Page 1

A dream becomes reality

an american artist

alum paints historical mural for the river campus

welcome to the crossroads museum to offer visitors closer look at area history

Pressing the boundaries

universit y press provides more than books


the maGaZine of SO UTH E A S T M I S S OUR I STATE U N I V ERS I T Y fall 2007 the mission of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is to bring the vitality that is southeast missouri state university into the lives of its alumni and friends… and to promote the cause of the university most effectively through its editorial focus on interesting people and interesting ideas…Experience Southeast…Experience Success. The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is made possible by members of the southeast missouri state university alumni association and donors to the southeast missouri university foundation. maGaZine team manaGinG editors karen Grebing director of marketing & development kgrebing@semo.edu diane sides director of university relations dosides@semo.edu copy and art editor shad burner coordinator of marketing sburner@semo.edu editorial advisory board Juan crites director of public services/publications Wayne smith vice president for university advancement/ executive director of the foundation Jane c. stacy director of alumni services & development art Wallhausen associate to the president contributors adam appleton amelie bertram Juan crites Jon fox ann hayes delain stafford photoGraphy brad chamness mike Grace nancy kelley thomas marrone matthew r. miller roWdy caricature thomas marrone

T

his issue of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University features the opening of our long-awaited new River Campus. Just a dream in the Spring of 1998 when the concept was first discussed, the River Campus and our new Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts are now “open for business” serving our students, the City of Cape Girardeau, and the entire Heartland area with educational facilities, professional performance venues, a spectacular museum, and art galleries never before available in this region. With the successful completion of this project, along with a number of other important indicators of quality, Southeast has laid claim to being Missouri’s premier regional comprehensive university. Significant as this $50 million River Campus project Kenneth W. Dobbins may be, it is not the only indicator that your University has President matured into one of the best comprehensive regional universities in the nation. Here are just a few of those indicators: • The University is again ranked in the top tier of Midwestern master’s degree-granting institutions by U. S. News and World Report – one of only 21 publics on that list of 70 fine institutions. • We have a record enrollment this fall for the seventh year in a row, and we expect the final fourth week census to show more than 10,500 students. • Our entering class of 1,800 freshmen is 20% larger than last year and is better qualified academically than any in recent memory. • The number of new students planning to major in the visual and performing arts has almost doubled compared to last year’s entering freshman class. • Our alumni and friends raised private donations totaling more than $13 million for the River Campus project. • Our Industrial and Engineering Technology and Engineering Physics programs have just received national accreditation from ABET -- the recognized accreditor for college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology. • Our students are making good use of a new, 100-plus computer “Information Commons” in Kent Library, and will soon be enjoying a state-of-the-art aquatic center adjoining the Student Recreation Center. Unfortunately, space is too limited to permit me to go into great detail about these and other accomplishments and innovations. Therefore, I hope you will pay the University campus a visit, possibly during Homecoming October 19-21, to see for yourself how Southeast has become Missouri’s premier regional comprehensive university. If a personal visit is not possible, I encourage you to read the following articles and browse through the pages of our Web site www.semo.edu. My basic message to you is that our alumni have every right to be proud of their affiliation with this remarkable institution. I look forward to seeing you on the campus sometime soon.

desiGn Jamie barnwell

Sincerely,

INSIDE this issue

Kenneth W. Dobbins President

8 20 26 An American Artist



t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

an american artist

s o u t h e a s t

welcome to the crossroads museum to offer visitors closer look at area history

Pressing the boundaries

universit y press provides more than books

m i s s o u r i

www.semoalumni.com

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7

16

Welcome to the Crossroads

s outheast alum nam es ne w alum ni onli ne com m unit y m useum to of fer visitors closer look at area h istor y

After great anticipation, the River Campus opened its doors to students this fall. The public grand opening will be held during Homecoming festivities on Oct. 19-21, 2007. s tat e

a dream b ecomes realit y

Pressing the Boundaries

O N THE COVER

alum paints historical mural for the river campus

The Grand Opening of the River Campus

a lum pai nts histor ical m ur al for r i ver cam pus

A d re a m b e c o m e s re a li t y

please send all correspondence to editor@semoalumni. com or to The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University, one university plaza ms7300, cape Girardeau, mo 63701.

4 6 24 27 31

10

iAMsoutheast

alumni association michael price, president Joan Gohn, vice president

letters policy The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University welcomes submissions by alumni and friends. class notes and letters may be edited for length and content.

let ters campus chronicles alumni almanac class notes roWdy’s nest

univer sit y press prov i des more t h an b ooks

university president dr. kenneth dobbins

southeast missouri university foundation harry rediger, chairman dick davidson, vice chairman

D E P A R T M E N T S

t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7




the maGaZine of SO UTH E A S T M I S S OUR I STATE U N I V ERS I T Y fall 2007 the mission of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is to bring the vitality that is southeast missouri state university into the lives of its alumni and friends… and to promote the cause of the university most effectively through its editorial focus on interesting people and interesting ideas…Experience Southeast…Experience Success. The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is made possible by members of the southeast missouri state university alumni association and donors to the southeast missouri university foundation. maGaZine team manaGinG editors karen Grebing director of marketing & development kgrebing@semo.edu diane sides director of university relations dosides@semo.edu copy and art editor shad burner coordinator of marketing sburner@semo.edu editorial advisory board Juan crites director of public services/publications Wayne smith vice president for university advancement/ executive director of the foundation Jane c. stacy director of alumni services & development art Wallhausen associate to the president contributors adam appleton amelie bertram Juan crites Jon fox ann hayes delain stafford photoGraphy brad chamness mike Grace nancy kelley thomas marrone matthew r. miller roWdy caricature thomas marrone

T

his issue of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University features the opening of our long-awaited new River Campus. Just a dream in the Spring of 1998 when the concept was first discussed, the River Campus and our new Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts are now “open for business” serving our students, the City of Cape Girardeau, and the entire Heartland area with educational facilities, professional performance venues, a spectacular museum, and art galleries never before available in this region. With the successful completion of this project, along with a number of other important indicators of quality, Southeast has laid claim to being Missouri’s premier regional comprehensive university. Significant as this $50 million River Campus project Kenneth W. Dobbins may be, it is not the only indicator that your University has President matured into one of the best comprehensive regional universities in the nation. Here are just a few of those indicators: • The University is again ranked in the top tier of Midwestern master’s degree-granting institutions by U. S. News and World Report – one of only 21 publics on that list of 70 fine institutions. • We have a record enrollment this fall for the seventh year in a row, and we expect the final fourth week census to show more than 10,500 students. • Our entering class of 1,800 freshmen is 20% larger than last year and is better qualified academically than any in recent memory. • The number of new students planning to major in the visual and performing arts has almost doubled compared to last year’s entering freshman class. • Our alumni and friends raised private donations totaling more than $13 million for the River Campus project. • Our Industrial and Engineering Technology and Engineering Physics programs have just received national accreditation from ABET -- the recognized accreditor for college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology. • Our students are making good use of a new, 100-plus computer “Information Commons” in Kent Library, and will soon be enjoying a state-of-the-art aquatic center adjoining the Student Recreation Center. Unfortunately, space is too limited to permit me to go into great detail about these and other accomplishments and innovations. Therefore, I hope you will pay the University campus a visit, possibly during Homecoming October 19-21, to see for yourself how Southeast has become Missouri’s premier regional comprehensive university. If a personal visit is not possible, I encourage you to read the following articles and browse through the pages of our Web site www.semo.edu. My basic message to you is that our alumni have every right to be proud of their affiliation with this remarkable institution. I look forward to seeing you on the campus sometime soon.

