Page 1

celebrating

50 years of nursing education

OVERCOMING RESISTANCE

RESEARCH COULD LEAD TO NEW ANTICANCER DRUG

Making a difference

Nursing alum finds home at st. louis children’s hospital

Doctors in

Training Southeast ’s medical school placement rate nearly doubles national average


THE MAGAZINE OF SO U T H EA S T M I S S OURI STAT E U N I V E R S I T Y

S

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Spring 2008 The mission of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is to bring the vitality that is Southeast Missouri State University into the lives of its alumni and friends… and to promote the cause of the University most effectively through its editorial focus on interesting people and interesting ideas…Experience Southeast…Experience Success. The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is made possible by members of the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association and donors to the Southeast Missouri University Foundation. MAGAZINE TEAM MANAGING EDITORS Karen Grebing Director of Marketing & Development kgrebing@semo.edu Diane Sides Director of University Relations dosides@semo.edu COPY AND ART EDITOR Shad Burner Coordinator of Marketing sburner@semo.edu EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Juan Crites Director of Public Services/Publications Wayne Smith Vice President for University Advancement/ Executive Director of the Foundation Jane C. Stacy Director of Alumni Services & Development Art Wallhausen Associate to the President CONTRIBUTORS Adam Appleton Juan Crites Jon Fox Ann Hayes Delain Stafford PHOTOGRAPHY Brad Chamness Mike Grace Nancy Kelley Thomas Marrone Matthew R. Miller Emily Sikes ROWDY CARICATURE Thomas Marrone DESIGN Jamie Barnwell UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT Dr. Ken Dobbins ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Joan Gohn, President Michael Price, Vice President

outheast continues to grow in record numbers. Preliminary data from the Admissions Office suggests we will have at least as many new freshman entering the University this August as was the case in 2007. You may recall that we enrolled over 1,800 beginning freshmen for the 2007-08 academic year – a record number and an increase of almost 300 over the previous year. We believe a number of factors have contributed to the increasing demand for places in our freshman class, but certainly our quality academic programs and the increased efforts of our alumni, faculty and staff to encourage academically prepared students to enroll at Southeast have played a major role. We also believe that the River Campus, a new Aquatic Center, and a new band scholarship program significantly contributed to our large enrollment growth. As a result, we are now taking steps to accommodate this growth. Because it appears the demand for on-campus Kenneth W. Dobbins housing is going to continue, the University has acquired President Henderson House, an apartment building across from the University Center, which will be converted into residence hall rooms for 80 students. As you may read on page five, we have also begun a fast-track planning process for a new 300-bed residence hall that will be built starting this spring near the west end of Houck Stadium. With so much growth and change on campus, we believe it is time to ask ourselves “What should Southeast Missouri State University look like in 2013?” To answer this question, we have decided to develop a new strategic plan for Southeast. The process started in February, when more than 130 individuals from the University and the region spent an entire day examining every aspect of the institution and its environment, developing a collective vision for the University’s immediate future, and finally compiling a short list of the most important tasks we face in the coming three to five years. We plan to hold open forums on campus this spring and have a final version ready for approval by the Board of Regents early in the fall semester. In the following pages you will read more about the growing student population and our plans to accommodate this growth in the future. I hope you will also read about some of our outstanding alumni, from Terry Bryant’s passion for her career at St. Louis Children’s Hospital to the class-note feature about Janet Eckles’ amazing story of overcoming adversity. There are many great things happening at Southeast! As I’ve said before, you have every right to be proud of your affiliation with this remarkable institution. Whether you e-mail, write a letter or simply pick up the phone, please do not hesitate to share your thoughts. We would love to hear from you! Sincerely,

Kenneth W. Dobbins President

SOUTHEAST MISSOURI UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION Harry Rediger, Chairman Dick Davidson, Vice Chairman

CElEbRATING

50 yEARS

LETTERS POLICY The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University welcomes submissions by alumni and friends. Class notes and letters may be edited for length and content. Please send all correspondence to editor@semoalumni. com or to The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University, One University Plaza MS7300, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701.



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

O n The Cover

Of NuRSING EduCATION

OVERCOMING RESISTANCE

RESEARCH COULD LEAD TO NEW ANTICANCER DRUG

MAkING A dIffERENCE

NURSING ALUm fINDS HOmE AT ST. LOUIS CHILDREN’S HOSpITAL

Doctors in

Training SOUTHEAST ’S mEDICAL SCHOOL pLACEmENT RATE NEARLy DOUbLES NATIONAL AvERAGE

S O U T H E A S T

Southeast pre -medical students Andrew Valleroy, Tara O’Connor and Andrew Jackson were recently chosen for the prestigious Br yant Scholars program for early admission into medical school.

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


D E P A R T M E N T S

inside

4 5 8 22 24 26 31

spring 2 0 0 8

LET TERS CAMPUS CHRONICLES FAMILY TRADITION EVENTS ALUMNI ALMANAC CLASS NOTES ROWDY’S NEST

10

Celebrating 50 Years of Nursing Education

S outh e a s t ’s m e d i c a l s c h o o l p l a c e ment rate n e a r l y d o u b l e s n a t i o n a l ave r age 

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

Making a Difference Nursing alum finds home at St. Louis Children’s Hospital

20

17

Doctors in Training

14

Overcoming Resistance R eserach could lead to ne w anticancer drug

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


LETTERS

With A Little Help from the President

Mary Ellen Haw Berkbigler from the 1942 Sagamore

A Look Back The spring 2007 edition of the magazine triggered my nostalgia. I returned in 1992 for the 50th anniversary of the class of ‘42---such impressive new additions since then!  I was one of Dean A. Edythe Mange’s student secretaries earning $20 a month, which almost covered the $25 per month room and board at Leming Hall.  I can still see and hear Sadie Kent insisting on absolute silence in “her” library. We weren’t a very big school then and nearly everybody knew one another. I was active in Black Mask (drama), music club and Sorosis. I do enjoy my memories of those busy years.  In the fifties I taught a couple years in Jackson, later eight years in Cape where I supervised student teachers from the college, and, of course, I returned to take more classes.   Some may remember my husband and I had Timberline Turkey Farm on the highway between Cape and Jackson..... an interesting experiment. In 1965 we moved to Washington, my husband Paul an executive with B.S.A. and I still a teacher. Life itself has been, and is still, an exciting experience. I wish that for all your readers. Mary Ellen Haw Berkbigler

I left Southeast after four years of study missing just one important item, my diploma. After four unforgettable years in Cape, all that was left was a student teaching stint that fall in Salem, Missouri and then hopefully, a teaching position somewhere near St. Louis. While I was back in Maine that summer a teaching and coaching position opened up at a high school in my area. The superintendent of the school was willing to offer me the position providing that I could get my student teaching assignment transferred from Southeast Missouri State to the University of Maine. I called Southeast President, Dr. Mark Scully, and asked him if anything like that could be arranged. I can still remember his words when he said “If you have an opportunity to teach somewhere, I’ll not stand in the way of that endeavor.” The two universities worked out an arrangement where I would student teach in Maine and be evaluated by the University of Maine and then receive my diploma from Southeast Missouri State. Following a successful student teaching assignment, I

Sports Memorabilia Follow-up to Rich Eichorst’s letter in the last issue of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University Southeast Missouri State University sports memorabilia will be catalogued and housed in the Special Collections and Archives unit of Kent Library. While Special Collections already had a small collection of ephemera relating to sports at Southeast, this is the first concerted attempt to develop the holdings in a significant way.  Dr. Lisa Speer, Special Collections Librarian, is delighted about the prospect of receiving additional Southeast sports memorabilia for the archives. “Developing a sports archive is a unique opportunity that will allow future generations to examine and research this

Southeast’s 10th president, Dr. Mark F. Scully

signed a teaching and coaching contract to complete the school year as a new faculty member. I am currently completing my 37th year at that same Maine high school where I’ve been a teacher, a coach, an athletic director and, now for the past 11 years, an assistant principal. I’ll never forget my days at Southeast Missouri State. More importantly, I’ll never forget the wonderful opportunity that Dr. Mark Scully and Southeast Missouri State gave to me during the summer of 1970. Randy Cook ’71 Farmington, Maine

aspect of Southeast’s history,” Speer said. Rich Eichhorst (basketball 1952-1956) has been researching Southeast sports history and has gathered considerable material, including photographs, programs, articles and oral histories, all of which he will eventually place in Kent Library’s Special Collections.  “It is very reassuring to have a trusted and secure repository for the preservation of our University’s sports memorabilia,” said Eichhorst.  “We are encouraging those who possess sports memorabilia and other items, to consider donating them with the Library’s Special Collections.”  If desired, reproductions of photographs and articles can be arranged or will be accepted.  For additional information, please contact Dr. Lisa Speer at (573) 986-7446 or lkspeer@semo.edu.

Marysville, Wash.



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CAMPUS CHRONICLES

New Residence Hall Planned

Record Enrollment, Better Prepared Students Another enrollment record has been broken. Total undergraduate and graduate student enrollment stood at 10,665 for the fall 2007 semester. This continued a trend of increasing enrollment that has the faculty expanding course offerings and administrators planning for additional housing and dining space. Freshmen enrollment was up by a whopping 19 percent, making Southeast one of the fastest growing universities in the Midwest. University officials say Southeast’s total enrollment has grown by 2,740 since 1994 when total fall semester enrollment was 7,925. Dr. Debbie Below, director of enrollment management and

admissions at Southeast, said, in addition to the increased size of the beginning freshman class, the students are also much better prepared. “We have enrolled approximately 25 percent more valedictorians and salutatorians, and the enrollment of students with an ACT in the 90th percentile (27 or higher) increased by 20 percent over last year,” Below said. Below attributes the growing student population to the University’s combination of small class size, personal attention, a great college town, real-life career education and the opening of Southeast’s new River Campus and its Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts.

Savings for Alumni Children, Grandchildren With Southeast’s Family Achievement Award, children and grandchildren of alumni who live outside of Missouri can attend Southeast at in-state rates. The award is valued at approximately $4,700. To be considered for the scholarship, list the name(s) of a parent or grandparent who has graduated from Southeast on the application for admission.



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

With unprecedented growth in enrollment, Southeast administrators face the challenge of sufficient residence hall space. In December, the Board of Regents approved the building of a new residence hall at the corner of Broadway and Henderson streets. The new hall will be similar to Vandiver Hall, which opened in fall 2002. It is expected to be ready by July 2009. The hall will feature a common space looking out over the football field, as well as retail dining. This new hall will be situated in close proximity to Vandiver and Myers, creating a large housing community of approximately 1,000 students on the south side of campus. The design mixes the privacy of suite-style living with the interactions of community-style living. Each room will be home to two students who will share a private bathroom and shower with only the adjoining suite room. In contrast with other halls where there are one or two lounges for the 30 or more residents, smaller lounges give the residents their own living room area. The lower level will house a large lounge/ game room. Serving as the social center for the building, it will be equipped with big screen televisions and pool tables. Current plans include an additional food service concept providing second late-night and weekend dining options. This will give increased options for students to use their meal plans.

