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SOUTHEAST THEMAGAZINEOFSOUTHEASTMISSOURISTATEUNIVERSITY

Fall 2009

LEAVING HOME First-Year Students Move Into Southeast & Life On Their Own

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HOMECOMING ‘09

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INVESTING IN THE FUTURE


Volume 4, Issue 2 THE MAGAZINE OF SO U T H EA S T M I S S OURI STAT E U N I V E R S I T Y

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Fall 2009 The mission of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is to bring the vitality that is Southeast Missouri State University into the lives of its alumni and friends… and to promote the cause of the University most effectively through its editorial focus on interesting people and interesting ideas… Experience Southeast…Experience Success.

Dear Friends, The Fall 2009 semester is already in full swing, and we have much exciting news to report. First, I’m pleased to announce that Southeast has continued its unprecedented growth with fall enrollment climbing to nearly 11,000 students. Our beginning freshmen class has exceeded 1,800 for the third year in a row, and we’re experiencing increases in most of our regional campus classes, in our minority student population, in our international students, and in the academic preparedness of our students. We opened yet another 300-bed residence Kenneth W. Dobbins hall to help house our more than 2,800 students President living on campus. We also have several outstanding programs for our new students, including our Learning Communities program in the new residence hall and the roommateclick.com program. In this issue, I hope you’ll enjoy reading about residence life today and remember your own campus life experiences at Southeast. In addition to the new residence hall, we have built additional parking spaces on both Broadway and New Madrid Streets for our additional students and visitors. Please take advantage of the new parking spaces when you visit Southeast for Homecoming 2009. We have many great events planned to help you “GET in the GAME.” We will be honoring several outstanding alumni, and the entire campus community is anxious to visit with all the returning graduates. Please review the Homecoming schedule of events in this magazine and mark your calendar for the weekend of October 9, 2009. I am also pleased to announce that, after an extensive national search, Bill Holland was selected as Vice President for University Advancement and Executive Director of the Southeast Missouri University Foundation. Bill brings a great deal of experience to this role, including an impressive St. Louis business background and a true passion for Southeast. I hope you will have the opportunity to visit with Bill during the Homecoming festivities, and I assure you he is eager to serve the Southeast alumni and our friends. Please enjoy this fall edition of “The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University,” and thank you for your continued support in making Southeast the University of First Choice: First Choice for students; First Choice for Faculty and Staff; First Choice for employers who hire our graduates; and, First Choice in the hearts and minds of our alumni.

The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is made possible by members of the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association and donors to the Southeast Missouri University Foundation. MAGAZINE TEAM MANAGING EDITOR Karen Grebing Director of Marketing & University Relations kgrebing@semo.edu COPY AND ART EDITOR Tonya Wells Assistant Director of Marketing twells@semo.edu CONTRIBUTORS Adam Appleton Ann Hayes Tyler Surman Delain Stafford Tonya Wells PHOTOGRAPHY Brad Chamness Mike Grace Sheryl Henley Nancy Kelley Thomas Marrone Matthew R. Miller ROWDY CARICATURE Thomas Marrone

UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT Dr. Ken Dobbins VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT/ EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE SOUTHEAST MISSOURI UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION Bill Holland ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Joan Gohn, President Michael Price, Vice President SOUTHEAST MISSOURI UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION Dick Davidson, Chairman Stan Crader, Vice Chairman

Sincerely,

LETTERS POLICY The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University welcomes submissions by alumni and friends. Class notes and letters may be edited for length and content.

Kenneth W. Dobbins President

Please send all correspondence to editor@ semoalumni.com or to The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University, One University Plaza MS7300, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701.

ON T H E COV E R: From left to right: Teri Ann DeRousse and Erica Ivie, of Por tageville, Mo., and their suitemates Ciera White and Nicole Sims, of St. Louis, Mo., move into New Hall for their first year at Southeast.

© 2009 Southeast Missouri State University. Content may not be reprinted without written permission of the editors.

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INSIDE

This is the Campus Life Residence Life takes on the challenges of helping students leave home and connect to Southeast.

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Let’s Hear it for the RAs

Home Suite Home Learn to Live: Live to Learn

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Learning the Business Redhawks Athletics Get Fired Up

In Jamaica

Southeast Speakers Series

Investing in the Future

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CLASS NOTES

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Departments 4

Alumni/Faculty Merit Awards

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GET in the GAME M A G A Z I N E

Finding Roommates Online

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Southeast Symphony Orchestra Performs in China In May, the Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra departed for China to present a series of concerts as part of the 2009 American Celebration of Music in China. The orchestra performed at several prestigious venues, including the world-famous Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing and at an outdoor concert on the Great Wall of China. The orchestra gave a special collaborative concert with the Shanghai Normal University Orchestra at the Concert Hall of Shanghai Normal and performed at Zhedjiang Provincial University and in Southeast Symphony Orchestra performing on the Great Wall of China Hangzhou, one of China’s most esteemed cultural sites. “All of our concerts in China were enthusiastically received,” says Sara Edgerton, Southeast Orchestra’s artistic director. “Our Chinese hosts were unbelievably gracious and extended invitations to us to return, and to bring our orchestra with us.”

New Degree Option Approved For Nursing The Department of Nursing at Southeast Missouri State University is accepting applications for a second degree accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) option. The new accelerated BSN option is being offered as a component of Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s Caring for Missourians initiative, a new effort to train each year more than 900 additional Missouri students to enter high-demand, critical-need health care fields. The state will provide an additional $40 million this year to help Missouri’s two- and four-year public colleges and universities increase the capacity of their health care training programs, in fields such as primary care, nursing and

pharmacology. Southeast’s portion of this appropriation ($1.17 million) will be used to improve current laboratories and start expanding the first cohort in the accelerated BSN option in January, says Dr. Marcie Hobbs, chair of Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Nursing. Eligible students must hold a prior baccalaureate degree and have completed all nursing prerequisites before January. Prerequisites include college courses in human anatomy, human physiology, chemistry, microbiology, nutrition, developmental psychology and statistics. Applications may be accessed online at www.semo.edu under the Department of Nursing.

“I’m excited about offering additional opportunities to those with prior degrees to move more quickly into the professional nursing workforce,” says Dr. Ann Sprengel, chair of the committee reviewing applications to the BSN program. In addition to increasing enrollment in the Department of Nursing’s baccalaureate program, the family nurse practitioner option on its master of science in nursing degree program also opened six additional spaces for fall 2009 admission. For more information about the family nurse practitioner option or the master of science in nursing degree program, contact Dr. Elaine Jackson, professor of nursing, at (573) 986-6413.

Magazine Readership Survey Following publication of the spring 2009 edition of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University, a random sample of alumni were chosen to participate in a magazine readership survey to assist us in improving the effectiveness of the magazine in serving your needs. The Southeast Missouri University Foundation pledged a contribution to a scholarship fund for each completed survey. As a result, a total of $1,960 was given to fund a scholarship for a Southeast student. Thank you to everyone who responded. Your input is extremely beneficial and greatly appreciated.

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CSIS Conference Showcases Southeast Students Southeast Missouri State University and the Global Strategy Institute of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) hosted the second annual CSIS Regional Conference in April. The conference addressed how significant social, economic, environmental and political issues will impact the United States and its role as a global citizen in the next 20 years. The conference brought together key CSIS scholars and 28 Southeast students who participated in an intensive spring break week-inresidence at CSIS--a nonpartisan and nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based think

tank established in 1962. Linda Jamison, CSIS dean and senior fellow of the Abshire-Inamori Leadership Academy, presented “Creative Leadership: Problem Solving for the 21st Century.” Prior to CSIS, Jamison served in two capacities at the United Nations, as senior adviser to the UN Information Center and as head of office for the UN Office for Project Services. Dr. Erik Peterson, CSIS senior vice president and director of the Global Strategy Institute, provided the keynote luncheon presentation, “The Seven Revolutions,” in the University Center Ballroom. As director of the Global Strategy Institute, Peterson heads the Seven Revolutions Initiative, an internationally recognized effort to identify and forecast global trends out to the year 2025 and beyond. Peterson also holds the William A.

Schreyer Chair in Global Analysis at CSIS. The conference provided the opportunity for Southeast students who participated in the CSIS Senior Seminar Course in Washington, D.C., to share with Southeast faculty, staff, other students and the community what they learned at this year’s seminar. The students presented their presidential policy recommendations on energy, transnational relations, conflict and climate change. The presentations stem from research conducted by the student teams at CSIS in March. During their week-inresidence, the student teams prepared a simulated researched briefing for CSIS officials on the issues of “U.S. and Transnational Relations” with an emphasis on India and China, “Conflict” with emphasis on nuclear nonproliferation, “Energy” with emphasis on alternative sources, and “Climate Change” with emphasis on water. Based on feedback from this exercise, the students then refined their presentations.

Dr. Erik Peterson and Linda Jamison of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

New Autism Center Underway Construction on the future Southeast Missouri State University Autism Center for Diagnosis and Treatment is underway after an official ground breaking ceremony in January. The Center will be located at the corner of Middle and Mill streets in Cape Girardeau. The new center will house numerous small and large diagnosis/therapy rooms with observation capabilities for family members, clinicians and students. The new center is scheduled for completion in November. T H E

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Tickets on Sale for River Campus 2009-2010 Season Tickets are on sale now for Southeast Missouri State University’s River Campus 2009-2010 season. The full lineup by the departments of Music and Theatre and Dance as well as professional touring companies was announced this summer. Touring performances this season will include Annie, Wizard of Oz, Queen of Bingo, TAO-The Martial Art of Drumming, Sleeping Beauty and the Virsky Ukrainian National Dance Company. The Department of Theatre and Dance will perform Little Shop of Horrors, The Children’s Hour, Carousel, Neil Simon’s Rumors, the Pulitzer-prize winning The Heidi Chronicles and Boy’s Life. The latter two performances will be student-directed projects while critically acclaimed director/choreographer Dennis Courtney will visit to take on the role of guest director for Carousel. The Department will also host the River North Chicago Dance Company as well as display its own dancing abilities during the Fall for Dance and Spring into Dance programs. The Department of Music has scheduled a complete lineup of Southeast student ensembles and faculty recitals as well as a jazz series with visiting artists Dan Jordan, Joe Eckert, the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra and the Pied Pipers. The Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra will perform Paul McCartney’s Behold My Heart, Dvorak’s New World Symphony, Handel’s Messiah and Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. The Southeast Symphony will also be welcoming the Moscow State Radio Symphony and violinist Liesl Schoenberger. The River Campus Art Gallery and the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Museum will be hosting works from artists such as Andy Warhol, Ansel Adams, Jackson Pollock, Glenn Williams and William H. Thielen as well as works from Southeast students and faculty. Special events planned at the River Campus this season include Garrison Keillor and Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. For tickets, contact the River Campus Box Office at (573) 651-2265 or MetroTix at www.metrotix.com or (800) 293-5949.

Jack Buck Scholar-Leadership Award Presented Madeline McKenzie, a Eureka High School student, was named the recipient of the seventh annual Madeline McKenzie and Carole Jack Buck Buck, widow of Jack Buck ScholarLeadership Award by Southeast Missouri State University. Carole Buck, wife of the late Jack Buck, presented the award to McKenzie. McKenzie stayed very busy as a 6

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Eureka High School student while still maintaining a grade point average above a 4.0. McKenzie served as captain of her swimming and volleyball teams for the past two years and was captain of the Lake Chesterfield Swim Team for six years. She played the flute in her school’s marching band all four years and participated in the concert and symphonic bands as well. In addition, she assisted new students at her school in adjusting to high school with her involvement in Wildcat Ambassadors. She was a gold level member of her school’s Renaissance Program and earned numerous academic, athletic and

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music awards for her involvement and character. McKenzie volunteered with the Franklin County Humane Society, the Adopt-A-Family Committee, music festivals and tutoring. She plans to pursue a degree in exercise science. In 2003, Southeast Missouri State University partnered with KMOX Radio in the establishment of the award. The award, which was the first scholarship to be established in memory of Buck, recognizes a student in the St. Louis metropolitan area who has demonstrated outstanding character, academic achievement and the potential to be a leader in the community.

