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Ian Spadin Portfolio Spring 2019


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

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Table of Contents

Iowa State University Music Hall Addition

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12

Timber in the City

Prototype for a Public Data Center

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Two x Two

Byre

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Steep

Generative Art

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Ian Spadin

ianspadin@gmail.com ianspadin.com

Education B.Arch, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (2014-present)

Bachelor of Architecture Spring 2018 Study Abroad in Rome, IT

Experience

References

Proving Ground Research Intern (Summer 2018)

Nick Senske

Researched technologies using Unity to expand on Proving Ground's existing work. Developed a 3D-viewer and data visualizer for IFC room data pulled from a MySQL database.

Assistant Professor, ISU Architecture nsenske@iastate.edu +1 515 294 8711

TF2Maps.net Community Staďż˝ Member (2015-present)

Nathan Miller

Organized map playtests. Organized/managed/judged large contests and events. Moderated chat room/forum discussion. Provided technical help and design feedback/critique on maps.

CEO, Proving Ground nate@provingground.io

DSN S 102 Peer Mentoring (Spring 2019, ongoing)

Associate Professor, ISU Architecture mikesch@iastate.edu +1 515 294 8786

Mentored students under direction of professor through providing critiques, guidance, and general advice. Attended night workshops with other mentors to develop skills.

Michael Muecke

Recognition

Skills

DLR Group Prize Finalist (2017)

Architecture Dra�ing/Modeling

Music Hall studio project

AutoCAD, Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, Revit (basic)

Music Hall Faculty's Top Choice (2017)

Studio project to renovate ISU's Music Hall tied for the music department faculty's top choice Team Fortress 2 Map Contract (2015)

Media Production

Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere, SONAR X3, Audacity

Independently designed and detailed map Byre for Team Fortress 2; licensed by Valve Corporation for inclusion in the game

Programming

Two x Two on ArchDaily (2016)

Game Engines

Project featured in "The Best Student Design-Build Projects Worldwide 2016"

Source, Unity, Unreal (basic)

C#, HTML/CSS/JS, Processing

Language

German (basic)


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Iowa State University Music Hall Addition

Fall 2017 DLR Group Prize Finalist Chosen as best project by ISU Music Department Faculty

The Iowa State University Music Department has significantly outgrown their original building. About 1,800 students are involved with the department: 5% of the campus, or about 1 in every 20 students. This project provides them with an addition that almost doubles their current square footage, adding two new rehearsal spaces, a new orchestra hall of 1,000 seats, and almost doubling the current number of classrooms and practice rooms. This proposal starts with demolishing the two existing rehearsal spaces and putting the new orchestra hall in their place, allowing both performance halls to share the benefits of a single lobby. This new lobby also expands outwards, improving the discoverability and accessibility of the building’s main entrance. New rehearsal spaces, classrooms, and practice rooms are then constructed to the south, with communal spaces and circulation continuing off of the original building’s main lobby. A single central spiral stair and elevator core provides vertical access to this new wing of the building. This project helped develop collaborative skills with clients. The program was not determined through a pre-existing document, but instead a new document was created through interviews with the Music Department faculty. In addition, this project served as an introduction into using Autodesk Revit.

Top: View of the addition from across Lake Laverne. Bottom: View of the new atrium, looking west. What used to be a long ramp (which was known for being dangerous in the winter) is now an interior stair.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Above: The new atrium in the existing context, Above: The existing student common area expands demonstrating how it overtakes the existing walkway forward, becoming the main axis of circulation between and becomes a more significant icon on campus. the old building and the new wing. This new double-height space has circulation to the choir rehearsal spaces above. Below is circulation to the band rehearsal spaces, which is closed off to help contain noise. 5


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Above: Step-by-step diagrams from the existing program to the new program.

Top: Section of the 1,000-seat orchestra hall. Proportions for the hall are roughly 1:2:1, which has good acoustic qualities. Seats behind the stage may be used by the choir or be ticketed for additional seating.

Yellow: Practice / Classrooms Red: Rehearsal Blue: Performance

Bottom: A perspective of the orchestra hall from the stage. The stage is atlevel with the band rehearsal spaces, allowing for easy transport of heavy equipment (percussion, large brass, etc.). 6


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: View of the new ground-level commons area, which serves as part of campus circulation, allowing students outside the music program to see and mingle with the students who are.

Bottom: Long section of the full building. The original building is on the right, and the new wing is on the left, joined by a glass-walled walkway.

This space also serves as the lobby for the electronic music “black-box� and has a cafe. 7


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Orchestra Hall Mechanical Space

UP

Music Technology Performance Space

Mech.

Cafe

Storage

UP

UP

UP

Main Entrance UP

Stage

Right: Floor plans. North is up.

