do till 20:00. I would stay more, but today there is that performance outside the library. It is so strange that today I will not even enter the library. How many hours did I spend there last year? I have probably sat in every computer. Certainly I have. At first in the central points. Next to the holes, near the bridges. I was impressed when I observed the people s activities, especially on the other floors. And I had met so many of them. And when the exam period was close, I would sit behind the columns. And in that table on the ground floor- such a concentration. Again the stairs. Here is the bridge. The furthest, I suppose. The first time I visited the building I was lost. Then every time I would discover a new room. Even now I sometimes feel that the building has expanded. The level with the trees, as seen from here, would be a perfect photograph. Grey columns, grey beams, grey floor, green trees. Between them people with colorful clothes are exercising. So this is where that girl headed. I walk strait. Elevator. Second or third floor? I guess third. These days they are replacing the 3d printers of the second floor. Here I am. I take out my cell phone to find my reservation code. 2108. The two glass doors open. And I open my laptop. What will I make today?

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Em. Mpenaki str. Architectural Competition I Spring 2018 Collaborator: N. Kourti Best 50 Shared responsibilities for concept and design. Personal respnonsibility for the creation of the final Renders and Drawings.

The challenge of the competition was to design the pavilion that would represent our country in a Universal Exposition. The objective was to build a didactic pavilion that could show the world the best of each country taking advantage of the international visibility of a Universal Exposition, using its architecture to improve the image of each nation. Every year millions of tourists visit Greece, for its ancient history and its landscapes. But besides these attractions, the every- day life of the capital is worth to be uncovered! Athens was mostly built in the 20th century. At first neoclassical buildings represented the connection with its ancient character, around the 1930s the modern movement aimed to set new rules for the upper- class residences, and forty years later the internal migration demanded a rapid construction of numerous blocks of flats. The proposal’s starting point is Em. Mpenaki str., which links the heart of Athens with Strefi Hill. Apartments of all typologies found along the street and the local plantations, become elements of the pavilion and transfer the city’s ambience, as interpretations in scale 1:1. When the visitors experience the space, a lesson for the significance of the authentic culture is gained, and a unique memory is formed. The pavilion tells two stories: The one is about the 20th century social and cultural local history, as revealed through the power of architecture. The second narrates the current reality, the every- day lives of the contemporary Athenians, as presented and experienced through their homes. Eat in the kitchens, lay on the couches and walk through the trees!

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Em. Benaki street links a central square of Athens with Strefi hill, a green oasis in the city.

Along the street there are three building typologies: Neoclassical, modern and typical blocks of flats of the 1970s.

High- rise development was an answer to the expanding demand for new residential space.

The pavilion includes the three typolgies, as well as mediterranean flora, giving to the visitor the impression of the athenian every- day ambiance.

Each level consists of one or more properties.

23.75 m. 19.00 m. 14.25 m. 9.50 m. 4.25 m.

View 1

View 2

Image 1

View 3

View 4

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The Kitchen on the “Modern Type� Level

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70s Type

Strefi

Neoclassical Type

Plan of the “Neoclassical Type” Level

Modern Type

Exploded Axonometric Drawing

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Image 2

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“Strefi” Level


23.75 m.

19.00 m.

14.25 m.

9.50 m.

4.25 m.

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“Modern Type” Level

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Romance Contemporaine House102 Internship I Fall 2017 I Residential Design Supervisor: 314 Architecture Studio Project Architect in Collaboration with N. Kourti

The project H102, Romance Contemporaine, is dealing with the renovation of an existing typical block of flats created in the 1970 s in Glyfada, Athens, which is being transformed into a contemporary sustainable home for a new family. The new residence, with a total area of 300m², is located on a 370m² site, and is being developed on four levels. Its sustainable function is succeeded with the creation of an atrium, which with a sliding ceiling regulates the circulation of the warm air in the building and its relief to the environment. At the same time, on the west side of the building, the existing protruding elements are converted into Sun Walls TROMBE, which contain tropical plants. The tangential inner walls are deconstructed, allowing the garden to be inserted into the residence, through the new curved openings. On the terrace level there is a building extension, using the square meters that were gained from the creation of the atrium. The couples’ bedroom is therefore designed on that level, with large openings which offer continuous view to the sea. The new volume is protected from the sun and maintains its privacy using a sliding system of a metal curtain. A key feature of the renovation are the continuous curved engravings, which are depicted as an imprint of light and shadow on the blur translucent facades.

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Glyfada, Athens

Basic Elements

Sustainability

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North-East View

North-West View

Section AA

Image 1

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Living Room

Section BB

Image 2

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Kitchen and Dining Room

Image 3

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Master Bedroom


Image 4

Image 5

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Angular View

Master Bedroom

Image 6

I View from the Road

Image 7

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Side View with Open Panels

Image 8

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Backyard

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Seaside Residential Mechanism

The subject of the eighth semester Architectural Design Studio was the creation of a system for seaside habitation, while the seaside area was a free choice.