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CAMPUS CHRONICLES

Making a Big Splash on Campus The new $8.5 million aquatic center opened with a big splash this past fall to the delight of serious swimmers and ‘hot tubbing’ students. In addition to a competitive pool and a leisure pool, the center boasts two aquatic amenities few others offer. The first is a 40-foot wide, 14-foot high bouldering wall that rises out of the leisure pool. The “rock” wall--the first of its kind in the world with four separate waterfalls--has students climbing to new heights. Those who can’t hang on are rewarded with a splash in the pool. The second feature is an indoor zip line that spans the leisure pool. Sending patrons along a wire for 20 to 25 yards, the zip line is designed to “thrill” those

who give it a ride. In addition to the bouldering wall and zip line, the aquatic center has a sixlane, 25-yard lap pool for competitive swimming, a 12-person spa, men’s and women’s locker rooms, and an aquatic “multi-purpose” room. Palm trees and

vegetation give the center a tropical feel. Already students are enjoying water basketball, polo, aerobic and fitness classes, “late nite” student programming and “dive-in” movies.

Two Alumni Sworn in as Deputy U.S. Marshals as a Result of Cooperative Program Brian Biermann ’07 of Washington, Mo., and Heather West ’07 of Jackson, Mo., graduated from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and are now Deputy U.S. Marshals. Because of a cooperative program with the U.S. Marshal Service (USMS), the two are headed to their new assignments. Biermann will serve as a Deputy U.S. Marshal in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and West in St. Louis. The two took part in the prestigious U.S. Marshal Service Centralized Student Career Experience Program (CSCEP) in Glencoe, Ga. The CSCEP is a 16-week program in which students who are interested in becoming Deputy U.S. Marshals and are majoring in criminal justice, political science, psychology, public administration, sociology or social science with a concentration in one of the areas listed can receive on-the-job training and



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

work experience. If chosen, first by the University and then by the USMS, students have the opportunity to earn a salary with benefits. Participation in this program can lead to eligibility for fulltime employment with the USMS. “Our early success is overwhelming,” said Dr. John Wade, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology, adding that this is the first time a Southeast graduate has been hired through the CSCEP program to become a U.S. Marshal. Biermann and West had the opportunity to gain experiential learning from one-on-one work with the Marshals. “I was overwhelmed with excitement and gratitude when I discovered my acceptance into the program. Most people wait years to become a part of the U.S. Marshals. The program provides students with direct access to

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

the Marshal Service. Unlike the majority of people wishing to get into federal law enforcement, I did not have to take a national test,” said West, a criminal justice major. “Getting to work closely with the deputies every day is my favorite part. I really get to see what goes on in their daily operations. It is not what television makes it out to be. It is an important and necessary function of the legal and criminal justice system,” Biermann stated. Upon successful completion of CSCEP and all degree requirements, students may be offered a Deputy U.S. Marshal position, as were Biermann and West. According to Wade, this noncompetitive process provides a direct line of employment, compared with the traditional route of working in public service for three or four years before moving into a position with the USMS.

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CAMPUS CHRONICLES

Two Alumni Receive Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching Sir Winston Churchill had a saying about learning. “I am always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.” Since few would argue that not everyone likes being taught, it is left to the classroom teacher to overcome this obstacle to learning. Only the best will succeed. Southeast students studying to become teachers have had the opportunity over the years to be placed with some of the area’s best, including Cape Girardeau Public School teachers Barb Egbert ’82 and Russell Grammer ’98, both of whom have received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. The award designates them among the nation’s best kindergarten through sixth grade math and science teachers. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush honored Egbert last May with the prestigious Presidential Award. Grammer received the award in 2005.

Southeast Music Students Outperform Their Peers: Eight music students won their division or were recognized for runner-up or honorable mention at the annual Missouri Music Teachers Association evaluative auditions in Springfield, Mo., last November. Southeast students, from freshmen to seniors, won four of the five divisions they entered, while competing against the best students from University of Missouri-Columbia, Missouri State, Central Missouri, Webster University, UMKC Conservatory and other colleges from across the state. Drum roll…’Go Southeast!’



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

ABET Accreditation Allows Southeast Students to Become Registered Engineers The Engineering Physics program has been reaccredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) Inc., the recognized accrediting body of college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering and technology. The program initially was accredited in 2000. Graduating from an accredited program allows students to enter graduate programs and makes them eligible to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam, the first step toward obtaining engineering licensure. The state of Missouri requires students to graduate from an accredited program in order to become registered professional engineers. “Ninety-five percent of our students have passed the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam, which reinforces the quality of education we are providing,” said Dr. David Probst, chair of the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics. ABET is a not-for-profit organization, owned and operated by its more than 25 professional and technical member societies. An internationally respected organization, ABET has set the higher education standards in the field of engineering and technology for nearly 75 years. U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


Teresa (Layton) Haney “Education has always been valued in my family, so I always knew I’d be going to college. My sister and biggest role model, Jenni, always sang Southeast’s praises. When I started the college search in high school, Southeast was a school I knew I wanted to consider right away.” Teresa is now employed by the University as an admission counselor and is back in the classroom working toward her M.B.A.

Husband

NIECE

Scott Haney ’03 Teresa (Layton) Haney ’05

Kent Layton “I picked Southeast because of the Computer Science Department and their strong reputation for putting out high performing graduates. My education and experiences prepared me for the work place by helping me develop technical and soft skills necessary to function well as a team member, working collaboratively on information technology projects of all sizes.”

NEPHEW

Kent Layton ‘91

Dr. Jennifer (Layton) McCluskey “My experience at Southeast truly shaped my professional career path. From the Emerging Leaders program to my involvement in Greek life, I found my passion for working with college students in being one myself at Southeast. I haven’t left the higher education arena since I began because my experience at Southeast was the most positive collegiate experience I could have ever had.  

NIECE

making southeast

a family

Dr. Jennifer (Layton) McCluskey ’94

tradition Southeast is proud of family heritage at the University. Several students from all generations belong to a family tree that is rich with Southeast experiences. The Layton/Schumer family is just one of the many who have made Southeast a part of their tradition. If you are part of a Southeast family tradition, we would love to hear from you! Contact one of the editors and maybe your family will be featured in an upcoming edition of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University.



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


schumers

Laytons

Husband

NIECE

Janelle (Schumer) Pope ‘02

NIECE

Clay Pope ‘01

Sarah (Schumer) Layton ’99

Janelle (Schumer) Pope “I chose Southeast because they have one of the best teacher education programs in the country, and I knew I would get an exceptional education. I also chose Southeast because it was close to family.”

NEPHEW

Craig Schumer ‘05 and wife, Alicia (Sachse) Schumer ’06

Craig Schumer “Two of the best things happened to me while I was at Southeast: I met some of my best friends through Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity and I met my wife in English class.”

Amy (Schumer) Schamburg ’97

NIECE

(Deceased Sept. 2006)

aunt and uncle

sisters

A Small Disclaimer: Unlike a true family tree, this diagram is laid out somewhat randomly. Don’t assume a certain family connection unless it is written. Also, we could not include all extended members of the family and we apologize, you know who you are.

Uncle Thomas Schumer ’86 and Aunt Debra (Newell) Schumer ’95, ’02



T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


Celebrating 50 Years of Nursing Education From the initiation of the Associate of Arts Degree in 1958, to the bachelor’s and master’s degree programs today, nursing has become an extremely successful area of study at Southeast. Highlighted in the following pages are a timeline of noteworthy events in nursing, a closer look at today’s nursing program and a feature about current nursing students.

Department of Nursing Timeline

10

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


C

Husband and wife make time for education

huck and Pam Groshong have found success in the nursing profession as registered nurses, working in the Intensive Care Unit at Saint Francis Medical Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo. This husband and wife duo has combined experience of more than 23 years meeting the needs of patients. But in fall 2007, the couple decided to take on an added challenge and pursue a long sought after dream. They took a leap of faith and entered the RN to BSN program at Southeast Missouri State University, and now both have their eyes set on earning their bachelor of science in nursing degrees.

1968 • RN-BSN program initiated – offering evening and late afternoon classes for working RNs

11

Back to School Returning to school is something the Groshongs have intended to do for many years. When their youngest of three children entered kindergarten this year, the timing finally seemed right, they said. “I always knew that, at some point, I wanted to get my bachelor’s degree,” Pam said, but with their children active in school, soccer, swimming and baseball, and with the two of them working as RNs, there seemed to be little time to entertain the notion. “All we know is being busy,” Pam said, a lifestyle Chuck likes to call “controlled chaos.” Chuck graduated with his associate degree

1980

1969 • First RN-BSN graduate

from the Southeast Missouri Hospital College of Nursing and Health Sciences in 2005 after serving a decade as a paramedic with Cape County Ambulance Service. He’s been employed at Saint Francis Medical Center since 2005. Pam graduated from Southeast Missouri State in 1992 with a two-year associate degree in nursing. Both passed the national licensure exam to become registered nurses (RN). Pam’s been employed at Saint Francis for 20 years. “Just getting started was very challenging,” Pam said. “I was very fearful after being out of the classroom for 15 years. 1984 “They’ve made it easy” to attain, though,

1976

• Accredited by Missouri Board of Nursing

• First baccalaureate class graduates • Nursing program moves to Crisp Hall

1983 • Computers introduced for class and research purposes


she says. “If you put the effort into what they ask of you, it’s very easy” to accomplish. Southeast’s RN to BSN Program was established at Southeast about 25 years ago for practicing Registered Nurses (RN) like the Groshongs who have an associate’s degree or a diploma in nursing and wish to pursue a bachelor of science in nursing degree (BSN). The degree program focuses on leadership and management skills, nursing practice in homes and communities, using nursing research to support practice, and caring for the frail elderly. The intent is to broaden the students’ professional nursing perspectives, their roles in nursing and to expand their

work with face-to-face classroom courses this semester. The program is offered on campus with some face to face interactive classroom settings via a one-day-a-week option and some online options. The program also is delivered off-campus in Kennett, Sikeston and Poplar Bluff, Mo., via a combination of online and interactive television courses. Chuck says acclimating to the online curriculum was challenging at first, but, in the end, the online coursework “has made it work for us.” Chuck works three 12-hour shifts a week at Saint Francis Medical Center. Pam is

“Without it (the RN to BSN Program) being here, we’d have to be long-distance learners” at another institution, such as the University of Missouri. “Southeast affords us a local opportunity.” - Chuck Groshong critical thinking skills. “Frequently, nurses have been promoted and are expected to serve in leadership/ management roles, yet lack formal education in the basic leadership and management skills,” said Dr. Janet Weber, a faculty advisor for the RN to BSN Program. “That’s why some health care providers are now requiring their nurses in middle management or higher to earn their BSN degree,” said Desma Reno, a faculty advisor for the RN to BSN Program.