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Blood, Sweat & Tears: Greeks Raise $25,000, Donate Blood, Collect Food For Charity A number of charitable organizations and individuals in need in the Southeast Missouri region benefitted because of Greek Week 2009 at Southeast Missouri State University. Greek Week is held each year in the spring to celebrate membership in the Greek community. Greek Week consists of seven days of community service, social interaction and friendly competition. Members of Southeast's fraternities and sororities volunteered at the Special Olympics, collected food and money to be donated to community organizations and individuals, participated in various community service projects around Cape Girardeau and conducted a blood drive to assist in the ongoing need to save lives. Together, members of Southeast fraternities and sororities donated more than 1,500 hours of community service during the week. As a result of fund raising, $25,000 was distributed in donations to the ALS Society, the Make-A-Wish Foundation,

Special Olympics of Southeast Missouri, The Backstoppers and Big Brothers Big Sisters. Each Greek chapter is responsible for raising money through fund-raising activities or by accepting donations. The Greek Week Blood Drive produced 502 pints of usable blood for

the American Red Cross. In addition to the blood units and funds, more than 34,000 cans of food were donated to the Salvation Army as part of the week. The main focus of Greek Week is philanthropy and community service but other activities are held such as Greek Games and Greek Sing.

Greek Week 2009

Scully-Rhodes Plaza Gives Students Experience The fountain at the new Scully-Rhodes Plaza is operational, completing this campus beautification project and student experiential learning opportunity. The plaza was completed in phases by Southeast students from the School of Polytechnic Studies with the support of the University’s Facilities Management Department. Construction Management students created a conceptual design and then began detailed drawings, preliminary estimates and a project schedule. A second team of students completed the final design before a third team worked alongside the contractor as the project was built, with one student serving as the student project manager. The project provided the students real-world experience with construction of a project from start to finish and provided the plaza with a centerpiece. The plaza is located on the north end of campus between Scully Building and Rhodes Hall of Science. T H E

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This is the Campus Life

This is the Campus Life

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Southeast student volunteers await the arrival of first-year students at 6 a.m. to help them move into residence halls.

On Thursday, Aug. 20, nearly half of Southeast Missouri State University’s 2,850 students living on campus moved into their residence halls. Students, parents, University staff and volunteers all working toward the same goal, moving 1,200 of the more than 1,800 first-year students and their most prized possessions into the halls and getting out of the way before the next round of incoming freshmen. “It is an event,” says Assistant Residence Life Director Kendra Skinner. “We plan the move-in times by floor in the residence halls. When students pull into the residence hall complex, 600 volunteers are on hand to descend.” Skinner says student volunteers mark boxes and belongings with the student’s name and room number and then begin the task of getting everything to the right place. “We’ve actually had some parents tell us moving was great, and they never lifted a thing,” she says. “It does look like chaos, but it is controlled. Traffic permitting, it usually only takes 30-45 minutes to move.” The massive move-in is just the first step in what, for many, will mark the first time they have left home. Skinner says that particular experience is often much more difficult for students, parents and even University staff than the heavy lifting. “The first six weeks are critical, and the staff does everything we can to get them participating. The more opportunities we give them to get out of the rooms, the better. They don’t have time to think about leaving home or what they are missing,” Skinner says. Opening weekend activities work to create just such an environment. Skinner says the residence halls start the process of getting students together and out of the rooms the first evening at floor meetings to let students know exactly what is expected of them, what’s happening and who their neighbors are. The Office of New Student Programs plans plenty of opening weekend events, and Skinner says her staff is encouraged to share the events with their residents. T H E

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It’s All About the Freedom Of course, homesickness is not the only challenge facing students on their own for the first time. For some students, the new-found freedoms will be more of a struggle. Skinner says her staff is there to help in those situations as well. “Part of the job is to keep an eye on students, to look for changes and to look for patterns of behavior. Are they around in the morning even though we know they have early classes? Do we need to discuss maybe switching classes to later in the day or offering advice about how easy it is to fall behind when you skip class? We aren’t moms or dads or even alarm clocks,” Skinner says. “But we do all we can to be supportive and help with solutions.” Residence Life staffers say they believe on-campus living is just better for students. “We strongly believe in what we do,” says Skinner. “Students who live on campus have higher GPAs and graduate faster.” Proximity to resources can explain part of that success. On-campus students have closer access to tutoring, study groups and computer labs, often without even having to leave the residence hall. Skinner says they

This is the Campus Life

are also more apt to utilize the library between classes and are not as rushed as their commuting counterparts who contend with traffic and parking. Jason Haxton’s oldest child, Parents, students and volunteers had a rainy early-morning move. Ross, started at Southeast Annapolis, Mo., echoes the nervous this fall, and sentiments. Haxton says knowing he’ll be on “I’m a little nervous but also pretty campus is a comfort. excited about living on campus. I like “Certainly we’ll be able to sleep the fact that I’ll be on my own for the more easily,” he says. “It will provide first time,” Hanner says. “I think living stability for him as he acclimates to his in the residence hall will be a blast. new academic challenges.” I expect it to be a completely new Haxton knows a little about the learning experience where there’s never benefits of living on campus. He and a dull moment.” his wife have both been university Skinner says her goal is to make directors of residence life in their sure that’s the case. From ice breakers careers. to study groups to cookouts, she wants “We truly understand the the residence halls to be a place where importance that the on-campus students can leave their doors open to experience has for students’ health and encourage meeting others. She also academic success,” he says. “Having says the ease of meeting others can be a meals ready, academic advisors nearby culture of the hall itself. and a community of students to meet “Students can find the place as friends and peers for learning will where they fit in because we have provide our son with many of his diverse communities on campus. The basic needs.” buildings have trends. I can remember Battling Butterflies when, before air conditioning, Still, even with the comfort of everyone was anxious about living on-campus living, freshmen will be in Dearmont. But, once they were new not just to college but also to there, it sucked them back in every the entire college experience. That is year. I think it was because with no something they say fills them with a air conditioning, all the doors were good mix of excitement and nerves. open. People went to the lounge. The “I am a little nervous,” says residents were really well connected.” freshman Bradley Beran, Festus, Mo. Skinner says her staff is doing more “I do fear a little homesickness and and more programming to get students taking on new responsibilities I have active in their communities. never had. I’m looking forward to it Making new friends in those though.” communities is another area this fall’s Freshman Jeremy Hanner,

Southeast basketball players help with move-in day. T H E

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friends and family all day long,” Skinner says. “While that’s not a bad thing, we have seen students get stressed out by not being there and the constant connection can make it harder for students to branch out and grow up here.” Skinner says it is an important challenge for students to strike the balance between making their own decisions as they venture out into the world for the first time and relying on mom and dad to continue to make decisions for them. Parent Jason Haxton agrees it can be a challenge. “His mother and I hope Ross is Southeast football players helped with move-in day prepared to know a bad situation and and distributed game schedules. avoid it, but also how to take positive risks and grow into his own person,” he first-year students are facing with some says. “Ross has done the research and trepidation. Joseph Ramos, Denver, chose Southeast over all other Missouri Colo.., says he is facing that task by schools. He could not have picked being as outgoing as possible. a more friendly, safe, academically “Students definitely shouldn’t focused and caring campus, so that be shy,” he says. “Be open to new helps us, as parents, let go.” experiences and different people.” Hanner says his strategy is to get Meet the Parents involved. For all the focus on getting students “During my first year, I hope to try interested, active and connected to their out a lot of new clubs and activities,” new homes, Skinner says parents are Hanner says. “I want to meet new always part of the equation. people and make a lot of friends.” “After working at five different Amanda Germann, Carrollton, Mo., higher education institutions during my thinks that’s the key to adjusting. career, the last four years I have seen a “I believe it is important to find growing number of parents becoming things to do on campus besides just more involved. It may be because they attending class. If students get involved are alumni or went to college as well on campus, they would feel more at ease and remember those experiences. But at school, and it will make the transition the University tries to share as much easier.” information as Beran says that’s where he hopes his possible, including residence hall will come in handy. a parent packet “I expect the halls to be a place to with a letter and relax and hang with new friends.” brochure about Skinner says while that’s the goal, what they’ll be today’s technology makes it more facing,” Skinner difficult than ever. Students who know says. friends and family are just a click, call That or text away can use the advances as a information was crutch rather than a comfort. a blessing to the “Students today have a huge Haxtons. connection to friends and family back “I think we home, and some of them talk to those prepared Ross T H E

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for the many great opportunities at Southeast, but we haven’t prepared ourselves as much for this separation” says Haxton. “The quality materials explaining all aspects of the University and how it is set up to help the student have been reassuring. Also, witnessing the faculty’s interaction with students during the pre-registration programs showed us the depth of talent and care that would be provided from those instructing.” New students also expressed appreciation for information prior to moving to Southeast. “The Facebook Web sites about living on campus really helped answer a lot of questions,” says Hanner. “The University has been a big help by providing a lot of information and just being available.” “I was in contact with my admissions counselor, Alisa McFerron, with anything I needed. Any question I had, she replied promptly, and if she didn’t know the answer, she found out where I could get it,” says Ramos. Beran agrees. “Providing all the information needed took off as much stress as possible with moving. All in all, I don’t think it will be too bad.” “As parents we are confident this University will provide our child with life skills and the academic ability to do well in his chosen career path,” says Haxton. “We just had to get past that goodbye on Aug. 20.”

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Let’s Hear It for the RAs

Shining the Spotlight on Resident Assistant Joseph Binkley

Hometown: St. Louis, Mo. Major: Physics Education, unified science option Future plans: “I’d like to start as a high school science teacher and eventually work my way up to principal or some type of administrator. I’ve also considered teaching at the college level. I really like baseball, so if I stay at the high school level, I’d also like to be a high school baseball coach.” Hobbies? “Playing sports, reading books and comic books, playing video games. Normal college student things.” Why did you choose Southeast? “I took a campus tour when I was a senior in high school. At the time, I knew I wanted to be a teacher of some kind. Our tour leader explained Southeast’s education program is one of the best in the country. Its affordability and location made it an easy choice.” What responsibilities does an RA have? “We have to conduct floor meetings and be on duty at different times. You also take your residents to different events the University hosts and try to come up with programming to get them acquainted with the University and the other residents on the floor.” Why did you want to be an RA? “The same reason I want to be a teacher and the reason I like being an RA: the potential to make a difference in someone’s life and to provide guidance to students who are looking for it.” Biggest frustration about being an RA: “When everything comes together at once. Sometimes I’ll have projects from a couple different classes due at the same time I have RA responsibilities to handle. There’s a big pileup of stuff going on, and it can be a little overwhelming.” Favorite part of being an RA: “The potential to make a difference to someone living on your floor. A lot of students come to college looking for some kind of guidance; that’s what I try to provide if one of my residents needs it.” What skills have you learned while being an RA? “My time management skills have grown tenfold. I thought they were good before I became an RA, but it really tests your ability to manage your time when you have so much going on. My social skills have also greatly improved; I’ve learned a lot about different people’s personalities.” What advice do you have for future RAs? “The two most important things are patience and time management. When you have RA responsibilities and academic responsibilities conflicting, you really have to learn good time management skills.” What are your favorite memories at Southeast so far? “Just hanging out with residents, fellow staff and making friends.” T H E

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SuiteHome

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Southeast’s newest residence hall is a 306-bed, suite-style hall. Each of the suites are connected by entry areas leading to two residence rooms, a bathroom and a water closet. The pod-style design was constructed to give residents the most in privacy while still connecting the suites together by more than just sharing a bathroom. The design is also conducive to Southeast’s new Learning Communities. Rooms are wired with high-speed internet, cable TV and telephone. All lounges have wireless internet access, and the hall has a 24-hour computer lab. In addition to the academic focus, students can grab a bite from the Mediterranean-themed Olive’s. There’s also a full kitchen for those who want to cook and a patio for those who want to cook out. Lounges have game tables and two 42-inch flat panel televisions. Students had input on the design of the rooms, color schemes and the furniture in the new hall. Those who live on the east side get a special treat. The hall is adjacent to Houck Stadium, so those lucky residents have a view of Houck Stadium and can watch football and soccer games from their room.

Learn To Live: Live To Learn This fall, some Southeast students will be living in Learning Communities, a new program that assigns students with the same major or interests to a particular floor or wing of a residence hall. It’s a program the Office of Residence Life hopes will help students get acclimated to being away from home and increase the focus on academics in the residence halls. “Research shows students graduate with higher grades and better social/interpersonal skills when they live in Learning Communities,” says Dustin Fritsche, assistant director for academic and leadership development in the Office of Residence Life. Successful Learning Communities aren’t just about putting students with similar majors together. Fritsche says location is just the first piece in the puzzle. Southeast’s learning communities will often be led by a resident assistant who also shares the same major or interest. What he sees as even more important is involvement with faculty from the department. “This fall, we’ll have Learning Communities for business, education, science and math and visual and performing arts students, to name a few. We’ve met with faculty in those departments about being actively involved in the communities whether it is leading a study session when a big exam is upcoming 12

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or just going over to the residence hall for a cookout.” Fritsche says faculty were very receptive to the idea, and they signed up for programs or events within their department’s learning community. “We’re also asking for their input on programming,” says Fritsche. “They know their areas and what their students need better than we do.” Ten learning communities will be underway this fall, and interest from students this first year is promising. “We had a good number of students sign up for the first year,” says Fritsche. He feels the interaction between students tied to the same academic area is really a benefit. “Students just starting college will have a better opportunity to get to know students they will be having classes with, and upperclassmen will have a chance to mentor. Hopefully that aspect will really continue to grow going forward,” says Fritsche. “It just puts a better focus on residence life by tying academics into ‘home.’ We’re going to work hard so our Learning Communities give students the chance to develop a bond with their faculty, excel both academically and socially and increase their connection to Southeast.”