desiGn Jamie barnwell

Sincerely,

INSIDE this issue

Kenneth W. Dobbins President

8 20 26 iAMproud

iAMdetermined

iAMstrong An American Artist



t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

an american artist

s o u t h e a s t

welcome to the crossroads museum to offer visitors closer look at area history

Pressing the boundaries

universit y press provides more than books

m i s s o u r i

u n i v e r s i t y

a dream b ecomes realit y

www.semoalumni.com

16

fa l l

2 0 0 7

Welcome to the Crossroads

s outheast alum nam es ne w alum ni onli ne com m unit y m useum to of fer visitors closer look at area h istor y

After great anticipation, the River Campus opened its doors to students this fall. The public grand opening will be held during Homecoming festivities on Oct. 19-21, 2007. s tat e

The Grand Opening of the River Campus

Pressing the Boundaries

O N THE COVER

alum paints historical mural for the river campus

4 6 24 27 31

a lum pai nts histor ical m ur al for r i ver cam pus

A d re a m b e c o m e s re a li t y

please send all correspondence to editor@semoalumni. com or to The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University, one university plaza ms7300, cape Girardeau, mo 63701.

10

iAMsoutheast

alumni association michael price, president Joan Gohn, vice president

letters policy The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University welcomes submissions by alumni and friends. class notes and letters may be edited for length and content.

let ters campus chronicles alumni almanac class notes roWdy’s nest

univer sit y press prov i des more t h an b ooks

university president dr. kenneth dobbins

southeast missouri university foundation harry rediger, chairman dick davidson, vice chairman

D E P A R T M E N T S

t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7




RIVER

LETTERS

Robert “Pee Wee” Hawkins was a football star at Southeast in the early 1900s

A LIttLE SportS HIStory Since 2003, I have been digging into the athletic history of Southeast and have discovered some amazing feats by our athletes from the “by’gone days.” One such player was Robert Franklin Hawkins. His classmates called him “Pee Wee.” He was from Valley Park, Mo., located in St Louis County. “Pee Wee” played here for four years, starting in 1903, missing 1904 and then playing the next three years. He was described as a big, strapping brute of a man, standing 6’ 1” and weighing 185 lbs. All muscle and bones! “Pee Wee” was a powerful fullback who had speed and the courage to buck the opposing line, as was needed in those days. Football was not a finesse game at the turn of the century but one of line bucks and plunges and mass formations. Chosen in 1930 as the greatest Cape Normal football player, Hawkins is a member of the Southeast Sports Hall of Fame. He

After you read this issue, why not take a moment to comment on one of our stories or send us your thoughts about what is happening on campus?



t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

is remembered for a game he dominated in 1907 as Cape Normal defeated the University of Mississippi 11-6 at Oxford Miss. Ferdinand J. Courleux, long time coach at Cape Normal (1915-1930) and Cape’s first full-time athletics director, was an all-star athlete at Cape from 1904-1908. He was in the backfield with Hawkins for the Mississippi game. Before the game started, Corleux tells about Hawkin’s statement “Give me the ball every time. I’ll carry it.” “PeeWee” had the strength and, mostly the nerve, to do it. The team captain, in those days, was a coach on the field since sideline coaching, with the players on the field, was prohibited by rule. Yardage penalties were administered for violating this rule. Hawkins, as Captain, had the prerogative and he wanted the ball on every play. From the kickoff, Hawkins pounded the ball at the Mississippi line every time and went over for a touchdown. “Pee Wee,” with the help of star blocker, Jim Arnold, and his teammates, held on to defeat “Ole Miss.” From college here at Cape, Hawkins was recruited by Coach Eddie Cochems at St Louis University. Eligibility rules were not as they are today. A Thanksgiving Day game on November 26, 1908 against the Carlisle Indians and famous athlete, Jim Thorpe, was played in St Louis. Because of injuries, Hawkins was moved to tackle, a position he had never played. Carlisle was coached by Glenn “Pop” Warner, one of the most famous college coaches of all time. After the game, Coach Warner said “that Hawkins is the greatest tackle I have ever seen!” And, “Pop” Warner had seen them all. — Rich Eichhorst class of 1956 [EDITOR’S NOTE] Mr. Eichhorst is currently writing a book about the history and happening of sports at Southeast.

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

CAMPUS The Board of Regents and President Kenneth W. Dobbins of Southeast Missouri State University cordially invite you to attend the

Dedication and Grand Opening of the River Campus 3 p.m. Sunday, October 21, 2007 Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall 518 South Fountain Street Cape Girardeau, Missouri

Southeast’s new Aquatics Center is scheduled to open later this fall

Refreshments and tours will follow, along with performances by the students and faculty of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts.

ENvIouS SwImmEr I graduated from Southeast a little more than a year ago. While I really enjoyed my time at the University, there was something missing. A pool! When I first got to campus, it was announced that the old pool was being turned into a space for copiers. Now, I am pro-Xerox, but photocopiers pale in comparison to a swimming pool. I felt the aquatic amenity should have been covered by the Rec Center fees they were charging me each semester. With this in mind, I was really excited when I read about Southeast’s new aquatic center in the last issue of the magazine. This will be a great asset for current and future students. I have two siblings still at Southeast, and another who might be there soon, all of whom are excited about the opportunity to add swimming to their list of college activities. I wish I had the opportunity to use the facilities when I was a student. As a young alum of Southeast, I am pleased to see the University taking steps, such as these, to improve student life on campus, especially in the midst of the River Campus construction. I commend the University for not forgetting about everybody else on campus.

Presentation and Remarks on the “Inland Waterways: The Highways of our Heritage” mural by Gary Lucy 6 p.m. Location: The John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center

Grand opening of the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum and opening of the Hainsworth Collection 6:30 p.m. Remarks by Dr. John D. Hainsworth Location: Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast MIssouri Regional Museum.