Adapting to Online Classes The Groshongs are currently enrolled in seven hours of coursework, including “Care of the Frail Elderly,” “Nursing Research” and “Statistics.” Their cohort is part of a pilot program meshing or blending online course

12

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

employed part time, putting in two 12-hour shifts a week there. The two work as a tag team, one working days and the other nights, allowing one of them to be home with their children at all times. Working opposite shifts also allows one of them to use their computer and complete their online coursework while the other is on duty at the hospital. Next fall, the program will become a fully online program, Southeast Department of Nursing officials say, and the one day a week program and the off-campus delivery of the program will be gradually phased out. “As nurses are working more and more hours, the availability of a more flexible program was needed,” Weber said. “As Southeast began expanding its online course offerings, students began asking for a fully online RN to BSN program to be included

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

in that mix,” Reno said. “The flexibility is greatly needed,” Weber said, “especially since many nurses are now working 12 hour shifts and as many as 40 to 60 hours a week. Approximately, 95 percent of the RN to BSN students in the program are working full time,” she said. Weber says as the online program grows, “we are developing a quality online program that meets the educational needs of nurses in our region to expand their career opportunities.” “Going entirely online will make it more attractive,” Chuck said of the fully online program to take effect next academic year.

One Step at a Time Chuck says the most rewarding part of the RN to BSN program, thus far, has been completing each class and watching their dream come to fruition. “Actually accomplishing the completion of that degree” is very fulfilling, he said. The program has not been without its challenges, though, they say. The Groshongs say they have spent several hours on weekends completing assignments, and“there have been some late nights,” Chuck admits. “I’m glad we’re going through it together,” he said. Together, Pam says, they offer one another “a vast amount of support.” They also are serving as role models to their own children -- Ethan, 12, Maggie, 10, and Grace, 6 -- all of whom are strong students. “We try to practice what we preach to them,” Pam says. Now in their second semester, she says she has appreciated the faculty’s approach to the program, recognizing their students are seasoned professionals with a wealth of nursing experience and knowledge. She

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


says faculty are not teaching them how to be nurses, but rather are focusing on leadership and managerial skills for nurses. “To have the experience that I have recognized” has been very rewarding, Pam says. The RN to BSN Program requires 24 credit hours of nursing course work along with a selection of University Studies courses. While the two say their employer does not financially compensate employees for completion of a bachelor of science In addition to being enrolled in seven in nursing degree, it does provide tuition hours of coursework, Chuck Groshong works three 12-hour shifts a week at reimbursement, a perk for which they Saint Francis Medical Center.. are grateful. The additional education also will allow them the opportunity to ascend the hospital’s career ladder into Opening Doors higher salaried positions. Pam is expected to complete the Added Pam, “A bachelor’s degree program in May 2009. Chuck hopes to doesn’t improve your clinical skills, graduate the following December. After but it opens up career advancement completing their bachelor’s degrees, opportunities.” both intend on entering Southeast’s Many students use the RN to BSN Master of Science in Nursing program. Program as a stepping stone to advance “The RN to BSN Program is a stepping their practice, Weber and Reno say, stone to move on to the master’s degree,” opening doors for students to continue said Pam, who said she eventually would for a master’s or doctoral degree like to become a nurse practitioner 1969or a physician’s assistant. She also is in nursing1968 to become family nurse RN-BSN graduate practitioners, nurse educators, • First nurse interested in teaching. • RN-BSN program initiated 1976 – offering evening and • Accredited by Missouri researchers, clinical nurse specialists or Chuck says he would like to move into late afternoon classes for Board of Nursing nursing administrators. a managerial role in nursing. working RNs “It opens up so many more “You always need to keep your eye on opportunities,” Weber said. the future. Higher education is the key to Chuck says the opportunities to move shifting out of bedside nursing,” he said. out of bedside nursing are “expanding “The career opportunities are endless once you reach the master’s level. It all the time.” Completing the RN to BSN opens up teaching and management Program will “continue to open” more doors for them as they advance their jobs and opportunities to work closely careers, he said. with physicians.” Reno says nurses with a bachelor of

2001

1995 • Dr. Louise Hart hired as chair of the Department of Nursing

1996 • MSN program seeks initial accreditation from the NLN • Associate degree program ends; Family Nurse Practitioner option begins

13

T H E

science in nursing are beginning to serve in more of a partnership role with physicians. “It’s a collegial spirit,” Weber said, adding many physicians respect the fact that nurses are pursuing higher degrees that enhance their critical thinking skills. “There’s no door that is unopened,” Chuck said. “No one says you are too educated in nursing.” For now, the Groshongs say they are enjoying their educational journey. “Without it (the RN to BSN Program) being here, we’d have to be long-distance learners” at another institution, such as the University of Missouri, Chuck said. “Southeast affords us a local opportunity.” Weber said health care agencies throughout southeast Missouri are benefiting from the many nurses prepared with a bachelor of science in nursing degree from Southeast. Since the inception of the RN to BSN Program at Southeast, many registered nurses have returned to school to earn their baccalaureate degree. These are usually part-time students with families working full time as registered nurses, Reno and Weber say. Graduates of the program are serving throughout the region as nurse managers or 1984 case managers at area hospitals; in community or home health nursing positions; as administrators of public health departments; and in hospice care and correction 1980facilities. Others are serving in faith community nursing positions, parish 1983 nursing posts • First baccalaureate class • Computers graduates and as nurse educators in LPN programs. introduced for class •And Nursingconsumers program movesare benefiting from this and research purposes to Crisp Hall educated nursing workforce, Weber says. Research shows that organizations that hire BSN prepared nurses shorten patients’ length of stay and decrease inpatient mortality. Studies also have shown that collegiality among nurses in agencies that employ more nurses with baccalaureate degrees is higher than at agencies without BSN prepared nurses.

M A G A Z I N E

O F

• MSN program receives accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), MSN Clinical Nurse Specialist option begins

2007 • Dr. Marcia Hobbs hired as chair as Dr. Gloria Green ends a two-year period serving as interim chair

• MSN Educator option starts, Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program receives CCNE accreditation

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

2008 • Department of Nursing celebrates 50 years of nursing education

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


Terry Bryant, director of professional practice and systems at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, talks with Dwight Doerhoff, patient care information specialist, emergency unit.

14

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


There are a lot of miracles that happen here. Making a difference in the lives of children and their families is very rewarding; whether it is directly or indirectly, that’s what we’re all about. - Terry Byrant

Making a Difference Nursing alum finds home at St. Louis Children’s Hospital

W

hen Terry Bryant walks into the office in the morning, she knows she is walking into a place where miracles happen every day. In her 24 years at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Bryant has developed a true passion for her nursing profession. “To hear the stories from families who tell you how we’ve made a difference for them and their children makes it really easy to come into work every day,” said Bryant. Since first opening its doors in 1879, St. Louis Children’s Hospital has grown to a 250-bed facility that serves over 275,000 families each year. Their mission is simply to do what’s right for children. With a proven dedication to that mission, St. Louis Children’s Hospital has been listed twice consecutively as one of the 10 best pediatric hospitals in the country by Child magazine. Bryant currently serves as the director of professional practice and systems, as well as the interim vice president of patient care services at Children’s. While she no longer wears scrubs to work, Bryant has had her share of patient experiences on a journey that began more than 30 years ago on the campus of Southeast Missouri State University.

College Life Terry Bryant’s decision to come to Southeast was greatly influenced by her

15

family’s history with the University. Her father had attended Southeast in the 1950s and her older sister was enrolled when Bryant applied. In August of 1976, with no career in mind, the St. Louis native became part of her family tradition when she stepped into a Southeast classroom for the first time. Once there, Bryant would turn to another member of her family for educational guidance. “I was not a child that grew up thinking I wanted to be a nurse, like many nurses,” said Bryant. “I went to Southeast, really, because it was a good school. As a freshman, I was still undecided when my mother said, ‘Well, your aunt’s a nurse. Why don’t you just apply to nursing school?’” Bryant took the recommendation of her mother and soon found herself in Southeast’s nursing program. The program proved to be a match for Bryant, as she quickly developed an enthusiasm for the field. Bryant says her professors helped fuel her newfound excitement. “I can honestly say that there were many very dedicated, knowledgeable nursing instructors at Southeast, but three had a significant influence on my education and future career: Barbara McKeon, Sue Evitts and Priscilla Lemone,” said Bryant. “A lot of programs can get narrowly focused and I think they did a nice job of really balancing many aspects of nursing as a career.” While Bryant has many fond memories from her college years, the bonds created with her fellow students are the ones

that she most enjoyed during her time at Southeast. “We had a very tight-knit group within our class,” said Bryant. “It’s an experience that, even though you don’t keep in close touch, you just never really forget…because you spend so much time together, so many hours studying, learning and growing professionally.” At some point during Bryant’s long hours and late nights studying for her pediatric classes at Southeast, she decided that she would enjoy working with children. This decision would later guide Bryant’s career choices.

Professional Journey Bryant was working as a nurse at Saint Francis Medical Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo., even before she graduated from Southeast in 1980. After receiving her bachelor of science in nursing, Bryant landed a full-time position on the pediatric unit at the hospital as a graduate nurse. It was here that she not only gained important experience, but also met her future husband…in the strangest of ways. One day while going about her regular duties, Bryant had to take a sick child to the bathroom. In the interest of the reader, let’s just say a short time later a young man was called to help clean the bathroom. Fred Bryant, who was working at Saint Francis while completing the nursing program at Southeast, and Terry Droste spoke for the first time right there over a flooded


toilet. This would be only the first of many conversations. As Fred finished his degree at Southeast and worked off his tuition, Terry took another position across town at Southeast Missouri Hospital’s newly opened Pediatric Special Care Unit. Bryant’s two years of experience at Southeast Hospital would prepare her for her next big move. In January 1984, Bryant and her husband moved from Cape Girardeau back to St. Louis, where she became a staff nurse in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. During her tenure in the PICU, Bryant was promoted from charge nurse to coordinator, and then to manager, a position she held for more than 15 years. “There were some really tough days… really tough days,” said Bryant, about her time managing the PICU. “The focus though is on health. If we couldn’t do anything to prevent your child from being ill, maybe we can do something to help you through it.” In 1999, Bryant moved into her current role as director of professional practice and systems. She is now responsible for interdepartmental programs and practices to ensure high-quality care is provided to patients in the following departments: Nursing Research, Clinical Practice, Infection Control, Patient Care Information Systems, Clinical Education and the Magnet Recognition Program. “It’s really all about bringing the right things to the people who are taking care of the kids,” said Bryant. “My whole team is here to support the staff and provide the care.” One of Bryant’s most valued accomplishments is helping the St. Louis Children’s Hospital attain Magnet designation from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC). Magnet designation is one of the highest honors for nursing that a health organization can receive. The Magnet designation process includes the appraisal of qualitative factors in nursing, also known as “Forces of Magnetism.” According to the ANCC Website, “the

16

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

Terry Bryant with mentee, Loretta Stewart, a nursing student who currently works as a patient care assistant at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

full expression of the Forces embodies a professional environment guided by a strong visionary nursing leader who advocates and supports development and excellence in nursing practice. As a natural outcome of this, the program elevates the reputation and standards of the nursing profession.” “We’re really proud that we’re a Magnet facility, and that’s a big part of who we are,” said Bryant. Bryant also developed a hospital-wide Nursing Quality Improvement program; implemented, then expanded, the Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice programs; and transitioned decision making to include those at the point of care, among several other accomplishments. Bryant says her success is due in large part to building relationships. “I think my secret to success is developing honest open relationships, where people know they can trust me to do a job well,” said Bryant.