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A Whole New World: Finding Roommates Online You can find anything you want on the Internet. Starting this year for Southeast students, that includes a roommate. Roommateclick.com offers students looking for roommates the ability to set up their own pages, similar to Facebook. Students can share vital information about themselves from hobbies to majors to what hours they like to sleep. “It’s really a great way for students to get more information about potential roommates and have more control over finding a roommate versus being assigned one,” says Dustin Fritsche, assistant director for academic and leadership development with the Office of Residence Life. Students can read about other students, find someone with similar

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interests and interact online while deciding if this is a compatible person with whom to share a room. Incoming freshman Ross Haxton found his roommate by using the site. It was important to him to find someone with similar interests. “We’ve been talking since the beginning of the year,” Ross says. “He’s from St. Louis but enjoys fishing and the outdoors like me. I know we’ll get along well.” Fritsche says the added control will be a big factor in the success of using the Web site.

Now Then

We asked this year’s first-year students and alumni who graduated 50 years ago to describe the three most important items they were bringing or had brought with them from home when they moved to Southeast.

“My laptop, TV and iPod.”

-Brad Beran, Festus, Mo.

“My best friend and roommate, cell phone and a credit card ... for emergencies.” -Joseph Ramos, Denver, Colo. “My cell phone because it keeps me in contact with so many people. Grape soda. Oddly enough, I’m addicted to it, and it’s about the only soda I’ll drink. My St. Christopher medal. I wear it all the time.” -Jeremy Hanner, Annapolis, Mo. “Cell phone, laptop and TV.”

-Amanda Germann, Carrollton, Mo. “Lots of photos of my parents and sister. A wireless computer with built-in camera, so I can see my family when we visit with each other online. My Snuggie--you know, it’s a blanket with sleeves.” -Ross Haxton, Greentop, Mo.

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“It allows students control over their random roommate,” he says. “Students search, they interact and they decide if they want to live together rather than being assigned. Another plus is they don’t even have to actively search. They can put their information out there and be found by someone else with similar interests.”

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“A typewriter, transistor radio and a coffee pot.” -James Berry ‘59 , Oriental, N.C. “Pencils, notebooks and a tape recorder.” -Ray McFarland ‘59, South Bloomingville, Ohio

Arriving at Southeast by train in 1959.

“A typewriter, a dictionary and a tennis racquet.” -Joyce Blair ‘59, Maryland Heights, Mo. “Slide rule, notebooks and a radio.” -John Reid ‘59, Evansville, Ind. “A bedspread my mom made me bring, a radio and a record player.” -Douglas Schier ‘59, Delray Beach, Fla.

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Learning the Business Southeast Business Interns Find Work, Experience and Education ... in Jamaica Many times in life, it is easier and more beneficial to “learn by doing” rather than just by passive listening and instruction. The faculty at Southeast Missouri State University is very aware of this fact, which is why many of Southeast’s academic programs require the completion of an internship. Faculty members are integral in helping students locate internship opportunities not only in Cape Girardeau but all over the United States and in some instances, even outside the country. Southeast students Jacob Brower, Kevin Davie and Jana Gass recently completed such an internship. Dr. James Stapleton, director of the Southeast Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, shared with them an internship opportunity with National Asset Recovery Services, Inc. (NARS). Based in St. Louis, NARS is a multi-national corporation offering business process outsourcing services to companies. Brower, Davie and Gass were chosen after submitting resumes and interviewing in the program’s open selection process. During the fourweek internship, the three students visited NARS’ four call center sites. The first two days of the internship were spent in St. Louis at NARS headquarters, with the remainder of the first week being spent at the Cape Girardeau site. The students spent the second week at NARS’ Panama City, Panama, office and the third week at its Montego Bay, Jamaica, office. They wrapped up the final week of the internship at NARS’ Cape Girardeau site. “This internship was really a great experience and opportunity,” says Brower, a fifth-year senior double majoring in international business and Spanish from Macon, Mo. “We met with every level of employee in the organization at all of the locations where we traveled.” The interns were exposed to the day-to-day operations of a real “living and breathing” corporation. “We had many focus groups with all levels of associates, conference calls between international sites and meetings with different parts of the operations such as client services, human resources, information technology and corporate security,” Brower says. “The nature of the internship was very dynamic,” adds Davie, a graduate student in the Master of Business Administration program from Cape Girardeau, Mo. He graduated in spring 2009 with a degree in financial economics. “In our case, we were exposed to a cross section of all operations. This exposure to

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the nuances of the company allowed us to participate in the business decisionmaking process,” he says. The students indeed interacted with employees and management at all levels of the corporation, including Greg Cappa, executive vice president and Chris Buehrle, NARS president and founder. Brower explains, “With each of these people and during meetings, we were allowed to see how an entrepreneurial enterprise works from each angle and the complexities and detail involved with an international organization. It was an amazing way to learn first hand about Left to right: Jacob Brower, Jana Gass and Kevin Davie business before stepping out into the ‘real world’. This was not, in my opinion, responsible for in order to be as successful as NARS,” says a business internship (such as the ones usually offered to Brower. business students), but a firsthand and first-rate business The students were given time to take in the local experience.” atmospheres of Panama and Jamaica. Gass, a senior international business major from “The NARS employees took us to dinner and lunch Belleville, Ill., adds, “Talking with Mr. Buehrle and Mr. almost every day, which was absolutely spectacular. In Cappa was extremely rewarding because we were able to Panama we were given a city tour, and we were taken to see see how they got to their positions. It was rewarding to see the Panama Canal, which was breathtaking. In Jamaica we how their hard work and dedication for NARS has paid off were given a couple of days to see the city as well,” says in the long run.” Gass. The students were challenged in real-world scenarios and Although the internship took place over the summer, it in ways beyond that which classroom instruction alone can will certainly serve to enhance their education at Southeast. provide. They were given an issue about which to develop “Now that I have seen how a business actually works, a presentation from an outsider’s perspective. it will allow me to understand my classes better. Instead “This is not your garden variety internship,” says of just learning the material, I feel like I will now be able Stapleton. “These students were immersed into the to take the material I learn and apply it to a company and management and executive functions of NARS.” understand how it influences the company as a whole and “It was very challenging in that you had to be ‘on’ the decisions that have to be made,” says Gass. all the time. Our itinerary was intense and full—very Brower continues, “This internship enhanced my demanding,” says Davie. personal education and things I have learned about “This internship was so saturated with information and entrepreneurship. The detail required to create and knowledge. The most challenging part was trying to take it grow a successful business, not to mention a successful all in. We were like sponges at the end, completely full of international business, is much greater than I could have information. I never could have imagined I could learn so ever learned from a textbook. This internship took what I much in a month’s time.” Brower says. learned at Southeast and made it real.” The internship helped teach the students invaluable realThe benefits were felt by both the students and NARS. world skills and competencies needed by professionals, The company was so impressed with the students, it including proper communication skills and how to interact hired one of them and has agreed to fund two of these in a business setting. international experience programs each year. NARS has “Being in a professional environment was extremely also agreed to donate $5,000 to support one of Southeast’s beneficial because it helped me understand even more international immersion programs. Dr. Stapleton is how to carry myself in that environment. I learned in detail planning to take a group of students to Panama next what each part of a great business does and what they are January. T H E

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Southeast Speakers Series The Southeast Missouri State University Speakers Series will be bringing in some heavy hitters in all fields this year . Topping the list will be “Health Care Today: A Discussion” featuring former chair of the Democratic National Committee Howard Dean and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. For additional ticketing information on any speaker in the series, visit www.semo.edu/speakers.

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“Health Care Today: A Discussion” Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009, at 7:30 p.m., Show Me Center

Howard Dean and Newt Gingrich both have a passion for improving the nation’s healthcare system. As Vermont governor, Dean was successful in getting 96 percent of the state’s children health care coverage and a third of the state’s Medicare recipients help in paying for their prescription drugs. Gingrich’s leadership helped save Medicare from bankruptcy, prompted FDA reform to help the seriously ill and initiated a new focus on research, prevention and wellness. In 2003, he founded The Center for Health Transformation. Tickets are $8. Students, faculty and staff free with Redhawks ID card. Tickets available at the Show Me Center Box Office and all Ticketmaster outlets.

Aron Ralston Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2009, at 7 p.m., Academic Auditorium In the remote Blue John Canyon in Utah, Aron Ralston was climbing down off a wedged boulder when the rock suddenly, came loose. The falling stone pinned his right hand and wrist against the canyon wall. Thus began six days of hell for Aron Ralston. He found himself trapped by an 800-pound boulder in the bottom of a canyon. Using the video camera from his pack, Ralston began recording his grateful good-byes to his family and friends and documenting a last will and testament with the hope that someone would find it. Then divine inspiration solved the riddle of the boulder. Ralston then committed the most extreme act imaginable to save himself–he amputated his own arm to survive. Event is free and open to the public. aster outlets. 16

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SPEAKERS SERIES

Christopher Gardner, Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Dinner Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2010, at 6 p.m., Show Me Center Christopher Gardner is the owner and CEO of Gardner Rich LLC., a brokerage firm with offices in New York, Chicago and San Francisco. A self-made success story, Gardner gives back to the communities where he conducts business because he has never forgotten his humble beginnings or the odds he has surmounted. Christopher Gardner not only overcame a lack of college and business school degrees, but most astonishing, homelessness. The Pursuit of Happyness, Gardner’s autobiography, was a New York Times best-seller and was also made into a critically acclaimed film starring Will Smith. Gardner is an inspirational speaker, addressing the keys to overcoming obstacles and breaking cycles. Dinner tickets are $15 and will be on sale Dec. 1, at the University Bookstore and Show Me Center Center Box Office.

Dirty Talk with Mike Rowe Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010, at 7:30 p.m., Show Me Center As the creator and executive producer of Discovery Channel’s Emmy®-nominated series “Dirty Jobs with Mike Rowe,” Mike has spent years traveling the country, working as an apprentice on more than 200 jobs most people would go out of their way to avoid. From coal miners to maggot farmers, Mike has worked in just about every industry, celebrating those hard-working Americans who make civilized life possible for the rest of us. No one is better suited to the role of good-natured guinea pig than Mike-mainly, because it’s not a role. The notion of depicting hard work as noble and fun is central to his personal mission. Mike established the mikeroweWORKS Foundation to help bolster various scholarship and apprentice programs around the country and to generally support the Trades. Tickets are $8. Students, faculty and staff free with Rehawks ID Card. Tickets available at the Show Me Center Box Office and all Ticketmaster outlets.

Lyah Beth LeFlore Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Location and time are yet to be announced for the bestselling author and television producer who has been featured in The New York Times, Essence Magazine and Entertainment Weekly. This fall she will introduce her new teen series “The World is Mine.”

The Reverend Marcia Dyson & Dr. Michael Eric Dyson Date, location and time are yet to be announced for the Dysons. Reverend Dyson has been hailed as one of our nation’s foremost religious figures, spiritual writers and noted civic-social activitists. Dr. Dyson has been named as one of the 40 most inspiring African-Americans and is a two-time winner of the NAACP Image Award. He has written 16 books and hosts his own radio talk show.

Dr. Drew Pinsky Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010, at 7 p.m., Academic Auditorium Millions know him as the host of the nationally syndicated radio call-in program “Loveline” and star of the VH1 show “Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew.” What you might not know is that Dr. Drew Pinsky is a practicing medical doctor and is board-certified in addiction medicine. He is currently the service director of the Chemical Dependency Program/Residential Treatment Center at Las Encinas Hospital in Pasadena, a staff member at Huntington Memorial Hospital, continues to run a private practice and is assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the Keck USC School of Medicine. His expert opinions have frequently been called on by the national news media, and he has appeared on many of the major networks and news channels. Event is free and open to the public. T H E

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S O U T H E A S T AT H L E T I C S

Southeast Athletic Teams We sat down with volleyball coach Renata Heard, soccer coach Heather Nelson and football coach Tony Samuel to get a preview of Southeast athletics this fall.

The 2009 Southeast Redhawks football team is led by Coach Tony Samuel. Doug Spada and Walter Peoples earned preseason all-conference honors for Southeast.

