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The show is abouT To begin

A sneAk preview of the inAugurAl seAson At the river CAmpus

geT up, geT ouT geT moving! students ge t AC tive At southeAst

ChaTTing wiTh The pros

Alum wins Contest, lAnds dreAm job

Celebrating the legaCy of jaCk buCk


the mAgAZine of SO UTH E A S T M I S S O UR I STATE U N I V E RS I T Y spring 2007 “the mission of the magazine of southeast missouri state university is to bring the vitality that is southeast missouri state university into the lives of its alumni and friends… and to promote the cause of the university most effectively through its editorial focus on interesting people and interesting ideas…Experience Southeast…Experience Success.” the magazine of southeast missouri state university is made possible by members of the southeast missouri state university Alumni Association and donors to the southeast missouri university foundation. mAgAZine teAm Co-editors karen grebing director of marketing & development kgrebing@semo.edu

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t’s time to get outside! Spring is here and Southeast students have emerged from the residence halls. Once again we can walk the campus and see students playing softball, sand volleyball, throwing a Frisbee or simply enjoying the weather.

I love seeing the campus come alive at this time of year. And students now, more than ever, have so many opportunities to get out and be active on campus.

diane sides director of university relations dosides@semo.edu

In the pages ahead, you will read about the various intramural sports and sports clubs that bring thousands of students out for friendly competition each year. You’ll learn about the new and exciting opportunities for students in the world of sports. I hope you will also read about the great Cardinals announcer, Jack Buck, and how his legacy of leadership is serving as a guide for future college students in the St. Louis metropolitan area.

editoriAl AdvisorY boArd juan Crites director of public services/publications wayne smith vice president for university Advancement/ executive director of the foundation jane C. stacy director of Alumni services & development Art wallhausen Associate to the president Contributors Adam Appleton shad burner doug mcdermott ryan murphy

Don’t forget to check out the sneak preview of the inaugural season at the River Campus. With so many exciting performances, you are sure to find a show you will enjoy!

photogrAphY brad Chamness mike grace bryan keefer nancy kelley thomas marrone national baseball hall of fame library

Southeast is alive with activity and we want you to be a part of it. I hope this magazine helps bring a little of the excitement to you.

rowdY CAriCAture thomas marrone

Come Home Soon!

design jamie barnwell universitY president dr. kenneth dobbins

Jane C. Stacy ’72 Director of Alumni Services & Development

Alumni AssoCiAtion michael price, president joan gohn, vice president southeAst missouri universitY foundAtion harry rediger, Chairman dick davidson, vice Chairman letters poliCY “the magazine of southeast missouri state university” welcomes submissions by alumni and friends. Class notes and letters may be edited for length and content.

The show is abouT To begin

A sneAk preview of the inAugurAl seAson At the river CAmpus

geT up, geT ouT geT moving! students ge t AC tive At southeAst

ChaTTing wiTh The pros

Alum wins Contest, lAnds dreAm job

jack buck’s legacy of character and

please send all correspondence to editor@semoalumni. com or to the magazine of southeast missouri state university, one university plaza ms7300, Cape girardeau, mo 63701.

leadership lives on through the Celebrating the legaCy of jaCk buCk

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recipients of the jack buck Scholarleadership award.

© 2007 southeast missouri state university. Content may not be reprinted without written permission of the editors.



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Chatting With the Pros

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LETTERS And, SMSC had bought the 100-yearold ( Johnson) house on the edge of the campus which was to be converted into a 10-resident women’s dormitory. I was to be the “House Father” (at age 25). Best of all, we could live free in the downstairs “suite”, and sharing the living room and our furniture with the residents. Part of this deal was that I clean, paint, do minor repairs to the house during the summer in preparation for the fall semester and the ten new residents. What a deal! Johnson Faculty Center (formerly Johnson Hall)

Johnson House, Lost Residents The stories of the Dome (Fall 2006) triggered a flood of great memories about Southeast Missouri State College in 1961-62. I related to Mr. Steve Brookins experience with Academic Hall. My memories of Academic Hall started the first time I set foot on SMSC campus in the summer of 1961. Two special people who enabled my first (and last) year at SMSC were Dr. Mark Scully, President, and Mr. Jack Wimpe, Business Manager for the college. These gentlemen, with their dedication to helping students succeed, facilitated in a rather unique way my BS in BA degree. On the phone Mr. Wimpe had said “... come on down...we will find some work for you...” We arrived in Cape in June of 1961, jobless and ready to attend summer school, and for my wife, Bonnie, to start working for money – which was how we were to finance ourselves for the next year. When we walked into Mr. Wimpe’s office in Academic Hall expecting to hear about a job, we were devastated when he announced the he had no work now but he would keep us in mind! Some weeks later, Jack Wimpe called us in to his office to offer Bonnie a job as the organizer and supervisor of a new faculty typing pool. She would be paid a very generous salary of $150 a month – before taxes. She was the highest paid student wife on campus!



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Our only regret was the loss of contact with our 10 residents after I graduated and we moved to Kansas City – even further from St. Louis! It would be great to hear from our 1961-62 residents of Johnson (Hall) House, again. Southeast Missouri State College, Academic Hall, Johnson Hall, and all the wonderful people who made it a great place to get smart – Thank you!

— Karl L. Nordyke ’62 Longwood, Fla. [Editor’s Note:]

If you were a resident and would like to get in touch with Mr. or Mrs. Nordyke, please email editor@semoalumni.com

Memorable First Day I learned many of the skills it takes to further the education of students, teachers, and parents from my roots in the education department of Southeast Missouri State University. I started in 1976 when my husband Butch was stationed at SEMO in the AFROTC department. He encouraged me to go to college, but I was reluctant because I didn’t feel I was smart enough.

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Suddenly, the bell rang. Dr. Easley closed his mouth, turned, and limped out. The students groaned. I sat and pondered what had just happened in that short hour. I noticed chills covered my body and I realized I was back from 1863. I didn’t know I could be so interested in history. I did know I wanted to tell stories like that. My enthusiasm for the teaching field began with storytelling and I have used that technique to present many successful lessons to students, parents, and teachers. I thank Southeast Missouri State University for helping me begin a funfilled career adventure that I hope will continue for many years.

— Lois Flint ‘79, ‘82 Prunedale, Calif.

The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University appreciates all submissions. After

I agreed to try it and arrived early for my first class. I was climbing the stairs to Dr. Easley’s history class when I heard people discussing the rules for waiting for a late instructor. Someone stated that students wait only five minutes. SOUTHE A ST

Someone else said they thought it was fifteen minutes. Several others entered the discussion. Then, in the distance, I heard a strange tapping sound I couldn’t recognize. The other students became silent. The tapping got louder. No one made a sound. Then, a booming voice began to speak about the Civil War. Dr. Easley came around the corner tapping the floor with his crutch, and the students wordlessly moved away from the door. He continued his monologue as he unlocked his door and we followed him into the classroom. He spoke and I was in the middle of a battle. I saw blood spill in puddles amidst the screams of young infantrymen in blue and gray. I was mesmerized.

you read this issue, why not take a moment to comment on one of our stories? Maybe your memories of Jack Buck? Your thoughts about what is happening on campus? E-mail us at editor@semoalumni.com with your comments.

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C A MPUS C H R O N I C L E S STUDENTS SPEND SPRING BREAK IN WASHINGTON, D.C., THINK TANK Thirty select Southeast juniors and seniors spent their spring break in Washington, D.C., learning about global issues in business, the environment and politics at the prestigious Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). “This was a remarkable opportunity for Southeast students to work with researchers and consultants who advise national leaders in the top levels of government as they develop policies and strategies that affect the United States and the global community,” said Southeast President Ken Dobbins. Participants had the opportunity to examine issues which may play out through the next 20 years and beyond, including population, resource management, technology, knowledge, economic integration, conflict and governance.

“We were very proud that Southeast joined Pennsylvania State University, Georgia Institute of Technology and Chapman University as one of only four institutions involved with the CSIS. The Southeast students who participated in the CSIS seminar were an elite group of young people who learned from some of the nation’s top policy advisors about global matters that will face the leaders of our country over the next several decades,” Dobbins said. The CSIS is a strategic think tank in Washington, D.C., whose scholars and board members advise the federal government on significant social, economic, environmental and political global issues. The CSIS, located just two blocks from the White House, is staffed by expert scholars who research these issues.

NEW MASS COMMUNICATION OPTION: TELEVISION AND FILM Already boasting worldwide recognition, Southeast’s mass communication program continues to improve. The Department of Communication now offers a new television and film option for mass communication majors with emphasis in film production, broadcast journalism and video production. This expands the career field for Southeast mass communication students and is particularly exciting to students who wish to work in these influential media. This past fall, Southeast’s mass communication program joined 109 other institutions worldwide in securing THE

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accreditation by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC). Only one other institution in Missouri, the University of Missouri-Columbia, has this elite accreditation. In addition, the public relations program is one of only 18 institutions with certification by the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Southeast is now positioned among only eight other institutions in the world with SOUTHE A ST

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recognitions from both ACEJMC and PRSA. Based on a six-year review of curriculum, faculty, students, alumni and facilities, these recognitions certify that Southeast’s mass communication program represents the highest standard of achievement worldwide. Already, the word has spread and the increase in interest is phenomenal. For the first time, students in Missouri have an alternative institution that is fully accredited.

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C A MPUS C H R O N I C L E S Southeast Renames Higher Education Centers as Regional Campuses Three of Southeast Missouri State University’s area higher education centers were designated in October 2006 as regional campuses. The new campus designations are “Southeast Missouri State University - Malden,” “Southeast Missouri State University - Kennett,” and “Southeast Missouri State University - Sikeston.”

Ishee leads redhawks to title, named new head coach John Ishee has been named head women’s basketball coach and has received a three-year contract to run through April 30, 2010. He was named acting head coach Nov. 9. Ishee led the Redhawks women’s basketball team to its second consecutive O’Reilly Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) Tournament championship in February and guided the women as they narrowly missed upsetting the thirdranked Oklahoma Sooners which posted a 74-60 win over 14th-seeded Southeast Missouri State in a first-round contest of the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Tournament at the University of Texas’ Frank Erwin Center in Austin. The Redhawks finished the season with a school-best 24-8 record. He was named OVC Coach of the Year after guiding the Redhawks to their second consecutive OVC regular-season championship with a school recordtying 16-4 conference record this season. Prior to the season, Southeast was picked to finish fifth in the preseason conference poll. Ishee becomes the second Southeast head coach in program history to win the award, joining Ed Arnzen who captured the honor during the 1998-1999 season.



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The University now teaches all undergraduate and graduate courses at those three centers south of Cape Girardeau. The new name for the center at Perryville, where the teaching load is shared by Southeast and Mineral Area College, is “Perryville Higher Education Center.” Enrollments continue to grow at the regional campuses, both in the number of students served and in the number of credit hours taken by the students.

Enrollment is up - expenses down Fall enrollment was historic. Southeast’s combined undergraduate and graduate headcount was at an all-time-high of 10,500. Twelve straight years of increasing enrollment mean more and more students compete for available tuition assistance dollars and often struggle to make up the difference by working extra hours or giving up basic “luxuries” like having a Continued on page 7 UNIVERSIT Y

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C A MPUS C H R O N I C L E S vehicle for transportation. For some, the uncertainty of expenses is a deterrent to attending a four-year university. Others begin a program but drop out when expenses reach higher-than-expected levels. In an effort to sustain the growth in student population, the Southeast Board of Regents approved a new tuition guarantee program that places a $400 cap on annual increases Missouri undergraduates experience during the time it takes to receive an education. Students can calculate the maximum cost of incidental fees (tuition) over the next four years, helping them to plan for their education without the threat of unanticipated costs. As in the past, Southeast continues to hold fees as low as possible.

SOUTHEAST TO PROVIDE NEW SCHOLARSHIPS FOR BAND MEMBERS The Golden Eagles Marching Band performed at the prestigious Edinburgh Military Tattoo in Scotland in 1999 and has been invited to return in 2008. It is the second American university marching band to perform there and the only university marching band to be invited back a second time. The Golden Eagles Marching Band has performed at two NFL Pro Bowl football games and a Super Bowl. Their list of accomplishments is impressive. Hoping to double the size of the Golden Eagles, Southeast has unveiled a new scholarship program. During the 20072008 academic year, all first-year members of the band will receive a $500 stipend, second-year members will receive a $650 stipend, third-year members will receive a THE

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$750 stipend and fourth-year members will receive a $1,000 stipend. Students who have performed in any all-state band or orchestra are eligible to receive a $1,000 stipend per year if they agree to participate in the marching band in the fall and in any Department of Music ensemble in the spring. “When considered with other Southeast scholarship opportunities and the new tuition guarantee program, students would be foolish to go elsewhere,” stated Barry Bernhardt, director of University bands. “The Golden Eagles are a visible part of our University, and we can make a positive influence on the student body. This is a win-win situation.”

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Chatting with the Pros

Alum wins contest, lands dream job

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ike Ditka, Joe Namath, Ozzie Smith, Tony LaRussa and Marcus Allen – it’s all in a week’s work for Jeff Vernetti, co-host of “Sports Edge,” a daily talk show on 1380 ESPN Radio in St. Louis. Combining sports and an academic major in communication appears to have been no problem for the Southeast graduate, although his professional climb appears to be relatively unconventional. Taking his 1999 communication degree and his hands-on experience from the University, Vernetti has propelled his talents into working with some of the most well-known, on-air radio sports personalities in the St. Louis market – all within a fairly short period of time. The unconventional part is the way Vernetti landed his career



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break at 1380 ESPN – he was a contestant in a “Dream Job” competition. He sent an audition tape and was selected, along with 10 others from some 125 applicants, to compete in a broadcast reality show with the goal being the hosting of a onehour Saturday sports show. “News updates, celebrity interviews, Q (question) and A (answer) – you name it, we did it. And I was selected after the six-week contest,” Vernetti says. Two years later, not only does Vernetti co-host his own daily sports show, he’s broadcasting from Super Bowl XLI, the World Series, Rams football and Blues hockey. He’s covering major boxing, basketball and hockey events. He’s interviewing Cardinals at the last game in old Busch Stadium and at the first game in the new stadium.