Orchestra Hall Lower Lobby

Backstage Percussion

Key:

Percussion

Basement

Percussion

Percussion

Floor 2 UP

Rehearsal Hall

Rehearsal Hall

DN

DN UP

Floor 1

Floor 3

UP

Practice & Instrument Storage

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DN


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

UP

UP

Orchestra Hall Upper Lobby

Organ Pipes

Orchestra Hall

Recital Hall

Upper Student Commons

DN

DN UP

UP

DN

Faculty Studios & Misc. Rooms

UP

Classrooms (converted from existing faculty studios)

Rooftop Space

Music Education

Choir

Choir

DN

Faculty Studios & Misc. Rooms

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: Process work from an early design phase of the Bottom: Birds-eye view of the same early design phase. project. Columns were designed to create larger spaces on the bottom while keeping a smaller column grid above.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Above: Select images from the second design phase. The The central axis was also designed as a large open atrium massing diagram is similar to the final, but choir rooms with an open view to the lake, which was discarded in are on the lakefront instead of above the band rehearsal favor of more functional circulation for the final design. spaces.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Timber in the City

Collaboration with Michael McKinney

Timber in the City is a large multi-use project set in the lower-east side of Manhattan island with a marketplace, a residential complex, and an Andy Warhol art museum. To locate each program on the site, the question was asked: What does each program require? The marketplace needs pedestrian traffic, so it is located on the busiest corner of the site at street level. The residential complex needs sunlight, and as such it is divided into a series of bars with gaps between them at the scale of a city street (which become shared spaces for the residents.) The residents also require security, so the living spaces are all located above street level. Lastly, the museum needs to be an icon, and so a single grand staircase is located at the most prominent location of the site for all to see.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Left: Exploded axonometric of the full complex. The marketplace supports the residential towers on the right while the museum features on the left. Below: Floor plans for the residences. Each color represents a different typical apartment, ranging from “micro� units to 3-bed units (there are many different 3-bed layouts, some are not shown here). Every unit has a balcony (excluding some micro units). Right: Perspective of the green shared space on the roof of the marketplace, between the apartment towers. The distance between the towers is 60 ft, approximately the same as a typical NYC street.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Below: Section and plans of the museum. The layout takes inspiration from Louis Kahn’s Yale Center for British art, with a large central atrium enforcing a circular flow onto each exhibition floor space.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Below: Interior of the museum from the lobby looking towards the central atrium and large projection screen.

Below: Interior of the marketplace.

Above: At the bottom of the atrium is an open exhibition space with a large projection screen, allowing Andy Warhol’s films to be watched from the museum lobby. Seating on the other side allows for more formal film watching. The screen can also open up to allow for live stage performances.

Next Spread: A selection of process sketches. Throughout the project, I used a pin-up board and notecards to keep an active “mood board” of the project’s concepts and values. → 17


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Prototype for a Public Data Center Data centers are an important piece of modern infrastructure that remain widely unseen. They are built in locations where land is plenty and electricity is cheap, which also hides them from the public eye. Quoting Alexander Taylor, who writes on this subject: “Perhaps the greatest trick tech companies ever pulled was convincing the world that their data doesn’t exist, in physical form, at least.”

serve the population of 884,363 in San Francisco. (The total capacity is 702 containers, or 1,067,040 people.) The structure is equipped with an overhead gantry crane to move containers throughout the building.

The project integrates a thermal bath to allow people into the building and see even more precisely where their data is kept, as well as how the facility is operated and maintained. Heat for the baths is provided by the data This prototype proposes the data center as a public center, which uses cold bay water for cooling. Visitors amenity to combat the placelessness of “The Cloud.” It is can literally bathe in the heat that their data usage creates. built to serve the surrounding population by providing one server computer to every citizen of San Francisco. The structure takes the abstract Cloud and makes it concrete. People who use The Cloud can see where their data lives. Practically, this also serves to reduce latency issues, allowing more functions to be moved off of computers and onto The Cloud. The Cloud is then made into a concrete idea by constructing a floating cloud of concrete. The structure sits above an old warehouse without actually touching it. This juxtaposes an old warehouse against a new warehouse, deliberately leaving the new warehouse wildly out of scale to communicate what modern data usage looks like. Servers are stored in shipping containers to provide modularity. This allows the facility to expand and shrink over time while allowing equipment to be upgraded regularly. Modularity also provides a way of better understanding the scale of the facility - each container represents 1,520 people. 582 containers are needed to

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: Perspectives of some of the baths. Some baths allow a view of the inner atrium. Bottom: Sections of the structure. The central atrium allows containers to be lifted and slid into place, as well as views from one side to the other. 22


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top Left: Main entrance. Bottom Left: A “manifesto image� of the project. Right: Perspective from the main entrance looking up into the atrium. 23


Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Above: Presentation boards from an earlier phase of the project. The separation between baths and data center was much stronger, and there was no storage container concept to give the facility a sense of scale.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Two x Two