Continuing a Legacy When Bryant first started at Southeast, she had no idea where her career would take her, or how successful she would become. She has had quite a journey along the way and attributes Southeast for helping to lay the foundation she has needed throughout her career. Including herself, six members of her close family throughout three generations

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

have attended Southeast. Bryant’s son, Daniel, and niece, Jill, are both currently enrolled, each with unique ties to that family tradition. Daniel, who is majoring in historic preservation, is living in the same residence hall his grandfather did in the 1950s. Jill is following in the footsteps of her aunt and will graduate this May with a bachelor of science in nursing degree. “I’m very, very proud of her,” said Bryant about her niece. “We’ve had a lot of conversations about nursing as a career. It’s one of those careers that opens doors…it doesn’t lock you into the same thing for your entire career.” Bryant also has a daughter, Katie, who is fulfilling a legacy of her own. Katie is majoring in mechanical engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She is preceded by two uncles and one aunt who majored in engineering at the former University of Missouri-Rolla. Bryant’s enthusiasm for her family can only be rivaled by her incredible passion for nursing, and the overwhelming satisfaction she receives from her work. “There are a lot of miracles that happen here,” said Bryant. “Making a difference in the lives of children and their families is very rewarding; whether it is directly or indirectly, that’s what we’re all about.”

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


S

From the left, the future doctors are: Andrew Valleroy, Tara O’Connor and Andrew Jackson.

Doctors in Training

Three Southeast students chosen for Mizzou’s prestigious Bryant Scholars Program for early admission to medical school

17

outheast pre-med student Andrew Jackson will be the first to admit he was unsure about his decision to attend Southeast. “I deliberated for some time whether Southeast was right for me,” Jackson said. “I now, with no hesitation, will tell you it was by far the best decision I could have made. The professors at Southeast are excellent, and although it may sound clichéd, all of my teachers have known me by name. I have several friends who are attending larger universities and are pursuing medicine as well, and I feel that my curriculum is equivalent to if not better than what they are receiving,” he added. Jackson, of Piedmont, Mo., and two of his classmates, Tara O’Connor, of Ingleside, Texas, and Andrew Valleroy, of Hillsboro, Mo., have all been accepted to the University of Missouri-Columbia Medical School’s Bryant Scholars Program. All three are majoring in biology with a biomedical sciences, or pre-med option. “Southeast may not always have the reputation that other schools do,” agreed Valleroy, “but it clearly has a very strong pre-medical program. All three of us being chosen for the Bryant Scholars Program is a direct reflection of that, and shows that Mizzou’s School of Medicine believes we can do well. At no point in the selection process did I feel that I was ill prepared compared to the pre-medical students from other schools. I believe we have great science professors, and certainly strong advising,” he said. “I love the pre-med program at Southeast,” O’Connor added. “I don’t feel like I’m just lost in the crowd. I have great professors who are genuinely interested in their students’ success, and I’m looking forward to what lies ahead.” This is exactly the message that Southeast wants to convey to high school students contemplating their future college choices, according to Dr. James Champine, director of the premedicine program at Southeast. “We want Missouri seniors to think of Southeast as their best choice for advancing to professional school,” Champine said.

Head of the Class “The Bryant Scholars pre-admission program was established in 1995 to allow students to receive their undergraduate degrees in their regions, while at the same time preparing them to attend medical school at the University of Missouri School of Medicine,” Champine said. “It is part of a strategy to encourage young people from rural areas to pursue a medical education, as these students are more likely to practice in a rural area. It’s a wonderful opportunity for students interested in med school. Southeast also has similar arrangements with


Southeast students pursuing medical careers have access to outstanding technology and equipment.

can go the extra mile and participate in selfless acts of community service, it really shows you are dedicated. It is easy to get discouraged, but persistence is key.” O’Connor also reminds students to enjoy their college experience and get involved in more than just their studies. “Be yourself and get involved,” she said. “There are so many great clubs and organizations and so much to be a part of. Just get out there and interact with lots of people; we learn a lot from each other as students.” AT Still University College of Osteopathic Medicine and the UM-Kansas City Dental School,” he added. The Bryant Scholars Program reserves admission to the University of Missouri Medical School if students maintain a high level of academic performance for the remainder of their undergraduate studies. To be considered for the program, students must demonstrate at minimum a 3.3 grade point average (GPA) and ACT scores of 30 or SAT scores of 1300. Bryant Scholars are expected to participate in rural medicine after they complete their residencies. The program is highly selective, according to Champine. “It is very rare for three candidates to be accepted from one school,” Champine said. “These three students are exceptional candidates. They meet the rigorous GPA and ACT/SAT criteria, have hundreds of hours of volunteer and medical shadowing experience, and are leaders in a number of on-campus organizations and off-campus service activities. “They were among 15 students from Truman State, University of MissouriRolla, Missouri State University and Drury College competing for 10 spots,” Champine added. “An exception to the program’s limit of two per school was made because these three students

18

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

were so highly qualified and well received,” he said. “It is quite an honor to be selected for this program. It is definitely rewarding to know that a professional school saw that I had the potential to do well in their program,” Valleroy said. O’Connor and Jackson echoed the sentiment. “I feel honored to have been chosen for such a selective program,” O’Connor said. “It’s a great feeling to be able to concentrate on my education at Southeast, while knowing that all my hard work will be preparing me for medical school.” After completing medical school, both O’Connor and Jackson plan to practice pediatrics, while Valleroy plans to enter a family medical practice. All three said the hours they spent shadowing at hospitals and volunteering helped prepare them for their pre-med studies, and they encourage other students interested in pre-med to do the same. “The more time I spent in the hospital shadowing physicians and volunteering, the more sure I was that this is what I want to do,” O’Connor said. “I would advise other students who are interested in pre-med to work hard, not only in school, but in the community,” Valleroy added. “Becoming a physician is about helping people, and if you S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

Getting into Medical School Southeast’s medical school placement rate nearly doubles national average

L

ike Jackson, O’Connor and Valleroy, more and more students are choosing to start their medical studies at Southeast Missouri State University. Whether a student wants to be a family practitioner, an optometrist, a physical therapist, a pharmacist or a veterinarian, Southeast has a proven record of helping students achieve their dreams. Southeast has an astounding placement rate of more than 85 percent of pre-medical graduates being accepted into medical schools. That’s well above the national average of 45 percent. So what is the secret to Southeast’s outstanding success in placing graduates in those coveted positions? While most medical programs do have their professional doctoral degree programs located at major research institutions or in metropolitan cities, students have found that beginning their initial core studies at Southeast has provided them with a “leg up” on their competition. In addition, the cost effectiveness of attending Southeast for the core courses for medical programs can benefit students from a financial standpoint. Pre-medical programs, whether in allopathic, osteopathic, dental or chiropractic medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, optometry, or veterinary medicine, are not a specific undergraduate major. Instead, students must U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


“I love the pre-med program at Southeast. I don’t feel like I’m just lost in the crowd. I have great professors who are genuinely interested in their students’ success, and I’m looking forward to what lies ahead.” choose a major that provides them with the required courses and tools they’ll need not only to gain entrance into medical school, but also to be successful in their chosen medical career. Most Southeast students interested in a medical career will major in one of the sciences while at Southeast – biology, biomedical science, microbiology or chemistry. But students may also choose agriculture if they are interested in veterinary medicine or athletic training or exercise science if they are interested in physical therapy. According to Dr. Bruce Hathaway, professor of Chemistry and an advisor to pre-pharmacy students, “It’s very important to declare a pre-professional major. By declaring as a freshman that a student is interested in getting into pharmacy school, he can be assigned an advisor to help him along in the process. There are different requirements for each pharmacy school and ideally, they want you to have two years of core courses before they’ll accept you,” Hathaway said.

Importance in Advising Each student who declares a preprofessional major automatically is assigned to a faculty advisor who specializes in advising for that particular medical career. Those advisors assist students in every step of the process, including providing information on the medical school process, including curriculum, selection of the appropriate school, preparation for the specific medical admissions test, preparation for the interview and the professional school applications. Dr. Amanda Sinclair, assistant professor of Health, Human Performance and Recreation, advises pre-physical therapy students and was once, herself, a pre-physical therapy major. “Seeing an advisor early can make all

19

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

- Tara O’Connor

the difference in the world in whether or not a student has the correct courses.” Sinclair said. “Although most professional medical programs will require chemistry and physics courses, it’s important to know which schools require which level of those courses.” Keeping abreast of the professional schools and what courses they require is important in the process and Southeast faculty and staff actively strive to maintain contacts with the admissions staff in medical schools. “We try to make sure we’ve talked to them and have a semi-formal agreement to ensure Southeast students can get the courses here to give them access to those programs,” Sinclair said. Southeast’s partnerships with the area hospitals and very strong relationships with area clinics and medical professionals is another factor in getting graduates into professional medical schools. Because of Southeast’s commitment to experiential learning, more than 90 percent of all graduates have specific real-world experience. So many science graduates have conducted research or have completed internships in regional hospitals or area clinics. Sinclair said students applying to professional physical therapy programs must complete from 40 to 50 hours of observation of physical therapists prior to being accepted. “Since exercise science and athletic training majors must complete an internship, most have worked for physical therapists during their training and they’ve already completed their observation hours,” Sinclair said.

Southeast pre-medical students are accepted into medical school at rates that nearly double the national average.

professional physical therapy schools with six graduates at various schools throughout the nation. An impressive 80 percent of graduating pre-optometry students are accepted into optometry school programs, while 80 percent of pre-dental students also achieve their goal of dental school. Southeast students enjoy a 90 percent acceptance rate into veterinary school. In addition to medical school advising and low student-faculty ratios, Southeast also has a variety of extracurricular activities which aid pre-medical students. The PrePharmacy Club, Southeast Student Medical Society and Pre-Vet Club give students opportunities to explore their interests through monthly programs and activities with other students and healthcare professionals in the area. All those efforts pay off as Southeast grads fill the roles of dentists, orthodontists, optometrists, physicians, veterinarians and physical therapists.