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announcer on the women’s basketball games, reinforced my communication and writing Vernetti’s dream job has given him the skills.” men’s baseball games, high school contests, chance to interview his idols – from Kurt But the sports bug and radio were never and to doing Southeast public address Warner to Ozzie Smith to Joe Buck and far from Vernetti’s mind and heart. announcing. It was unreal and so valuable Bob Costas. “I missed radio and I wanted a way in.” to be able to practice before that first job “Two years ago, I am working in a cubicle. That led him to the unconventional “Dream when you have little room to fail.” Now I sit in Tony LaRussa’s office and listen Job” broadcasting competition. Vernetti is quick to point out that to him talk baseball. It is surreal.” The one-hour Saturday sports show was Southeast professor of communication, His meteoric rise to sports radio all began not enough to support his sophomore year his wife and mortgage, of college when he “Two years ago, I am working in a cubicle. so Vernetti kept his job followed friends with the fraternity and and his girlfriend Now I sit in Tony LaRussa’s office and listen took every opportunity (now his wife) to to him talk baseball. It is surreal.” to be at the radio station the campus of and to offer to help out Southeast Missouri in any way he could. State University. “I did a bunch for free A 1995 graduate and tried to get involved with everything. Dr. Bruce Mims, and Sports Information of Lafayette High School in Wildwood, Production, setting up live shows, helping Director Ron Hines provided guidance Vernetti first attended Truman State with the marketing – anything. As people and offered him experience in the sports University in order to play baseball – his left the station to move on to other stations communication business. sports passion. Even in his freshman year of or change as people do, I kept getting more Mims is a professor in the radio option college, Vernetti knew he was interested in a and more to do and reduced my role at the and manages the student-operated campus career in radio. fraternity, eventually going full time with radio station. “Underclassmen (at Truman) did not get ESPN.” “I was really close to Dr. Mims,” Vernetti the opportunity to get airtime early. I didn’t Vernetti’s show eventually was expanded says. “He really helped me understand a like that, because if I didn’t like radio, I’d be number of the behind-the-scenes things in stuck with it. I was not interested in being from the one-hour on Saturday to two the radio business, including the FCC, legal in college for more than four years, so I was hours. During the weekdays, he produced issues and technical arrangements, and he very focused on choosing the right major. I a morning show and spent his afternoon really focused my energy on working hard chose radio (as a career option) because of doing marketing and promotions. and not faking anything. my interest in sports and my desire to do “I did as much reporting as I could – sound Vernetti said his experience in the sports play-by-play.” from Rams, Cards, Blues games, specialty Southeast Sports Information Department After visiting his girlfriend, Kelly, an interviews – you name it. This past year, I “taught me the sports business – how to education major, on the Southeast campus, traveled with the Rams, going on the road as be professional at games; how to build Vernetti says he “just fell in love” with the the station’s Rams beat reporter.” relationships with players and coaches, and University. “While I appreciated my roles at the appreciate long hours.” “It was a big-school atmosphere with a station, I wanted to be on the air full time “Ron (Hines) put me on the sports hometown feel. (It was) Close enough to and move away from the behind-the-scenes information staff where I had the home to get back for family things and roles.” opportunity to not only work in friends, but a chance to be involved right This past December, Vernetti achieved that broadcasting, but to hone my writing, game away – in sports, radio, etc.” desire when his show was moved to a daily management and passion for sports. He Vernetti’s experience at Southeast offered airing at 6 p.m. Only two months later, taught me sports, although fun, is a tireless him “instant hands-on experience. For his success was rewarded with a coveted and financially underwhelming profession. my major, you get a taste of all the areas morning drive-time show – from 7 to 9 But it can be so rewarding if you put all your a.m., Monday through Friday. of communication, not just in my option. focus on the tasks at hand.” That’s beneficial to me now because I’m “I’d be lying if I said I thought I’d be here Vernetti admits he didn’t land his dream involved in TV, pr, writing, and I gained this quickly. But when I was young and left job right out of college. His first stop was valuable experience. As for radio, you had radio prematurely, it was always my goal to at SBC where he worked for three years in almost an instant opportunity to get on the be on the air all the time before I turned 30. management. air and practice.” And I just made it.” “It made me appreciate and miss sports and His Southeast experience provided him Vernetti will turn 30 in November of this made me understand a cubicle lifestyle, and with the tools he needed to be successful in year. corporate life was not for me whatsoever.” the sports radio business. His second job was a three-year stint with “A few guys and I started a sports talk show his national fraternity, Theta Xi. on campus, which the students in the radio “I traveled the country educating chapters option still do today. We also practiced (to and alumni on everything from fraternity tape) broadcasting play-by-play of Southeast operations to recruiting to marketing. It football, basketball and baseball games. That taught me great responsibility and really practice led me to working as a play-by-play

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get out geT moving ! gEttINg outDoorS Outdoor adventure new method of helping students ‘get out’

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wo years ago, Southeast’s Student Recreation Services launched a new program to provide opportunities for students to experience the outdoors. These programs have taken students across the country and to their own backyard to find opportunities to get moving outside. “Right now, people aren’t getting outdoors,” said Eric Redinger, assistant director for outdoor adventure. “We want to change that.” Statistics show that the average child gets fewer than 25 hours of outdoor, unstructured play per year, and as those children reach college age, that number decreases. “There are so many reasons people need to get outside,” Redinger said. “There’s even a documented disease that comes from too little outdoor exposure.” Redinger was referring to seasonal apathetic disorder, which has symptoms similar to depression resulting from too little sun exposure. An outdoor buff himself, Redinger is responsible for planning recreational trips for students of all ages and activity levels that allow them to increase their physical activity and experience nature in different settings.

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Redinger says that participation is good, but that the program is growing and still trying to decipher exactly which travel destinations and activities will best-suit Southeast students. “It’s hard to track because the program is so young,” Redinger said. “Do students want rigor and challenge, like our hike at the Grand Canyon, or do they want more fun relaxation, like our trip to the beach on the Gulf of Mexico?” In 2005 and 2006, students and staff camped and participated in site seeing at the Grand Canyon. Other trips have included whitewater rafting in Estes Park, Colo., and day trips to regional parks and campsites. Activities have included hiking, rock climbing, camping and soaking in the sun on the beach. During the 2006 3-day-trip to Destin, Fla., over fall break, Southeast junior Josh O’Donnell says he got more than just fun and sun. He said that the trip was full of adventure, and that it was a cultural learning experience as well. “This was my first time camping on the beach,” O’Donnell said. “Near our campsite, there was a lagoon with alligators in it. We could see them in the water, and when they came up on the beach, it was exciting and scary.” “We played football on the beach, ate out at a nice restaurant one night and had a lot of fun,” O’Donnell said. O’Donnell was joined on the trip by

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three of Southeast’s international students representing Japan, Germany and China. “We called it the ‘United Nations of Vacations,’” O’Donnell said. “I learned about other cultures and still talk to the three girls from the trip when I see them on campus.” Redinger says that a number of students are excited consumers of the programming, but that some do not participate because of fear of the unknown. “Some students have interest, but are not willing to take the first step,” Redinger said. “It’s apprehension.” To reduce that hestiation, Redinger said that the department offers necessary training before more rigorous events and that it provides necessary equipment for students if they do not have their own. Redinger finds reward in a comment made by an international graduate student who participated in the Colorado outdoor adventure. “He told me during the whitewater rafting trip, ‘If someone would have told me I’d be doing this, I would have never believed them. I can do this,’” Redinger recalled. “I love it when people become self sufficient and find they can enjoy the outdoors.” “My goal is to bring back outdoor, oldfashioned play,” Redinger said. “Students are tired of being cooped up inside and are starved for a reason to get outside and do things.” Southeast’s Recreation Services are ready to feed that hunger with its upcoming May whitewater rafting trip on the steepest part of the Chattanooga River in South Carolina.

ExpaNDINg rEcrEatIoN facIlItIES SErvE StuDENtS Southeast provides two student recreation centers and will open its new aquatic center later this year

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s Americans of all ages battle obesity and college students fight the freshman15, culture is becoming more interested in fitness. Health centers and corporate gyms vie for public attention with spacious buildings, the latest fitness equipment and glossy ads. Today’s students rate college recreation t h e

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the new aquatic center, which will open in late fall 2007, features a recreational pool, whirlpool and a six-lane lap pool. centers as an important factor in choosing a university, making fitness centers an essential recruiting tool in addition to their traditional role as a workout center for athletes. Southeast’s Student Recreation Services is meeting this challenge with new facilities and an increasing number of activities. In late fall 2007, the new student aquatic center will open at Southeast. The request for construction of the aquatic center came from the University’s Student Senate in Feb. 2005. An addition to both of the Student Recreation Centers, the aquatic center features approximately 25,000 square feet including a recreational pool and whirlpool, a six-lane, 25yard lap pool and a wet classroom for aquatics. The 12-foot bouldering-climbing wall rising out of the deep end has an attached zip line on which students can glide to the other side of the pool. Group exercise is another popular area of fitness. Programs such as yoga, Pilates, kickboxing and boot camp training keep students healthy, flexible and in top condition. In addition, everything from judo to racquetball is now available. There is something for everyone. With two recreation centers and an outdoor sports complex, Southeast provides convenient facilities during most waking hours. Intramural sports activities include the familiar “classics,” like track and basketball, and popular new sports such as ultimate Frisbee and paintball. Students can even find games that are more social than athletic such as Texas Hold ‘Em poker games. The Student Recreation Center on the north end of campus features basketball, volleyball and s o u t h e A s t

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racquetball courts in addition to a group fitness studio, a weight room that includes more than 20 pieces of cardiovascular equipment, selectorized weight equipment, free-weight equipment, an indoor walking/jogging track, and a climbing wall. Therapeutic massages are offered to ease sore muscles and help students de-stress after a challenging day of university life. The Student Recreation Center South Campus offers a fitness room with cardiovascular equipment (bikes, treadmills, ellipticals and steppers), a multipurpose basketball court and an elevated walking/jogging track. The outdoor sports complex includes two

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lighted softball diamonds with outfields that can accommodate full-size soccer and flag football fields. Nine lighted tennis courts and a softball field are located across from the sports complex. According to the National IntramuralRecreational Sports Association (NIRSA), over 75 percent of all students utilize their recreation centers and participate in intramural and recreational sports activities. With this in mind, Southeast student recreation centers are expanding their facilities and increasing the diversity of activities to stay ahead of the game in the effort to recruit new students and to serve current students. Non-student memberships are available for the recreation centers, the aquatic center or both.

StuDENtS go hEaD-to-hEaD Intramurals and sport clubs provide competitive opportunity for college fun-seekers

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ealthy competition is mixed with a dose of fun when students like Lauren Lubiewski and Kerry Dickinson compete in intramural sports. Lubiewski, a junior management major, is not new to athletic competition. She played three sports in high school, including golf, soccer and basketball, and thrives on the activity and competition. “I’ve always been athletic since high school,” Lubiewski said. “I don’t play sports for Southeast [athletics] teams, so this gives me a way to play the sports I like.” Kerry Dickinson, a mass communication major, was also a high school athlete in football and track, but plays intramural sports for another reason. “The games are exciting and intense,” said Dickinson. “Intramural sports keep people from just sitting in their room and doing homework all the time. I always look forward to the games.” Currently, Recreation Services offers 35 different sports, including group, team and individual competition. Lubiewski and Dickinson are just two of the approximately

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1500 students at Southeast who participate in intramural sports each year. According to a 2002 study by the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association, college students highly involved in recreational sports cite improvements in overall emotional well-being, a reduction of stress, improved self-confidence and improvements in overall happiness. Intramural sports may be competitive. However, sport clubs take competition to a whole new level. Sport clubs are official student organizations, formed and managed by students, that travel to compete against other college club teams. “These groups are one step below official collegiate athletic teams,” said James Wayne, coordinator of sport clubs and intramural sports. “They’re not scholarship teams, but they’re just as competitive.” “Our largest team is men’s soccer, with

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between 30 and 40 members,” Wayne said. “But the team that has received the most national acclaim is the Southeast Bass Anglers.” At just over a year in existence, the Southeast Bass Anglers have scored in the top 25 in two national tournaments, received national coverage from ESPN and Fox Sports Net, and have recently returned from a March tournament sponsored by Arkansas Tech University. John Parsons, the founder of the club, says that their quick success has been rewarding, but not without work. “It’s been a challenge to get the group going,” Parsons said. “But now, more than ever, we have a great group of guys from all backgrounds who are really getting into the club and actively trying to make it successful.” Parsons adds to the diversity of the club’s membership. Parsons, 35, is a non-traditional

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student who is working on a degree at Southeast after a career in the Army, but he says that the different perspectives brought by club members have added to its success. “Working with these guys [of traditional college age] takes me back to when I was young and in basic training,” Parsons said. “I remember how I was, how I felt, and it’s great.” “The common thing we share is love of fishing and competing as a team. That’s what makes us successful.” Though the team did not finish with the high score they hoped in the Arkansas tournament, they resolve to keep competing and having fun. Southeast sport clubs are also gaining prominence by hosting regional and national competitions. The Racquetball Club hosted its fourth annual “SEMO Classic” in March and competed in the U.S. Nationals in Tempe, Ariz. The Judo Club hosted its third annual SEMO Judo Tournament in March with more than 100 participants. Other active sport clubs include Fencing, Rock Climbing, Roller Hockey, Swimming, Tae Kwon Do, Ultimate Frisbee, Women’s Volleyball, Men’s Volleyball and Men’s Soccer. sally smith ‘06 did her student teaching in belfast, northern ireland, where she not only used her physical education teaching skills, but also learned about cultural differences.