Featured on ArchDaily: “The Best Student Design-Build Projects Worldwide 2016”

Two x Two was a 77-student collaboration design-build project. Using the method of construction pioneered by SHoP’s Dunescape, five different studios designed and built a public space project for the College of Design’s atrium. (The project was later moved to Reiman Gardens.) Besides contributing to the design of the project, I also contributed to documentation/construction through Grasshopper scripts, one that split a Rhino model into individual layers for exporting the linework and another that estimated the total amount of lumber that needed to be ordered. Lastly, I was also in charge of producing a short documentary video of the project’s construction with the help of a few other students. This included shooting most of the video, recording and conducting interviews with students and faculty, and editing the final cut. The video was shown at the opening for the project.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Photos 1, 2, 3: Two x Two in the ISU College of Design atrium. Photo credit: Iowa State University. Photo 4: Two x Two outdoors in ISU’s Reiman Gardens. Photo credit: Atalie Ruhnke.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Above: Use of grasshopper to automate the construction process. The top script measures the length of every piece to determine how much lumber is needed. The bottom script splits the model into discrete layers for creating construction documents.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Above: Stills from the documentary I produced. The full film team consisted of myself, Eric Niu, Ayla Hendrickson, and John Nguyen.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Byre

Contracted by Valve to be included in Team Fortress 2, as part of the “Invasion Update” TF2Maps.net Mercenaries vs. Aliens Contest 3rd Place

Byre is a map developed for Team Fortress 2’s ‘arena’ mode, which is unique from other modes of the game in that players do not respawn. The primary objective is to eliminate all players on the enemy team. Rounds are focused on survival and deathmatch ability, making communication between allies important. Typically a capture point objective is placed in the center of the map which only unlocks after about a minute into the round to help prevent stalemates. Byre turns this stalemate safeguard into an asset by featuring two of them on opposite sides of the map and unlocking them at the very start of the round. Players must make strategic decisions not only about how to stay alive, but also on how to attack the enemy’s control point while defending their own. Capturing the objective isn’t the easy way out, but an intended strategy.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: Layout for the first released version of the map. Each team has a “home� control point, with two other neutral points in the center. Middle: In-progress rework of the layout after playtesting showed the final points did not work very well. Bottom: Final released version for the 72-hour contest.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: Perspective of the 72-hour contest version. Middle: Layout of the first properly artpassed version. More buildings and surroundings are added. Bottom: Layout of the final shipped version. The layout got slightly bigger at the middle, and spawn buildings were developed further.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Steep

TF2Maps.net/Potato’s MvM Servers Mappers vs. Machines Contest 2nd Place

Steep is a map designed for Team Fortress 2’s Mann vs. Machine mode, where 6 players team up to defend against 6 waves of robots who try to carry a bomb to a hatch. If the bomb reaches the hatch, the game ends. The map is set in an abandoned mining camp on a large slope, which puts an emphasis on vertical combat. Robots take one of two paths: one which leads around a building up and down the slope of the mountain, and the other which goes into the mountain through an excavated mining area. Waves of robots were also designed for the map, both in easy and hard difficulties. These were tested with an experienced group of MvM players and balanced over several sessions. Optimization work was done by Rebecca ‘phi’ Ailes.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: Early layout work. The top route design was scrapped early on to make the map follow the slope of a hill. Middle: Later layout work. At this point, a problem revealed itself - the cave route was shorter than the hill route. The area around the bomb hatch also made the hillside concept difficult. Bottom: Layout as it appeared in the first tested version. The cave route was altered to have both entrances face the same direction, creating a cleaner separation of spaces (better for artpassing/realism as well as layout clarity).

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Top: First version of the hill route.

Top: First version of the bot entrance. Bots only had one place to enter the map.

Bottom: Revision of the hill route. The original building structure, while more realistic, was annoying to fight Bottom: Revision of the bot entrance. A second entry around and did not function as well as a W space. Some was added to make it harder to lock down the area as well elements (like the elevated stair/walkway) were kept. as offer more potential variety to bot wave design.

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Ian Spadin Portfolio - Spring 2019

Generative Art This is a small collection of art created through software. The first is a series of interference patterns. Different equations use the x and y coordinates of each pixel to determine if it should be “on” or “off” (sometimes greyscale, sometimes per each color channel). The second is a voxel engine that performs operations on random volumes, such as adding blocks, carving them, creating windows, deleting every other row, etc. Repeating the same series of instructions multiple times will produce unique forms that still relate to each other, making the art more about the process than the end result (ala Sol Lewitt).

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Profile for Ian Spadin

Ian Spadin Architecture Portfolio (Spring 2019)  

Architecture portfolio for Spring 2019. This is my final portfolio for my undergrad degree.

Ian Spadin Architecture Portfolio (Spring 2019)  

Architecture portfolio for Spring 2019. This is my final portfolio for my undergrad degree.

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