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CITY ATLAS: WATER

A journey through New York City 1800–2060

The City Atlas help people think about life in the future and about the effects of choices we make now. The Atlas may embrace questions on the largest scale - what happens if the sea level rises over twenty years - and also questions of everyday life - which Greenmarkets are open today? Our goal is to start a conversation with New Yorkers (and visitors to the city) from the ground up, rather than the top down. We also believe that once people understand how the city has changed in the past, it becomes more manageable to understand how it will change

New York City has one of the largest natural water filtration systems throughout the country, feeding from three reservoirs in upstate New York. Population growth and urbanization encouraged the development of a well-functioning water delivery system which is still in use today. Development of the water delivery system in upstate New York counties caused tensions among residents living in the watershed area. Eventually, these tensions led to mutual understandings by both parties and the subsequent success of the water system as it stands today. Currently, the water system for New York City functions through two main water tunnels and pumps over 1.2 billion gallons of water per day. A third water tunnel is currently in development to supplement the two existing water tunnels fully by 2020. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) maintains a comprehensive watershed protection program to assure New York City’s water quality remains high. Additionally, the DEP maintains drought provisions to protect reserves in the upstate reservoirs during dry periods. Continued development will be needed in New York City’s water supply to ensure fresh, clean drinking water for the residents of New York City.

Project:

newyork.thecityatlas.org

A Collaboration with: Parsons the New School for Design Artist as Citizen CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities Funded by: Rockefeller Foundation

Category:

in the future. Thus the Atlas will serve to bridge past and future portraits of the city, like those shown respectively in Mannahatta and PlaNYC. The essential functions of New York have always included: food, water, energy, shelter, transportation, and lifestyle -- and they all are going to shift in the next decade, as climate change, issues of sustainability, and government policies take hold. To break the ice, we plan to ask the public (and experts) what they think New York will be like in ten years, and what they would like New York to be like in ten years.

Atlas Directors: Artist As Citizen

Richard Reiss CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities

Carina Molnar

Atlas Team: Project Coordinator

Chun-wo Pat

Wright Brothers’ first flight

Cholera Epidemic

Communication Design AMT Water

Meryl Vedros

Industrial Revolution

Waste

Peter Lum Takayo Yamazaki

World War I

Civil War

World War II

Vietnam War

Transit

Ryan Hines present

1800

1810

1820

1830

1840

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

10 million

9,400,000–9,700,000 (projected)

fu tu re

1400 feet

8,692,564 (projected)

past

8 million 8,175,133 people living within the 5 boroughs, as of the 2010 Census

The population is a driving force behind the infastructure of New York City. This diagram compares building height in relation to population growth in New York City from 1770 to present.

1200 feet

In 2008 Bottling water produced more than 2.5 million tons of carbon dioxide

Water heaters available for warm water

Most New York residents had private bath and shower in their apartments

6 million

900 feet

POPULATION

4 million

600 feet

Running water available in apartments

1810

1820

1830

1840

1850

1860

1880

1890

1900

1910

NORTH TOWER WORLD TRADE CENTER

THE EMPIRE STATE BUILDING

THE WOOLWORTH BUILDING

THE METROPOLITAN LIFE TOWER

THE PARK ROW BUILDING

ST. PATRICK’S CATHEDRAL

1870

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

Cr

ot

on

Ca ts

ki

W at er s

lls

he d

bu

W at e

ilt

rs

he d

bu

ilt

1800

TRINITY CHURCH

TENNEMENTS

AGAINST NATURE

Nearly impossible to run water to the top floor of a 5 story building

NEW YORK WORLD BUILDING

300 feet

THE SINGER BUILDING

2 million

1800

1810

1820

1830

1840

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

During the 1770s, the wells where most people got their drinking water mostly dried up and the Collect Pond that the 33,000 people used was quickly contaminated with diseases and waste. The city became an infectious center with high concentrations of yellow fever in 1819 and cholera in 1832. Many people died due to lack of clean water (Owen, 2009, Ch.1).

1900

1910

1920

1930

In comparison to other public water systems, the NYC system is both economical and flexible. Approximately 95% of the total water supply is delivered to the consumer by gravity.

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

Quality Requirements: Tested for E. Coli Required to provide source Quality reports required Higher cost

TAP

VS

BOTTLED

TAP WATER creates less pollution, less energy, and less natural resources REUSE glass bottles to drink from SUPPORT your local water system

Catskills/Delaware Watersheds

Croton Watershed

Croton Watershed

x 2.5 BILLION More the 2.5 billion plastic bottles are purchased each year in New York City, enough to stack to the moon


Water