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outheast students who have spent their youth pursuing sports, whether baseball, basketball, soccer, tennis or golf, often wonder what to do with their talents and enthusiasm when they graduate from high school. In years past, many chose the option of majoring in physical education so they could teach or coach the sport they loved. These days, the world of sports, athletics, wellness, recreation, marketing and sports nutrition have evolved into a myriad of new careers. With an aging baby boomer population and their needs and desires to stay young and healthy, the sports and wellness industries have exploded. In the health management realm, thousands of businesses, industries and hospitals provide health promotion and wellness programming for citizens. Employment prospects are strong for Southeast Missouri State University students who major in such areas as nutrition, athletic training, exercise science, sports marketing and communication. The University has developed a number of programs and majors to prepare professionals for the world of health, human performance and recreation. Areas of study include programs to prepare professionals who will guide others toward healthier lifestyles through wise use of leisure time. The entire lifespan is considered from preparing top-rate physical educators to professionals in health promotion, coaching, sports management, performance enhancement, nutrition and many other aspects of healthy living. One of the most active units in this area is the Department of Human Performance and Recreation, where programs are offered in athletic training, exercise science, health promotion, physical education, sport management and pre-physical therapy. Not only do students in these programs get a full complement of academics, research, quality classroom instruction and a variety of clinical experiences, but all participate in an internship opportunity.

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matt kryzynski ‘06, a st. louis native, was a duel major in business and communication when he landed a summer internship with the Cardinals’ radio network and worked as an associate producer in the broadcast booth, working side-by-side with Cardinal announcers mike shannon and wayne hagin. But not every student in the program can add an internship with Disney’s Wide World of Sports to their resume. In fact, Southeast’s Andi Malick ’04 was one of only seven students from around the country chosen for a three-month summer internship program in athletic training with the sports complex in Orlando, Fla. “I was given a lot of responsibility at the Wide World of Sports, and that really helped boost my confidence level and put my knowledge to the test. Under the supervision of a certified athletic trainer, I was responsible for the care of the athletes who were competing in the complex, and for keeping all the necessary documentation and helping keep the athletic training facility in order.” Athletic training provides students with training in the prevention of athletic injuries; recognition, evaluation and immediate care of athletic injuries; rehabilitation and reconditioning; health care administration; and education and counseling. Southeast offers an accredited Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP). Mitchell Sharp ’06, a Sikeston native, spent his Southeast career soaking up every recreation opportunity possible. His semester-long internship led him to the Snow Mountain Ranch at the YMCA of the Rockies near Winter Park, Colo. “Oh man, it was great,” Sharp said. “I taught outdoor education to junior high school students from Denver. I taught survival, outdoor living skills, beaver, forest and wetland ecology. The kids were great and I got to spend 30 to 50 hours a week outside in the Rocky Mountains – tell me a desk job that can beat that.”

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mitchell sharp took a spring break ski trip to Colorado, two summer pre-session trips to the southeastern united states and a threeweek backpacking trip to utah - all a part of his degree program.

Like a lot of students who choose the recreation career route, Sharp was a high school athlete who played baseball and football. Through his major, he said, “I was challenged with new activities on a weekly and monthly basis.” Sharp took a spring break ski trip to Colorado, two summer pre-session trips to the southeastern United States and a three-week backpacking trip to Utah. In Utah, he earned “wilderness first aid” and “leave no trace” certifications. “I loved how the teachers were passionate and how they participated in the learning process,” Sharp said. “They had a trip planned every time there was some time off from school, and the teachers came right along with the students. They also stressed experiential learning, which taught you about life and not necessarily the x’s and o’s of a particular subject.” Southeast’s recreation major is accredited by the National Recreation and Parks Association and the American Association of Leisure/Recreation. Even the physical education major has received a new lift with the opportunities available for student teaching. For Sally Smith ’06, student teaching meant traveling to Belfast, Northern Ireland, to not only use her newly acquired physical education teaching skills, but also to learn about cultural differences when it comes to sports and games. A relatively new program in sports management combines the best practices in the athletic, recreation and health and wellness fields with a solid business background. No one liked to hear the crack of a homerun or the swish of a three-point basket more than Mark Kraemer, ’04, of Imperial, Mo. His choice of a

major in sports management led him to Rawlings Sporting Goods, one of the leading manufacturers in baseball, basketball, softball and football products. Brent Lewis ’05, a native of Jackson, Mo., said his dream was to work in baseball. His sports management degree led him to the Kane County Cougars, a Minor League baseball team and a Class A affiliate of the Oakland Athletics based in Oakland, Calif. Lewis’ primary responsibility is the box office, but he said he never knows what will arise on a typical day and has worked in a variety of areas. “Southeast was the only college in the state that had a sport management degree program at the time I was choosing schools,” Lewis explained. “I feel that my classes and experiences at Southeast prepared me very well and provided me with the knowledge to be successful in my career.”

sean gallagher’s internship with the national baseball hall of fame in Cooperstown, n.Y., was a dream come true for the sports fanatic.

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Even business majors are finding their “field of dreams” through their program choices. Matt Kryzynski ’06, a St. Louis native, was a dual major in business and communication when he landed a summer internship with the Cardinals’ radio network and worked as an associate producer in the broadcast booth, working side-by-side with Cardinal announcers Mike Shannon and Wayne Hagin. “I saw a triple play happen on the field at Busch Stadium, witnessed a pitching duel between Houston Astros pitcher Roger Clements and St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Mark Mulder, and then gave an updated list of baseball stats to Mike Shannon.” Kryzynski practiced his skills by announcing for the “Sports Brawl” on the campus radio station, KDMC, Rage 103.7, and announcing at Redhawks baseball games. Communication major Sean Gallagher ’05, a St. Charles native, was a nut for “good ol’ American sports,” so his internship at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y. made perfect sense. As one of four interns working in the Membership Department, Gallagher was responsible for marketing, sales, advertising and customer service. “I think the classes in communication studies do a great job of preparing students to become effective and competent leaders,” Gallagher said. “My time at Southeast was very balanced and helped me become a wellrounded person. I got to climb mountains and go white water rafting in Colorado as well as listen to important historical figures brought in by the Department of Communication. Southeast allowed me to pursue multiple passions.” Whether it’s a career in training athletes, providing healthcare and wellness, or marketing their successes, there’s a program or area of study for it at Southeast. No longer does the “field of dreams” have to end at high school graduation.

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he road to college is paved with many twists and turns for today’s students. Different backgrounds and life experiences merge to a single place of learning, and students’ lives are never the same. The path to college traveled by Jack Buck, sportscaster and St. Louis legend who died June 18, 2002, was not straight and narrow, but rather filled with many experiences that

contributed to his success as a scholar and a leader. His success is honored annually through the Jack Buck Scholar-Leadership Award, an award given to a St.

Louis metro-area student that honors the legacy of Jack Buck and celebrates student potential.

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“What you do that nobody knows about is written on somebody’s heart. Every kindness, every going out of your way, every good thing that you do, they remember you, just like you told us you remember Jack,” - Carole Buck

wall long enough so we didn’t meet the qualifying time. We never became officers. It was probably one of the smartest decisions I ever made.”

From soldier to celebrity

Work ethic makes for storied past

Decision time for Buck

In 1941, Buck decided it was time to quit Born John Francis Buck in Holyoke, Mass., high school and get a full-time job to help in 1924 to parents Earle and Kathleen, Jack support the family, but one teacher stood in the way of his decision, Edna Kleinshmidt. grew up amid The Great Depression with “She went crazy when I told her I was one positive outlet, baseball. leaving school,” Buck wrote. “She even In his 1999 autobiography, “That’s a went to my house to talk to my mother. She Winner!” Buck wrote, “When I wasn’t stomped her foot, and nobody stomped their listening to the Red Sox games or talking foot at my mother.” about baseball, I was playing it…We all The teacher made it clear that under no played baseball every spring and summer circumstances would Jack quit school, and day.” Buck’s dream was, at first, to play baseball as a career, but that dream “I wasn’t much more than a C student, but evolved as he made his way through young if I hadn’t finished high school, my whole adulthood. At age 15, his father’s life would have been different,” job as a railroad accountant took - Jack Buck him from their New England home to the shores of the Great Lakes of Cleveland, he didn’t. Ohio, Within a year, however, 49-year“I wasn’t much more than a C student, old Earle Buck died, leaving the family but if I hadn’t finished high school, my working hard to make ends meet. whole life would have been different,” Buck Jack Buck’s enjoyment of work, which wrote. he carried to the end of his life, was a help Upon graduating high school at age 17, during these tough teenage years. Buck joined a friend and took a job on an Buck wrote that his days were filled from iron ore boat on the Great Lakes. start to finish. Mornings before school Serving first as a porter, then as night three days each week, he would deliver the cook and baker, and later as a deckhand, “Shopping News” door-to-door. After Buck earned money which he sent home to school, he worked at the Franklin Ice his family. Cream Shop and, after his shift, would go into the basement to process orders. The Army came calling Other jobs included selling the Cleveland Press from the street corner or filling On December 7, 1941, America entered nearly every possible role from dishwasher into World War II. America’s involvement to carhop at Jack Kraw’s, a diner in the in the war spurred a need for a growth in Cleveland suburb of Rocky River. the military, and in 1943, Buck became one of the thousands of U.S. teenagers drafted to serve for his country. Buck was soon sent to basic training in Fort Eustis, Va. It was not long before his

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leadership skills would became apparent to his supervisors. Buck was put in charge of training new recruits on everything from handling grenades to using machine guns, and

even how to march and drill. His strong leadership skills, coupled with a booming voice, allowed Buck to be a successful instructor. This success almost led to a completely different life for the future sportscaster. Buck and friend, Luke Riley, decided they would become officers. In order to be admitted to the Officer’s Training School, however, a soldier was first required to complete an obstacle course in a specified time. Buck wrote about the experience in his autobiography. “We ran the course and were both way ahead of the qualifying time when we arrived at the last obstacle. Luke stopped and said, ‘I don’t really want to do this. Do you?’ I said, ‘I don’t think so.’ We sat at the

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Upon returning home, Buck worked various jobs, but found none that fulfilled him. In 1946, he decided he would use his GI Bill to attend classes at Ohio State University to become a sports announcer. Not wanting to miss out on a whole semester, Buck ignored the fact that his GI papers were not yet in order. He started going to classes anyway. He was able to use his quick wit to convince inquiring professors that, even though he wasn’t on their official roster, he was enrolled. Eventually, his papers came through and Buck became an official student, his Dr. Ken Dobbins, president of Southeast, visited in the KMOX booth with Jack Buck not long before professors none-the-wiser. Buck’s death. Dobbins said Buck “was a great supporter of education and specifically of the students at In 1948, Buck went on the air for the first Southeast Missouri State University. “ time at WOSU, the Ohio State University campus radio station. This job helped land there’s a soft spot in your makeup and it Buck a position doing sports announcing single season record breaking homerun erodes like the bank of a stream.” with WCOL, a local radio station. There, he in 1998, Buck was there to guide the fans Buck was a scholar, a leader and a developed a passion for doing play-by-play through it all. For many Midwesterners, gentleman. His character was never that never left him. and especially for St. Louisans, his words compromised, and there could be no In 1953, Buck became a play-by-play will define these great Cardinal moments better person to serve as a model for announcer for a St. Louis Cardinals’ farm forever. Southeast’s future student leaders. club in Rochester. While Buck’s famous words It didn’t take long may define these moments, these for the D’Arcy moments will never define Buck. Recipient hopes to be Advertising Agency, To many, he was much more than “Being able to man for others the company an announcer. While presenting survive as a responsible for the Jack Buck Scholar Leadership broadcaster, Buck’s legacy continues in the 2007 hiring the Cardinals Award to a Southeast student, especially in recipient of the Jack Buck Scholarbroadcasters, to Carole Buck, Jack’s widow, baseball, is Leadership Award, St. Louis University notice the young recalled the great things people driven by one High senior Bryan Kujawa. announcer. Buck had to say about Buck and how truism - you Kujawa, 18, was chosen from 35 soon found a home he truly made an impact in the have to find applicants to represent Buck’s legacy as doing play-by-play lives of so many people. a way to stick the fourth-ever recipient of the award. for the St. Louis “What you do that nobody around long The selection of the recipient was made by Cardinals. knows about is written on enough for In his biography, somebody’s heart. Every kindness, Carole Buck, based on Kujawa’s character, people to get excellent scholastic and student leadership Buck wrote “being every going out of your way, used to you. “ record, and potential to be a leader in the able to survive every good thing that you do, community. as a broadcaster, they remember you, just like you “I have always loved the St. Louis especially in told us you remember Jack,” said baseball, is driven by one truism – you have Carole Buck. “So keep doing these things, Cardinals, and there is so much about him [ Jack Buck] that makes me honored to to find a way to stick around long enough just like Jack.” receive this award,” Kujawa said. for people to get used to you.” Buck wrote that “the biggest Southeast Director of Admissions and And people got used to Buck. He was the failure people make is when they do Enrollment Management Dr. Debbie voice of the Cardinals for decades. From compromise—on their character, their Bob Gibson’s 1971 no hitter, to the 1982 principles, their work ethic, their honesty, World Series victory, and Mark McGuire’s whatever. Once you start to compromise, Continued on page 18 T H E

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“What you do that nobody knows about is written on somebody’s heart. Every kindness, every going out of your way, every good thing that you do, they remember you, just like you told us you remember Jack,” - Carole Buck

wall long enough so we didn’t meet the qualifying time. We never became officers. It was probably one of the smartest decisions I ever made.”