— Emily Sikes ’06 Morley, Missouri

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7

t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7




RIVER

LETTERS

Robert “Pee Wee” Hawkins was a football star at Southeast in the early 1900s

A LIttLE SportS HIStory Since 2003, I have been digging into the athletic history of Southeast and have discovered some amazing feats by our athletes from the “by’gone days.” One such player was Robert Franklin Hawkins. His classmates called him “Pee Wee.” He was from Valley Park, Mo., located in St Louis County. “Pee Wee” played here for four years, starting in 1903, missing 1904 and then playing the next three years. He was described as a big, strapping brute of a man, standing 6’ 1” and weighing 185 lbs. All muscle and bones! “Pee Wee” was a powerful fullback who had speed and the courage to buck the opposing line, as was needed in those days. Football was not a finesse game at the turn of the century but one of line bucks and plunges and mass formations. Chosen in 1930 as the greatest Cape Normal football player, Hawkins is a member of the Southeast Sports Hall of Fame. He

After you read this issue, why not take a moment to comment on one of our stories or send us your thoughts about what is happening on campus?



t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

is remembered for a game he dominated in 1907 as Cape Normal defeated the University of Mississippi 11-6 at Oxford Miss. Ferdinand J. Courleux, long time coach at Cape Normal (1915-1930) and Cape’s first full-time athletics director, was an all-star athlete at Cape from 1904-1908. He was in the backfield with Hawkins for the Mississippi game. Before the game started, Corleux tells about Hawkin’s statement “Give me the ball every time. I’ll carry it.” “PeeWee” had the strength and, mostly the nerve, to do it. The team captain, in those days, was a coach on the field since sideline coaching, with the players on the field, was prohibited by rule. Yardage penalties were administered for violating this rule. Hawkins, as Captain, had the prerogative and he wanted the ball on every play. From the kickoff, Hawkins pounded the ball at the Mississippi line every time and went over for a touchdown. “Pee Wee,” with the help of star blocker, Jim Arnold, and his teammates, held on to defeat “Ole Miss.” From college here at Cape, Hawkins was recruited by Coach Eddie Cochems at St Louis University. Eligibility rules were not as they are today. A Thanksgiving Day game on November 26, 1908 against the Carlisle Indians and famous athlete, Jim Thorpe, was played in St Louis. Because of injuries, Hawkins was moved to tackle, a position he had never played. Carlisle was coached by Glenn “Pop” Warner, one of the most famous college coaches of all time. After the game, Coach Warner said “that Hawkins is the greatest tackle I have ever seen!” And, “Pop” Warner had seen them all. — Rich Eichhorst class of 1956 [EDITOR’S NOTE] Mr. Eichhorst is currently writing a book about the history and happening of sports at Southeast.

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

CAMPUS The Board of Regents and President Kenneth W. Dobbins of Southeast Missouri State University cordially invite you to attend the

Dedication and Grand Opening of the River Campus 3 p.m. Sunday, October 21, 2007 Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall 518 South Fountain Street Cape Girardeau, Missouri

Southeast’s new Aquatics Center is scheduled to open later this fall

Refreshments and tours will follow, along with performances by the students and faculty of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts.

ENvIouS SwImmEr I graduated from Southeast a little more than a year ago. While I really enjoyed my time at the University, there was something missing. A pool! When I first got to campus, it was announced that the old pool was being turned into a space for copiers. Now, I am pro-Xerox, but photocopiers pale in comparison to a swimming pool. I felt the aquatic amenity should have been covered by the Rec Center fees they were charging me each semester. With this in mind, I was really excited when I read about Southeast’s new aquatic center in the last issue of the magazine. This will be a great asset for current and future students. I have two siblings still at Southeast, and another who might be there soon, all of whom are excited about the opportunity to add swimming to their list of college activities. I wish I had the opportunity to use the facilities when I was a student. As a young alum of Southeast, I am pleased to see the University taking steps, such as these, to improve student life on campus, especially in the midst of the River Campus construction. I commend the University for not forgetting about everybody else on campus.

Presentation and Remarks on the “Inland Waterways: The Highways of our Heritage” mural by Gary Lucy 6 p.m. Location: The John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center

Grand opening of the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum and opening of the Hainsworth Collection 6:30 p.m. Remarks by Dr. John D. Hainsworth Location: Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast MIssouri Regional Museum.

— Emily Sikes ’06 Morley, Missouri

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

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t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

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CAMPUS C H R O N I C L E S

CAMPUS C H R O N I C L E S different tribes from across the nation, will offer a new production, portions of which premiered a few years ago at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts.

2007-2008 TOURING SERIES Shaolin Warriors

stage in the new Broadway musical Ring of Fire, featuring 38 signature songs from the legendary Johnny Cash. Stories of passion, redemption, humor and salvation set the stage ablaze in this musical celebration of the world’s most favorite rebel. With favorites like “Walk the Line,” “Hurt,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “A Boy Named Sue,” and the title track, “Ring of Fire,” audiences will tap their toes, stomp their feet and shout for more.

Wednesday, October 31, 2007 In a fully choreographed theatrical production, the Shaolin Warriors bring the remarkable skill, stunning movement and spectacular imagery of Kung Fu to stages throughout the world. Performed by the Buddhist monks of the Shaolin Temple, a sect that has become known throughout the world for its disciplined spiritualism and deadly martial-arts prowess, the production features many forms of Shaolin Kung Fu as well as a look at the daily temple life of the monks and their Zen Buddhist philosophy.

2007-2008 River Campus Season The opening season at the River Campus will be one to remember. With three performance series, dozens of studentfaculty performances, several professional and student-faculty art exhibits, and a series of programs at the Crisp Museum, there will always be something exciting happening at Southeast. With the highly anticipated 2007-2008 Touring Series quickly approaching, tickets are going fast. The River Campus will proudly welcome such highly-acclaimed acts as the Shaolin Warriors, the St. Petersburg Ballet: Swan Lake, and Hal Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight! This series also will feature the always-entertaining Late Nite Catechism, among other great events. The Theatre and Dance Series will showcase some of Southeast’s top performers. From the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall’s inaugural musical Big River to Dance-apalozza 2008, Southeast



THE

M A G A Z I N E

OF

will be well-represented by these rising young artists. The series also will feature Coyote Ugly, a fascinating, witty play, which will be the first to take advantage of the unique atmosphere in the Wendy Kurka Rust Flexible Theatre. The Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra, which is part of this year’s Symphony Series, will sound better than ever as it plays in the acoustically-friendly Bedell Performance Hall. The sounds will continue to be sweet with performances by the Choral Union and University Choir. As the season nears its close, the internationally renowned Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra will make a special one-day appearance at the River Campus. Performance art is not the only kind of art lined up for the new season at the River Campus. The Department of Art also has developed an impressive gallery schedule. With exhibits by upper-level art students,

SOUTHEAST

MISSOURI

STATE

faculty members, alumni and area artists, there is sure to be an eclectic mix in the new art gallery this season. The new gallery, which is located in the south wing of the historic Seminary building, will be an ideal location to display the magnificent artwork. For a more hands-on approach to the cultural world, Tuesdays @ the museum will be a series of workshops held in the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum of the River Campus. The workshops range from identifying artifacts to gourd decorating and even pine needle basket weaving. All workshops will be free of charge, but do require registration. The museum also will be featuring four 20072008 exhibitions including the Hainsworth Collection, the 30th Annual High School Art Exhibition, Cindy Tower: Workplace Series, and New Deal Photographers in Southern Missouri 1936-1942.