Design Studio I 8th semester I Spring 2017 Supervisor: Prof. Yannis Aesopos Collaborator: N. Kourti Shared responsibilities for concept and design. Personal respnonsibility for the creation of some of the final renders and drawings.

Tourism is one of the most characteristic aspects of contemporary Greece. The purpose of the eighth Architectural Design Studio was to create an alternative and ephemeral touristic accommodation on a sea shore. Even though the wild camping is strictly forbidden, an increasing number of people appear to be choosing this form of tourism every summer, not only because of its adaptation to economic restrictions, but also because a greater contact with nature is achieved. The proposal is situated in Antirion, a village which is about fifteen kilometers away from Patras, Greece. The beach’s most characteristic element is the low sea level of the first fifty meters of the sea. The area is naturally organized in layers, alongside the shore: sand, Salt- cedar trees, Reeds and Eucalyptus trees. The existing plantations were carefully studied and categorized according to their average heights, as well as their potential use.

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Antirion, Greece

Freedom of Choice

Concept Images

Regularity

Freedom of Choice

Densities and Dilutions

Images of the Unit at Different Points

The proposal’s concept was found when answering the following question: How is it possible to retain the freedom that the wild campers enjoy when deciding their accommodation spot, as well as their close contact to nature, while they become parts of an organized system? We imagined a grid: the horizontal lines represent the nature layers, and the vertical ones show the movement of the campers’ accommodation units on rails. In this way, every camper can access every part of the nature, any time he/she wishes (concept diagrams).

Image 2

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Walking on the Seashore

Every spring the rails are placed upon the ground, and due to the use and the weather conditions, they are steadily camouflaged by the sand and the soil. At the end of the summer, the railways are collected, not having left any ‘imprint’.

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The twenty-five sets of rails are placed in various distances, in order to provide a desirable isolation in nature or alternatively, a communication between the users. The shared, public spaces are placed between the two most condensed zones. The units can be transferred by the users according to the time of the day or the weather conditions. For example, in case of a strong wind, the unit can be protected from the Reeds. Each unit consists of three parts: a compact one which functions as a storage space, a turning one which, depending on its angle, is a wall or a floor, and four separate rolling elements, through which the construction becomes flexible and gets diverse combination forms. The two shared- spaces stripes include tables, kitchens, a reception, a food market and bathrooms. All the elements are designed according to the deconstruction of compactness, which is achieved through the removal of some facades, the ‘explosion’ into smaller volumes and the creation of perforated details.

Masterplan

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Open Unit

ClosedUnit Residential Unit’s Plans

Section AA

Axonometrics


Section Along the Rails

Top View

Axonometric Drawing of the Shared Spaces

Image 1

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Walking on the Main Path

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Museum for the Development & Promotion of Art Design Studio I 6th semester I Spring 2016 Supervisor: Konstantios Daskalakis Collaborator: N. Markou Shared responsibilities for concept and design. Personal respnonsibility for the creation of the final Renders and Drawings.

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The subject of the sixth semester Architectural Design Studio was the creation of a Design Museum for the city of Athens, Greece. Leaving aside the most common model of the museum’s concept, our Design Museum aims to develop and promote art, rather than simply display it. The Museum of Development and Promotion of Art gives the possibility to new artists to create and exhibit their work, encouraging youth’s evolution. To serve this purpose, activities are organized around 5 workshops which operate as spaces for teaching and experimentation on various forms of art. These functions are combined and complemented by exhibition, concert and entertainment venues. The building provokes and invites the outside observers, as its transparency allows them to be in direct contact with the internal functions. At the same time, the interior of the building disputes the concept of enclosed spaces and floors.It introduces visually unified spaces and replaces the unified floor with uneven levels that seem to float into space, creating a tangled yet clear visual and functional effect. The monolithic volume in the front of the building responds to the busy Piraeus street, while the back is exploded in large accessible terraces, adapting to the residential area around it. The building is developed on 8 levels. The administrative offices are on the ground floor of the museum. On the first level there is a cafeteria and a museum shop. Higher levels include 5 workshops, 6 exhibition halls, a library and a roof garden. Finally, an auditorium is developed in the back of the building. Access to the different levels is only possible through the front of the building, where there is a ramp after the reception that acts as the main feature for vertical circulation. Aerial tunnels run from ramps to any workshop or other venue. Each tunnel is a preamble for the following workshop. Each workshop is linked to a closed exhibition space for the works produced in it.