From soldier to celebrity

Work ethic makes for storied past

Decision time for Buck

In 1941, Buck decided it was time to quit Born John Francis Buck in Holyoke, Mass., high school and get a full-time job to help in 1924 to parents Earle and Kathleen, Jack support the family, but one teacher stood in the way of his decision, Edna Kleinshmidt. grew up amid The Great Depression with “She went crazy when I told her I was one positive outlet, baseball. leaving school,” Buck wrote. “She even In his 1999 autobiography, “That’s a went to my house to talk to my mother. She Winner!” Buck wrote, “When I wasn’t stomped her foot, and nobody stomped their listening to the Red Sox games or talking foot at my mother.” about baseball, I was playing it…We all The teacher made it clear that under no played baseball every spring and summer circumstances would Jack quit school, and day.” Buck’s dream was, at first, to play baseball as a career, but that dream “I wasn’t much more than a C student, but evolved as he made his way through young if I hadn’t finished high school, my whole adulthood. At age 15, his father’s life would have been different,” job as a railroad accountant took - Jack Buck him from their New England home to the shores of the Great Lakes of Cleveland, he didn’t. Ohio, Within a year, however, 49-year“I wasn’t much more than a C student, old Earle Buck died, leaving the family but if I hadn’t finished high school, my working hard to make ends meet. whole life would have been different,” Buck Jack Buck’s enjoyment of work, which wrote. he carried to the end of his life, was a help Upon graduating high school at age 17, during these tough teenage years. Buck joined a friend and took a job on an Buck wrote that his days were filled from iron ore boat on the Great Lakes. start to finish. Mornings before school Serving first as a porter, then as night three days each week, he would deliver the cook and baker, and later as a deckhand, “Shopping News” door-to-door. After Buck earned money which he sent home to school, he worked at the Franklin Ice his family. Cream Shop and, after his shift, would go into the basement to process orders. The Army came calling Other jobs included selling the Cleveland Press from the street corner or filling On December 7, 1941, America entered nearly every possible role from dishwasher into World War II. America’s involvement to carhop at Jack Kraw’s, a diner in the in the war spurred a need for a growth in Cleveland suburb of Rocky River. the military, and in 1943, Buck became one of the thousands of U.S. teenagers drafted to serve for his country. Buck was soon sent to basic training in Fort Eustis, Va. It was not long before his

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leadership skills would became apparent to his supervisors. Buck was put in charge of training new recruits on everything from handling grenades to using machine guns, and

even how to march and drill. His strong leadership skills, coupled with a booming voice, allowed Buck to be a successful instructor. This success almost led to a completely different life for the future sportscaster. Buck and friend, Luke Riley, decided they would become officers. In order to be admitted to the Officer’s Training School, however, a soldier was first required to complete an obstacle course in a specified time. Buck wrote about the experience in his autobiography. “We ran the course and were both way ahead of the qualifying time when we arrived at the last obstacle. Luke stopped and said, ‘I don’t really want to do this. Do you?’ I said, ‘I don’t think so.’ We sat at the

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Upon returning home, Buck worked various jobs, but found none that fulfilled him. In 1946, he decided he would use his GI Bill to attend classes at Ohio State University to become a sports announcer. Not wanting to miss out on a whole semester, Buck ignored the fact that his GI papers were not yet in order. He started going to classes anyway. He was able to use his quick wit to convince inquiring professors that, even though he wasn’t on their official roster, he was enrolled. Eventually, his papers came through and Buck became an official student, his Dr. Ken Dobbins, president of Southeast, visited in the KMOX booth with Jack Buck not long before professors none-the-wiser. Buck’s death. Dobbins said Buck “was a great supporter of education and specifically of the students at In 1948, Buck went on the air for the first Southeast Missouri State University. “ time at WOSU, the Ohio State University campus radio station. This job helped land there’s a soft spot in your makeup and it Buck a position doing sports announcing single season record breaking homerun erodes like the bank of a stream.” with WCOL, a local radio station. There, he in 1998, Buck was there to guide the fans Buck was a scholar, a leader and a developed a passion for doing play-by-play through it all. For many Midwesterners, gentleman. His character was never that never left him. and especially for St. Louisans, his words compromised, and there could be no In 1953, Buck became a play-by-play will define these great Cardinal moments better person to serve as a model for announcer for a St. Louis Cardinals’ farm forever. Southeast’s future student leaders. club in Rochester. While Buck’s famous words It didn’t take long may define these moments, these for the D’Arcy moments will never define Buck. Recipient hopes to be Advertising Agency, To many, he was much more than “Being able to man for others the company an announcer. While presenting survive as a responsible for the Jack Buck Scholar Leadership broadcaster, Buck’s legacy continues in the 2007 hiring the Cardinals Award to a Southeast student, especially in recipient of the Jack Buck Scholarbroadcasters, to Carole Buck, Jack’s widow, baseball, is Leadership Award, St. Louis University notice the young recalled the great things people driven by one High senior Bryan Kujawa. announcer. Buck had to say about Buck and how truism - you Kujawa, 18, was chosen from 35 soon found a home he truly made an impact in the have to find applicants to represent Buck’s legacy as doing play-by-play lives of so many people. a way to stick the fourth-ever recipient of the award. for the St. Louis “What you do that nobody around long The selection of the recipient was made by Cardinals. knows about is written on enough for In his biography, somebody’s heart. Every kindness, Carole Buck, based on Kujawa’s character, people to get excellent scholastic and student leadership Buck wrote “being every going out of your way, used to you. “ record, and potential to be a leader in the able to survive every good thing that you do, community. as a broadcaster, they remember you, just like you “I have always loved the St. Louis especially in told us you remember Jack,” said baseball, is driven by one truism – you have Carole Buck. “So keep doing these things, Cardinals, and there is so much about him [ Jack Buck] that makes me honored to to find a way to stick around long enough just like Jack.” receive this award,” Kujawa said. for people to get used to you.” Buck wrote that “the biggest Southeast Director of Admissions and And people got used to Buck. He was the failure people make is when they do Enrollment Management Dr. Debbie voice of the Cardinals for decades. From compromise—on their character, their Bob Gibson’s 1971 no hitter, to the 1982 principles, their work ethic, their honesty, World Series victory, and Mark McGuire’s whatever. Once you start to compromise, Continued on page 18 T H E

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“Leadership requires work, and it is sometimes hard to do. But once you get into the mode of treating people the way Jack Buck did, it becomes a way of life.” - Bryan Kujawa

Below said Kujawa was a standout among candidates for the award. “The award goes to students who can emulate the leadership qualities Jack Buck showed all his life and Bryan definitely exemplifies those qualities,” Below said. “His humility was a marked aspect of who he was. The fact that he was a public figure is not what made him a leader, but it was what he did in private that made him who he was,” Kujawa said. Kujawa, a Fenton, Mo., native, said that what he learned from Jack Buck’s life was that leadership requires listening. “Jack Buck listened to people. He actually heard what people said and he responded by helping them.” Kujawa gives much of the credit for his recognition as the Jack Buck Scholar-Leader to his high school. “My high school’s motto, ‘be a man for others,’ has really become a guide for me, not just in school, but in life.” Kujawa said he was the only student from his grade school to attend St. Louis University High, and being forced to meet new people and have new experiences contributed to his success in school. “The first chance I had to meet people was before school started when I tried out for the football team,” Kujawa said. He believes that through football, he acquired the skills that align him with the values of Jack Buck. “Joining the football team went beyond just meeting new people. I learned that you have to give 100 percent of yourself to the team and then everybody wins,” Kujawa said. Kujawa chose to move on from football in his senior year to focus on other opportunities, including community service and additional school activities, and his actions have been noticed by school leaders. “Intelligent, creative and dedicated are the words that come to mind when I think of Bryan Kujawa,” wrote Mary Michalski, guidance counselor at St. Louis University High. “I am confident that Bryan will be an outstanding

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Bryan Kujawa, a senior at St. Louis University High, is the recipient of the 2007 Jack Buck Scholar -Leadership Award. Kujawa was selected based on his character, excellent scholastic and student leadership record, and potential to be a leader in the community.

scholar. He is eager to learn and not afraid to be challenged,” Michalski wrote. “You have to open yourself to other people…that allows you to impact so many more people by example. That’s what Jack Buck did,” Kujawa said. Kujawa knows his long-term goals will be advanced by his relationships. “You can’t step on others to get where you want to go. Leadership requires work, and it is sometimes hard to do. But once you get into the mode of treating people the way Jack Buck did, it becomes a way of life,” Kujawa said. Kujawa hopes to go into a career in business and is confident his campus activities will help prepare him to be a true servant leader. Currently editor of the school yearbook and president of the Art Club, Kujawa also serves as an advisor to freshmen making the transition to high school, chairs the National Honor Society Habitat for Humanity Committee, and is a small group leader and speaker in retreats and his youth group. Below said she is pleased to see increasing numbers of high-quality students from the St. Louis area like Kujawa, planning to attend Southeast. “The anticipated number of new freshmen from St. Louis looks like it will be up significantly over previous years,” Below said. “That increase can be attributed to several things including the fall opening

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of the River Campus, which is exciting, and the Jack Buck Scholar-Leadership Program.” Students from the St. Louis Metro Area, including St. Louis County and City, St. Charles County, Franklin County, Jefferson County and the Metro East area in Illinois are eligible to apply for the award. High school guidance counselors are asked to nominate one student from their respective schools. In 2003, Southeast Missouri State University teamed up with KMOX Radio in the establishment of the award, the first to be established in memory of Buck. Southeast President Dr. Kenneth W. Dobbins discussed the idea with Buck before his death, and the partnership continued after his death with the endorsement and participation of Carole Buck, currently a St. Louis radio host. “Southeast Missouri State University is very fortunate to have the Jack Buck Scholar-Leadership Award associated with our institution. Jack Buck was a man of impeccable character, a humble gentleman who went about his business quietly, but whose humility and professionalism left a lasting impression of excellence,” Dobbins said. “We think these qualities are similar to those of Southeast,” Dobbins said. “We think Jack Buck would call this award in his name ‘a winner.’” The award was presented to Kujawa on April 19 in a ceremony at the Sheraton Westport. Previous recipients include Ashley Pate of Fort Zumwalt West High School, Daniel Rettke of Union High School, Amanda Bell of St. Francis Borgia Regional High School, and Jay Hubert of Freeburg [Illinois] Community High School.

SOUTHEAST SALUTES HONORS ALUMNI LEADERS leadership development does not stop after college. Rather, life’s experiences in the professional world and in the family and community setting continues to shape people for scholarship and service. In addition to honoring Jack Buck’s legacy among incoming students, the April t h e

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McKenna was elected 19 ceremony also provided the venue for to the Missouri House honoring St. Louis Area alumni. of Representatives, Southeast Salutes Awards recognize where he served six alumni who have made a difference terms. In 1993, he was in their communities—personal and elected to the Missouri professional—based upon professional Senate. McKenna growth, service to the University and served as the President individual character. The award is sponsored by the St. Louis Chapter of William P. McKenna ‘69 Pro Tem of the Senate during the 89th the Southeast Missouri State University General Assembly. In Alumni Association. 1999, McKenna became the president of Recipients in 2007 included Gregg Jefferson College, a position he held until Billmeyer ’83, Michael August 2006. He is a past chair and a Grojean ’68, William current member of the Missouri Highway P. McKenna ’69, ’98, and Transportation Glenn Mehrhoff ’78, Committee. and Stephen Jerabek Glen Mehrhoff ’70. ’70, majored in Gregg Billmeyer physical education at was a varsity soccer Southeast and later player who majored received a master’s in marketing. After degree from U.S. graduation in 1983, Gregg Billmeyer ‘83 Sports Academy. He he went on to recently retired from receive his MBA the Lindbergh School from Lindenwood University. In 1985, Glen Mehrhoff‘78 District where he Billmeyer joined Anheuser-Busch and coached the Lindbergh developed a broad business skill set High School soccer and track teams to through several promotions into areas numerous conference, district, sectional of increasing responsibility: 15 positions and state championships. Mehrhoff during a 21-year-career. He is currently was awarded the Jimmy Dunn Award senior director of marketing strategy as Outstanding Coach of the Greater and communication with the company. St. Louis Area and was selected as the Billmeyer is also Missouri State High School Soccer Coach involved with the of the Year in 1994. Mehrhoff holds the Southeast Missouri positions of president of the newly formed State University Southeast Missouri State University St. Louis Area Varsity Club and vice-president of the St. Corporate Marketing Louis Chapter of the Southeast Missouri Committee. State University Michael Grojean Alumni Association. was admitted as a Stephen Jerabek ’70, partner in Anders, was a St. Louis Police Minkler and Diehl, Michael Grojean ‘68 officer who recently an accounting firm, in died following the 1981. He is a Certified completion of a Public Accountant in both Missouri mandatory physical and Illinois. Grojean is responsible for fitness test. Jerabek organizing and directing the assurance was recognized on the and advisory services group. He is also an active member in the St. Louis Chapter of Stephen Jerabek, ‘70 Southeast campus as being an outstanding the Southeast Missouri State University football player who Alumni Association. had a distinguished career with the St. William P. McKenna ’69, ’98, majored in social studies at Southeast. In 1983, Louis police force.