UNIVERSITY

FALL

2 0 0 7

American Indian Dance Theatre Saturday, November 3, 2007

Founded in 1987 by playwright/ director Hanay Geiogamah and produced by the late Barbara Schwei, this is the country’s leading Native American performing company. The 16-18 dancers, singers and musicians have performed to acclaim in virtually every state of the Union and have toured to theatres and festivals in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Australia, often with the support of the U.S. State Department. During the 2007-2008 season, the company, whose members have been recruited from as many as 10

Hal Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight! Saturday, April 26, 2008

St. Petersburg Ballet: Swan Lake Thursday, January 17, 2008

In 1966, the company was founded as the first Theatre of Ballet in Russia under the management of the People’s Artist of Russia, Professor Peter Gusev. Gusev’s credentials included being an artist of Leningrad Opera and Ballet Theatre in Beijing, and ballet schools in Shanghai and Guanchjou; and a balletmaster in the Maly Opera and Ballet Theatre and then in the Novosibirsk Theatre.

Late Nite Catechism

Friday, February 1, 2008 Now in its 11th year, Late Nite Catechism has brought its nostalgic kick to every state in the U.S. as well as to Canada, the U.K., and Australia. Late Nite Catechism is an uproariously funny play that takes the audience back to their youth. The irrepressible “Sister” teaches class to a roomful of “students” (the audience). Throughout the course of the class the benevolent instructor rewards the “students” for correct answers with glowin-the-dark rosaries and other nifty prizes. Naughty “students” may well find themselves on stage sitting in a corner reflecting their actions. However, even the most reluctant “students” will be clamoring to get into this Sister’s “class.”

Ring of Fire – The Music of the Man in Black Wednesday, February 13, 2008

The music of the Man in Black ignites the THE

M A G A Z I N E

A LIVING BREATHING AMERICAN MASTERPIECE! It is, quite simply, one of the most acclaimed and enduring performances in the history of theatre. Nearly 50 years ago, a young actor took the stage in a tiny off-Broadway theatre and introduced the world to a man they’d never forget. The actor was Hal Holbrook. The man was Mark Twain.

OF

SOUTHEAST

MISSOURI

STATE

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra April 13, 2008 Founded in 1880, on the belief that great music should be available to everyone, the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra is recognized internationally as an ensemble of the highest caliber, performing a broad musical repertoire with skill and spirit. Through a series of innovative and nationally recognized community-oriented activities, the musicians of the Symphony have shared their love for music with millions and introduced classical music to those who otherwise might not have been exposed to it.

UNIVERSITY

FALL

2 0 0 7




CAMPUS C H R O N I C L E S

CAMPUS C H R O N I C L E S different tribes from across the nation, will offer a new production, portions of which premiered a few years ago at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Massachusetts.

2007-2008 TOURING SERIES Shaolin Warriors

stage in the new Broadway musical Ring of Fire, featuring 38 signature songs from the legendary Johnny Cash. Stories of passion, redemption, humor and salvation set the stage ablaze in this musical celebration of the world’s most favorite rebel. With favorites like “Walk the Line,” “Hurt,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “A Boy Named Sue,” and the title track, “Ring of Fire,” audiences will tap their toes, stomp their feet and shout for more.

Wednesday, October 31, 2007 In a fully choreographed theatrical production, the Shaolin Warriors bring the remarkable skill, stunning movement and spectacular imagery of Kung Fu to stages throughout the world. Performed by the Buddhist monks of the Shaolin Temple, a sect that has become known throughout the world for its disciplined spiritualism and deadly martial-arts prowess, the production features many forms of Shaolin Kung Fu as well as a look at the daily temple life of the monks and their Zen Buddhist philosophy.

2007-2008 River Campus Season The opening season at the River Campus will be one to remember. With three performance series, dozens of studentfaculty performances, several professional and student-faculty art exhibits, and a series of programs at the Crisp Museum, there will always be something exciting happening at Southeast. With the highly anticipated 2007-2008 Touring Series quickly approaching, tickets are going fast. The River Campus will proudly welcome such highly-acclaimed acts as the Shaolin Warriors, the St. Petersburg Ballet: Swan Lake, and Hal Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight! This series also will feature the always-entertaining Late Nite Catechism, among other great events. The Theatre and Dance Series will showcase some of Southeast’s top performers. From the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall’s inaugural musical Big River to Dance-apalozza 2008, Southeast



THE

M A G A Z I N E

OF

will be well-represented by these rising young artists. The series also will feature Coyote Ugly, a fascinating, witty play, which will be the first to take advantage of the unique atmosphere in the Wendy Kurka Rust Flexible Theatre. The Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra, which is part of this year’s Symphony Series, will sound better than ever as it plays in the acoustically-friendly Bedell Performance Hall. The sounds will continue to be sweet with performances by the Choral Union and University Choir. As the season nears its close, the internationally renowned Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra will make a special one-day appearance at the River Campus. Performance art is not the only kind of art lined up for the new season at the River Campus. The Department of Art also has developed an impressive gallery schedule. With exhibits by upper-level art students,

SOUTHEAST

MISSOURI

STATE

faculty members, alumni and area artists, there is sure to be an eclectic mix in the new art gallery this season. The new gallery, which is located in the south wing of the historic Seminary building, will be an ideal location to display the magnificent artwork. For a more hands-on approach to the cultural world, Tuesdays @ the museum will be a series of workshops held in the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum of the River Campus. The workshops range from identifying artifacts to gourd decorating and even pine needle basket weaving. All workshops will be free of charge, but do require registration. The museum also will be featuring four 20072008 exhibitions including the Hainsworth Collection, the 30th Annual High School Art Exhibition, Cindy Tower: Workplace Series, and New Deal Photographers in Southern Missouri 1936-1942.