Athens, Greece

Intensity Calm

Exhibition Venues Workshops Vertical Movement

Space

Inside

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View Peiraios Street

View Alkminis Street

Side View

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Looking at the Building from Peiraios Street

Physical Models

Image 2

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Looking out of the Ramp

Image 3

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Walking Beneath the Building

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Landscape ‘Revival’ Connection of Ancient and New Olympia Urban Design Studio I 6th semester I Spring 2016 Supervisor: Τhanassis Manis Collaborator: N. Markou Shared responsibilities for concept and design. Personal respnonsibility for the creation of the final renders and drawings.

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The subject of the sixth semester Urban Design Studio was an intervention in the city of Olympia, Greece in relation to its ancient monuments. The proposal attempts to create an overall experience of visual and acoustic stimuli that will prepare and complement the experience of visiting the Ancient site of Olympia, Greece. The aim of the intervention is also to include the natural environment in the visit, the beauty of which was the criterion for selecting the venue for the Olympic Games in antiquity. More specifically, the current visitor s pathway is changed, in order to follow the flow of ancient athletes through the holy road to the stadium and the sense of hearing is integrated into the overall experience, through appropriate acoustic stimuli. The above is achieved by changing the entry gate position of the ancient site and creating two routes as well as a parking space near the new entrance. The two routes that have been created, start from the new city and develop in the natural environment, aiming to restore nature’s impact on the overall experience of the visit. The two routes, although following the same course, provide different experiences: The first one, following the relief of nature, is used by those who simply want an interaction with the natural environment before they visit the ancient monuments. In the configuration of the route, interventions are made only where necessary for the facilitation and security of the passage. On the other hand, the second route is a path where interventions attempt to expand the overall experience with the addition of the sense of hearing. It acts as an acoustic extension of space. For this purpose, four spaces are created along the path where the visitor can hear sounds that refer to the original ‘life’ of the area, such as applause and exclamations. Through the two routes and the existence of the parking lot, three options - scenarios are created: The visitor is able to use one, both or none of them according to their preference.


Olympia, Greece

Wooden Elements Which Reflect Sound

Bronze Perforated Surface

Planting and Terrain Domestic Elements: configuration Landscape

Site Analysis

Masterplan

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m 280

Section AA

Section BB

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Intervention

Movement Intervention I / Route 2

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Suggested Movements: new city, archaeological site, museum, landscape

Sound

Movement Intervention II / Route 2

New Road Network

Sound


Starting Point of the Two Routs

Relation Between the Two Routes

Detail of Intervention I Route 2

End Point of the Two Routes. Entrance to the Archaeological Site

New Parking Lot

Section Across Kladeos River

Section Along Kladeos River Masterplan

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City in the City Design Studio I 5th semester I Fall 2015 Supervisor: Kostantios Daskalakis Collaborator: N. Markou Shared responsibilities for concept and design. Personal respnonsibility for the creation of the final renders and drawings.

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The subject of the fifth semester Architectural Design Studio was the creation of an elementary school for the city of Patras, Greece. The city of Patras is characterized by a dense urban planning that contains mono-functional buildings. The proposed design deviates from this model and incorporates a school building, halls for sports and social events into a single complex in such a way that each maintains its utilitarian independence but at the same time coexists and interacts with the rest. Thus, the whole complex can offer a grid of multiple suggestions of engaging and social interaction. The dominant role of the school complex is extended to include several activities accessible to the public, such as a basketball court, libraries, a theater, event and restaurant halls that coexist and function as a whole, without losing their architectural and functional identity. Private and public spaces have unclear boundaries. Glass, patios, open and closed, transparent and opaque spaces create an environment characterized by continuous flow, controlled transparency and contact with the environment. The complex is developed on three levels, a basement, a ground floor and an upper floor that communicates with ladders placed on the patios. The basement contains a basketball court open to students and the public. On the ground floor there are spaces used by the students, as well as spaces for public use. Thus, a theater, libraries, event and restaurant halls are developed around glass-enclosed patios for intense lighting and ventilation. The ground floor s perimeter is covered entirely with glass. Inner curtains enable the interior to be isolated from the outside environment when needed. On the first floor, the school complex is designed, in the form of learning neighborhoods , in a school as a city . Three different types of classrooms are designed in order to serve teaching purposes rather than simply housing them.


Patras, Greece

Circular Urban Plan

library

Underground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Gridded Urban Plan

Site’s Urban Plan

School’s “Urban” Plan

basketball restaurant court

theater

Second Floor Plan

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20 m

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View 1

View 2

View 4

View 3

Craft Room

Section BB

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Literature Room

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Profile for Iason Ntounis

Architectural Folio of Works: Iason Ntounis  

Architectural Folio of Works: Iason Ntounis  

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