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the show is about to begin A sneak preview of the inaugural season at the River Campus

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al Holbrook, St. Petersburg Ballet, Shaolin Warriors. Ring of Fire, Big River, Biloxi Blues. Orchestras, jazz ensembles, modern dancers. This is not the 2007-2008 line up for Carnegie Hall or Broadway, but Southeast Missouri State University’s new River Campus. This upcoming season of performances will herald a new era for the arts at Southeast and in the entire region. Upon completion of the River Campus, Southeast will be the only institution in the state to have a separate arts campus. Beautifully situated on the banks of the Mississippi River, the River Campus will house the School of Visual and Performing Arts in a unique blend of historic and modern facilities. Bob Cerchio, assistant director of the School of Visual and Performing Arts, is excited about the nearing completion of the facilities and the upcoming performance season. “It is just so wonderful to watch this vision grow into a reality a little more each day,” said Cerchio. “The River Campus is a great addition to Southeast that will increase the value of the

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education of our performing arts students, while also allowing us to bring in such major acts as Hal Holbrook and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. The entire community will share in the benefits of this magnificent new element of the University.” Season tickets for the Touring Series, Tickets may be the Symphony Series and the Theatre purchased by calling and Dance Series go on sale May 14. the Box Office at Tickets may be purchased by calling the (7) 1-. Box Office at (573) 651-2265. Singleevent tickets will be available June 25. “The River Campus is only going to open once, so we have spent a lot of time planning a fantastic season that will appeal to all ages and provide an opportunity for everyone to attend an event in the new venue,” said Cerchio. “We have everything from student and faculty performances to major international artists and productions.”

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2007-2008 toURing seRies 2002 and 2004. After returning to China for several years to work on the show, the monks are ready to make a triumphant return.

following is a sneak preview of the performances that will take place during the inaugural season: Shaolin Warriors Wednesday, October 31, 2007 In a fully choreographed theatrical production, the Shaolin Warriors bring the remarkable skill, stunning movement and spectacular imagery of Kung Fu to stages throughout the world. Performed by the Buddhist monks of the Shaolin Temple, a sect that has become known throughout the world for its disciplined spiritualism and deadly martial-arts prowess, the production features many forms of Shaolin Kung Fu as well as a look at the daily temple life of the monks and their Zen Buddhist philosophy. Shaolin Warriors is produced by China Performing Arts Agency Productions in Beijing in association with Columbia Artists Management International Ventures and performed by the authentic monks of the Shaolin Temple. These Kung Fu masters have trained from a very young age in mental and physical disciplines, which allow them to perform feats one thought only possible in the movies. Shaolin Warriors toured North America with great success in 2000, t h e

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American Indian Dance Theatre Saturday, November 3, 2007 Founded in 1987 by playwright/ director Hanay Geiogamah and produced by the late Barbara Schwei, this is the country’s leading Native American performing company. The 16-18 dancers, singers and musicians have performed to acclaim in virtually every state of the Union and have toured to theatres and festivals in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Australia, often with the support of the U.S. State Department. The company has taped two television specials for the PBS Great Performance Series, one of which was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award. Its multi-week engagements at the Joyce Theatre in New York City have regularly played to enthusiastic, sell-out audiences. In the last few seasons the troupe has performed in more than 50 cities, including a weeklong engagement for the Kennedy Center’s Youth and Family Program Division. During the 2007-2008 season, the company, whose members have

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been recruited from as many as 10 different tribes from across the nation, will offer a new production, portions of which premiered a few years ago at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts. St. petersburg Ballet: Swan Lake Thursday, January 17, 2008 In 1966, the company was founded as the first Theatre of Ballet in Russia under the management of the People’s Artist of Russia, Professor Peter Gusev. Gusev’s credentials included being an artist of Leningrad Opera and Ballet Theatre in Beijing, and ballet schools in Shanghai and Guanchjou; and a balletmaster in the Maly Opera and Ballet Theatre and then in the Novosibirsk Theatre. Since 2001 the post of Artistic Director has been held by the famous choreographer – People’s Artist of Russia, State Prize Laureate of Russia, and Laureate to International Ballet competition – Yuri Petukhov. The St. Petersburg Ballet constantly expands its sphere of activity. Its creativity has been accumulated over the years and the mastery of the high traditions of Russian Ballet is being passed on to a younger generation of artists, both Russian and foreign. Late Nite Catechism Friday, February 1, 2008 Now in its 11th year, Late Nite Catechism has brought its nostalgic kick to every u n i v e r s i t Y

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{“Holbrook’s characterization of the great novelist and raconteur is, to this day, a work in progress. The transformation is so complete as to be almost unsettling at times. The combination of Holbrook’s physical and vocal talents and the potency of Twain’s words is a mesmerizing thing to behold.” -Washington Post, Washington, D.C., November 16, 1996}

state in the U.S. as well as to Canada, the U.K., and Australia. Late Nite Catechism is an uproariously funny play that takes the audience back to their youth. The irrepressible “Sister” teaches class to a roomful of “students” (the audience). Throughout the course of the class the benevolent instructor rewards the “students” for correct answers with glow-in-the-dark rosaries and other nifty prizes. Naughty “students” may well find themselves on stage sitting in a corner reflecting their actions. However, even the most reluctant “students” will be clamoring to get into this Sister’s “class.”

{“It’s all very politically incorrect and very, very funny. Holbrook as Twain had the nearly full house screaming with laughter and crying for mercy. If you’d closed your eyes during Holbrook’s tour de force, you’d have sworn this was a contemporary commentary.” -The Desert Sun, Palm Desert, Calif., January 17, 1995 }

2007-2008 sYMPhonY seRies Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra November 6, 2007 Featuring Liesl Schoenberger on the violin. Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra, University Choir and Choral Union December 7 & 8, 2007 Performance of Handel’s Messiah Ring of Fire – The Music of the Man in Black Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra March 4, 2008

The music of the Man in Black ignites the stage in the new Broadway musical Ring of Fire, featuring 38 signature songs from the legendary Johnny Cash. Stories of passion, redemption, humor and salvation set the stage ablaze in this musical celebration of the world’s most favorite rebel. With favorites like “Walk the Line,” “Hurt,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “A Boy Named Sue,” and the title track, “Ring of Fire,” audiences will tap their toes, stomp their feet and shout for more. Hal Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight! Saturday, April 26, 2008 A LIVING BREATHING AMERICAN MASTERPIECE! It is, quite simply, one of the most acclaimed and enduring performances in the history of theatre. Nearly 50 years ago, a young actor took the stage in a tiny off-Broadway theatre and introduced the world to a man they’d never forget. The actor was Hal Holbrook. The man was Mark Twain.



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St. Louis Symphony Orchestra April 13, 2008 Founded in 1880, the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra (SLSO) is recognized internationally as an ensemble of the highest caliber, performing a broad musical repertoire with skill and spirit. In December 2003, the SLSO announced the appointment of its 12th and second American-born, Music Director, David Robertson. He began his inaugural season in September 2005, joining the SLSO after an 18-month international search. Prior to his Saint Louis Symphony appointment, Mr. Robertson was music director of the Orchestre National de Lyon and artistic director of the city’s auditorium. The Symphony expanded its audience through frequent tours of the Midwest and the East and West Coasts in the 1980s and 90s. Tours to Europe in 1985, 1993 and 1998, and to the Far East in 1986, 1990 and 1995, spread the reputation of the Orchestra throughout the world. Appearances at New York’s Carnegie Hall continue to garner critical acclaim. Recordings by the Symphony have been honored with six Grammy Awards and 56 Grammy nominations. The Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra was founded on the belief that great music should be available to everyone. Through a series of innovative and nationally recognized community-oriented activities, the musicians of the Symphony have shared their love for music with millions and introduced classical music to those who otherwise might not have been exposed to it. Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra and University Choir April 29, 2008 Featuring student winners of the annual Concerto/Aria competition.

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In addition to the Symphony Series, the Department of Music will present the following performances: Wind Symphony October 4, 2007 percussion Ensemble October 30, 2007 Jazz Ensemble November 1, 2007 University Choir November 15, 2007 Wind Symphony November 29, 2007 Jazz Festival February 14-16, 2008 Wind Symphony March 6, 2008 percussion Ensemble March 18, 2008 Jazz Concert April 22, 2008 Wind Symphony April 24, 2008 *Season tickets are not available for these events. t h e

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2007-2008 theatRe & DanCe seRies Big River October 24-28, 2007 The Theatre & Dance season will open with this hugely popular musical, adapted from the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. Fall Dance Concert November 8-10, 2007 Showcases the creative and sometimes quite avant-garde inspirations of aspiring choreographers. Coyote Ugly November 28-December 2, 2007 Explores the twisted psyches of its unique, damaged characters and will fascinate audiences with its audacious wit and wild swings between outrageous humor and chilling violence. Crimes of the Heart February 6-10, 2008 The story of three sisters who reunite at their family home in Mississippi, and try to make their tearful, hilarious way to a better day as they revisit long-ignored familial issues. Dance-apalooza 00 February 28-March 2, 2008 The larger dance concert of the season, features faculty and guest choreographers, state-of-theart, professional lighting, music, and costume design. It is a feast of the senses for all ages, and an inspiring collaboration of theatre, dance, art and music. Biloxi Blues April 10-12 & 18-20, 2008 The second of Neil Simon’s trilogy of semi-autobiographical plays, is a coming of age story of Eugene Jerome, a New York City Jew who is uprooted and transplanted to Biloxi, Mississippi, for basic training in the U.S. Army, in the final years of WWII. o f

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A LUMNI A L M A N A C Six Southeast Alumni to Receive Young Alumni Merit Award

The Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association recently selected six Southeast alumni to receive the 2007 Young Alumni Merit Award. The six will be honored at a commencement luncheon and recognized during spring commencement exercises on May 12.The Young Alumni Merit Award is given annually to honor those alumni, 37 years of age or younger, who have brought distinction to the University through professional growth, service and individual character. The Alumni Association chooses from a list of nominees representing each college and selects the recipients. Nominations may come from faculty, staff or alumni.

The 2007 Recipients: disease, working with multiple sclerosis and pioneering the application to pediatric populations, including children with cerebral palsy and Down syndrome. Dr. Fox received a doctorate in 2002 and has published over 50 pieces of work including articles, book chapters, media productions and research papers. She currently is a research associate at the National Center for Voice and Speech, a research lecturer in the department of neurology at the University of Arizona – Tucson, and executive vice president of the LSVT Foundation.

Andrew Comstock ’94,’00, graduated from Southeast with a bachelor of science in education and a master of arts in educational administration. Comstock attended Southeast on the President’s Scholarship, which he maintained all eight semesters. Upon graduation, Comstock began his career at New Madrid County Central High School, where he taught science and coached both football and track. In 2000, he left New Madrid to be the assistant principal at Sikeston Junior High School. After just one year in this role, he accepted a position as principal at the junior high. Comstock’s ultimate career goal is to become a superintendent at a public school. Dr. Cynthia Fox ’92, has done great things in the field of speech therapy since graduating from Southeast. After receiving her master’s just two years later at the University of Colorado – Boulder, she landed a research specialist position at the University of Arizona – Tucson doing voice therapy efficacy research for Parkinson disease. This position helped Dr. Fox find a passion for LSVT speech treatment in people with Parkinson disease, a treatment in which she has since become a world expert. She was the first to apply this treatment to disorders other than Parkinson

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City Chamber of Commerce as the director of conference development.

Mary-Katherine Landewee ’97, graduated with a bachelor of science in both agriculture business and animal science. In her final year at Southeast, she landed an internship with MFA Agri Services in Chaffee, Mo., working with their Precision Ag team. Upon graduation, Landewee was able to transition from intern to full-time precision ag specialist with Tracey Glenn ’95, graduated MFA. Her responsibilities included Global from Southeast with a degree in mass Position Satellite (GPS) grid soil sampling communication. During her college career, and working with growers to create soil Glenn also worked as a graphic designer fertility plans, among many other things. In with the Standard-Democrat Newspaper in Sikeston, Mo. Shortly before graduation, she 2000, Landewee became a Certified Crop Advisor (CCA) with the American Society of was able to land a graphic design position with the Southeast Missourian. This position, Agronomy. She was the first female employed by MFA, who employees one-third of all along with a year at Magna-Tel, would Missouri CCAs, to achieve this certification. help Glenn gain the experience necessary In 2004, Landewee made the move into her to prepare her for her future role as public information officer for Cape Girardeau, Mo. current position of area precision ag specialist, a role which places the precision ag activities She spent nearly ten years of four area locations under her command. as the voice of the city. In this post, Glenn published a variety of documents Cindy Mobley ’95, received a bachelor including newsletters, of science in marketing press releases and city from Southeast. Her senior publications. She also internship with Maritz produced and hosted Marketing Research a monthly television Inc. opened the door for program, coordinated and planned special Mobley, who was able to events, served as the media liaison, and transition into a full-time coordinated the overall public relation employee shortly after activities of Cape Girardeau. Glenn recently graduation. Her role with accepted a new position with the Jefferson Maritz Marketing Research Inc. grew quickly

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A LUMNI A L M A N A C from there. Through various positions with the company, Mobley has assisted with all or some of the costing, writing, design and final proposal for several prominent clients including Goodyear, Bank of America, Drury, Nationwide, Edward Jones and the American Cancer Society, among many others. Mobley now works as a product development manager, developing, supporting and managing research techniques and product offerings for Maritz. Nathan Springer ’97, transferred to Southeast from Bethany Lutheran College in 1994. He was able to maintain his already high grades and graduate with honors from the Department of Biology. Upon graduation, Springer was admitted to the doctoral program at the University of Minnesota. He completed his Ph.D. in Plant Biology in only three years, a program that takes most students between five and seven years to complete. During his doctoral program, Springer was the U.S.D.A. National Needs Fellow with the University of Minnesota. Since receiving his doctorate in 2000, he has worked as an associate professor at the University of Minnesota and published a number of articles, book chapters and abstracts. Springer also has done postdoctoral research on two grants from the National Science Foundation S o u t h e a s t N i g h t at B u s c h

Mark your calendars! Southeast Night at Busch Stadium is set for Friday, Sept. 14, 2007.  Don’t miss the excitement as the Cards take on rival Chicago Cubs. Tickets will be available soon. Visit www.semoalumni.com for up-to-date information on alumni events.