How are the teams looking for the upcoming season? Tony Samuel: I think we had a good summer, and we finished last season with momentum. I’m excited about the entire team. Our kids have trained hard. Renata Heard: If we can stay healthy, there’s no reason we can’t compete for an OVC championship this season. This season my first recruiting class will be seniors, and they have really taken ownership of the team and set the tone for hard work. The coaches’ jobs have turned into supporting the players rather than convincing them they can win.

The 2009 Southeast Redhawks volleyball team led by Coach Renata Heard took its second straight American Volleyball Coaches Association Team Academic Award.

Heather Nelson: We’ll be a young team with nine incoming freshmen. But we have a lot of talented, dedicated athletes. We should be contending for the top of the conference.

The 2009 Southeast Redhawks soccer team is led by Coach Heather Nelson. The team is young with nine incoming freshmen out of 20 players.

What do you feel will be the teams’ strengths this season? TS: We have a good quarterback, Matt Scheible, coming off a big win in the last

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game of last season. We also have All-Conference players in Doug Spada and Eddie Calvin. I think we’ll have a lot more depth than we’ve had in recent years. I’ll wait until after fall camp before I make predictions. RH: The tightness and unity of the team is really impressive. We’ve decided we’re going to win the OVC. This is our goal. About threequarters of our returning players stayed here over the summer, found jobs and trained. TS: We saw a lot of them coming by the training room. We’ve found that [unity] about our team, too. The team itself is a selling point. It’s very unique. HN: Our organization is a huge strength. We’re very talented up the center of the field, and our team is in great shape. What are you excited about this season? TS: I’m expecting great things from this team. Our first two games will be huge. RH: We’re excited to have a home game at Homecoming this year.

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Are Fired Up This Fall

& They Think You Should Be, Too

TS: Homecoming is the best crowd, most exciting.

What do you want the fans to know about the teams?

RH: And, we never get to be there. We always have an away game. We have a no-text-messaging rule on the bus, but they always know what the football score is.

TS: We’ve got talent, and I’m excited to see it in action this fall.

TS: I did not know that. That’s cool because game days have to create this energy, and the crowd plays a huge part. It’s so different the mind set you have to be in for game day. We need the crowd to be good, loud and wild on game day.

HN: I don’t think a lot of people realize how physical soccer is. In the stands you can see it. I’d like us to get more supporters. When you look up in the stands and see red and black, it pushes you to do what you think you can’t.

RH: It also develops a bond between the teams.

TS: And preparation. We put in so much time, so we expect good things. They say champions are made when everyone is tired.

TS: Oh yeah, sometimes they train together. They give each other a hard time about conditioning. RH: It’s a competitive deal for them. One of the football players had it pointed out to him that one of the volleyball players was lifting more. That’s all it took for him to up his weights, and of course, she said she could do more, too. HN: We’ve always had a connection with the other sports teams. Most of our players go together to the softball games.

RH: We’re just ready to get into competition.

RH: Absolutely. Give us a chance. Be proud of us and come support us this year. You will be pleasantly surprised. I hope to reignite the excitement of when the fans were in school themselves. We need to get fired up. TS: It’s something when a player shows up on game day, and there are already people here, waiting for the game, tailgating, the bands are going. Their excitement

breeds our excitement. HN: Southeast Athletics has so much potential to be at the top of the OVC. TS: Every team is different. We improve every year, and this is the hardest I’ve ever seen a team train. RH: As long as we stay healthy. TS: Yes, so many little things can flip the script during a game for or against you. RH: On our side [Department of Athletics], it’s a whole new experience. It’s nothing the public has seen yet, but things are really where they need to be. Our leadership is really doing great things. TS: The community hasn’t seen it yet, but it’s there. HN: I see a new enthusiasm and dedication in the department. Right now, we have the best of everything. Lots of experience and lots of new blood.

Visit www.gosoutheast.com for Redhawks game schedules and tickets. T H E

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Gymnastics Team Takes National Top Academic Honors Southeast Missouri State University earned the National Association of Collegiate Gymnastics Coaches/Women National Academic Team Championship for the thirdconsecutive year. The Redhawks posted a 3.91 grade point average, bolstered by 14 individuals with perfect 4.0s for the 2008-09 academic year. All 17 Southeast gymnasts earned Scholastic All-America status as a result of 3.5 or better GPAs. The 3.91 GPA is the highest in the program’s history, as Southeast became only the second school in the nation to win the award three years in a row. “We are very pleased with our commitment to academic excellence,” said head coach Tom Farden. “To receive this prestigious honor threestraight years says a lot about our team and its ability to set the standard high and succeed as student-athletes.” Southeast also secured its first Midwest Independent Conference Championship under Farden after going 14-3 overall and undefeated at 11-0 in conference play last season.

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INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

BARTON AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER DEDICATED Southeast Missouri State University dedicated its new David M. Barton Agriculture Research Center in May. In October 2008, the Southeast Missouri University Foundation received a seven-figure gift, the largest single gift in its history, to benefit the Southeast Missouri State University Agriculture Research Center and the University's agriculture program. June Barton of Catron, Mo., a 1963 alumna of Southeast with a degree in elementary education, donated 850 acres of prime farmland in New Madrid County, making the gift possible. Income from the farm is being divided with half going towards an endowment for the ongoing development and future upkeep and improvements to the facilities at the Demonstration Farm and the other half to establish the David M. Barton endowed scholarships for students pursuing a degree in Southeast's Department of Agriculture. With the gift, the University's Research Farm in Gordonville, Mo., was renamed the David M. Barton Agriculture Research Center in memory of Mrs. Barton's late husband. Originally from Arkansas, David M. Barton moved to Catron, Mo., in the early 1930s and farmed in New Madrid County until

June Barton with Southeast President Ken Dobbins at the dedication of the David M. Barton Agriculture Research Center. his death in 1987. His contributions to the agricultural history of Southeast Missouri include 35 years on the board of supervisors of the Little River Drainage District, during which he served as board president from 1962 to 1987. Since her husband's death, June Barton has served as owner and manager of David M. Barton Farms and has continued farming the land she loves. Mrs. Barton says she is proud of her husband's impact on agriculture in Southeast Missouri and pleased it will continue at the University as a result of this gift.

Dr. Randy Shaw, dean of Southeast's School of Polytechnic Studies and assistant provost of extended learning, says, "The funding available from this gift will insure that the new David M. Barton Agriculture Research Center will always have the resources needed to do cutting edge research and also provide scholarship assistance to many students wanting to study agriculture. A gift of this size will have a significant and lasting impact on the Department of Agriculture, and on behalf of the faculty and students, I want to express our deepest appreciation for the gift."

MILLER-LAWRENCE FAMILY DONATE PRESERVE John and Addison Lawrence knew exactly what to do with a portion of the family farm after their mother, Georgia Miller Lawrence, passed away in 2007. A gift of 27 acres of farmland would be used to fufill their mother’s wish to benefit Southeast Missouri State University. The land would provide an ecological preserve for teaching and research under the Department of 20

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Biology at Southeast Missouri State University. The Lawrences worked with the Southeast Missouri University Foundation, the Department of Biology and the Missouri Department of Conservation to begin returning the property in Scott County back to its original, natural state. The goal is to give both students and conservationists the

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opportunity for teaching, learning and research while monitoring and recording the changes to the land. “The process should provide good teaching and practical opportunities for wildlife management students,” says John Lawrence. The farmland had been in the Miller family for more than 100 years.

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INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

UELEKES PARTNER ON WESSEL MATHEMATICS LABS SCHOLARSHIP John Ueleke ‘68 and his wife Margaret are pleased to be making a difference in the lives of Southeast students. The Uelekes partnered with the Department of Mathematics to develop two new computer labs with access to self-paced sofware called ALEKS. This highly effective software has been proven to provide the necessary foundation in mathematics all college students need to succeed in their chosen fields of study. This fall, the John William Ueleke and Margaret Ritter Ueleke Mathematics Labs are fully functional, helping Southeast students to succeed in algebra and mathematics. John Ueleke says the foundation he received in math and the natural sciences at Southeast has had a major impact on his success throughout his career. “It is a blessing for us to be able to give back to an institution which has had a profound influence in my career and in our lives,” says John Ueleke. “Quality, affordable education has never been more important than it is today. We are proud of the role that Southeast has in helping our young people reach their potential.”

Last fall, the Southeast Missouri University Foundation received a partial distribution of $2 million from the estate of Wilver W. Wessel to benefit the Wilver W. and Dolores H. Wessel Scholarship awarded to students in the Donald L. Harrison College of Business. Wessel, a former Cape Girardeau postmaster, established the scholarship fund in his and his late wife, Dolores’, name in 1982. They were longtime activists in local civic affairs. The scholarship provides full fees to a student who demonstrates financial need from a middle- to low-income family. The eligible student must have a 3.0 grade point average, be a junior or senior in the College of Business, be of good moral character and live in the area between Ste. Genevieve and Dunklin and Pemiscot counties. A College of Business scholarship committee selects the recipient. “Mr. Wessel was a friend of Southeast and its students throughout his life. We are honored that he would choose Southeast to be the beneficiary of his estate,” says Trudy Lee, director of planned giving with the Southeast Missouri University Foundation. “In these uncertain economic times, the availability of our endowed scholarships can be reassuring to prospective students and their parents. We’re extremely grateful for this act of generosity,”says Dr. Gerald McDougall, dean of the Donald L. Harrison College of Business.

Margaret and John Ueleke

Touch one life. Touch many lives.

When you include Southeast Missouri State University in your estate planning, you aren’t just changing the life of one student. You change the lives of all those our student touches.

For more information, contact Trudy Lee at (888) 812-3769 or visit us online at www.semofoundation.org. T H E

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GET GAME IN THE

homecoming 2009 WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7

SATURDAY, OCT. 10

What: Man & Woman of the Year Recognition Dinner When: 7 p.m. Where: University Center Ballroom Contact: Katherine Pei at (573) 651-2280

What: All Alumni Breakfast When: 7:30 a.m. Where: Wehking Alumni Center, 926 Broadway Cost: $10 per person Contact: Dorothy Koenig at (573) 651-2259 or dkoenig@semo.edu

FRIDAY, OCT. 9 What: Delta Chi Open House When: 5 - 7 p.m. Where: 223 N. Ellis Contact: Ross Devereux at (314) 560-7847 or Zach Bridgewater at (636) 280-3914 What: Alpha Phi Alpha When: 5 p.m. Where: Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity House What: Copper Dome Society/Merit Award Recognition Dinner When: 6:30 p.m. Where: Show Me Center Cost: $25 per person Contact: Southeast Missouri University Foundation at (573) 651-2332 What: Sigma Chi Alumni Reception When: 7 -10 p.m. Where: Buckner Brewing Company, 132 N. Main Street What: Lambda Chi Alpha Alumni Reception When: 7 p.m. Where: Bel Air Grill, 24 South Spanish Contact: Austin McConnell at (573) 380-8629 or deltaphi_alumni@yahoo.com What: Pi Kappa Alpha Alumni Party When: 8 p.m. Where: Pike Memorial Lodge Contact: Robert Cox at (866) 335-3460 or Robert@coxandassociates.biz

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What: Homecoming Parade It’s time to Get in the Game starting with one of the region’s largest parades. Watch as Broadway is taken over with music, floats and fun. When: 9:30 a.m. Where: Broadway Contact: Gretchen Grojean at (573) 651-2877 or ggrojean@semo.edu What: Delta Chi Homecoming Celebration Breakfast prior to Parade at 233 N. Ellis BBQ in Capaha Park at 1 p.m. Dinner at Port Cape at 7 p.m. Contact: Ross Devereux at (314) 560-7847 or Zach Bridgewater (636) 280-3914 What: Sigma Tau Gamma Homecoming Celebration Breakfast prior to Parade at 325 N. Pacific BBQ/Pig Roast after the parade at 325 N. Pacific Contact: Geoff Ogden at (314) 680-1814 or gsogdensigtau@gmail.com What: Alpha Delta Pi Homecoming Celebration Breakfast following the Parade at the Chapter House. River Ridge Winery in Commerce following the football game. What: Theta Xi BBQ When: After the parade Where: Theta Xi House, 915 College Hill Contact: Kevin Bray at (314) 249-7967 What: New Residence Hall Open House When: After parade until 1 p.m. Where: Corner of Henderson & Broadway Contact: Bruce Skinner at (573) 651-2274 or bskinner@semo.edu

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What: 50-Year Reunion Lunch Members of the Class of 1959 are invited to celebrate the 50-year reunion. When: 11:30 a.m. Where: Wehking Alumni Center, 926 Broadway Cost: $15 per person Contact: Dorothy Koenig at (573) 651-2259 or dkoenig@semo.edu What: Sigma Sigma Sigma Alumnae BBQ When: Noon Where: On-campus House Contact: Cate Chaney at (816) 377-6321 or cmchaney1s@semo.edu What: Diamond Club Reception Alumni 70 years of age or older are invited for a time of fun and remembering. Appetizers and cash bar available. When: 4 p.m. Where: River Campus John & Betty Glenn Convocation Center Cost: $15 per person Contact: Dorothy Koenig at (573) 651-2259 or dkoenig@semo.edu What: VET Corps Pig Roast Former VET Corp members Annual Pig Roast When: 5 p.m. Where: VFW Post 3838, 1049 N. Kingshighway Contact: Tom Meyer at (573) 334-2975 or tmmeyer@tlmrealty.com or Walt Wildman at (573) 579-8626 or walterwildman@charter.net What: Redhawks Volleyball vs. Tennessee Tech When: 6 p.m. Where: Houck Field House Contact: Call (888) SEMO-TIK or visit www.gosoutheast.com to order online. What: Pi Kappa Alpha Dinner & Dance When: 7 p.m. Where: Town Plaza Banquet Center Contact: Robert Cox at (866) 335-3460 or Robert@coxandassociates.biz

FOOTBALL GAME What: Redhawks vs. Austin Peay When: 1 p.m. Where: Houck Stadium Halftime: Crowning of Man & Woman of the Year For Tickets: Call (888) SEMO-TIK or visit www.gosoutheast.com to order online.