UNIVERSITY

FALL

2 0 0 7

American Indian Dance Theatre Saturday, November 3, 2007

Founded in 1987 by playwright/ director Hanay Geiogamah and produced by the late Barbara Schwei, this is the country’s leading Native American performing company. The 16-18 dancers, singers and musicians have performed to acclaim in virtually every state of the Union and have toured to theatres and festivals in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Australia, often with the support of the U.S. State Department. During the 2007-2008 season, the company, whose members have been recruited from as many as 10

Hal Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight! Saturday, April 26, 2008

St. Petersburg Ballet: Swan Lake Thursday, January 17, 2008

In 1966, the company was founded as the first Theatre of Ballet in Russia under the management of the People’s Artist of Russia, Professor Peter Gusev. Gusev’s credentials included being an artist of Leningrad Opera and Ballet Theatre in Beijing, and ballet schools in Shanghai and Guanchjou; and a balletmaster in the Maly Opera and Ballet Theatre and then in the Novosibirsk Theatre.

Late Nite Catechism

Friday, February 1, 2008 Now in its 11th year, Late Nite Catechism has brought its nostalgic kick to every state in the U.S. as well as to Canada, the U.K., and Australia. Late Nite Catechism is an uproariously funny play that takes the audience back to their youth. The irrepressible “Sister” teaches class to a roomful of “students” (the audience). Throughout the course of the class the benevolent instructor rewards the “students” for correct answers with glowin-the-dark rosaries and other nifty prizes. Naughty “students” may well find themselves on stage sitting in a corner reflecting their actions. However, even the most reluctant “students” will be clamoring to get into this Sister’s “class.”

Ring of Fire – The Music of the Man in Black Wednesday, February 13, 2008

The music of the Man in Black ignites the THE

M A G A Z I N E

A LIVING BREATHING AMERICAN MASTERPIECE! It is, quite simply, one of the most acclaimed and enduring performances in the history of theatre. Nearly 50 years ago, a young actor took the stage in a tiny off-Broadway theatre and introduced the world to a man they’d never forget. The actor was Hal Holbrook. The man was Mark Twain.

OF

SOUTHEAST

MISSOURI

STATE

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra April 13, 2008 Founded in 1880, on the belief that great music should be available to everyone, the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra is recognized internationally as an ensemble of the highest caliber, performing a broad musical repertoire with skill and spirit. Through a series of innovative and nationally recognized community-oriented activities, the musicians of the Symphony have shared their love for music with millions and introduced classical music to those who otherwise might not have been exposed to it.

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Gary Lucy, artist of “Inland Waterways: The Highways of our Heritage,” says the great steamboat race of 1870, which is the centerpiece of his mural, “embodies the grand age of the river.”

an American artist Alum paints historical mural for River Campus



t h e

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G

ary Lucy, whose studio overlooks the Missouri riverfront in historic Washington, Mo., has been working steadily since 2004 when he was commissioned by Southeast to paint a mural for the River Campus. The work of art, titled “Inland Waterways: The Highways of our Heritage,” is a fitting premise, Lucy said, for the new River Campus, situated on the banks of the Mississippi River at the foot of the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge. When it is completed, the mural will hang next to the entrance of the new Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum. The museum will highlight Southeast Missouri as a crossroads of geology and geography and modes of transportation, including the area’s legacy with the Mississippi River.

IDEnTIFyInG THE HISTORy OF A REGIOn

F

or Lucy, who grew up in southeast Missouri’s Bootheel, the mural and the museum are ways to depict the history of a river-oriented region. The mural’s centerpiece depicts the historic Great Steamboat Race of 1870 between the Robu n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

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ert E. Lee and the Natzchez. Lucy, a self-proclaimed “American Artist,” said the steamboat race was the country’s first big media event. According to the history books, huge sums of money were wagered and large crowds traveled considerable distances to line the banks of the river. The progress of the race was broadcast through the new telegraph to a national audience. “This event embodies the grand age of the river,” Lucy said. The centerpiece is bordered with two side panels filled with images reflecting the river’s many different vessels and passengers. The images progress from early dugout canoes, flatboats and early steamboats such as the New Orleans 1811 to images of Civil War ironclads, the Delta Queen 1924 and towboats of today. The far right offers a view from the pilot house of a modern river vessel of the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge and two children who are fishing. In honor of the new facility for the visual and performing arts, Lucy dedicated four panels along the top of the mural to the four disciplines to be taught at River Campus: music, dance, theatre and art. The mural’s creation is a multifaceted undertaking and Lucy has detailed the making of the mural in an online journal, which is available at www.garylucy.com. “Working on a mural is like eating a bowl of very average pasta – the more you eat, the bigger it gets,” Lucy said. “There are many projects within this project. The mural’s frame must be made from scratch to contain the ninefoot six-inch by 27-foot work. Then it must be photographed, which will be a hard job. All of the text accompanying the mural will have to be written and printed.” The finished mural will be crated and shipped via truck “very carefully,” according to Lucy, so it remains unharmed during the two-hour trip from t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

Washington, Mo. Once the mural is safely installed at the River Campus, a formal dedication ceremony will take place on Sunday, Oct. 21, during Homecoming weekend.

RIGHT MAn FOR THE JOB

A

1971 graduate of Southeast with a degree in art education, Lucy admits that today, he spends more time researching and writing about his subjects than painting them. Upon graduation, Lucy began his career as an elementary art instructor in Washington. However, after only one year, he acknowledged that his real desire was to become a full-time, professional artist.

He spent 12 years as an award-winning wildlife artist and in 1985, his interests expanded to include frontier themes in the style of two other past Missouri artists, George Caleb Bingham and Thomas Hart Benton. The change of direction in his work to historic interpretation of the waterways of North America has widened his popularity and public awareness. The Southeast mural is not Lucy’s first large-scale project. In 1977, he was commissioned by the West Plains Bank to complete a seven-foot sixinch by 22-foot mural featuring Missouri wildlife. In 1979, he received a s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

grant from the Missouri Arts Council to complete a five-foot six-inch by 18foot mural for the City of Washington. Lucy said special considerations must be made for large-scale works, such as how to light the canvas without creating a glare. While most murals are painted directly onto a building’s wall, Lucy paints on large canvas stretchers to ensure the survival of the work. “After studying murals, which were painted directly onto the walls, I’ve found that many murals are lost over time,” he said. “It is either too expensive or impossible to remove the work when the building is no longer useful. Thus, the art is lost.” Once the mural for River Campus is complete, Lucy said he has three other commissioned jobs from which to choose. He also plans to do some work aboard his river studio, a houseboat affectionately called the “River Rover,” which will allow him to paint the river as it is today. Lucy has received the 1993 Alumni Merit Award for the College of Liberal Arts, the “Southeast Salutes” award from the University’s Alumni Association, the “Spotlight Award” at the Missouri Governor’s Conference on Tourism in 2004 and the Regional Commerce and Growth Association’s 2004 Individual Achievement Award, “Sold on St. Louis.” Lucy completed a renowned series of paintings titled, “Lewis and Clark: The Journey Begins,” which generated a great deal of interest in conjunction with the commemoration of the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition. The images Lucy researched and created were received internationally and reproduced in magazines and newspapers such as Time, Newsweek, The Smithsonian, Better Homes and Gardens, US News & World Report, USA Today and numerous other publications. Collectively, Lucy’s images have been reproduced 225 million times.