The Results Currently, Southeast has a 100 percent placement rate for graduates applying to

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


Overcoming Resistance

Research could lead to new anticancer drug 20

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


T

wo faculty members from Southeast’s College of Science and Mathematics are conducting drug research that could potentially lead to new antibiotic or anticancer drugs. Dr. Jim Champine, associate professor of biology, and Dr. Bruce Hathaway, professor of chemistry, cite the increasing need for new drugs as the medical community deals with growing resistance to current drugs. “The first clinically useful antimicrobial compounds, sulfa drugs and penicillins, were developed in the 1930s and 40s,” Hathaway said. “While these compounds were effective against a variety of bacterial diseases, over time, a number of bacteria became resistant to them. By 1990, it was estimated that 80 percent of both hospital and community-acquired bacterial infections were resistant to Penicillin G, while some strains of bacteria are not sensitive to any currently approved drugs. The need for new drugs that are effective against resistant organisms is evident,” he said. “Many strains of bacteria, malaria and some cancers are resistant to our current drugs,” Champine added. “Methotrexate is widely prescribed in cancer treatment, yet not all cancers respond to it. We have to constantly look for new compounds that are effective.” Champine and Hathaway, along with several undergraduate and graduate students, are studying the preparation of substituted triazines as potential antimicrobial drugs. “These complex organic molecules called triazines are of interest because they inhibit an enzyme called DHFR, which is important in the rapid growth of cells,” Champine said. “Unfortunately, rapidly growing cells can include tumors, malaria, parasites and bacterial infections. If you can inhibit the DHFR enzyme, you can control the growth of these things. “There are an unlimited number of organic chemical compounds,” Champine said.“The compounds Dr. Hathaway’s students are making have never been tested before in antimicrobial activity. Some of these compounds we’ve tested have performed well in certain tests, and some are approaching the effectiveness of Methotrexate, but are not yet as effective.”

anthrax. Mason, a McNair Scholar, says she has enjoyed the research experience. “Working on this project has made me feel that I am actually making a meaningful contribution to the scientific community,” Mason said. “It is a project for which, as a student, one can see the possible real-world application. Not all projects have the clear application potentials that students can readily see, as this project has. I have loved being able to work on something that could potentially be used against several microbial organisms,” she added. “This research experience has really benefited the students involved,” Champine said. “Graduate schools like students with research experience, and several of our students who have worked on this project have been accepted into graduate school. Twila is going to Vanderbilt,” he added. The research could be beneficial to others in biomedical research as well, leading Hathaway and Champine to present their research findings at professional meetings. They also arranged for a student involved in the research to present at the American Society for Microbiology meeting in Toronto last May, and they have plans to publish the information as well. “Although Southeast is not a research institution and therefore could not develop a new drug, the best possible outcome of the research would be the discovery of a new compound that effectively inhibits bacterial growth,” Hathaway said. “If we discover something that looks promising, a pharmaceutical company might buy our rights,” Champine said. “Even our negative results could help others with their research by eliminating compounds and keeping them from going down the wrong road,” he added.

Making an Impact Although the development of a new drug would be years off, Hathaway and Champine point out that the results of their research could be promising in a number of ways. “We’re primarily doing this for student learning, which is more the focus of our institution,” they said. “Fifteen students have been involved in the preparation and testing of these compounds over the past three years, and additional students will have the opportunity as the research continues.” Twila Mason, a senior double-majoring in biology and chemistry from Bloomfield, Mo., has assisted Champine and Hathaway with the research by testing compounds against a harmless surrogate for

21

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

Standing from left, Dr. Bruce Hathaway, professor of chemistry, and Dr. Jim Champine, associate professor of biology, are assisting biology majors, Cory Edwards (left) and Mark Sophie, with drug research.

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


EVENTS

Remembering the Titans

‘All’s Fair in Love and Politics’ James Carville and Mary Matalin were at Southeast on Feb. 19, 2008, to speak on the topics of love and politics. The event, which was held in the Show Me Center, was free and open to the public. Matalin formerly served as assistant to President George W. Bush and counselor to Vice President Dick Cheney, and was the first White House official to hold that double title. Before joining the Bush/Cheney White House, Matalin hosted CNN’s critically acclaimed debate show, Crossfire. Matalin is the former founding co-host of the Washington-based political weeknight talk show, Equal Time, which premiered in May 1993 on CNBC.  She served as co-host until shortly after the 1996 national political conventions.  Her political astuteness and antics contributed to the show’s being called “the best talk show on television” by Knight Ridder News Service.  Matalin’s humor, straightforward discussion, and ability to discuss the hottest political issues in Washington helped to make the show one of the most talked about programs in the network’s history. Matalin now runs Threshold, a new conservative publishing imprint at Simon & Schuster. She also serves as vice president of the Washington Humane Society and is a board member of the Cheney Cardiovascular Institute. In addition, she sits on the Editorial Board of Campaigns and Elections Magazine, which features up-to-date campaign information, the latest news about political consultants and the business and trends in

22

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

the industry Carville is America’s best-known political consultant. His long list of electoral successes evidences a knack for steering overlooked campaigns to unexpected landslide victories and for re-making political underdogs into upset winners. In 1992, Carville—who had already gained national attention—guided William Jefferson Clinton to the Presidency. A year later, Carville was honored as Campaign Manager of the Year by the American Association of Political Consultants for his leadership of Clinton’s fearsome and intense “War Room” at campaign headquarters in Little Rock. After the Clinton victory, Carville began to focus on foreign consulting. Since that time, Carville’s political clients have included the following: Greek Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis; Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso; Honduran Prime Minister Carlos Flores; President Jamil Mahuad of Ecuador; the Liberal Party of Canada; Sao Paolo Mayor Celso Pitta, Argentine Economic Minister Domingo Cavallo, Francisco Labastida of Mexico, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago Basdeo Panday; Hipolito Meija of the Dominican Republic; and many others spread across the globe. In 1999, Carville led Ehud Barak to victory in his campaign to become the Prime Minister of Israel. Carville is also an author, actor, producer, talk-show host, speaker and restaurateur. He and wife, Matalin, co-authored All’s Fair: Love, War, and Running for President, a book that spent eight weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

More than 1,200 students and invited members of the community were treated to the real-life coaches of the movie “Remember the Titans” at the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Dinner on Jan. 23, 2008. Herman Boone and Bill Yoast were the featured speakers. Anyone who has seen this Disney movie will never forget the image of Coach Herman Boone patrolling the sidelines motivating his team to victory. In the sea of turmoil that accompanied the times, Coach Boone motivated, while Coach Yoast was the calming influence.  For those who don’t remember, the movie is set in 1971 at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Va., as three schools merged to form a newly integrated one.  Out of this racially charged experience, the story of “Remember the Titans” emerged. They went undefeated and won the state championship that year. While there have been more than 30 Virginia championship games since then, that 1971 season, coached by Herman Boone, will always be special. The inspirational story of how two coaches put aside their prejudices and unified their players to form a championship team, and in doing so helped their small Virginian community put aside their intolerance, became a blockbuster-hit movie in 2000.

Fromleft,LincolnScott,assistanttothepresidentfor equityanddiversityissuesatSoutheast,Coach Bill Yoast, Coach Herman Boone and Dr. Ken Dobbins, Southeast president.

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


EVENTS

An Evening Celebrating America’s Greatest Sport Southeast will be hosting a special baseball-themed event, From Cape Girardeau to Cooperstown, at the River Campus on Monday, April 28, 2008. The event will feature a white-linen dinner, a baseball auction and the presentation of the Jack Buck Scholar-Leadership Award to the student recipient. Carole Buck, widow of legendary St. Louis Cardinals broadcaster Jack Buck, will be in attendance to present the Jack Buck

Scholar-Leadership Award. The annual award recognizes a student in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area who has demonstrated great leadership, compassion and academic achievement. Providing for a significant portion of the student’s cost of attendance at Southeast, the scholarship is a fitting tribute to the great broadcaster. To find out more about the event, go to www.iAMsoutheast.com/cooperstown or call (573) 651-2322.

Southeast Night at

Jack Buck

Saturday, May 31, 2008 6:30 - 9:30 p.m.

Grant’s Farm

Come enjoy this family-friendly University event at Grant’s Farm in St. Louis! Admission includes Anheuser-Busch products, soft drinks and meal. $25 per Adult Free for children under 12

RSVP by Friday, May 15, 2008. Get tickets at iAMsoutheast.com or by calling (573) 651-2332.

23

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

Save the Date! S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


ALUMNI ALMANAC

A brief Q & A w i t h t h re e S o u t h e a s t a l ums Kelly Finke Kelly Finke (Lambing) ’02, who majored in accounting, is currently a team leader in the Anheuser-Busch Internal Audit Services Department. She and husband, Jason Finke, were married in March 2008 and reside in O’Fallon, Ill. Q: In a sentence or two, describe your secret to success. A: I think that always pushing myself to do better and never resting on my laurels has helped me succeed. I realize that learning is not just in the classroom and that knowledge is a powerful tool for career success.

to help me grow my leadership and time management skills. In addition, the classes themselves helped me gain technical knowledge for me to apply to my job today. Finally, I think that the professors were really passionate about making sure they see their students succeed.

A: My husband and I really enjoy traveling and seeing new places. Traveling to another country is especially exciting because it opens my eyes to new cultures and ways of living. In addition, I like to exercise, which balances out with my love for eating out at restaurants! I enjoy almost any type of restaurant and it is fun to try new places, especially since downtown St. Louis is really growing with new businesses and people.

Phil Milligan Phil Milligan ‘83, who majored in music education, is assistant principal at Bryan Middle School in the Francis Howell School District in St. Charles, Mo.

A: Professionally this past year, I accepted a position with Anheuser-Busch’s Internal Audit Services Department and also received a promotion to Team Lead this fall. In addition, I passed the Certified Internal Auditor examination and successfully completed a survey-based research paper to submit to the Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation for potential recognition.

Q: In a sentence or two, describe your secret to success.

Q: What is the most rewarding part of your profession?

A: I have worked hard at anything I attempted, and when possible, I ignore the difficulties I have faced. Q: Are there any professional or personal accomplishments and/or recognitions you would like to share? A: Two great daughters, a wonderful wife, two master’s and a specialist degree. Q: What is the most rewarding part of your profession? A: The most rewarding part of my job is helping struggling students succeed.

Q: How did Southeast help prepare you for your career?

Q: How did Southeast help prepare you for your career?

A: Southeast provided a lot of opportunities for me to get involved in organizations

A: I had some great teachers and role

24

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

Q: What do you do for fun? A: In addition to my musical interests, I have taken up bicycling in a big way and I also do triathlons.

Q: What do you do for fun?

Q: Are there any professional or personal accomplishments and/or recognitions you would like to share?