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Did Someone Say Tailgating? When & Where: After the parade, join us outside Houck Stadium on Bellevue & the Wehking Alumni Center parking lot for lots of fun. In addition to the planned tailgating events below, spaces are available for your own event on a first-come, first-served basis. What: Southeast Athletics Tailgate Gathering Contact: Bobby Brune at (573) 986-6139 or rjbrune@semo.edu What: Booster Club Tailgate Contact: Greg Brune at (573) 651-2005 or gbrune@semo.edu What: College of Education 1st Annual Battle of the Bakers Contact: Dana Baer at (573) 651-2408 or dbaer@semo.edu What: Sigma Chi Tailgate Where: Parade Route near Houck Stadium What: Alpha Phi Alpha XI Gamma Chapter Tailgate Where: Parade Route near Houck Stadium What: Southeast Young Alumni Chapter Tailgate Contact: Alisa McFerron at amcferron@semo.edu What: Residence Life Reunion Tailgate Contact: Bruce Skinner at (573) 651-2274 or bskinner@semo.edu

What: Lambda Chi Alpha Homecoming Dinner When: 7 p.m. Where: Dockside the Upper Deck, 4 North Spanish Contact: Austin McConnell at (573) 380-8629 or deltaphi_alumni@ yahoo.com What: Alpha Phi Alpha Black Tie Dinner & Dance When: 7 p.m. Contact: Terry Allen at (901) 219-2535 or tlavan06@yahoo.com, Duane Hickman at (314) 265-7868 or dshickmn@hotmail.com, Pernell Witherspoon at (314) 602-1908 What: America’s Hits on Parade Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra & the Pied Pipers with music from the 1940s When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall, River Campus Contact: River Campus Box Office at (573) 651-2265

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ALUMNI ALMANAC

ALUMNI MERIT AWARDS

Nine alumni and one faculty member will receive Merit Awards presented by the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association during Homecoming weekend festivities. Since 1958, Alumni Merit Awards have been presented to Southeast graduates who have brought distinction to themselves and to the University. The Faculty Merit Award is presented for excellence in teaching.

RUBY LONG College of Education

Dr. Ruby Long is a 1956 graduate of Southeast and a retired professor from Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, where she taught and served as chair of the Department of Special Education, School of Education. After graduating from Southeast, Long attended the University of Missouri to pursue master’s and doctoral degrees. She began her career teaching in public secondary schools and later moved to the college level, where she taught at several universities. She was involved in many research projects throughout her career and volunteered for the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, the United Way and others. Long also has fully funded the college education of seven students, including three who graduated from Southeast.

JOHN HESSEL

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College of Liberal Arts

MAX HEEB

John Hessel is an attorney in St. Louis with the firm of Lewis, Rice & Fingersh. After graduating cum laude from Southeast in 1974, Hessel attended St. Louis University School of Law and graduated in the top 10 percent of his class in 1977. He is a member of the Management Committee at Lewis, Rice & Fingersh and vice-chairman of the Litigation Department. One of his primary practice areas is in media and communications law through the representation of such clients as Fox Television, KTVI-2, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, HBO and Reed Elsevier Publishing Company. Hessel also serves as the city attorney for the cities of Kirkwood and Florissant. He was recognized as the 2008 Citizen of the Year by the Kirkwood/Des Peres Chamber of Commerce for his long-time service as city attorney and for his actions during the shootings at a Kirkwood City Council meeting and fund-raising activities for the families of the victims. He also received the 2008 Medal of Valor Award for his actions during the Kirkwood shooting. In addition, he received recognition with the Best Lawyers in America designation and was honored among St. Louis Magazines’ Best Lawyers in St. Louis. He is a member of Southeast’s Corporate Planning Committee in St. Louis and a former member of the executive council for the St. Louis Alumni Chapter.

Dr. Max Heeb, a retired surgeon, graduated from Southeast in 1950 and continued his education for two years at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine. He then transferred to Washington University in St. Louis where he graduated from medical school. He attended medical school on the G.I. bill, which he earned after serving in the U.S. Navy. After completing medical school, Heeb joined a practice as a surgeon in Sikeston, just 25 miles from where he was raised. He was named the “Man of the Year” by the Sikeston Chamber of Commerce in 1991, received the 1993 National Divisional Award by the American Cancer Society and the Health and Human Services Award in 1992-1993 presented by Gov. Mel Carnahan from the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Heeb has been a member of the American Medical Association, American College of Surgeons and many other professional organizations. He has served on the Board of Governors and was president of the University of Missouri Medical Alumni Association and was president of the Missouri Chapter of the American College of Surgeons. He also has written a book about his life as well as many medical-related articles.

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ALUMNI ALMANAC

TINA KLOCKE

ROBERT LEE YOWELL

Harrison College of Business

Holland School of Visual & Performing Arts

Dr. Robert Lee Yowell is a 1966 Southeast graduate. Dr. Yowell teaches academic courses in acting, directing, dramatic literature, oral interpretation, improvisation and voice at Northern Arizona University. He earned a master of arts degree from St. Louis University and a doctoral degree from Bowling Green State University. Yowell has served as chairman of Theater and Dance at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock; the University of Alabama at Birmingham and California State UniversitySan Bernardino, and director of the School of Performing Arts at Northern Arizona University. Dr. Yowell has written articles on theater as a learning medium, theater education, directing and dramatic literature. He has also written original plays, including “Montana Love Story.” Yowell is an actor who has performed in plays, on television, in movies and has done voice work. He is a past president of the Northern Arizona University Faculty Senate and served as the Arizona chair for the Kennedy Center/ American College Theatre Festival (KC/ ACTF). He has directed more than 100 plays and seven of his productions have been invited to regional KC/ACTF festivals. His production of “El Paso Blue” by Octavio Solis was a national winner and was performed at the Kennedy Center.

Tina Klocke is a 1982 Southeast graduate and was recently recognized as one of the St. Louis Business Journal’s 25 Most Influential Business Women. She became the chief financial bear for Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc., in November 1997, the company’s treasurer in 2000 and secretary in 2004. She is currently chief operations and financial bear. Prior to joining Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc., she was controller for Clayton Corporation, a manufacturing company, where she supervised accounting and finance functions as well as human resources. Before joining Clayton in 1990, she was controller for Love Real Estate Company, a diversified investment management and development firm. She began her career in 1982 with Ernst & Young LLP. Klocke also is a former Alumni Monday speaker.

JOHN HESKETT College of Health & Human Services

Dr. John Heskett is a 1969 graduate of Southeast with a bachelor of science in education degree and a 1971 Southeast graduate with a master of arts degree in speech pathology. He is an education consultant at Education Solutions, LLC. While with Education Solutions, he has been engaged in research and service projects with the University of Minnesota, Utah State University, St. Louis Public Schools and Missouri Department of Mental Health. He is also a member of the adjunct faculties at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and Missouri Baptist University. He was the assistant superintendent at Pattonville Public Schools; assistant commissioner and coordinator for special education services in the Division of Special Education for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education; superintendent and assistant superintendent at the State Schools for the Severely Handicapped; and speech/language pathologist for State Schools for the Severely Handicapped and Dexter Public Schools. He has served on the boards of several state and national professional organizations and has participated in many research and grant activities.

DANIEL P. WALSH Harrison College of Business

Dr. Daniel P. Walsh is a 1971 graduate of the College of Business. He graduated cum laude from the University of Health Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1982, where he accepted an academic scholarship from the U.S. Navy. He served as the chief triage officer for the Liberation of Grenada and Multi National Peacekeeping Force in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1983 and 1984. T H E

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He was named Chief Resident of the Year at one of the largest Naval hospitals in the country. Walsh remained active in the U.S. Navy Reserves after beginning his civilian career in medicine, serving in Iraq’s “Operation Noble Eagle & Enduring Freedom” in 2003. He held the position of “Specialty Leader to the Surgeon General for Emergency Medicine Reserves.” Walsh retired from the U.S. Navy in 2007 with a rank of captain. In 2000, he launched his own company, Physician’s Link Centers, Inc., managing emergency medicine services in several hospitals and treatment centers in northeast Ohio. Walsh also established The Sigma Chi Foundation Medical Scholarship for students entering the field of medicine. M I S S O U R I

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ALUMNI ALMANAC

NANCY BLATTNER

EMMET J. FINK

Dr. Nancy Blattner is a 1978 Southeast graduate and was recently named president of Caldwell College, a Dominican institution of higher education in Caldwell, N.J. Between 1980 and 1987, she was an adjunct faculty member in the Department of English at Southeast. From 1987 to 2002, she was a faculty member in the Department of English, achieving tenure and full professor rank. She also served as director of the Writing Assessment program from 1987 to 2000 and as associate dean of the School of University Studies and as a faculty associate in the Office of the Provost from 1999 to 2002. She left Southeast to serve as an ACE Fellow at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., under the direction of President Patricia Cormier. Following that, she became vice president and dean of Academic Affairs at Fontbonne University in St. Louis. She is a former Alumni Monday speaker.

Emmet Fink is a 1940 graduate of the Southeast industrial arts program. Fink served in the U.S. Army infantry in North Africa and in the signal corps in Africa and Europe during World War II. After the war, Fink taught high school industrial arts. He went on to work for Carter Carburetor as a tool designer and later became a tool engineer with McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis. He designed innovative tools to build fighter jets such as the Banshee, the Voodoo, the F-4, the F-15 and the F-101, as well as the Mercury and Gemini Space Capsules. In 1969, he was transferred to Japan to head up a team for McDonnell Aircraft to build an American fighter jet for the Japanese Self Defense Force at Kawasaki Heavy Industries. He retired from McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis in 1981. He then began a second career as a tool designer at various aircraft plants. Formerly an avid carpenter, Fink now enjoys drawing building plans; his current project is a winery production facility for his grandson. He and his wife also have become avid quilters.

College of Education

School of Polytechnic Studies

FACULTY MERIT AWARD SARA EDGERTON Department of Music

Dr. Sara Edgerton received her undergraduate degree in cello performance from the Eastman School of Music and her master of arts and doctor of musical arts degrees from Cornell University, where she was the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards. She also has studied extensively in England. Edgerton performs throughout the United States both as a modern and Baroque cellist. As artistic director of the Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra, Edgerton conducts the orchestra in its Symphony Series performances. In summer 2009, she led the Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra on a concert tour of China as part of the 2009 American Celebration of Music in China, with performances on the Great Wall of China and at several major universities and conservatories in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hangzhou, China. Her students have been accepted for graduate study at prestigious universities and conservatories and have gone on to successful professional careers in music as teachers, orchestral players and studio performers.

Southeast Night at Grant’s Farm Alumni and family enjoyed Southeast Night at Grant’s Farm in May. The family-friendly event gave alumni the chance to share Southeast memories while having a “Southeast Only” viewing of Grant’s Farm.