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Gary Lucy, artist of “Inland Waterways: The Highways of our Heritage,” says the great steamboat race of 1870, which is the centerpiece of his mural, “embodies the grand age of the river.”

an American artist Alum paints historical mural for River Campus



t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

G

ary Lucy, whose studio overlooks the Missouri riverfront in historic Washington, Mo., has been working steadily since 2004 when he was commissioned by Southeast to paint a mural for the River Campus. The work of art, titled “Inland Waterways: The Highways of our Heritage,” is a fitting premise, Lucy said, for the new River Campus, situated on the banks of the Mississippi River at the foot of the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge. When it is completed, the mural will hang next to the entrance of the new Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum. The museum will highlight Southeast Missouri as a crossroads of geology and geography and modes of transportation, including the area’s legacy with the Mississippi River.

IDEnTIFyInG THE HISTORy OF A REGIOn

F

or Lucy, who grew up in southeast Missouri’s Bootheel, the mural and the museum are ways to depict the history of a river-oriented region. The mural’s centerpiece depicts the historic Great Steamboat Race of 1870 between the Robu n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7

ert E. Lee and the Natzchez. Lucy, a self-proclaimed “American Artist,” said the steamboat race was the country’s first big media event. According to the history books, huge sums of money were wagered and large crowds traveled considerable distances to line the banks of the river. The progress of the race was broadcast through the new telegraph to a national audience. “This event embodies the grand age of the river,” Lucy said. The centerpiece is bordered with two side panels filled with images reflecting the river’s many different vessels and passengers. The images progress from early dugout canoes, flatboats and early steamboats such as the New Orleans 1811 to images of Civil War ironclads, the Delta Queen 1924 and towboats of today. The far right offers a view from the pilot house of a modern river vessel of the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge and two children who are fishing. In honor of the new facility for the visual and performing arts, Lucy dedicated four panels along the top of the mural to the four disciplines to be taught at River Campus: music, dance, theatre and art. The mural’s creation is a multifaceted undertaking and Lucy has detailed the making of the mural in an online journal, which is available at www.garylucy.com. “Working on a mural is like eating a bowl of very average pasta – the more you eat, the bigger it gets,” Lucy said. “There are many projects within this project. The mural’s frame must be made from scratch to contain the ninefoot six-inch by 27-foot work. Then it must be photographed, which will be a hard job. All of the text accompanying the mural will have to be written and printed.” The finished mural will be crated and shipped via truck “very carefully,” according to Lucy, so it remains unharmed during the two-hour trip from t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

Washington, Mo. Once the mural is safely installed at the River Campus, a formal dedication ceremony will take place on Sunday, Oct. 21, during Homecoming weekend.

RIGHT MAn FOR THE JOB

A

1971 graduate of Southeast with a degree in art education, Lucy admits that today, he spends more time researching and writing about his subjects than painting them. Upon graduation, Lucy began his career as an elementary art instructor in Washington. However, after only one year, he acknowledged that his real desire was to become a full-time, professional artist.

He spent 12 years as an award-winning wildlife artist and in 1985, his interests expanded to include frontier themes in the style of two other past Missouri artists, George Caleb Bingham and Thomas Hart Benton. The change of direction in his work to historic interpretation of the waterways of North America has widened his popularity and public awareness. The Southeast mural is not Lucy’s first large-scale project. In 1977, he was commissioned by the West Plains Bank to complete a seven-foot sixinch by 22-foot mural featuring Missouri wildlife. In 1979, he received a s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

grant from the Missouri Arts Council to complete a five-foot six-inch by 18foot mural for the City of Washington. Lucy said special considerations must be made for large-scale works, such as how to light the canvas without creating a glare. While most murals are painted directly onto a building’s wall, Lucy paints on large canvas stretchers to ensure the survival of the work. “After studying murals, which were painted directly onto the walls, I’ve found that many murals are lost over time,” he said. “It is either too expensive or impossible to remove the work when the building is no longer useful. Thus, the art is lost.” Once the mural for River Campus is complete, Lucy said he has three other commissioned jobs from which to choose. He also plans to do some work aboard his river studio, a houseboat affectionately called the “River Rover,” which will allow him to paint the river as it is today. Lucy has received the 1993 Alumni Merit Award for the College of Liberal Arts, the “Southeast Salutes” award from the University’s Alumni Association, the “Spotlight Award” at the Missouri Governor’s Conference on Tourism in 2004 and the Regional Commerce and Growth Association’s 2004 Individual Achievement Award, “Sold on St. Louis.” Lucy completed a renowned series of paintings titled, “Lewis and Clark: The Journey Begins,” which generated a great deal of interest in conjunction with the commemoration of the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition. The images Lucy researched and created were received internationally and reproduced in magazines and newspapers such as Time, Newsweek, The Smithsonian, Better Homes and Gardens, US News & World Report, USA Today and numerous other publications. Collectively, Lucy’s images have been reproduced 225 million times.

u n i v e r s i t y

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of the River Campus

The Grand Opening After great anticipation, the Public Grand Opening of the River Campus is almost here! This is your opportunity to get a front-row view of one of the most premier performing and visual arts facilities in the region. From the secrets in the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall to the amazing view in the Dance Studio, the following pages take a close and personal look at the River Campus. So sit back, kick up your feet and enjoy the show.

Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts Enrollment on the rise

S

outheast Missouri State University’s record enrollment this fall has included record numbers of students of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. Students majoring in music, art, theatre and dance have been on the rise in recent years as they have anxiously awaited the opening of Southeast’s new arts campus, which brings together the University’s arts disciplines into one location. The Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts is now located primarily in the River Campus, which is made up of two main buildings — the historic Seminary building and the new Cultural Arts Center. The Seminary building has been renovated to include a recital hall, classrooms and faculty offices. The Cultural Arts Center contains three new performance venues, the museum and the convocation center. Dr. Gary Miller, director of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts, says the departments of music, art, and theatre and dance have all opened extra sections of courses for their majors and in-service courses this fall due to growing enrollment. “Students and their parents are excited about coming to the River Campus,” said Dr. Pat Reagan, chair of the Department of Art. She says her department has seen consistent increases of six to nine students a year for approximately seven years. That Judith Farris, artist-in-residence, leads a discussion in one of the new classrooms at the River Campus

10

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trend will continue this year, she says, with the department expecting between 205 and 215 art majors. Dr. Kenn Stilson, chair of the Department of Theatre and Dance, says his department expects to have between 105 and 110 theatre and dance majors this fall. That’s up from 17 theatre and dance majors in 2001 and 100 last year. Stilson says the River Campus is most certainly a recruitment tool for attracting theatre and dance majors to Southeast, but he points to the quality of programs being offered at the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts as the deciding factor for students. “We have reinvented ourselves” over the past six years, he says. “We went from being an extracurricular activity to a pre-professional program. We have tried to create a program that would rival any program in the Midwest, and our curriculum has really reflected that. “There is not one class that existed in the 1990s that exists today,” he said. “It has been almost a 100 percent categorical change. We started from scratch. We started with a blank piece of paper” and rewrote the curriculum. Students may now pursue a bachelor of fine arts in performing arts or a bachelor of arts in theatre. Options are available in design/tech, dance and theatre performance, and students may pursue minors in dance, technical theatre, theater arts, and theatre performance.. The Department of Theatre and Dance shares River Campus facilities with the Department of Music, along with the Department of Art. “There is a tremendous energy created when artists get together,” said Dr. Chris Goeke, chair of Southeast’s Department of Music. Goeke says the Department of Music is expecting between 115 and 120 music majors this fall. That’s up from 103 music majors in 2006-2007. “Conservatively, we will be up about 10 s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

Dr. Marc Strauss, professor of theatre and dance, teaches one of the first classes in the new home of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts percent,” he said. Goeke added that the Department of Music is fortunate to be large enough to offer outstanding programs, but small enough that students can get specialized attention. “Every one of our students gets one-onone attention at least once a week with a faculty member,” Goeke said. “I think this makes us unique.” Like Stilson, Goeke acknowledges that the new River Campus is proving to be a significant recruitment tool. “There will be much more of a ‘wow’ factor now that they can see the facilities,” Goeke said. He says every student who has the opportunity to get a sneak peak at River Campus facilities is excited. In the past, “we’ve been able to deliver a quality program in a very bare-bones facility,” Goeke said, referring to Brandt Hall of Music. “This (River Campus) is much more of a real music facility.” He suggests the quality of facilities available at the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts will entice students to perform at an even higher level. “Unconsciously, it gives you more of a feeling of stepping up to perform,” he said. “There’s going to be a huge facility factor when students start to perform in these surroundings. Earl and Margie Holland’s donation is the largest cash gift in the University’s history and has helped make the School a reality. Mr. Holland was a 1997 recipient of the Alumni Merit Award and the Hollands were named “Friends of the University” in 2000 by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation. Mr. Holland has served on the Foundation Board of Directors since 2000 and was appointed an emeritus member in 2006. He is also a member of the President’s Council, the Foundation organization to recognize major donors.

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11


Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts Enrollment on the rise

S

After great anticipation, the Public Grand Opening of the River Campus is almost here! This is your opportunity to get a front-row view of one of the most premier performing and visual arts facilities in the region. From the secrets in the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall to the amazing view in the Dance Studio, the following pages take a close and personal look at the River Campus. So sit back, kick up your feet and enjoy the show.

outheast Missouri State University’s record enrollment this fall has included record numbers of students of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. Students majoring in music, art, theatre and dance have been on the rise in recent years as they have anxiously awaited the opening of Southeast’s new arts campus, which brings together the University’s arts disciplines into one location. The Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts is now located primarily in the River Campus, which is made up of two main buildings — the historic Seminary building and the new Cultural Arts Center. The Seminary building has been renovated to include a recital hall, classrooms and faculty offices. The Cultural Arts Center contains three new performance venues, the museum and the convocation center. Dr. Gary Miller, director of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts, says the departments of music, art, and theatre and dance have all opened extra sections of courses for their majors and in-service courses this fall due to growing enrollment. “Students and their parents are excited about coming to the River Campus,” said Dr. Pat Reagan, chair of the Department of Art. She says her department has seen consistent increases of six to nine students a year for approximately seven years. That Judith Farris, artist-in-residence, leads a discussion in one of the new classrooms at the River Campus

10

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trend will continue this year, she says, with the department expecting between 205 and 215 art majors. Dr. Kenn Stilson, chair of the Department of Theatre and Dance, says his department expects to have between 105 and 110 theatre and dance majors this fall. That’s up from 17 theatre and dance majors in 2001 and 100 last year. Stilson says the River Campus is most certainly a recruitment tool for attracting theatre and dance majors to Southeast, but he points to the quality of programs being offered at the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts as the deciding factor for students. “We have reinvented ourselves” over the past six years, he says. “We went from being an extracurricular activity to a pre-professional program. We have tried to create a program that would rival any program in the Midwest, and our curriculum has really reflected that. “There is not one class that existed in the 1990s that exists today,” he said. “It has been almost a 100 percent categorical change. We started from scratch. We started with a blank piece of paper” and rewrote the curriculum. Students may now pursue a bachelor of fine arts in performing arts or a bachelor of arts in theatre. Options are available in design/tech, dance and theatre performance, and students may pursue minors in dance, technical theatre, theater arts, and theatre performance.. The Department of Theatre and Dance shares River Campus facilities with the Department of Music, along with the Department of Art. “There is a tremendous energy created when artists get together,” said Dr. Chris Goeke, chair of Southeast’s Department of Music. Goeke says the Department of Music is expecting between 115 and 120 music majors this fall. That’s up from 103 music majors in 2006-2007. “Conservatively, we will be up about 10 s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

Dr. Marc Strauss, professor of theatre and dance, teaches one of the first classes in the new home of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts percent,” he said. Goeke added that the Department of Music is fortunate to be large enough to offer outstanding programs, but small enough that students can get specialized attention. “Every one of our students gets one-onone attention at least once a week with a faculty member,” Goeke said. “I think this makes us unique.” Like Stilson, Goeke acknowledges that the new River Campus is proving to be a significant recruitment tool. “There will be much more of a ‘wow’ factor now that they can see the facilities,” Goeke said. He says every student who has the opportunity to get a sneak peak at River Campus facilities is excited. In the past, “we’ve been able to deliver a quality program in a very bare-bones facility,” Goeke said, referring to Brandt Hall of Music. “This (River Campus) is much more of a real music facility.” He suggests the quality of facilities available at the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts will entice students to perform at an even higher level. “Unconsciously, it gives you more of a feeling of stepping up to perform,” he said. “There’s going to be a huge facility factor when students start to perform in these surroundings. Earl and Margie Holland’s donation is the largest cash gift in the University’s history and has helped make the School a reality. Mr. Holland was a 1997 recipient of the Alumni Merit Award and the Hollands were named “Friends of the University” in 2000 by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation. Mr. Holland has served on the Foundation Board of Directors since 2000 and was appointed an emeritus member in 2006. He is also a member of the President’s Council, the Foundation organization to recognize major donors.