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ALUMNI MONDAY Alumni Monday, which was held March 12, 2007, brought 18 Southeast graduates back to campus to hold lectures and discussions with students about experiences in their careers. The spring event marks the third biannual Alumni Monday. Sponsored by the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association, Alumni Monday is designed to strengthen the Southeast community by providing students opportunities to learn from and network with successful Southeast graduates.  The event began in spring of 2006 and has quickly become a strong component of the Alumni Association’s overall program for alumni. According to Jane Stacy, director of alumni services and development, Alumni Monday has been well-received by faculty, students and alumni speakers alike. “It has just been a great experience all the way around,” said Stacy. “The professors are thrilled to have former students sharing

success stories. The alums are excited to come back to the University, and students enjoy hearing current professionals, who went through the same academic program, talk about what they can expect after graduation.” The March Alumni Monday event featured a variety of alumni speakers. From graphic designers to a member of the DEA, alumni from all different fields shared their experiences with students.

List of Speakers: Harrison College of Business n Gary Smith ’67, division president, AMDOCS - Clayton, Mo. n Cindy Mobley ’95, project development manager, Maritz Research - St. Peter’s, Mo. College of Education n Rich Payne ’83, director, Cape Girardeau Career and Technology Center – Cape Girardeau, Mo. n Dr. Beth Emmendorfer ’90, director of special services, Jackson R-2 School District – Jackson, Mo. College of Health & Human Services n Karen Fitzpatrick ’90, speech pathologist and owner, Prodigy Rehab - St. Charles, Mo. n Larry Gregory ’78, special agent, DEA, Cape Girardeau Regional Office – Cape Girardeau, Mo. n Frances Hemphill ‘96, social worker, Southeast Hospital – Cape Girardeau, Mo. College of Liberal Arts n Jeff Mozingo ’83, owner and president, Mozingo Music – O’Fallon, Mo. n Terri Foley ’02, historic preservation

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consultant - Cape Girardeau, Mo. n Amber Hughey Overbey ’02, publication designer/layout artist, Southeast Missourian – Cape Girardeau, Mo. n Jean Hampton ’04, graphic designer, Southeast Missourian – Cape Girardeau, Mo. School of Polytechnic Studies n Todd Marchi ’03, director of marketing and business development, Goedecke Company - Jackson, Mo. n Cassy Landewee ’79, area precision ag specialist, SEMO MFA Agri Services  - Chaffee, Mo. College of Science & Mathematics n Shawn Asmus ’94, software developer, Automation Services - Jackson, Mo. n Denise Dowling ’91, interpretive resource coordinator, Trail of Tears State Park – Cape Girardeau, Mo. n Nicolette (Nikki) Tanksley ’04, law student specializing in environmental law - St. Louis, Mo. n Dr. Kirby Keller ’69, technical fellow, Boeing Phantom Works - Chesterfield, Mo. n Jamie Chitester ’99, information technology manager, City Light, Gas & Water - Kennett, Mo.

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ClAss NOTES 10s Ruth Ann Hohler ‘33 is retired from teaching and lives in La Grange Park, a suburb of Chicago. She recently was awarded a 50-year pin (Key Women in Education) by Delta Kappa Gamma.

10s Helen Glazer (Fox) ‘45 lives in Bethesda, Md., with husband, Sidney. They have five children.

10s Geraldine Hahs (Neal) ‘52 is retired from teaching and lives in Oak Ridge, Tenn., with husband, Charles. John Heard ‘52 retired from Richland Blueprint, Inc., where he was vice president and partner. He lives in Bellville, Ohio, with wife, Lorraine. Audrey Johansson (Sutherlin) ‘56 and husband, Leo, are retired and living in Wasilla, Ark. Billy Murphy ‘57 retired as a pilot, but now works as a pilot instructor for Flight Safety International. He resides in Melbourne Beach, Fla., with wife, Ann. Fred Saalfeld ‘57 is a senior fellow at the Potomac Institute for Policy Study in Arlington, Va. He and wife, Elizabeth, live in Springfield, Va. Dennis Wheeler ‘57 retired from East Prairie Public Schools as the assistant superintendent. He now lives in Jackson, Mo., with wife, Lola. Rodney Mills ‘58 and wife, Joyce ‘78, are retired and living in St. Louis, Mo.

10s Lawrence Luetje ‘61 retired from teaching, but stays busy playing in the North Winds Concert Band, the St. Louis



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Wind Symphony, and the Rolling Thunder Brass Quintet, as well as conducting the Muny Band in Alton, Ill. Barbara Ardinger (Rohne) ‘63 is a freelance book editor and author in Long Beach, Calif. Timothy Patterson ‘63 recently retired as circuit judge, Division One, in Hillsboro, Mo. James Piatchek ‘63 is the owner and CEO of The Professional Disturber in Memphis, Tenn. He lives in Lakeland, Tenn., with wife, Sally. Dorothy Gardner (Harrison) ‘65 retired from the education field and is living in Matthews, Mo., with husband, Larry. Allan Crader ‘66 is vice president of L.J. Hart & Company in Chesterfield, Mo. Dennis Davis ‘66 is an attorney in private practice and a partner of Stinson Morrison Hecker. He resides in Kansas City, Mo. Carolyn Kennett-Jedlicka ‘66 has retired from teaching and lives in Columbia, Md., with husband, Richard. Nancy Rueter (Niehaus) ‘66 is a counselor at Garrisonville Elementary School in Stafford, Va., where she lives with husband, Gary. Patricia Carlton (Holt) ‘67 is a library media specialist for Columbia Public Schools in Columbia, Mo., and has two children. Robert Cox ‘67 is president of Cox and Associates, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His wife, Margaret ‘67, is the office manager of the company. Charlotte Deckelman (Mullen) ‘67 is a retired music teacher and resides in Williamsville, Mo., with husband, Howard. Alberta Dougan (Macke) ‘67 recently retired as chair of the Department of History

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and interim chair of the Department of Middle and Secondary Education at Southeast Missouri State University. Mary Lou England (Stender) ‘67 will soon retire as executive director of the Kane County Health Department, which she grew from 50 employees to 130 in just seven and a half years. Sandra Miller (DeClue) ‘67 is the registrar at Illinios Mathematics and Science Academy and lives in Yorkville, Ill. Grover Overstreet ‘67 and wife, Susan (Moses) ‘66, are retired and living in Fort Myers, Fla. Robert Scully ‘67 retired from the Missouri State Highway Patrol and currently resides in St Joseph, Mo., with wife, Patty. Jane Trease (Mifflin) ‘67 and husband, Kenneth ‘66, are retired and living in Spokane, Wash. Jane retired from teaching and Kenneth from the U.S. Air Force. Richard Hill ‘68 retired from education and moved to Weslaco, Texas, with wife, Yolanda, to start his own business. Lynette Williamson (Lewis) ‘68 has lived with husband, Robert, on a Dutch trawler since 2002. They have cruised the canals, lakes and rivers in the Netherlands, Belgium, and France as well as most the U.S. east coast. Larry Featherston ‘69 is the executive vice president of Bank 21, responsible for developing the Eastern Jackson County Missouri market. John Shoush ’69 passed away in Oklahoma City, Okla., March 21, 2007. He was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha and the basketball team at Southeast. Juanita Wyman (Rapp) ‘69 retired from the DeSoto School

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District 73. She is currently residing in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., and has two sons, Bryan and Todd.

170s Jim Anderson ‘70 resides in Kailua Kona, Hawaii. Oran Morgan ‘70 is a security program manager for IBM Global Services, and recently completed a master’s degree in information assurance from Norwich University. H Pieschel ‘70 is regional sales manager for Win Stuff/Good Stuff, LLC., and resides in Concord, N.C. Paul Hoffmann ‘71 is a field appraiser with the Cape Girardeau County Assessor’s Office. His wife, Debra (Hill),’75, is a business education teacher with the Jackson School District. William Marsh ‘71 is a videographer with Digital Memories in Salem, Ill. Wife, Katie ‘71, is the media center director for Nashville High School. Nora Zimmer (Reynolds) ‘71 is a system test analyst for Great-West Healthcare in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with husband, Michael. Nora is the regent of the Olde Towne Fenton chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Christopher Rainey ‘72 works with director-research and development at ScheringPlough in Memphis, Tenn. He and wife, Patricia ‘74, a realtor with Crye-Leike Realtors, have two children. Diana Scott ‘72 is a teacher for the Brantley City Board of Education in Nahunta, Ga. Maury Yzaguirre (Reardon) ‘72 is a teacher at Moreno Valley USD in Highland, Calif. Elwood Doss ‘73 is piano technician and technical

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director for the Department of Music at University of Tennessee - Martin Tedra Gee (Mosley) ‘73 is the librarian for W.O. Inman Middle School in Paris, Tenn., and has two children. Stuart Jones ‘73 is president of CPU, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Mo., where he lives with wife, Gail (Kohlfeld) ‘74. Brenda McCowan (Schlimpert) ‘73 is the director of finance for Cape Public Schools in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Gerald Portman ‘73 is the director of cooperating schools at the University of Iowa. He and wife, Tarrell ‘81, live in Riverside, Iowa, and have three children. Martin Roth ‘73 is retired from the controller’s office at Southeast Missouri State University. He and his wife, Betty, have three children, Brian, Kevin and Christopher. Jane Winfield (Jones) ‘73 is a math teacher at Brentwood Academy in Nashville, Tenn., where she lives with husband, Jerry. Bruce Bufford ‘74 is an education & training liaison for Arbor Education & Training in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lives with wife, Brenda. They have one child. Russell Crawford ‘74 is the director of student services for High Tech Central in Ft. Myers, Fla. Don Slazinik ‘74 was nominated by President George W. Bush for the position of U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Illinois. He and wife, Debbra (Hall) ‘75, live in O’Fallon, Ill. Monica Stein (Heuring) ‘74 is a legal secretary for the Office of the Attorney General in Mesa, Ariz. James Gosche ‘75 is vice president of Alliance Bank in Oran, Mo. He lives in Cape s p r i n g

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C L A SS N O T E S Girardeau, Mo., with wife, Mary (Staebel) ‘74, a human development specialist for the University of Missouri Extension Service James Keathley ‘75 was recently appointed superintendent of the Missouri State Highway Patrol by Governor Matt Blunt and will hold the rank of colonel. Debra Nelson (Evans) ‘75 retired from the education profession at Scott County R-4 School District. Debra has two daughters and lives in Sikeston, Mo. Roger Arledge ‘76 is a worship pastor in Denver, Colo. Hubert Guillet ‘77 is marketing manager for ACE, and lives in Quimper, France, with wife, Agnes, and family.

pilot with United Parcel Service. Rod has four children and resides in Louisville, Ky.

1980s Lisa Bertrand (McClard) ‘80 is an associate professor at Southeast Missouri State University. She lives in Cape Girardeau, Mo., with husband, Charles ‘68, who is retired from the education field and owns Spanish Street Mercantile. Kevin Billings ‘80 is a career special agent with the U.S. Secret Service and president of EPIC Security Solutions living in Maitland, Fla. Glenna Lucas (Miller) ‘80 is a special education teacher at North County Middle School

Walter Kolan ‘78 is a new construction engineer with Alliance Water Resources in O’Fallon, Mo. Shari Napier (Uelsmann) ‘78 is a habilitation specialist with Montgomery County MR/DD and lives in Springboro, Ohio. Robert Butler ‘79 practices general dentistry in Webster Groves, Mo. He was recently selected to serve on the American Dental Association Council on Government Affairs. Teresa DeMattei (DeLeonardo) ‘79 is a second grade teacher for Centralia Illinois City Schools. Teresa and husband, JJ, have two sons who currently attend Southeast. Rodney Maddux ‘79 is a chief THE

State University, and is married with two children.

Terry Parker (Bruegenhemke) ‘81 is a women’s health nurse practitioner at Spectrum Health Care in Colorado Springs, Colo., where she lives with husband, Tony. They have two children, Ashley and Tony.

Daniel Fieser ‘83 is lab manager at St. Francis Medical Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Wife, Mary (Higgerson) ‘84, is a teacher at Immaculate Conception School in Jackson, Mo. They have two daughters.

Tarrell Portman (Cato) ‘81 is an associate professor and the coordinator for school counseling and counselor education and supervision programs at the University of Iowa. She and husband, Gerald ‘73, live in Riverside, Iowa, and have three children. Deborah Schrader (Proctor) ‘81 is a customer service and production scheduling supervisor for ThyssenKrupp

Eugene Nolen ‘83 is a network system engineer for Southeast Missouri State University. Penny Shelton (Stone) ‘83 is an acute care nurse practitioner in Waxham, N.C., where she lives with husband, Michael ‘82, who is a national escalation manager with Metrocities Mortgage. They have three children. William Goodman ‘84 has been promoted to captain

Enjoy reading about your fellow alums? They would enjoy reading about you too! Visit semoalumni.com to update your class note information.