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CLASS NOTES

CLASSNOTES Changed your career? Your address? Do you have family news or any career information you’d like to share with Southeast alumni? Visit www.iAMsoutheast.com and update your class note. Eugene (Jack) Story ‘53 had a wonderful career launched by attending Southeast, including becoming a professor of physics and directing R&D for nuclear weapons testing and the Superconducting Super Collider. He traveled throughout the world investigating cutting-edge technologies. Jack has three great grandchildren and is retired at 80 years old. You can read more about Jack at www.jackstorysite.com. Donald Brod ‘54 completed his term this summer as president of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors (ISWNE) after presiding over the annual conference at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada. ISWNE has members in the United States, Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and Australia. Fowler Jones ‘54 is an associate clinical professor in pyschiatry (Division of Psychology) at the University of Kansas Medical School. He is also in the private practice of psychology in the greater Kansas City area. Harvey Shell ’54 recently finished his first book, Whispers from the Maple Hill: Life During the Depression and World War II in Southeast Missouri. He lives in Columbia, Mo., where he is CEO of an engineering consulting firm. Eugene Munger ‘56 will be attending Homecoming 2009 and will have a book signing at that time. His book Momma, Don’t Ya Want Me To Learn Nothin? covers his growing up in Southeast Missouri during the transitional ‘40s and ‘50s. Kenneth Wessel ‘56 and his wife, Sandi, moved to the Cincinnati area from New Hampshire to be more involved with their growing family. Robert Crawford ‘57 and his wife, Brenda, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversay on June 27, 2009. After having had three sons, the first eight grandchildren were girls! They finally got one grandson who is extremely spoiled by his grandparents and sisters. Derrill Heiland ‘60 has been appointed director of orthodontics by the University of Florida Pediatric Residency program at Edison in Naples, Fla. Donna (Lewis) McGee ‘60 has retired from teaching. Gilbert Baumker ‘62 retired in 2007 after 45 years as a design engineer at two companies in Washington, Mo. He and his wife, Margie, now take care of the grandchildren and golf.

several states as well as Germany. She has resided in South Florida for 20 years and now is retired after teaching for more than 40 years. She was married to Alvin Francis ‘61 for nearly 54 years. Alvin passed away June 2008. Paul Bippen ‘63 retired five years ago from Indiana University as Dean Emeritus. He and his wife, Pat, now spend time with family and friends and travel extensively. James Piatchek ‘63 is now Rev. James Piatchek, an ordained permanent deacon in the Catholic church, serving the Memphis diocese at St. Brigid Church. He is also a certified independent business advisor conducting mastermind coaching groups while continuing to speak and write books. Jim serves as the director of the St. Vincent DePaul food mission. Judith (Owens) Copanas ‘64 retired to the Central Coast of California after selling pharmaceuticals for 30 years. She has two sons and five grandchildren.

Donald White ‘67 retired from the U.S. Postal Service in May 2009. He is now doing automotive parts delivery part-time. Donald has two sons and seven grandchildren.

California. In 2007, he was one of the 1,000 individuals chosen to spend time with Al Gore and be trained by him as a presenter of “An Incovenient Truth.” In February 2008, John was a visiting preacher at the Memorial Church of Harvard University.

Jean (Heisserer) Allen ’68, entered the real estate field where she has been ranked in the top one percent of all realtors in North America. Jean is also in the Hall of Fame and has received numerous awards for outstanding client service.

Melinda (Morrison) Hilterbrand ‘71 has been a realtor specializing in residential sales with ERA Cape Realty since 2000. She would like to wish all her classmates who are turning 60 this year a Happy Birthday!

Sandra (Wilmesher) Hechst ‘68 has retired from teaching and enjoys working part time at Grant’s Farm in St. Louis, Mo. She has two grandchildren.

Wayne Jones ‘71 retired as assistant superintendent-business services at Bonsall Union School District in July 2009 after 16 years of service.

Ellie (Fuchs) Depew ‘69 has retired from teaching Spanish at Hunter Huss High School in Gastonia, N.C.

Janet (Thompson) Presson ’71 is director and instructor at Keyboards & Kindermusik Conservatory. She recently saw her 200th Gold Cup earned by her students in the National Junior Music Festival. To receive a Gold Cup, students must compete at a minimum of three years earning the top rating.

John Donica ‘69 owns a company that plans and manages conferences and meetings. He lives in Bloomington, Ind.

Charles Bess ‘65 is a retired pastor and author. His last position as pastor/missionary was in Wiesbaden, Germany. He and his wife, Mary, are continuing a family tradition of operating several small businesses with their daughter and son-in-law.

Gary Johnston ‘69 is now retired and living on his “mini-farm.” He is enjoying restoring and showing antique tractors and trucks and spending time with his son, daughter and granddaughters. His wife, Linda (Smith) ’69, passed away in 2001.

Larry Harris ‘65 retired from the federal government as an auditor. After retirement, he began an accounting and income tax business where he works part-time. Larry lives outside of Washington, D.C ., which has been home for the past 32 years.

Ted Schearf ‘69 is a semi-retired realtor in the Springfield/Branson area. He and his wife, Joyce, enjoy sailing their sailboat on Table Rock Lake and charter a sailboat when they go to Florida in the winter.

Vicky (Altemeyer) Krulic ‘65 sold her business and retired 10 years ago and has been playing golf ever since. She has three children and four grandchildren. Gayle Kingery ‘66 was presented with the 2009 James C. Kirkpatrick Excellence in Governance Award. Robert Yowell ‘66 is a professor of theatre at Northern Arizona University (NAU). His wife, Marsha (Reissaus) ‘74, is also on the faculty at NAU in the school of communications. They have two sons.

Larry Berry ‘70 is a retired school superintendent and now Southern Commissioner of Bates County, Mo. Dora (Opalewski) Cole ‘70 retired after 35 years with the Missouri Department of Mental Health. Gary Corbin ‘70 is currently an adjunct microbiology instructor at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. His real passion, however, is playing rock and roll music, and over the years, he has been in numerous local bands and is currently playing in two bands in small venues around the city.

Ronald Eaglin ‘62 was honored on June 11 by Morehead State University when the space science program was named the Ronald G. Eaglin Science Program. Mary Seabaugh Francis ‘62 received her BS and MA degrees from Southeast. She taught in

Sandra (Mouser) Vitt ‘67 co-authored with Michael Hickman a cookbook entitled Rhubarb: More Than Just Pies. On June 15, 2009, she was interviewed live on Martha Stewart’s Sirius Radio

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Brenda (Brown) Ross ‘71 retired in 2003 after 32 years of teaching but returned part-time in 2005. She is presently involved in a rental property business along with her husband, Nelson. Harold “Dick” Schuerenberg ‘71 retired from Shell Oil Company after 37 years of employment. He resides in Tampa, Fla. Joann (Young) Crowell ‘72 retired from her teaching career. She feels blessed with the time she had at Southeast. Michael Pohlman ‘72 retired as fire chief of the city of Two Rivers, Wis., in 2004. He moved to Madison, Wis., and is working part-time as a consultant and riding a GS BMW. Susan (Ryan) Weston ‘72 retired in June 2005, following a 33-year teaching career. She and her husband, Edward, now live at Lake of Egypt near Marion, Ill. Barbara (Timm) Willis ‘72 works as the internship coordinator for the Office of Service-Learning at the University of Missouri.

Bradley Estes ’70 received a Ph.D. in human resource development from Barry University in Miami in May 2009.

Kathy (Rice) Colvin ‘73 is in her 19th year of teaching at Oak Ridge High School outside of Sacramento, Calif. She has taught French, Spanish and social studies.

Brenda (Slavings) Taylor ‘70 taught school for 32 years at Hayti High School in Hayti, Mo., teaching accounting, English and speech. She was senior sponsor for 28 years and cheerleading sponsor for eight. She and her husband, Allen ’70, have one daughter.

Dorris (Brannon) Fredman ‘73 is retired and spends most of her time writing. She recently had a poem in the journal Drash: Northwest Mosaic published in Seattle, Wash. One of three articles accepted by FATE Magazine was published in the January-February 2009 issue.

John Walsh ‘70 just began his 12th year as the university chaplain and professor in religious studies at the University of Redlands in southern

Robert Johnson ‘73 has been in educational sales (textbooks and technology) for several years

William “Bill” Prelli ‘67 is retired and living in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Dale Vitt ‘67 was honored at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale’s “Excellence through Commitment” awards dinner. He has published two books and 39 refereed journal articles and serves as editor of The Bryologist, his field’s top journal. He also directs PEATNET, a global network for peatland research funded by the National Science Foundation

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CLASS NOTES after leaving school administration. He and his wife, Karen, have two children and stay busy with their jobs, children and college football games. Deborah (VonKessel) Sanders ‘73 is employed at Harrison College in Columbus, Ind. Susan (Willmering) Swiney ‘73 retired in 2005 and now substitute teaches. Sandra (Johnson) Winter ‘73 retired from her career with State Farm Auto Claims after more than 31 years. She married a childhood friend, Steve Winter, and moved to Texas.

Anna (Angier) Butler ‘75 at the age of 87 is still singing. She recently presented an hour program of art songs, spirituals and folk songs at John Knox Village where she resides. Janet (Perez) Eckles ’75, a writer, columnist, author and international speaker was recently interviewed on the national television show, “The Good Life” on Christian Television Network (CTN). Maureen (Malke) Hoessle ‘75 wrote a book called Under Three Flags: Exploring Early St. Louis History. Philip Svoboda ‘75 lives in Owings Mills, Md., while his wife works on her Ph.D. at the University of Maryland in Baltimore

Linda (Smith) Crowe ‘78 is an associate professor in communication disorders at the University of Nebraska at Kearney and was named chair of the department in May 2009. She has published research in language and literacy and has made numerous state, national and international presentations. Beverlee (Kettler) Maschek ‘78 works for Lutheran Senior Services at Lutheran Covalescent Home on the Laclede Groves Campus. Sylvia (Parsons) Ramsey-Rezner ‘78 is an associate professor in the communications department at GMC-Augusta and the coodinator for the Academic Resource Center. She is the vice-president of the American Bladder Cancer Society. Her second book was published this year, an espionage novel titled, An Underground Jewel. Sylvia’s first book to be published was a collection of poetry, Pulse Points of a Women’s World.

Danny Gunter ‘79 and his wife, Anne, are proud parents of Grace Elizabeth, born May 7, 2008. Judith (Hutchings) Hill ‘79 is retired from South Iron Elementary. She lives in Desloge, Mo., and travels with her friends from high school. Sue (Strawder) Whitener ‘79 is currently a teacher in the University City School District with its early childhood program. She has twice been selected in the past to be in Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers. Terrell Whitener ‘79 is currently working as a consultant and entrepeneur. He works with nonprofit and for-profit organizations as a leadership coach and social advocate for positive change in society.

Susan (Rice) Comer ‘76 is a retired teacher/ school counselor and does some substitute teaching at Sikeston High School. Glynn (Henry) Garner ‘76 and her husband, Brian Garner ’74, have two sons. She is currently employed by Shawnee Mission Public Schools as a reading specialist. Dennis Jauch ‘76 works for Pinellas Technical Education Centers. He and his students recently finished repairing and refreshing a 1996 Dodge Viper donated to the organization by Chrysler. Richard Seng ‘76 is beginning his 33rd year of teaching at the elementary level and now has two grandchildren, Logan and Lydia. M A G A Z I N E

Margaret (Burchfield) Wessel ’80 is now a registered professional geologist in the state of Washington. Margaret works for Vertex Construction Services and Vertex Environmental Insurance Services on Vashon Island, Wash.

Nancy (Grommet) Bland ‘79 is a high school counselor for grades 7 through 12.

Teresa (Macey) Ainsworth ‘76 practices emergency and occupational medicine and resides outside Rochester, N.Y. She has a son, Austine, and a daughter, Aspen.

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Marilyn Crites ‘77 is working at the Center for Writing Excellence at Southeast and also at the Shawnee Community College Student Success Center.

David Ainsworth ‘79 is a software systems engineer and lives outside of Rochester, N.Y.

Karen (Walker) Winberry ‘75 is working as a speech pathologist in the Poplar Bluff R-1 School District and is looking forward to retirement in the next couple of years.

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Nick Wagner ‘80 received a first place award from the Catholic Press Association in the Pastoral Ministry category for his book The Way of Faith: A Field Guide for the RCIA Process.

Judith (Baumgardner) Hughey ‘77 is an associate professor at Kansas State University, Manhattan, Ks.

William Black ‘75 just completed his 18th season as costume designer with the Tony Award winning Utah Shakespearean Festival in Cedar City, Utah. He is the associate head of theatre at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and the resident costume designer for the Clarence Brown Theatre Company. He continues to work regularly in regional theatres around the country, most recently the Denver Center Theatre Company.

City.

Connie (Bellew) Cox ‘77 retired after teaching for 25 years from Fredericktown Middle School and now works part-time at Southeast Missouri Mental Health Center in Farmington, Mo.