A: Being an internal auditor has been one of the most challenging, yet exciting jobs for me. My job is not the same thing every day because I am auditing various parts of the company that play key roles in the whole organization. Plus, I get to interact with so many successful individuals and learn about their leadership and management skills. Finally, I get to see some amazing parts of the world when I travel for audits. My favorite place has definitely been Melbourne, Australia!

I also created bonds with other students which remain today.

models, most notably, Dr. Robert Gifford.

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

Brandi Ritter Brandi Ritter ‘05, who graduated with a master’s degree in school counseling, is currently a guidance counselor and psychological examiner for Chaffee Public Schools in Chaffee, Mo. She and husband, Ben, live in Cape Girardeau with their dog, Baylor. Ritter is currently working on a specialist degree in counseling and plans to complete the program in May. Q: What is the most rewarding part of your profession? A: The most meaningful part of being a school counselor is the opportunity to build meaningful relationships with students and their families. Q: How did Southeast help prepare you for your career? A: The Educational Leadership and Counseling Department faculty does an outstanding job of preparing graduate students for professional level work. The relationships I developed with the faculty were a major factor in my success. Q: What do you do for fun? A: I enjoy making jewelry, painting and basically anything crafty that allows me to be creative.

Alumni spotlights are first published in the twice-monthly e-newsletter, iAMsoutheast News. To view more spotlights, go to www.iAMsoutheast.com.

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


ALUMNI ALMANAC

Alumni Monday

Southeast Night at Busch

The spring 2008 Alumni Monday session was held on Monday, March 3. Sixteen alums returned to campus to speak with students about careers in their field. This is the fifth biannual Alumni Monday.

Mark your Southeast calendar! Southeast Night at Busch is set for Sept. 23, 2008. Come out and watch the Cardinals take on the Cincinnati Reds in one of the last regular season games of the year! An e-mail notification will be sent when tickets become available.

From left to right, front row: Gretchen Davie ’01 – Team Leader of School Services for Rehab Choice, Inc. Emily Westhoff ’06 – Pursuing Master of Natural Science Degree at Southeast Dr. Nancy Blattner ’78, ’80 – Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs at Fontbonne College Jeanne Whitley ’98 – Program Manager at Maritz Research Kelly Finke ’02 – Team Leader in the Anheuser-Busch Internal Audit Services Department

owner of River Bend Rice Seed, Inc. James Baughn ’02 – Webmaster for the Southeast Missourian Terry Allen ’90 – Corporate Logistics Manager at Memphis Distribution Center of Cummins, Inc. Michael Winkler ’02 – Supply Chain Account Coordinator at DCSI Thomas Williams ’85 – Principal at Sikeston Senior High School Lynne Karnes ’05 – Teacher at St. Vincent de Paul School John Hilpert ’04 – Correctional Officer

Back row: Dr. Ken Dobbins – President of Southeast Missouri State University T. Ronald Hahs ’64 – Manager of the Hahs Group Blake Gerard ’98 – President and Co-

Not Pictured: Dr. Shawn Guiling ’98 – Psychologist in Columbia, Mo. and Adjunct Faculty at Stephens College Carla Jordan ’04 – Founder of C.L. Jordan Preservation Group Britton May ’03 – OB Nurse at Southeast Hospital

Southeast Salutes Southeast Salutes, held April 16, 2008, honors alumni who exemplify excellence in the St. Louis Metropolitan area and have brought distinction to Southeast Missouri State University. This year’s honorees are Kevin Montgomery ’78, August “Gus” Koebbe ’78, Mimi Brandt ’68, Hon. Timothy J. Patterson ’63, Michael W. Gohn ’81, James Frisella ’58, and special honoree, Veryl Riddle, who is receiving the Distinguished Service Award.

Why Submit Your Email?

We’re Very Sad...

• Receive a twice-monthly e-newsletter. • Stay connected through iAMsoutheast – your online alumni community. • Get special invitations and notifications. • Maintain email privacy while still allowing friends to message you through iAMsoutheast. • Help reduce our mailing expenses.

Go to www.iAMsoutheast.com

25

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

Because we can’t email all our alumni and friends!

2008

email

Click on “2008 email campaign”

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

campaign

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CLASS NOTES 1950s Harold Hodges ‘57 was a teacher and administrator for 36 years, most of which were in programs for blind students. William Page ‘57 is a nationally known motivational, inspirational and educational speaker. He has written dozens of articles, and recently published a new book

1960s Ruth (Niehaus) Hunt ‘60 is partially retired from private practice in counseling. She and husband, Gene ’61, have four children and six grandchidren. Bob Yowell ‘66 is professor of theatre at Northern Arizona University. Frederick Eggers ‘67 recently retired from Sparta Community Hospital in Sparta, Ill., following a 40-year accounting career. In his retirement, he enjoys serving as the treasurer for his church, community fair and rural fire protection district. Sharon Fox ‘67 is a retired graphic artist and volunteers at a local community theater, where she is active in the costume department. She resides in Florida. Sandra Miller ‘67 is the registrar and manager of student records for the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy near Chicago, Ill. She is also a part-time campus manager for a local community college. Dr. Louis Rohlfs ‘67 has closed his private dental practice of 34 years in Jackson, Mo., and is presently practicing at Cross Trails Medical Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo. He and wife, Carol (Bollheimer) ‘66, have three children and four grandchildren. Allen Brickhaus ‘69, ‘76 is a retired public school music instructor. He is active in his church and is a columnist for several publications including Flying Models, Stunt News

and Aviation Modeler International (British). Gary Johnston ‘69 is retired and living on his mini-farm. He enjoys spending time with his son, daughter and four granddaughters. Dennis Seyer ‘69 retired from Southeast Missouri State University as a professor of theatre and dance. He continues to serve as a free-lance scenic designer, theatre consultant and IATSE (theatrical employee union) stagehand.

1970s Colleen (Grasser) Harris ‘71 is a guidance counselor at Dobbs Elementary in the Hickman Mills School District in Kansas City, Mo. She and husband, Len, have three children and one grandson. Anita (Isle) Sievers ‘71 and husband, Mike ‘71, are both retired and selling real estate around Lake of the Ozarks. Ken McManaman ‘72 has served as an adjunct professor of law at Nottingham-Trent University Law School in the United Kingdom, where he obtained his postgraduate diploma and master at law degree (LLM) in advanced litigation. Willis Springer ‘72 has retired after 37 years as a high school teacher and elementary principal. He is currently an adjunct professor of English and also teaches in the Department of Elementary Education at Southeast Missouri State University. Linda Wells ‘72 was recently selected as coach for the Dutch Olympic softball team that will compete in the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. She currently lives in Haarlem, the Netherlands, where she is training for the Olympics. Barbara (Timm) Willis ‘72 is the Civic Leaders Internship Program coordinator at the University of Missouri - Columbia. Sharon (Helms) Hall ‘74 is a second grade teacher in Jackson, Mo. She and her husband have three children and one grandson.

James Piatchek ‘63 James Piatchek ‘63, who majored in business administration, is a nationally recognized financial advisor and motivational speaker. He is also a member of the Million Dollar Round Table, an honor received by less than one percent of the world’s most successful life insurance and financial services professionals in 76 nations and territories. Piatchek is a Top of the Table member, which means he earns at least six-times the base production required to be in the Round Table. Piatchek started his career in insurance and investment sales in St. Louis. Piatchek then moved to Cape Girardeau, Mo., for three years as a unit manager for his company. After some time as managing general agent for Mass Mutual, Piatchek was promoted to state manager for the state of Mississippi. In 1991 he landed in Memphis, Tenn., after accepting a position with John Hancock Financial Services as their mid-South managing general agent. In 2003 Piatchek retired as regional manager from Waddell & Reed Financial. With 40 years of business experience in sales and marketing, Piatchek, and wife, Sally, formed the Senior Advisory Group in 2003. They have conducted over 150 retirement seminars for seniors and pre-retirees and reached thousands of individuals seeking financial advice before and during retirement. Piatchek started his own publishing company, “The Professional Disturber” in 2004, the

Joyce (Dietl) Hunter ‘74 recently accepted a new position as the experiential learning coordinator at Southeast Missouri State University. Donna Kholer ‘74 retired from a 30-year teaching career in 2006.

Donna Kholer ‘74 and sons David Stiles ‘74 is living in Atlanta, Ga., and is married to Becky (Stahly) ‘75.

name under which his dozen books, CDs, and DVDs are published. Piatchek is thankful for his opportunity to help others during his career. “My most rewarding experience is the small part I have played in the sales and marketing careers of hundreds of successful people I have recruited and trained over more than 30 years,” said Piatchek. He and Sally have been married for more than 40 years, and enjoy traveling, running and St. Louis Cardinals baseball. Piatchek said, “They receive much joy and fulfillment from their many clients, most of whom are also good friends. And finally, their commitment to their faith and those they serve will always be number one in their lives.” Jim also serves his community as director of the St. Vincent dePaul Food Mission. Philip Svoboda ‘75 is a car sales consultant with a dealership in Scranton, Penn., where he lives with his wife and two children. Leo F. Vorwerk ‘75 was recently inducted into the 2008 Hall of Fame at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Fla., for his accomplishments as former men’s and women’s tennis head coach, including winning the 1986 NAIA national women’s title, first of any sport at UNF. Leo and wife, Linda ‘76, reside in Jacksonville and have three children, Nikki, Carl and Trent.

Names in red denote memb ers of iAMsoutheast.

26

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CLASS NOTES

Janet (Perez) Eckles ‘75 With a heart bursting with excitement and expectations, Janet (Perez) Eckles ‘75 left Southeast Missouri State University with a degree in business administration in May, 1975. Months later, she married her college love, Gene. The couple started a family and Janet became a thrilled, full-time mom to their three sons. But nine years after their wedding day, Eckles’ dreams crumbled, and their hopes for a bright future vanished as an incurable retinal disease robbed her of her sight. In a matter of 18 months, Eckles’ world turned dark in every way. She changed from a healthy, optimistic mom and wife to an angry woman sinking in darkness – physically and emotionally. At the verge of defeat, Eckles’ prayers were answered. Although she didn’t regain her sight, Eckles gained a new attitude, perception and confidence.

Rebecca Belli ‘76 is an elementary music teacher for Gaston County Schools in Gastonia, N.C. She is one of five finalists among teachers from 53 schools for Teacher of the Year in that district, and is currently working on her master’s degree in school administration at GardnerWebb University. Jayne Bohnert ‘76 recently retired after teaching 31 years at Perryville High School in Perryville, Mo. She and husband, Kenny, celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary in June 2007. Marcia Jackson ‘76 worked 29 years as a registered nurse and has taken some time off from the nursing profession. She and her husband have two daughters. Dr. Kenneth Rosenauer ‘76 is president of College Media Advisers, an 850-member national organization of advisers to college newspapers, yearbooks, magazines, television, radio and multimedia publications. He is professor of journalism and English at Missouri Western State University, where he has been a faculty member since 1979.