Bonnie Kirchhoff (Tarbox) ‘77 is a compliance mangager for Evolutions and is married to Tim ‘77. Linda Null (Mitchell) ‘77 is the math consultant for the Southeast Regional Professional Development Center. She and husband, Harold, have two children and live in Wappapello, Mo.

where he lives with wife, Tracy. He has two children.

in Park Hills, Mo. She has four children and is married to Norman. Karim Mansouri ‘80 is a managing director for M & I Construction and lives in Arden, N.C., with wife, Olga. They have one child, Alessia. Donna Morrison (Schweizer) ‘80 is a marketing consultant with Deer Park Group, Inc. She and husband, Tom, live in Palatine, Ill., and have two children. Timothy Roth ‘80 is the interactive sales manager for KHOU-TV in Houston, Texas. He and wife, Gail, live in Spring, Texas, and have two children, Elizabeth and Jake. Cheryl Van Denburg ‘80 is an adjuct faculty member and a clinical psychologist for the counseling and psychological service at the University of Montana. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology. David Fiebig ‘81 is a manger for Verizon in Affton, Mo.,

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Waupaca Co. in Tell City, Ind. Ellen Seyer (Gruber) ‘81 is the director of music for Notre Dame Regional High School in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Husband, Dennis ‘69, is a professor in theatre & dance at Southeast and has hosted Broadway Melodies on KRCU 90.9. They have two children, Sean and Geoffrey. Michael Ward ‘81 is the vice president of sales for American Express Incentive Services in St. Louis, Mo., where he lives with wife, Kim. They have two children, Katie and Kelly. Douglas Richards ‘82 is an attorney living in Wildwood, Mo., with wife, Kelly. They have three children. Randy Wilkinson ‘82 works for Edward Jones Company and lives in St. Charles, Mo. Bruce Baker ‘83 is vice president of Innovative Chemical Technologies in Canton, Ga. He has a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Iowa

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in the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps aboard the U.S.S. Winston S. Churchill. Paul James ‘84 is supervisor for Mid America Hotel Corporations. Wife, Sherry (Douglas) ‘85, is the owner of Comfort Keepers in Cape Girardeau, Mo. They have two sons. Bryan McGraw ‘84 is assitant director for the National Archives & Records Administration, and lives in Imperial, Mo. Cynthia Gannon ‘85 is the associate athletic director for Southeast Missouri State University. Tricia Halferty (Lewis) ‘85 is assistant director of online communications for Taylor University in Fort Wayne, Ind., where she lives with husband, Michael. They have two children. Cheryl McAllister (Jarrell) ‘85 is assistant professor of math at Southeast Missouri

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State University. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics education in 2005. Randall Moallankamp ‘85 works as a telecommunications specialist with the Illinois State Police in Ullin, Ill. Timothy Seyer ‘85 is general manager of Commercial Casework, Inc. in Fremont, Calif., where he lives with wife, Janell. They have four children. Alan Winton ‘85 is a U.S. probation officer for the United States District Court in Long Beach, Calif. Darryl Yarber ‘85 is a broker for Show Me Realty, Inc. in Decatur, Ga. Robin Boyle (Krause) ‘86 is director of finance for Cambridge Engineering in Chesterfield, Mo. Robin and husband, Patrick, have four children. Myra Dean (Mayfield) ‘86 is the business public affairs leader for The Dow Chemical Company. She and husband, Victor, have three children and live in Midland, Mich. John Hensel ‘86 is president and CEO of Hensel Enterprises in Palm Beach, Fla. Erin Reilly ‘86 is working as an associate professor at Auburn University-Montgomery and lives in Montgomery, Ala. Dwayne Blumenberg ‘87 is an IT strategist for SYSCO Corporation in Houston, Texas. Bobbi Morris (Whitnel) ‘87 is a faculty member with the Southeast Missouri State University Deptartment of Nursing and is the director of the S.H.O.W. Mobile. Zena Onstott (Buchanan) ‘87 is purchasing supervisor for Collins & Aikman Company and lives in Tuscola, Ill.

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ClAss NOTES theresa perry (layton) ‘87 is working as park manager at the lake Cascade State Park in Cascade, idaho. She and husband, russell, have one child, harmony.

ronald Beaton ‘89 is senior supervisor facilities planning with Centocor biologics, llC. in St. louis, Mo. he and wife, Janet (lutterman) ‘98, have three children

theodore hutchins ‘90 is a partner with the Denton & keulermakes law firm, and lives in Paducah, ky., with wife, Monica. they have two children.

university School of Medicine. husband, Bruce ‘91, is a deputy sheriff with the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department. they have two children and live in Valmeyer, ill.

Stephen crain ‘88 is the executive director for Missouri rehab Center in Mount Vernon, Mo.

Mike Brey ‘89 is athletic director for alton high School. he lives in godfrey, ill., with wife, elizabeth.

Jeffrey laatsch ‘90 is controller for hyatt Palm Springs, and is currently residing in Desert hot Springs, Calif.

Stephanie franks (Bond) ‘88 is employed as an associate professor in the nursing department at St. louis Community College. Stephanie and husband, Mike, have one daughter and live in St. louis, Mo.

christopher carr ‘89 is a software engineer for enterprise rent-a-Car in Clayton, Mo. he and wife, anne, have two sons.

Jane Nicholas (rodgers) ‘90 is a public service assistant with the Missouri Department of Conservation nature Center, and lives in jackson, Mo.

Daniel Jensen ‘92 retired from the military and is a doctoral candidate at Penn State university. Daniel is married to Kristi (Nevels) ‘94.

robert gilot ‘88 is the regional business director for novo nordisk. he and wife, gerri, have four children Juan Medina ‘88 is president of thread and trim Suppliers in Choloma, honduras, where he lives with wife, Maricruz. they have two children. thomas Neff ‘88 is an environmental review coordinator for the city of kansas City, Mo., and lives in Morningside with wife, leah. they have two children.



t h e

theresa vineyard (Stimley) ‘89 is chief financial officer for north Central baptist hospital in San antonio, texas.

10s Karen fitzpatrick (versheldon) ‘90 founded Prodigy rehab, a speech and occupational therapy company, and has since received an award for continuing education from the american Speech-language-hearing association. She husband, bill, live in St. Peters, Mo., and have two sons, brennan and nolan.

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Sherri giron ‘91 is a flight attendant with american airlines based out of new york, n.y. Sherri and husband, Steven, live in fullerton, Calif. connie hughes (tropf) ‘91 is the librarian for bell City Schools in bell City, Mo. She and husband, Stephen, have two children.

Michele Moon (lariviere) ‘92 is the director of birthright in Cape girardeau, Mo., where she lives with husband, Scott. Joan Scannell ‘92 is a nurse clinician at northwestern Memorial hospital in Chicago, ill. James adair ‘93 is assistant professor of mathematics at Missouri Valley College in Marshall, Mo. he and wife, janet, have two children. Jeffrey allen ‘93 is vice president at Wireless asset group in St. Charles, Mo.

Michael reber ‘91 is the director of the School of education at northern Marianas College, and lives in Saipan Mariana islands, MP, with wife, kayoko.

connie gerard (otto) ‘93 is vice president at u.S. bank in St. louis, Mo. She and husband, john, have two children.

toni Whipple ‘91 is a clinical nurse manager at Washington

Brandi greene (Springmeyer) ‘93 and

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husband, Colin, recently celebrated the birth of son harrison. they live in Woodstock, ga. ron Mccormick ‘93 has been appointed second district associate county commissioner for Scott County by Missouri governor Matt blunt. ron lives in benton, Mo., and is owner of a&b Cleaners in Sikeston. christopher abernathy ‘94 is a training and development specialist for Shelter insurance Company in Columbia, Mo., where he lives with wife, Michelle. Edward Balsmann ‘94 is general counsel and chief compliance officer for Consulting Services group, llC in Memphis, tenn. laura Bernet (pierce) ‘94 is a self-empolyed music therapist, married and living in lawrence, kan. Stephen Blackman ‘94 is principal at Sikeston high School in Sikeston, Mo. he and wife, amy ‘98, have three children Shelia Burkhalter (higgs) ‘94 is director of first year

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C L A SS N O T E S experience at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, and recently became the chair of the NASP Undergraduate Fellows Program Board. Shelia and husband, Tim, have one daughter. Mary Henckell (Jones) ‘94 is director of user services for Southeast Missouri State University, and recently received her doctorate in educational leadership and policy analysis. Barbara Loggins ‘94 is president and CEO of Stategy Source in Houston, Texas. Robert McAlister ‘94 is an agriculture teacher at Century High School in Ullin, Ill. Wife, Leah (Allstun) ‘97, is a library assistant at Southeast Missouri State University. Richard Potter ‘94 is a corporate financial controller for DeWitt Company, Inc. in Sikeston, Mo. He and wife, Johnna, have two children, Melissa and Richard. Angela Webb (Hinton) ‘94 is owner of Staged to Sell in Waconia, Minn. She and husband, Kevin, have two sons. Aaron Barbee ‘95 is tech center manager and instructor at Missouri College in St. Louis, Mo. In 2006, he was honored as Instructor of the Year at Missouri College. He and wife, Amy, have one son. Dwayne Griffey ‘95 recently returned home from a yearlong tour of duty in Iraq, and is to be stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., as an instructor for new recruits going to Iraq. He and wife, Kimberlee, have one daughter, Ava. Joaquin Nuevo Alarcon ‘95 is the manager for Comprarcasa Neuvo Alarcon in Sevilla, Spain. He and wife, Carmen, have one daughter. Jule Peukert (Hagan) ‘95 is a junior high teacher in Vicksburg, Miss., where she lives with husband, John ‘95. Julie Smith (Heintz) ‘95 is a nutritional consultant at THE

Wellpoint in St. Louis, Mo. Arthur Yarbrough ‘95 is the project director for strategic initiatives at the American Cancer Society in Kansas City, Mo. Tiffany Yeast (Ford) ‘95 works for the Commonwealth of Kentucky as executive director of human resources, Commerce Cabinet. She and husband, Terence, reside in Harrodsburg, Ky. Jamie Ehling-Spaulding ‘96 works for Dippin’ Dots Franchising, Inc. in Paducah, Ky. She and husband, Richard, have two children. Toni Hill (Dawson) ‘96 is the superintendent of the Portageville School District in Portageville, Mo.

‘03, technical director for Raycom Communications, and their daughter. Stephanie Ellinger (Baker) ‘97 is employed by the Cape Girardeau School District as a parent educator with Cape Parents as Teachers. Stephanie Evelsizer (Rau) ‘97 is a third grade teacher at Ste. Genevieve Elementary School in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., where she earned the teaching profession’s top crediential by achieving National Board Certification in 2006. Laura Matlock (Nance) ‘97 is a junior high teacher with the Cape Girardeau Public Schools, and lives in Jackson, Mo., with husband Gary and three children.

Jayne Hollensbe (Jauch) ‘96 is a teacher in St. Charles, Mo., where she lives with husband, Richard ‘96, who is employed by AT&T. They recently celebrated the birth of their second son.

Nicole Obert (Schoob) ‘97 is a research assistant at Texas A & M, and lives in League City, Texas, with husband, Daniel ‘99, a reinsurance manager with American National Insurance Company.

Ryan Kasten ‘96 holds a Master’s of Music in pipe organ performance from the University of Nebraska and recently graduated with a Master’s of Music in choral conducting from Florida State University. He lives in Tallahassee, Fla.

Bruce Skinner ‘97 is director for housing and residence life at Southeast Missouri State University.

Christine Mah (Petitt)‘96 is business manager at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa. Jennifer Smith (Gertz) ‘96 works as accounting manager for BusComm Inc. in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Deric, have two sons. Jeffrey Barker ‘97 is the quality assurance manger of LeroySomer, and lives with wife, Heather, in Wildersville, Tenn. Daniel Bline ‘97 is an FMA tax manager for Ernst & Young, LLP. He and wife, Julie, live in Racine, Wis., with their three children. Heather Dickerson (Foreman) ‘97 works for AT&T in Cape Girardeau, Mo., where she lives with husband, Derek

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Marianne Targonski ‘97 is a crime analyst with the Evanston Police Department, and recently married Joseph in Tulum, Mexico. Alicia Westerhold ‘97 is a GIS analyst for SAIC Corporation in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with husband Scott. Amy Blackman (Crosier) ‘98 is the director of the Southeast Missouri State University Child Enrichment Center. She and husband, Brad ‘94, live in Sikeston, Mo., and have three children. Michael Chappell ‘98 is an instructional media specialist at Logan College of Chiropractic in Chesterfield, Mo. Amy Gibson (Follmer) ‘98 is married to Joe ‘96, and they are living in Ballwin, Mo. Joe is a financial analyst with Edward Jones.

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Travis Hux ‘98 is assistant director of human resources for Raytown C-2 School District and lives in Kansas City, Mo. Anthony Kimbrough ‘98 is a budget officer with USAF in Tucson, Ariz., where he lives with wife, Jennifer. Charles Kish Jr ‘98 is the assistant men’s basketball coach and wellness center director at Mineral Area College in Park Hills, Mo. Jeremy Koerber ‘98 started a personal training and consultation business in St. Louis, Mo. He is also employed by BJC HealthCare as their lead exercise specialist. Darin Pettit ‘98 is a conservation agent with the Department of Conservation in Cape Girardeau, Mo. He and wife, Autumn (Masterson) ‘97, a unit supervisor for the Board of Probation and Parole in Charleston, Mo., have two children, Scout and Cooper. Jennifer Phillips (Kelly) ‘98 is a volunteer and community education coordinator for the Alzheimer’s Association in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with her husband and their first child, Logan. In 2006, she was selected as the Volunteer of the Year by the St. Louis CVD Rick Smith ‘98 is a financial advisor for Edward Jones Investments. He and wife, Dana ‘99, live in Lexington, Mo., with daughter, Eva. Melynda Barks (Bell) ‘99 is an instructor at Mineral Area College in Park Hills, Mo., and lives in Farmington, Mo., with husband, Tracey ‘85, owner of DSL Computer Systems. Bryan Beattie ‘99 is senior accountant with Interface Security Systems, LLC in Earth City, Mo. He and wife, Chelsea ‘99, business development account manger for The Growth Partnership, Inc., have one son and reside in St. Peters, Mo.