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Elizabeth Brown ‘80 was recently chosen STAR teacher of South Pike High School in Magnolia, Miss., where she has taught for 21 years. She teaches English, creative writing and oral communications. She is also a national boardcertified licensed mortician. William “Bill” Shaffer ‘80 has been working for the Federal Reserve for more than 26 years and is currently the information security officer at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Terry Spitzmiller ‘80 retired from the Air Force in August 2007 and now works for Customs and Border Protection. Terry and his wife, Sally, have been married for 30 years and live in Bellbrook, Ohio. S O U T H E A S T

Sid Aslin ‘81 and his wife, Cindy, will celebrate their 25th anniversary this year and have twin sons. He has worked for AT&T Yellow Pages since 1985. Lise (Krah) Broccard ‘81 and her husband, Kevin, have been married for 23 years and have two children. She is currently working as an elementary school librarian after 17 years as a special education teacher and eight years as a library assistant. Mark Cook ‘81 joined a firm in Irvine, Calif., after leaving PwC in St. Louis after 17 years as a tax partner. He would like to connect with alumni in his area. Louis DesPres ‘81 has practiced as a CRNA at Southeast Missouri Hospital in Cape Girardeau since graduating in 1987 from the Washington University School of Medicine Nurse Anesthesia Program. Therese (Schuberth) Hubble ‘81 is in her 20th year with the Parent as Teachers program as a parent educator. She is currenlty serving families in the Jenks Public School District in Jenks, Okla. Paula (Prater) Johnston ‘81 has a new business, Patient Focus Solutions, where she offers inspirational consulting through AreWeThereYet Retreats and one-on-one interactions to both individual and business clients. Michael Loyet ‘81 is beginning his 28th year as a Catholic educator and his third year as president of St. John Vianney High School, an all male Catholic high school with more than 600 students in St. Louis, Mo. He and his wife, Sheila, have two sons. Vernon Reisenbichler ‘81 received a promotion to a chemist 4 in the scientific research production division of Sigma Aldrich in St. Louis, Mo., where he has been employed for 28 years. Ronald “Ron” McAllister ‘83 has been working in sales and sales management in the steel pipe and tube industry for 25 years. Since 1996 he has been national outside sales manager for Northwest Pipe Company headquartered in Vancouver, Wash. Phillip Milligan ‘83 is the principal of Bernard Middle School in the Mehlville School District. He and his wife, Teresa, have two daughters. Carl Axelson ‘84 recently purchased ownership of Carrabba’s Italian Grill in Mason, Ohio. Daniel Bussell ‘84 has worked for “60 Minutes” for eight years. His next assignment will be in Afghanistan, working three separate stories about the war.

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Barry Byers ‘84 recently accepted a postion with Sensient Technologies-Color Division Business Unit Controller North America. William Caldwell ‘84 is a graphic artist at Auto Trim Design in Cape Girardeau. Diane James ‘84 is celebrating 25 years with Edward Jones. She is a senior writer for the Operations & Service division training department, creating instructor-led and computer-based training. Diane lives in Florissant, Mo. Linda Keena ‘84 joined the faculty of the legal studies department at the University of Mississippi. William Schrum ‘84 and his wife, Rhonda (Baker) ‘84, recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary by taking a seven-day cruise to Hawaii. William teaches science and Rhonda teaches art in the Hazelwood School District. Lynn Butler ‘85 has been serving as the minister of education at Leawood Baptist Church since 2004. His wife, Heather (McCallister) ‘85, is teaching physical education for Shelby County Schools. Teresa Grossman ‘85 is currently employed at Boulder County Mental Health Center in Boulder, Colo. She and her husband have one son. Maude (Bankhead) Harris ‘85 is currently employed with the Univeristy of Missouri Extension Center in Scott County. Sheryl Hullaby-Saari ‘85 is beginning her 24th year of teaching. Her entire career has been in Houston I.S.D., where for the past nine years, she has been at Briarmeadow Charter School. Cheryl (Jarrell) McAllister ‘85 is assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics at Southeast Missouri State University. She completed a Ph.D. in teaching and learning/ mathematics education from University of Missouri-St. Louis in 2005. Olalekan Oguntoyinbo ‘85 recently accepted a position as assistant professor of journalism and mass communications at Lincoln University in Missouri. He is also a freelance writer and journalist whose most recent article appeared in the Detroit Free Press. Lisa (Gilreath) Dlabick ‘86 just completed her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from Maryville University and is currently an instructional coach in the Hazelwood School District. Douglas Sanders ’86 and his wife, Janet (Hahs) ’91, have two daughters who are both recent graduates of Southeast. Heather (Sanders) Boyle ‘07 graduated with a bachelor’s degree in nursing and Krista Sanders ’08 earned a bachelor’s degree in fashion merchandising. Jonathan Stewart ‘86 is moving to Bartlesville, Okla., for a new position as an assistant professor of music at Oklahoma Wesleyan University. Kelly (McDonald) Taylor ‘86 is currently a marketing director for a Cape Girardeau radio station. Kelly and and her husband, Doug, just celebrated 19 years of marriage and have two daughters. FA L L

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CLASS NOTES Roger Shuck ‘87 is attending the U.S. Army War College (USAWC) in Carlisle, Pa. The USAWC is the Army’s senior educational institution. Students include senior military officers of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard, foreign military officers and senior civilian managers of federal agencies.

Norlita (Kaul) Robinson ‘89 married husband Dave in August 2008 and became an ordained minister in November 2008.

Tammy (Spane) Brock ‘88 is currently an assistant principal at Hearnes Elementary School in Charleston, Mo. She is married and has two children.

Bill Battle ’90 has been honored by the National Athletic Trainer Association (NATA) with the Excellence in Sports Medicine Reporting Award. He won for his five-part volleyball injury series written for the Washington Missourian, the newspaper where he currently serves as sports editor. He also received the Missouri Sportswriter of the Year award at the 50th Annual National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Awards program, marking the fourth time in five years he has won the award. Bill served as sports editor for the Capaha Arrow from 1988-1990.

Elizabeth (Tilmon) Palmer ‘88 is currently working as a nurse for Dr. Jeffrey Childers. She and her husband, Doug, celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary in June and have two daughters. Linda (Conner) York ‘88 received a Ph.D. in healthcare administration in March 2009. Julie (Bouchard) Gau ‘89 is a Juice Plus nutrition consultant, personal fitness trainer and wellness coach. Mark Maples ‘89 is working as the chief of police for the City of Lake Ozark, Mo. Kathleen (Clark) Waggoner ‘89 and her husband, Curtis, are foster parents to teen girls and have fostered 50 girls in their home. Their own children are grown. They have adopted three of their foster children and have 19 grandchildren. She is a licensed professional counselor, working on contract for community counseling center, at her own private practice and with a teen screen suicide prention program.

Michael Gann ‘92 is now a deputy warden after completing his M.S.A. in criminal justice at Southeast. He began as a corrections officer for the Missouri Department of Corrections. Jeffrey Halpern ‘93 works at the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette as a sports page designer. Angela (Smith) Robinson ‘93 just completed her second degree in May 2009. She graduated from the University of Mississippi with a degree in elementary education. She and her husband, Robert, live in Hattiesburg, Miss.

Terri (Blunt) Smith ‘90 is employed as an instructor in accounting and information systems at Three Rivers Community College and also serves as an adjunct instructor in accounting for Central Methodist University at its Poplar Bluff campus. Jody (Neal) Giles ‘91 is a lecturer in the department of educational leadership and counseling at Murray State University. Christina (Filla) Kessler ‘91 was promoted to manager of commerical lines at Lutheran Trust in St. Charles, Mo. Tammy Murphy ‘91 made a career change from school counselor to working in community counseling at Berthelot Counseling in Dexter, Mo.

Share information and reconnect with fellow alumni at www.iAMsoutheast.com. Dr. Jason Lane, a 1999 graduate of Southeast Missouri State University and a faculty member at the State University of New York at Albany, went to Dubai this past summer as a participant in the 2009-2010 Fulbright New Century Scholar program. Thirty-five academics from across the globe were selected from several hundred to participate in the program in which they studied how universities can expand their roles in generating solutions to global challenges, advancing economic and community development and improving quality of life. The scholars, he says, explored universities as innovators and knowledge centers. Some of his colleagues were engaged in innovative work like improving seaweed manufacturing and boosting water supplies in arid countries. Lane says he examined organizational innovations and how institutions are designed to foster innovation. Lane plans to make a return trip to Dubai in January. During that time, he will meet with policy makers and university administrators in Dubai, which is home to 25 campuses from other countries. Branch campuses are a way for institutions to increase their share of the global higher education market as well as expand their international prominence, Lane says. Universities are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to economic and social development in the developing world, he says. “Because of their historic role as knowledge incubators and protectors of ideas, the university has an abundance of capital it can use to help address many of the world’s problems,” he says. “Part of our collective efforts is to investigate successful and innovative ways in which universities are engaging with society to address these problems.” T H E

Lana (Abercrombie) Andrews ‘92 is in her 11th year teaching English as a secondary language at Central Junior High and Central Senior High Schools in Cape Girardeau Public Schools.

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Andrew Scholl ‘93 just started a position with Missouri S&T athletics in Rolla, Mo.

Stephanie (Lewis) Dubbs ‘94 has taught full time at Northwest Arkansas Community College in Bentonville, Ark., since 2006. She teaches art history survey courses, history of photography and graphic design, art appreciation and painting. She is also the full time advisor to the art club. Stephanie and her husband, Jeremiah, were married in May 2007. Laura (Bartlett) Jurica ‘94 and her husband Cory were recognized in an issue of the Eyes and Ears, an employee publication for Walt Disney World.

Timothy Moore ‘94 is the general manager of logistics at Southern Cal Transport, Inc. Shaina (Schiwitz) Reynolds ’94 and husband Mark Reynolds ‘96 have moved to San Antonio, Texas. Shaina is now working with IPC--the hospitalist company as a hospitalist physician in the Mission pod, and Mark, after being promoted to the rank of major with the US Air Force in December 2008, is working with the Air Force Medical Operations Agency, Lackland AFB. Paul Anslow ’95 is a professional engineer, specializing in fire protection engineering in South Carolina. Marlow (Greiner) Barton ‘95 began as instructional specialist for the Migrant and English Language Learner Program (MELL) at cooperating school districts in St. Louis on July 1, 2009. Pamela Norris ‘95 is teaching fifth grade at Van Buren R-1 School and business and computer classes in the evenings for Mineral Area College. She also owns and operates her own business, Stray Dog BBQ, with her husband. Andrew Weld ‘95 was recently elected president of the Arkansas Associated Press Managing Editors. He is employed as editor of the Blytheville Courier News in Blytheville, Ark. He is married to Jena (White) ‘95, who is marketing coordinator for the Northeast Arkansas Federal Credit Union. Arthur Yarbrough ‘95 recently relocated to St. Louis as director of conference and travel management for the American Cancer Society. He began his relationship with the non-profit organization as a volunteer during college and has been a staff member for more than 12 years.

While Lane is being hosted by Michigan State-Dubai, he will visit several campuses in both Dubai and Qatar. Lane, a Troy, Ill., native, is a former Student Government president at Southeast where he earned a bachelor of science degree with a major in political science and a minor in business. “I certainly would not be doing what I am doing today had it not been for my experiences at Southeast,” he said. “My interest in higher education and politics started while a political science student. And, I really started studying the organization and governance of universities during my two-year terms as Student Government president. I was probably the only student who memorized all of the strategic planning priorities for the University at the time. But, I was passionate about learning as much as I could about the University, how it operated and how it could be improved.” Lane had the opportunity to work as a student in the Southeast President’s Office during the administrations of former president Dr. Dale Nitzschke and current president Dr. Kenneth W. Dobbins, and during the tenure of former Board of Regents President Donald Dickerson and former Associate to the President Art Wallhausen. These administrators, Lane said, “provided me a solid foundation for understanding the realities of higher education that could only be understood from the perspective of that office.” Lane just completed his second year at the State University of New York at Albany. There, he is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Administration and Policy Studies and an affiliate faculty member of the Comparative International Education Policy Program as well as the Rockefeller School of Public Affair’s Public Policy Program.

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CLASS NOTES John McDermott ‘99 has been working for Asuragen for more than three years, an RNAfocused diagnositics and therapeutics company. He enjoys traveling to the Philippines to visit his wife’s family and road tripping across Texas to find great BBQ. John and his wife, Ling, have one daughter, Isabel.

Deborah (Mana) Besher ‘96 was selected as the Southeast Missouri School Counselor of the Tear for 2008-2009. Jason Burgess ’96 will be joining the Department of Homeland Security as a criminal investigator for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Christina “Tina” (Barker) Clark ’96 and husband Chris welcomed their third daughter, Delaney Marie on Oct. 25, 2008. Her big sisters Morgan Elizabeth and Kaitlyn Nicole are very proud of their new baby sister. Theresa (Hale) Hoffmeister ‘96 married Thomas Hoffmeister on Sept. 27, 2008 in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Vance Pawielski ‘99 has been working at Air Force ROTC at Southeast Missouri State University for 14 years.