A friend suggested the possibility of Eckles serving as a Spanish interpreter, since it was her native language. After diligent study, Eckles began rendering simultaneous interpretation for St. Louis court proceedings. Not having visual distractions, her accuracy in interpretation was heightened. Eckles’ success in the courtroom equipped her to land a job for the world’s largest over-the-phone interpretation company. For over 18 years, Eckles has served as an interpreter and holds training sessions for interpreters in the legal and medical fields across the United States, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic. Eckles was honored with the highest and prestigious award of professional excellence in her company. After overcoming her lack of sight, Eckles was inspired to become a writer. Using a special voice synthesizer that reads the computer

screen, she poured all the details of her life story into her book, Trials of Today, Treasures for Tomorrow – Overcoming Adversities in Life, which reached international levels of success. “Walking through the path of selfpity to professional success nudged me to write these compelling episodes to inspire others,” said Eckles. Her articles have been published in national and regional magazines. She also has a monthly inspirational column in a local newspaper. Additionally, Eckles has contributed to ten books including the Chicken Soup for the Soul and Guidepost books. Eckles’ writing successes prompted invitations to speak before corporations and Christian churches across the country. “When speaking to corporations such as Disney and at other professional settings, I ignite in my

Dr. Ronald Smith ‘76 is the research evaluation coordinator at Portland Community College in Portland, Ore.

Dr. Robert Butler ‘79 was recently inducted as a fellow of the American College of Dentists. He has just completed renovating a new and expanded office space in Webster Groves, Mo., where he has practiced general dentistry for the past 22 years.

Daniel Lakin ‘77 is a global account manager for Eaton Corporation. He and wife, Rosemary, reside in High Ridge, Mo. Sue (Trantham) Rector ‘78 conducts educational training for school-based speech training implementers. She and husband, Mel, have five children and live in Lake St. Louis, Mo. Tara Thomas ‘78 is a senior tax accountant with American Enterprise Group, Inc., in Des Moines, Iowa. Geniece Warren ‘78 is retired after 28 years as a probation and parole field officer, unit supervisor, and district administrator with the Missouri Department of Corrections in Rolla, Mo.

Names in red denote memb ers of iAMsoutheast.

27

Thomas Smith ‘79 works primarily as an assistant director and has freelanced in film and TV production since 1982.

1980s Denise (Chandler) Lane ‘80 is a program manager for Citizens for Progressive Change, Inc., in Benton Harbor, Mich. Karim Mansouri ‘80 is managing director of his family business located in Bahrain, Persian Gulf. Dr. Raymond Larry Bohannon ‘81, ‘91 retired from the Sikeston

audiences the passion to move beyond adversity to reach triumph and success,” said Eckles. “The battle over adversity is won not so much with abilities and skills, but with courage, determination and commitment.” Eckles and husband, Gene, live in Florida and enjoy life to its fullest.

R-6 School District as assistant superintendent in June 2007 after 30 years in education. He is currently assistant professor at Southeast Missouri State University in the Department of Early, Elementary and Special Education. Diana (Meyer) Dye ‘81 is the program nurse for REM Developmental Services, after being a homemaker for most of her life. She and her husband recently celebrated their 26th wedding anniversary and the birth of their first grandchild. Carla Richters ‘81 is the costume shop manager at Dartmouth College and a Nationally Registered Paramedic with Upper Valley Ambulance in Fairlee, Vt. She has been a wardrobe supervisor with touring companies of Broadway shows, rock-and-roll bands, and several international dance companies. Beth Free ‘82 is branch manager for the Shaw Group in Cape Girardeau, Mo. continued on page 2 8


CLASS NOTES Jonathan Meier ‘82 is the director of theatre at Mundelein High School in Mundelein, Ill. His production of Dancing at Lughnasa was selected to be performed at the 2008 Illinois High School Theatre Festival. Donna Taylor ‘83 currently works for the National Healthcare Corporation, a rehabilitation center in Desloge, Mo. LaDonna (Buford) Barnett ‘84 has joined the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Team In Training and is walking the St. Louis Half Marathon in April 2008. Mark Rutledge ‘84 is the North American sales and applications manager for Summit Microelectronics, Inc. He and wife, Juliette, live in McKinney, Texas. Edwina (Williams) Slater ‘85 is a senior accountant with SSM Healthcare in Bridgeton, Mo. James Fieser ‘86 is a computer specialist for Columbia Catholic School in Columbia, Mo., and a paternity testing company. He and wife, Ann, have three children.

at St. Louis Community College at Meramec in Kirkwood, Mo. She and her husband of 15 years have a 5year-old daughter. Eliza (Howard) Winfrey ‘88 is employed with Advance Brands, LLC, and was recently promoted to a new sales territory that covers six states. Carmen McDowell ‘89 is in her third year of seminary in a fouryear masters of divinity program at Seattle University. She is a parttime bookkeeper at the regional office for the Pacific Northwest District of the Unitarian Universalist Association.

1990s Dr. Nolan Snider ‘90 practices family medicine in Marshfield, Mo. Lindell Barks ‘91 recently accepted a new position as assistant general manager of purchasing and receiving warehouse for TG Missouri. He and wife, Cathy, were married in 2006. Cindy James ‘91 lives in Memphis, Tenn., and was recently promoted to regional associate of new business development with excelleRx. Tim Adkisson ‘92 is a production manager with Rolls-Royce and just completed his 14th year as a football coach at Cardinal Ritter High School in Indianapolis, Ind. He and wife, Mary Anne, have two children.

James Fieser ‘86 and family Cynthia Fleck ‘87 is vice president of clinical marketing for Medline Industries, Advanced Wound Care Division. She is a columnist and section editor for several wound care industry publications.

Susan Barnes ‘92 is the program director for Climb Wyoming in Gillette, Wyo., which trains and places single moms in careers that successfully support their families. Koki Iwazaki ‘93 is an engineering project manager of Sony VAIO laptop at Sony Electronics, Inc. He and wife, Riki, have three children and reside in San Marcos, Calif.

Ken Stricker ‘87 is president and chief executive officer of Consort Homes in Chesterfield, Mo.

Dr. Jennifer McCluskey ‘94 and husband, Brian, along with son, Braden, celebrated the birth of their newest addition, Blake, in Jan. 2008.

Stephanie (Bond) Franks ‘88 is an associate professor of nursing

Richard Potter ‘94 was recently promoted to chief financial officer of

Laura Jurica ‘94 Laura Jurica ’94 works in the Artist Prep Support Department at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom as a show finisher. “Each night is an adventure as I climb Mount Everest to do surgery on the Yeti, travel back in time to give a make-over to a man-eating dinosaur or head out on safari to make sure those safari trucks look muddy enough to have been on safari for years,” said Jurica. “My job reminds me of Smiths 3-D design course, where each day you found yourself using many different products.” In 2000, Laura met her future husband, Cory, in Florida. They were married in Florence, Italy, at the Palazzo Vecchio, the old Palace of the Medici.

DeWitt Company, Inc., in Sikeston, Mo. Aaron Barbee ‘95 recently received a master’s degree in business administration and is working for a law firm in St. Louis. Mishea (Chapman) Culbreath ‘95 is the advising coordinator for the Harrison College of Business at Southeast Missouri State University. She and husband, Jason, have two children, Annie and Austin.

“Both of us are fine artists so the birthplace of the Renaissance was the perfect choice,” said Jurica. “We had so much fun and the setting made a great backdrop for photos.” To see more photos of Jurica’s work and wedding, go to www. iAMsoutheast.com and view her class notes. Links are provided to slideshows of additional photos.

Terry Eaker ‘96 is a senior business analyst in the IT department for Enterprise Rent-A-Car in St. Louis, Mo. He and wife, Sarah (Whittington) ‘98, have two daughters, Madelynn and Megan. Michelle Million-Worley ‘96 is part of an organization serving children with life-threatening illnesses throughout Southeast Missouri and the surrounding areas.

Jennifer (Sherwood) Levine ‘95 and husband, Matt, were married in July 2007.

Stephen Owen ‘96 was recently granted tenure and promoted to associate professor of criminal justice at Radford University, in Radford, Va.

Robert Pool ‘95 recently relocated and accepted a position as the director of student activities at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, N.Y. He and wife, Kim, have three children.

Emily (Enzenauer) Scott ‘96 is a teaching coach at McKinley Classical Junior Academy in the St. Louis Public Schools system.

Jared Ramsey ‘95 is a financial advisor for Edward Jones, and was recently named field trainer leader for his area of 60 advisors. He and wife, Traci, have two children and reside in Ballwin, Mo. Tracy (Newberry) Bates ‘96 is a high school language arts, speech and drama teacher at Clearwater High School, in Piedmont, Mo. She also coaches the speech and debate team.

Gina (Schiwitz) Essner ‘97 and husband, Jeffrey, were married in 2000. They reside in Benton, Mo., with their mixed Pekingese pooch, Jackson. She is a probation and parole officer with the State of Missouri. Kimberly (Speight) Nordyke ‘97 is a reporter covering the television industry for The Hollywood Reporter, in Los Angeles, Calif. She and husband, Brett, celebrated their second wedding anniversary in Feb. 2008.

Names in Red denote memb ers of iAMsoutheast.

28

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CLASS NOTES Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Bryce Aubuchon ‘05 Bryce Aubuchon ‘05, who majored in mass communication with an emphasis in public relations, is currently in training to be a U.S. Navy Pilot. Aubuchon holds the rank of Ensign, which is equivalent to a 2nd Lieutenant in most other branches. Initially, Aubuchon took a test that qualified his acceptance into Officer Candidate School (OCS) as a pilot in the flight program. According to Aubuchon, only one in 40 applicants is accepted into OCS with an aviation slot. He completed OCS and was commissioned Ensign in late Sept. 2006. Aubuchon was then ordered to Aviation Preflight Indoctrination (API) in Pensacola, Fla., where he studied six weeks of aeronautics, weather, navigation, flight physiology and survival training. After API, he spent eight months in primary flight training in Corpus Christi, Texas, flying the T-34C Turbomentor attached to the training squadron, VT-27. Subsequently, Aubuchon was selected to train and fly the P3 Orion, a maritime patrol and subhunter aircraft – its main mission being to hunt and destroy enemy submarines or act as an airborne operations control center. He is currently learning to fly a multiengine wartime aircraft in any type of situation or emergency. Aubuchon says, “Of everyone that applies to the Navy to become Nicole Obert (Schoob) ’97 and Dan Obert ’99 welcomed twin daughters, Abigail Grace and Isabel Elyne, into the world on Feb. 28, 2008.