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Jennifer Bollinger (Ulrich) ‘99 is a parts sales administrator for CPAC, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Mo. She and husband, Terry, recently celebrated the birth of their first child, Nadia. Amanda Branham ‘99 works for the Commonwealth of Kentucky as a staff attorney. She resides in Kevil, Ky. Christopher Carlton ‘99 is the assistant vice president of finance at LaSalle Bank Corporation in Chicago, Ill. Aaron Chandler ‘99 works for Music Center in Kirkwood, Mo. He and wife, Erica ‘98, media coordinator for Fox Associates, live in Affton, Mo., and have one son, Aaron. Kevin Clark ‘99 is an attorney with Boggs, Boggs, and Bates and resides in Fenton, Mo., with wife Jamie. William Clifton ‘99 is the financial center manager for Branch Banking and Trust in Paducah, Ky. Larissa Cutsinger (Sybert) ‘99 is an elementary music teacher in Waynesville, Mo. Larissa, and husband, John, have two children. Edward Francis ‘99 is a hospital supply representative with Cardinal Health. He and wife, Wendy (Welter) ‘00, live in Olathe, Kan., with their two children. Dustin Fritsche ‘99 is resident director at the University of Illinois - Champaign in Champaign, Ill. He and wife, Amy ‘99, have two children. Rhonda Gayheart (Banks) ‘99 is a speech pathologist in Hindman, Ky. She and husband, Michael, have three children. Jennifer James ‘99 started her own graphic design business JenInTheCity Design, located in Chicago, Ill. Marci Montrose ‘99 is a natural resources management park ranger for the U.S.

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C L A SS N O T E S Army Corps of Engineers in Connecticut. In January 2007, she was featured on the show Dirty Jobs for work on the Stamford Hurricane Barrier. Nancy Phillips (Muegge) ‘99 is living in Blacklick, Ohio, with husband, Matt, and their child, Evan. Joseph Roussin ‘99 is a demand planner with Energizer. He and wife, Julie, currently reside in Festus, Mo. Dana Smith (Maldonado) ‘99 is an account executive with Ikon Office Solutions. She and husband, Rick ‘98, live in Lexington, Mo., with daughter, Eva. Jerry Wolsey ‘99 is a Missouri district manager with Security Services of Missouri and lives in Cape Girardeau, with wife, Amy.

2000s Stephen Bauer ‘00 is the director at American Humanics in Kansas City, Mo. He and wife, Laura, recently welcomed a baby boy into the world. Edwin Blanton ‘00 served in the U.S. Peace Corps in 2004-2005 as a youth and community development volunteer, and is co-founder of a non profit organization, Ready, Willing, Enable!, Inc. Heather Fisher (Verhines) ‘00 is assistant director and training coordinator for child care and referral at Southeast Missouri State University. Rachel Kingree (Phillips) ‘00 has completed medical school and is doing her residency at University Hospital in Columbia, Mo., where she lives with husband, Matt ‘99, and their two daughters. James Lingle ‘00 works in risk management for First Banks, Inc. He and wife, Rebecca ‘99, a teacher for the Washington School District, live in Washington, Mo., with son, William.

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Kristin Lohman (Stanger) ‘00 is a teacher with Fox C-6 School District and lives in Eureka, Mo. Kathryn Majeed-Ali ‘00 is event manager for The Mayflower Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C. Justin McCullough ‘00 has been promoted to the rank of corporal and designated assistant zone commander of Zone 7, Dent County, with the Missouri State Highway Patrol. John Peukert ‘00 is an archeologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He lives in Vicksburg, Miss., with wife Jule (Hagan) ‘95. Danielle Reynolds ‘00 is resource manager for Rose International in Chesterfield, Mo. She recently celebrated the birth of her son, Quinn. Julie Schaefer ‘00 is a project manger for Rocio Romero LLC and lives in Ste. Genevieve, Mo. She recently received a Master’s of Architecture Degree from Tulane University. Heather Schuckenbrock ‘00 is a counselor for HCADA and resides in Hannibal, Mo. Joanna Shaver ‘00 was hired as coordinator for campus programming at Southeast Missouri State University. She and husband, Phillip ‘02, operations manager for Rhodes 101, live in Scott City , Mo. Kathy White (Gooch) ‘00 is the director of the nursing program at Pemiscott County Vocational School in Hayti, Mo. She and husband, Johnny, live in Hornersville, Mo., with three children. Garvin Ambrose ‘01 graduated from Thomas M. Cooley Law School and was admitted to the State Bar of Illinois. He is now an attorney with the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office in Chicago, Ill. Colleen Barry ‘01 resides in South Boston, Mass., where she is senior scientist for

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Calloway Labs. Jamie Clark ‘01 is senior internal auditor for Brown Shoe Company in St. Louis. Jamie and husband, Kevin ‘99, reside in Fenton, Mo. Courtney Haarlow ‘01 is a staff attorney with IBM Corporation in Chicago, Ill., and recently celebrated her marriage to John. Yen Hua Hsu ‘01 is export manager for Sweet Garden Biotechnology Food Company and lives in Taichung County, Taiwan. Joyce Mayaka ‘01 is an MOU data analyst with Onvoy, Inc. in Minneapolis, Minn., and recently celebrated the birth of Deandre’. Jessica Ozkok (Spirk) ‘01 is a teacher for the Rockwood School District and resides in Fenton, Mo., with husband, Bahattin ‘05, and their child, Jordan. Aaron Spratt ‘01 is married to Lisa Spratt ‘02, and they reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Aaron is assistant district supervisor and Lisa is a claims adjudicator for the State of Missouri Disablility Determinations. Michelle Wooldridge (Kissinger) ‘01 is an administrative assistant at Southeast Missouri State University. Her and husband, David, live in McClure, Ill., and have two sons, Alex and Jacob. Allyson Bird (Byrd) ‘02 is a music teacher for the Sparta R-III School District and resides in Ozark, Mo. Elizabeth Foster (Hutchcraft) ‘02 is an accountant with People’s First Community Bank in Panama City, Fla., where she lives with husband, Charles, and their one-year-old son. Joshua Hester ‘02 works for Meramec Regional Planning Commission in St. James, Mo.

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Phillip Kaser ‘02 is working as a commercial banker and loan officer at U.S. Bank in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Juliana Ott ‘02 is the assistant vice president at First Bank in Creve Coeur, Mo. Daniel Smiley ‘02 recently received a master’s degree from Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia in Madison, Tenn. He and wife, Amy ‘03, live in Goodlettsville, Tenn. Patricia Van Dyne (Sander) ‘02 is a staff accountant for Brown, Smith, Wallace, LLC., and lives in Hazelwood, Mo. Jeremy Wells ‘02 has been accepted into the Ph.D. program in environmental design and planning at Clemson University. He and wife, Jeanne, recently moved to Central, S.C. Leslie Williams ‘02 is a customer service associate with Apria Healthcare in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Erica Wilson ‘02 is working for Ernst & Young LLP in Clayton. She and husband, Lance, reside in St. Charles, Mo. Patricia Farley (Cooper) ‘03 is an elementary principal in Steele, Mo. This spring, she was selected as Southeast Missouri Distinguished Principal by the Missouri Association for Elementary School Principals. Tiffany Ferrell ‘03 is a member of the Florida Highway Patrol and resides in Sarasota, Fla. Jessica Leggett ‘03 is currently working as apartment life coordinator at the University of California - Irvine. Mitchell Ogles ‘03 will be graduating from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center with an M.D. in May ‘07 and has been accepted into a Urology residency position at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss. Mitch is married to Julie (Hogan) ‘03.

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Russell Oliver ‘03 recently graduated from law school at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. Russell and wife, Jennifer, are returning to Bloomfield, Mo., where he will work in a law firm . Erica Reno ‘03 was promoted to branch manger of Bank Star of the Bootheel in Caruthersville, Mo. Nicholas Risch ‘03 is the chief financial officer at DMR Events, Inc. in Washington, Mo., and recently celebrated his marriage to Nicole. Rachel Sigel ‘03 is employed by Metro West Anesthesia Group as office coordinator and lives in St. Louis, Mo. Lisa Vandergraaf ‘03 is a special security officer in the U.S. Air Force and lives in Mount Holly, N.J. Kristen White ‘03 lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, with husband, Jacob. Lisa Baxter ‘04 works as a teacher for the Kirkwood Early Childhood Center in St. Louis, Mo. Melissa Bradley ‘04 is a teacher with Fox C-6 School District in the St. Louis area, where she lives with husband, Richard ‘04. Katie Bremer ‘04 is a registered nurse at St. John’s Mercy Medical Center in St. Louis, Mo. Krista Coleman ‘04 works as an advertising coordinator for Aqua Glass Corporation and lives in Savannah, Tenn. Erin Corkery ‘04 serves as human resources coordinator for Maritz, Inc. in Fenton, Mo. Ryan Fear ‘04 is logistics manager for Pepsi Mid America and lives in Anna, Ill. Scott Hayles ‘04 is a registered nurse at North Kansas City Hopsital in Kansas City, Mo.

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ClAss NOTES Krista hulsey ‘04 is a teacher at belgrade elementary School. She and husband, Christopher, have one son. adriana Meder (vasquez) ‘04 teaches Spanish at fort Zumwalt high School. She and husband, fred, live in troy, Mo. Bryan Schmid ‘04 is employed as a county extension agent-agriculture with the university of arkansas Division of agriculture Cooperative extension Service job. he currently resides in Clarkedale, ark. Daniel Schuh ‘04 is a seventh grade social studies teacher for affton School District in St. louis, Mo., where he lives with wife, alicia. Jessie Walker ‘04 works for Parents as teachers through Sikeston Public Schools in Sikeston, Mo. She and husband, Calvin, have two children. Megan Wilson ‘04 is a sales analyst for ooCl, inc. in Memphis, tenn. David Blanton ‘05 is vice president for Xtreme exhibits in St. louis, Mo. John Bloecher ‘05 is assistant superintendent at Colonial Country Club in Memphis, tenn. Jessie canoy (lincoln) ‘05 works for educare as a parent educator. She and husband, Christopher, recently celebrated the birth of a child. christina ciluffo ‘05 is hospitality services manager at aVP, inc. and lives in St. Charles, Mo. Brian coleman ‘05 is center manager for fed ex kinko in the St. louis area. Matthew feldt ‘05 is the coordinator of annual fund at Southeast Missouri State university. Daniel frierdich ‘05 works as event specialist and student activities board advisor for Saint louis univeristy. Jennifer fritsche (favier) ‘05 is a human resources assistant at falcon foam and lives in Perryville, Mo., with husband, john. angela hester ‘05 is a sales rep for Chemsearch in St. louis, Mo., and recently celebrated her marriage to Scott. t h e

rowdY’s NEST

Dianna Karnes ‘05 teaches at Saint Vincent De Paul School and was selected as the 2006 Chamber of Commerce teacher of the year in Cape girardeau, Mo. Kristopher Keller ‘05 is an athletic trainer for bothwell regional health Center, and recently married Kelly Beahon ‘03, who is the general manager of holiday inn express in Columbia, Mo. Maggie Kollmeyer ‘05 is a graphic designer at Crown Valley Winery in Ste. genevieve, Mo. Stephanie Nugent (Weeks) ‘05 is a contract administration assistant for insituform technologies, inc. in St. louis, Mo. richard ogles ‘05 is a second year medical student at the university of tennessee health Science Center in Memphis, tenn. he is married to amy (Dewrock) ‘05, who is a financial analyst with autoZone Corp. Bahattin ozkok ‘05 is a Software engineer for Varian Medical Systems and lives in fenton, Mo., with wife, Jessica ‘03, and child, jordan. Kristin pender (house) ‘05 is employed by big brothers big Sisters as a school based manager in Cape girardeau, Mo. She lives in jackson, Mo., with husband, brian, and daughter, alyssa. adam rhodes ‘05 is a graphic designer for Creative School Zone and lives in east Prairie, Mo., with wife, Caitlyn. Dana Spinks (Essner) ‘05 is a program specialist with StayWell health Management in fenton, Mo., and recently married Philip. Emily Wilson ‘05 is a stage management intern at the julliard School in new york, n.y. Bethany Winschel ‘05 is employed as service coordinator for Missouri first Steps at Southeast Missouri State university. christopher Miller ‘06 is a physical education teacher and boys basketball coach for Southern reynolds County r-2 School. he recently married Carissa.

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Rowdy takes a dip Spring is in the air, and so are many of my feathered friends, back from the south after a long winter break. While i may not have been away for winter (i just crashed on campus. Call me crazy for passing up a 1,000-mile flight to catch some awesome Southeast athletic action), i must say i am looking forward to enjoying this great weather with the rest of the flock. now don’t get me wrong. i’m going to be right there for all the summer sports action, but even i feel the need to stretch my wings and relax at the pool. unfortunately, some of the best spots have already been taken. the sweet cement birdbath on the Courthouse lawn in downtown Cape is overrun with blue jays and cardinals (like i would want to be seen at that overpriced fashion show anyway). the fountain in front of kent library is definitely the most popular swimming hole for the more hardcore water-favoring avian. i won’t even start on the pond at Capaha Park. let’s just say things get a little too territorial there for my taste. but i’m not even sweating it, although with this humidity, i will be before long. the new Southeast aquatic Center is coming soon and that’s the place to be for the who’s who of fun-loving fowl such as myself. With a recreational pool, whirlpool and a six-lane, 25-yard lap pool, why would i want to be caught anywhere else? besides, i get a free pass. but don’t think i’ll just be lounging around the pool all year. i have to start preparing for my big audition at the river Campus. to get in shape for the grand october opening of the river Campus, i’ll be swimming laps at the aquatic Center on a daily basis. Who knows? by october, i may be able to celebrate the opening of the only campus in the state dedicated to art, dance, music and the performing arts by swimming across the Mississippi river. oh heck, maybe i’ll just fly!

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Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association One Univeristy Plaza MS 7300 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4799

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Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University  

Spring 2007 Issue #3

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