Matthew Libby ‘03 is the new executive director of the Platte County Community Center North YMCA.

Michael Shenberg ‘99 is currently a pharmaceutical sales rep for Astellas Pharma US.

Derek McCarty ’03 and wife Heather had their first baby girl, Addison Ella McCarty, on July 9, 2009.

Guadalupe Dorsett-Davis ‘00 is starting her fifth year as a Spanish teacher at North County High School in Bonne Terre, Mo.

Mark Pedigo ‘96 is currently working on a Ph.D. in mathematics from Saint Louis University. On July 18, 2009, he married Mandy Baumgartner. Keira (Rettig) Brem ‘97 is teaching special education for 9-12th graders and is also the cheerleading sponsor. Keira and her husband have been married for six years and had their first child in December 2008. Kimberly (Speight) Nordyke ‘97 and husband Brett welcomed a baby boy, Braden Wayne, on May 26, 2009. Kimberly lives in Los Angeles and was promoted to online news editor at The Hollywood Reporter, a daily trade magazine for the entertainment industry.

Jeff Karcher ’00 is the Illinois State Police (ISP) District 19 Trooper of the Year. He joined the ISP in 2002, following his graduation from the Illinois State Police Academy and was first assigned to patrol duties. He now serves as District 19’s K-9 officer with his K-9 partner, Geido. He is a member of the ISP Region IV Crowd Control Team. Jeff lives in McLeansboro, Ill., with his wife, Nicole, son Layton, 5, and daughter Kaelee, 4. Kathie Kearbey ’00 is an employment adviser for people with disabilities through the Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program. Colleen Rossomanno ‘00 is the fitness programs supervisor for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. She has three children, Cara, Cate and Michael.

Brooke (Hildebrand) Clubbs ‘98 and her husband, Bobby Clubbs ’97, welcomed their daughter, Lily Hope on Feb. 20, 2009. Lily joins her siblings, Eva Rell and Eli Hildebrand. Bobby is employed as a speech and theatre teacher at Jackson High School. Brooke is employed as an instructor for the Department of Communication Studies at Southeast.

Julie (Causey) Aycock ‘01 is the regional director of development for the American Cancer Society for the Sikeston and Cape Girardeau areas. Julie and her husband, Bobby, have been married for six years and have a daughter, Aubrey Ella.

Kevin Cook ’98 was recognized as the Advisor of the Year at the 2009 Leadership Banquet hosted by residence hall student leaders at Kansas State University. Kevin advises two student organizations at K-State: the National Residence Hall Honorary Chapter and Housing & Dining Ambassadors.

Jessica (Grab) Brooks ‘01 is a stay-at-home mom to her two children, Bailey and Carter. She and Nicholas Brooks ‘99 have been married for eight years and live in Charlotte, N.C.

Allison (Griffitts) Horton ‘98 and her husband, Josh, have two daughters, Delaney and Claire, and live in Madison, Ala.

Ryan Rhodes ‘01 recently joined the United States Department of Commerce as a political appointee to the International Trade Administration. Rhodes serves as a special assistant to the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Import Administration. Prior to his current role, Rhodes worked as an associate in the White House Office of Presidential Personnel and as a member of the Obama for America Campaign.

Christopher Carlton ’99 and wife Jill were blessed with their first child, Christopher William Carlton on May 19, 2009. They live in Minneapolis, Minn. Dana (Heisserer) Daniel ‘99 and her husband, Jeremy, welcomed their twin daughter and son, Anniston Grace and Andrew Cole, on April 13, 2009. They join big sister Allie Elizabeth.

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Matthew McKnight ‘99 was recently elected to serve a four-year term on the city council of Hyattsville, Md. Matt recieved the highest number of votes in a race with three other candidates.

Tammy (Fancher) Kutscher ’03 began her own legal nurse consulting business to assist attorneys in deciphering complex medical records. Her oldest son, Daniel Brandt ‘09, has a BS from Southeast and is currently working on a master’s.

Amanda (Davis) Anthony ‘00 and her husband, Todd, had their first child, a daughter named Schuyler Grace, on March 7, 2009.

Ellen (Armbruster) Josephsen ‘96 and husband Justin welcomed their son Matthew David on Nov. 9, 2008. He joins big brother Bradley at home.

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Kelly (Lambing) Finke ‘02 joined AT&T’s corporate internal audit department in January 2009.

Misti (Pikey) Harrison ‘01 is a graphic design specialist for SEMO Alliance for Disability Independence, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

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Tamara Nelson ‘03 is a member of the board of directors for Safe Harbor Animal Sanctuary in Jackson, Mo. Kimberly Armbruster ‘04 received her master’s degree in health and physical education from Columbus State University in 2006. She is an athletic trainer at Allatoona High School in Acworth, Ga. She also teaches sports medicine/ aerobics classes. Vicki Bean ‘04 will become president of the Missouri Art Education Association in March 2010 in Caruthersville, Mo. Kay (Rittirote) Bieber ‘04 and her husband, Steve, welcomed their daughter, Kaylea Jane on April 30, 2009. Jeremy Boyer ‘04 is currently living in St. Louis where he is the director of Liturgical Music at Christ, Prince of Peace (a 1,200 family parish) in West St. Louis County. He is also the organist for the St. Louis Blues at Scottrade Center in downtown St. Louis. Melissa (Chandler) Bradley ‘04 and her husband, Rick Bradley ‘04, welcomed their son, Grant Owen in October 2008. Nathaniel Morgan ’04 is currently store manager for Food Giant Supermarkets in Sikeston, Mo. He is also finishing his master’s degree in industrial management from Southeast. Julie Richey ‘04 and her husband, Jason, were married on April 4, 2009, and are living in St. Louis, Mo. Dawn Volk ‘04 works as a health, environment and safety coordinator for Stallion Oilfield Services. The company is based in Houston, Texas and provides various critical care services for on/offshore drilling in 72 locations across the nation. Krisinda (Ing) Cook ‘05 and her husband were blessed to receive Jordahn Cook on Nov. 18, 2008. Krisinda also received her master’s in applied communication from Northern Arizona University. She and her family reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

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Andrew Corcoran ‘05 graduated in May 2009 with a Doctor of Medicine degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston Salem, N.C., and recently started residency training in pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Kimberly (Paris) Cremer ‘05 is currently working with foster children in Illinois. She and her husband, Doug, were married in 2007 and became new parents this year. Leshae (Simmons) Hann ‘05 and her husband, Jamie, were married on Aug. 1, 2009. Dianna Karnes ‘05 was honored in May as a 2009 Heartland’s Best Teacher Award winner. Richard Ogles ‘05 graduated in May from the University of Tennessee (Memphis) School of Medicine, Dr. Ogles, and wife, Amy (Dewrock) ’05, have moved to Columbia, Mo., where he has accepted a radiology resident position with the University of Missouri Hospital. They have one son, Caden. Jennifer Phelps ‘05 is working in the ER at Southeast Missouri Hospital. She is in her second year of nursing school and plans to get her BSN and MSN. Brandy Goggin ‘06 is the corporate marketing director for Community Care Centers, Inc., Graduate LCIE Program at Lindenwood University in St. Charles, Mo. Kelly McDaniel ‘06 is the office manager at Midwest Geriatrics, which specializes in long term and assisted living facilities. Liddia (Greer) Sanglton ‘06 is a juvenile probation officer in Madison County, Ind., where she resides. Amanda (Smith) Smallmon ‘06 passed the family nurse practitioner certification exam and is starting a new job with the Family Practice Clinic of Paragould in Paragould, Ark. Trista (Zoll) Stahr ‘06 married John Stahr ‘05 on July 18, 2009. Melanie Thompson ‘06 is the director of Learning Assistance Programs & Disability Support Services at Southeast. She presented at national conferences in Seattle, Wash., Washington D.C. and Louisville, Ky. Jennifer Weggenmann ‘06 moved to Jefferson City to work as a staff auditor for the Missouri State Auditor’s Office. In addition, she is studying for and taking various parts of the CPA exam. Karen (McColloch) Bowyer ‘07 is teaching eighth grade social studies at North County Middle School in Desloge, Mo. Jessica Hanna ‘07 is beginning work on her master’s in the family nurse practitioner program at the University of Missouri - Columbia this fall. Amanda (Kridelbaugh) Kitchen ‘07 and her husband, Caleb, were married in April. Caitlin Murphy ‘07 is employed at Colliers Turley Martin Tucker in St. Louis, Mo., as a portfolio managing consultant to Siemens Real Estate. FA L L

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ROWDY’S NEST She and Kyle Clark ’05 toured London, Paris, Versailles, Bruges, Brussels, Amsterdam and the Romantic Road in Germany to Munich in May. Lanor Payne ‘07 recently finished his master’s degree in early childhood from Webster University. He is working at Cornerstone Early Childhood Center in St. Louis, Mo., as a pre-k teacher and will begin the Ph.D. program in educational leadership in the spring. Shandi (Grieve) Penrod ‘07 and Jason Penrod ‘07 married at Cave Vineyard in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., on June 13, 2009.

in Philadelphia with a master of fine arts degree in museum exhibition planning and design. Gregory Soutiea ‘07 is the studio manager of an Elements Therapeutic Massage Studio just outside of Boston, Mass.

teacher at Rockwood Summit High School in Fenton, Mo. Angela Mills ‘08 is working at Vera Bradley corporate office in Fort Wayne, Ind.

Stephanie Tracy ‘07 presented a study at the American Academy of Audiology Convention in Dallas with a full paper on the study and results in the works. She is in her third year of grad school.

Michael Painton ’08 was fortunate to visit many historic sites on the East Coast, including Old Jamestowne, Va., as part of a summer fellowship program.

Carrie (Golden) Cain ‘08 and her husband, Justin, welcomed their first child on July 16, 2009.

Julie Pickerel ‘07 is a housing specialist at Chestnut Health Systems. She does individual and group therapy, case management and community support at a residential facility in Collinsville, Ill. Diane Riley ‘07 is with the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis as an exhibit designer. She graduated in May from the University of the Arts

Andrew Huggins ‘08 is a T-Mobile sales representative. Twila (Patrick) Mason ‘08 was accepted onto the Cellular, Biochemical and Molecular Sciences (CBMS) training grant through Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. Mark Matusiak ‘08 is a biology and chemistry

Richard Reagan ‘08 is an HD studio engineer with Blue Ridge PBS, a major educational television broadcast network, covering 26,000 square miles and five states. Deborah Rodery ‘08 has been employed at Montgomery Bank in Cape Girardeau, Mo., for eight years.

Amanda Foltz ‘09 graduated in December 2008 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication with an emphasis in public relations. She works as an admission counselor at Southeast Missouri State University and her territories include south central and northeast Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas. Natasha (Bennett) Hershey ‘09 and her husband, Chad, were married on May 23, 2009, and live in Sims, Ill., with their dog, George, and ferrett, Izzy. Brennan Hollenbeck ‘09 is a financial advisor and securities broker for Oppenheimer & Co. in Chicago, Ill. Erica Robbins ‘09 is moving to Barcelona, Spain to participate in the Teaching English as a Second Language program. Candra Rose ‘09 was promoted in May to a match support specialist at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri in Cape Girardeau.

Rowdy’s Nest Hey everybody. It’s Rowdy, back to tell you about all of the exciting things happening around campus. It’s hard to believe the fall semester is already underway, and I, for one, am really excited about all the events coming up for my red-feather friends and me! There are few things more exciting than the beginning of the fall semester and seeing all my friends, old and new, flocking back to campus! And those ‘Hawks that are migrating back this fall should really be excited about the opening of our newest residence hall. It’s a great new nest for the students who will be living on campus. The residence halls offer great activities and events to help the newest ‘Hawks get acclimated to their new nests! There are also some great changes around campus that our old birds should be pretty pumped about as they migrate back to campus! Don’t think for a second that moving in is where the excitement ends! This fall semester is going to offer some great opportunities for all Redhawks to get involved on campus, make new friends and do a lot of great things. With the charitable activities being hosted by some of our campus organizations, we have a great opportunity for all Redhawks to show our community how we are ready to lend a helping hand, or wing in my case. These activities are also a great way to make our own community on campus even stronger! I cannot mention campus activities without bringing up Homecoming! We have had some great Homecomings in the past, but I believe the Redhawks can look forward to one of the best Homecomings ever this year! Also, the ‘Hawks can look forward to some great events that will broaden our horizons and keep us sharp like the upcoming debate between Newt Gingrich and Howard Dean on healthcare. I could talk all day about the great activities and events we ‘Hawks have to look forward to, and we should all be proud of the opportunities being offered this year! ‘Til next time, keep flying high Redhawks! T H E

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The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University  

Fall 2009 Issue #8

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