Allen Martin ‘99 and wife, Melissa (Sullivan) ‘99, celebrated the birth of their first son, Nolan David, in Oct. 2007.

a pilot, about one in 100 will make it to their winging.” He is slated to become a winged naval aviator on July 3, 2008. Following his winging in July, Aubuchon will go to Search, Evade, and Rescue School (SEARS) in Maine. A two-week school, SEARS covers advanced survival training with very intense and realistic hostage, interrogation and capture situations. After SEARS, he will train for another six to eight months on the P3 in Jacksonville, Fla. After approximately three years of training, Aubuchon will be assigned to an active fleet squadron and will be committed to the Navy for eight years from the date of his winging. Aubuchon and his two dogs currently live in Corpus Christi, Texas, with brother, Todd ‘03. Des Peres, Mo., where she is a stayat-home mom. They celebrated the birth of their daughter, GracieAnn Elaine, in July 2007.

Lauren Rayfield ‘97 and husband, Chip, celebrated the birth of their first child, Josilyn Colleen, in June 2007, and live in Wildwood, Mo. April Westerhold ‘97 and husband, Scott, were married in Oct. 2006 and currently live in

Amy (Penny) Franklin ‘98 works with special needs children and teaches child development courses at Southeast Missouri State University. She is married with one son, and lives in Jackson, Mo. Mark Oberhauser ‘98 is the minister of students and recreation at Chatham Baptist Church in Chatham, Ill. He and wife, Joni (Hutton) ‘99, have four sons. Lisa Blank ‘99 is the fiscal and administrative manager at Cottonwood Residential Treatment

Dr. Matthew McKnight ‘99 just completed his Ph.D. in anthropology at Penn State University and has recently accepted a position as a research archaeologist with the Maryland Historical Trust. He and wife, Dee, celebrated the birth of their daughter, Clara, in April 2007. Whitney (Hosmer) Tate ‘99 and husband, Ryan, were married in 2007. She is operations manager of Mississippi River Radio in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Kurt Bliggenstorfer ‘02 accepted a position with United Health Group’s analytic division, Ingenix. He currently lives in Maryland Heights, Mo. Patrick Carter ‘02 and wife, Abigail, were married in Oct. 2007, and he has established his own video production company in Las Vegas, Nev. Sharon Essner ‘02 completed a course in parish nursing and has implemented a Parish Health Ministry at St. Vincent de Paul Parish in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Kelly Finke (Lambing) ‘02 was recently promoted to team lead at Anheuser-Busch Internal Audit Services.

Dr. Angie (Fornkohl) Blum ‘00 recently graduated from her pediatric residency and is a board certified general pediatrician in New Castle, Ind. She and husband, Jerry, have a daughter, Allison, and reside in Greenfield, Ind.

Elizabeth Foster ‘02 and husband, Chuck, along with son, Chase, celebrated the birth of their newest addition, Hannah Grace, in Dec. 2007. They reside in Panama City, Fla.

Wayne Dunker ‘00 accepted a new position with Webster Groves Parks and Recreation in St. Louis, Mo., in March 2007.

Jeremy Wells ‘02 is in his second year of a doctoral program in environmental design and planning at Clemson University.

Heather Higgins ‘00 and husband, David, were married in Oct. 2007

Misty Everett ‘03 will graduate with a master’s degree in English this May and is currently teaching at Malden High School in Malden, Mo.

2000s

Sarah (Bommarito) Kachadorian ‘00 and her husband celebrated the birth of their second child, Matthew Paul, in Dec. 2007. They also have a three-year old daugher, Kayla. Mary (Tipton) Nagle ’00 was recently promoted to alumni director for the Logan College of Chiropractic Alumni Association. Garvin G. Ambrose ‘01 is currently an assistant state’s attorney with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office in Chicago, Ill. He married wife, Toya, in Aug. 2007. Lindsey Wulfing ‘01 is a regional manager for HelmsBriscoe.

Kris Keller ‘03 is a certified athletic trainer at Bothwell Regional Health Center in Sedalia, Mo., and serves as athletic trainer for Sedalia Public Schools. He is also pursuing his master of education degree in athletic and activities administration. Jessica Leggett ‘03 coordinates all aspects of apartment life (Student Housing) at the University of California - Irvine.

continued on page 3 0

Names in Red denote memb ers of iAMsoutheast.

29

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


CLASS NOTES Nathan Pinter ‘03 is a police officer for the City of Washington, Mo. He loves his job and travels as much as possible.

Alisa McFerron ‘04 works in the office of admissions at Southeast Missouri State University. She and husband, Ross ‘04, were married in March 2007 and reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Tera (Popp) Bloecher ‘04 and husband, John ‘05, were married in Sept. 2007. Erin Corkery ‘04 is a project coordinator in the training and development department at Maritz in Fenton, Mo. She is working toward a master’s degree in human resource development at Webster University in St. Louis, Mo. Amy Keith ‘04 is a development officer for the Sigma Sigma Sigma Foundation, and currently resides in Golden, Colo.

Katherine Myer ‘04 is the lead teacher of the three and fouryear-old class at Oak Ridge Early Childhood Center in Oak Ridge, Mo. Kay Rittirote ‘04 is a second grade teacher in Hazelwood, Mo., and resides in Columbia, Ill. Scott Harrison ‘05 is the district technology director for the Clarkton C4 School District in Clarkton, Mo., where he and wife, Julie, live with their two daughters, Caroline and Katherine. Ashley (Hudock) Smith ‘05 and husband, Joey ’05, were married in Sept. 2007.

Sara (Handshear) King ‘04 and husband, Brian ‘03, were married in July 2007 and reside in St. Louis, Mo.

Jennifer (Hoffman) Starkey ‘05 and husband, Christopher ‘06, were married in May 2006 and live in Ballwin, Mo.

Mitchell Newhouse ‘06 recently began attending Saint Louis University School of Law.

Amanda Kridelbaugh ‘07 recently celebrated the birth of her daughter, Cayleanne Marie.

Kyra Joiner ‘06 was promoted to corporate sales and marketing account service coordinator for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Rachael Lowes ‘07 recently accepted a job as the development and public relations specialist for the Optimist International Foundation in St. Louis, Mo.

Alicia Shockley ‘06 and Ryan Robinson ‘04 were married Sept. 1, 2007, at Trinity Lutheran Church in St. Louis, Mo., where they now reside.

Lindsey Lucas ‘07 is currently in her first year at the University of Illinois - Champaign/Urbana, and is working toward a degree of doctor of veterinary medicine. Leslie McDowell ‘07 accepted a position as a business analyst with sales and marketing for Express Scripts in St. Louis, Mo.

Trista Zoll ‘06 is a human resource representative for Colliers, Turley, Martin, Tucker in Clayton, Mo. Karen Bowyer ‘07 and husband, Cody, were married in Dec. 2007. She is currently an alternative education teacher in Potosi, Mo.

Stephanie Tracy ‘07 is currently in her first year at the University of South Florida, and is working toward a degree of doctor of audiology.

Doris (Dorlac) Irvin ‘07 and husband, Simon, were married in Oct. 2007.

Na mes in re d denote memb ers of iAMsoutheast.

A

Check out the Southeast Bookstore Web site for a great selection of Southeast merchandise!

www2.semo.edu/bookstore

Sweatshirts 30

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

Polos O F

S O U T H E A S T

Caps M I S S O U R I

Diploma Frames S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

T-Shirts S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


ROWDY’S NEST

Time to Celebrate

River Campus Touring Series 2008-09 BATTLEWORKS DANCE COMPANY The company’s repertory of quirky idiosyncratic dances that are brilliantly composed and executed. Robert Battle posseses a dance vocabulary that utilizes gesture and nuance in a beautifully bizarre way. When it comes to movement Battle has no boundaries in creating his imagery. CIRQUE ÉLOIZE: NEBBIA - Positioned at the heart of the renewal of circus arts, Cirque Éloize has been creating moving performances filled with magic since 1993. Continually striving for artistic perfection, it relies on a number of leaders in contemporary circus arts. This will be the first U.S. tour of this exciting new production. THE RUSSIAN NATIONAL BALLET THEATRE - The ballet was founded in 1989 when legendary principal dance of the Bolshoi Ballet, Sergei Radchenko, sought to realize his vision. He wanted a company which would bring together the highest classical elements of the great Bolshoi and Kirov Ballet companies in an independent new company within the framework of Russian classic ballet.

electrifying music, Footloose launched a dance craze that spread across the nation. This show’s classic 80s hits include “Holding Out for a Hero,” “Almost Paradise,” “Let’s Hear It for the Boy,” and of course, the unforgettable “Footloose!” HAIRSPRAY - Broadway’s Tony Award-winning musical-comedy phenomenon takes you back to 1962 Baltimore, as 16-year old Tracy Turnblad sets out to dance her way onto TV’s most popular show. This mega-hit is piled bouffant high with laughter and romance--and enough deliriously tuneful new songs to fill a nonstop platter party. It’s the winner of eight 2003 Tony® Awards, including Best Musical. ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA - David Robinson, Music Director and Conductor One of the top orchestras in the country, this will be their second performance at the River Campus.

SAVION GLOVER - Mr. Glover won the 1996 Tony Award for his choreography in the Broadway smash hit Bring in ‘Da Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk. He made his Broadway debut at age 10, starring in The Tap Dance Kid.

SWEENEY TODD - This triumphant new cutting-edge production of a Broadway tour de force will take your breath away. The legendary demon barber, hell-bent on revenge, takes up with his enterprising neighbor in a delicious plot to slice their way through England’s upper crust. Justice will be served – along with lush melody, audacious humor and bloody good thrills.

FOOTLOOSE - In 1984, the movie Footloose, starring Kevin Bacon, captured the heart of America. With its youthful spirit, dazzling dance and

*This list is subject to change. Go to www.semo.edu/rivercampus for up-todate touring and ticket information. A finalized schedule will be available soon.

31

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S O U T H E A S T

M I S S O U R I

Wow, Redhawks…what a successful first season it has been at the River Campus! I just have to thank you all for the great turnout and I can’t wait to see you there next season (did you see the great shows that are coming?!). With my role in Big River out of the picture, I’ve turned my feathers in another direction. As you may have read, this year marks the 50th anniversary of Southeast’s nursing program. That’s amazing…I wasn’t even a hatchling then! In preparation for the big celebration, I dug all of my medical gear out of the closet. (A bird’s got to be prepared for anything these days!) I can’t wait to commemorate 50 years of success in this great program. With all the exciting things happening on campus, the Southeast flock just keeps getting bigger! In July of next year, the University will open its newest residence hall to better accommodate the growing number of Redhawks on campus. I’m really excited about the new hall because it is going to be right in my back yard at the west end of Houck Stadium. The residence hall will offer a combination of suite-style privacy with a community-style atmosphere…so this bird can stretch his feathers while still getting to hang out with the ‘Hawks. With all this celebration of the old and new, a bird’s work is never done. The University is doing some exciting research and since I’ve already got the lab coat on, I might as well be a part of it! Keep your eyes open for the great new changes on campus and I’ll see you around!

S TAT E

U N I V E R S I T Y

S P R I N G

2 0 0 8


Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association One Univeristy Plaza MS 7300 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4799

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 Permit No. 1000

Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University  

Spring 2008 Issue #5

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you