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Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall Becoming a performing arts landmark

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ith the construction of the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall, Southeast Missouri State University has truly taken an enormous step forward in becoming a major performing arts landmark in the Midwest. The remarkable 12,000-square foot, 952-seat Bedell Performance Hall will be the site of ballets, concerts, musicals and instrumental performances, as well as vocal recitals beginning this fall. Because of its outstanding acoustics, this space is one in which performances will be appreciated to their fullest and is the only such professional venue in the out-state region between St. Louis and Memphis. “While the University has, in the past, hosted a few fine arts touring companies, these events have been presented in venues not terribly ideal for large-scale, fine arts. The Bedell Performance Hall has been specifically designed to accommodate a wide variety of locally produced and touring events of any size—from theatre to ballet to symphonies,” said Bob Cerchio, assistant director of Southeast’s Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. Seating for the performance hall allows the observer to enjoy a performance from a variety of vantage points that afford an excellent view of the stage and that take advantage of the facility’s excellent acoustic

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engineering. According to Cerchio, in addition to standard orchestra level and balcony seating, box seating will now be available for the first time for guests attending Southeast productions. The Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall contains 10 boxes which have corporate and individual sponsors. Cerchio says ambient noises from air conditioning or heating systems can cause unwanted distraction during key moments in a moving piece of music or a particularly dramatic moment in a play. Thanks to a plenum system for heating and cooling, this will not be an issue in the Bedell, Cerchio says. This efficiency keeps a room at a comfortable temperature while avoiding the irritation of a noisy, forced air system. Much of the magic of the performing arts takes place off the stage and is accomplished through the technology of lighting and sound. What the audience sees on the stage is only half of the marvel of a production. In the rear portion of the seating area is a control room from which the “behindthe-scenes” work takes place. Cerchio notes that in the backstage area, an intricate system of theatrical rigging (often called a “fly system”) ensures that all visual aspects of production— lighting, scenery, drapes, backdrops, etc.—are able to be efficiently placed

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with minimal distraction from the actual performance. When the actors leave and musicians take the stage, the Bedell can easily be transformed into a beautiful concert hall with the help of an acoustical shell. The acoustical shell is an amazing 24-feet tall wood wall and ceiling that can be lowered onto stage and raised off in minutes. The shell transforms the entire setting by adding a wonderful tone and richness to the music. In addition, it will create a magnificent visual background for the performance, as the shell is equipped with a built in lighting system. The Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall is named for Donald C. Bedell of Sikeston, Mo., an area businessman who was named a “Friend of the University” by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation in 2003, and has been a member of the Foundation Board of Directors since 2002. Bedell is also a member of the President’s Council. The Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra will perform several times on the stage of the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall this year.

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John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center Providing unlimited event opportunities

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rts lovers will be able to extend their stay for events at the new River Campus thanks to the new John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center. The Center provides a venue for preand post-concert receptions, as well as dinners, meetings and conferences. “Many performing arts facilities don’t have a place for pre- and post-events,” said Bob Cerchio, assistant director of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. “We are very fortunate” to have a Convocation Center, Cerchio said. “Its greatest strength is the flexibility it gives us to support performances with other types of gatherings.” The John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center also will be the site for workshops and discussion sessions with featured artists, he said. t h e

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“Its use will be limited only by the imagination of those who want to use it,” Cerchio said. The John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center is located on the west side of the River Campus complex. Its exterior entrance and signage face north toward Morgan Oak Street and its distinctive curved red brick wall is on the west side of the building, facing Fountain Street. It also has an interior entrance and lobby area adjoining the main lobby of the River Campus Cultural Arts Center. The Center is a 2,400-plus-squarefoot facility fully equipped with a catering kitchen and two dining rooms that can be configured for separate events. A technology package and a screen are available for presentations. The north dining room is 1,935 square feet and seats 144 at round tables. The more

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intimate south dining area is 500 square feet and will seat 24 at round tables. The south dining facility will also be used as a private dining area for performing artists. The Convocation Center is named for John and Betty Glenn, both alumni of Southeast and long-time generous contributors to the University. Mr. Glenn was named a “Friend of the University” in 1995 for his generous financial contributions to University projects such as seven endowed scholarships and his support for the John and Betty Glenn Auditorium located in Robert A. Dempster Hall. He was also a 1986 recipient of the Alumni Merit Award and was named to the President’s Council in 1989. Mr. Glenn has served as a member of the Foundation Board of Directors since 2002 and was named an emeritus member in 2005.

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1


Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall Becoming a performing arts landmark

W

ith the construction of the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall, Southeast Missouri State University has truly taken an enormous step forward in becoming a major performing arts landmark in the Midwest. The remarkable 12,000-square foot, 952-seat Bedell Performance Hall will be the site of ballets, concerts, musicals and instrumental performances, as well as vocal recitals beginning this fall. Because of its outstanding acoustics, this space is one in which performances will be appreciated to their fullest and is the only such professional venue in the out-state region between St. Louis and Memphis. “While the University has, in the past, hosted a few fine arts touring companies, these events have been presented in venues not terribly ideal for large-scale, fine arts. The Bedell Performance Hall has been specifically designed to accommodate a wide variety of locally produced and touring events of any size—from theatre to ballet to symphonies,” said Bob Cerchio, assistant director of Southeast’s Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. Seating for the performance hall allows the observer to enjoy a performance from a variety of vantage points that afford an excellent view of the stage and that take advantage of the facility’s excellent acoustic

1

t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

engineering. According to Cerchio, in addition to standard orchestra level and balcony seating, box seating will now be available for the first time for guests attending Southeast productions. The Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall contains 10 boxes which have corporate and individual sponsors. Cerchio says ambient noises from air conditioning or heating systems can cause unwanted distraction during key moments in a moving piece of music or a particularly dramatic moment in a play. Thanks to a plenum system for heating and cooling, this will not be an issue in the Bedell, Cerchio says. This efficiency keeps a room at a comfortable temperature while avoiding the irritation of a noisy, forced air system. Much of the magic of the performing arts takes place off the stage and is accomplished through the technology of lighting and sound. What the audience sees on the stage is only half of the marvel of a production. In the rear portion of the seating area is a control room from which the “behindthe-scenes” work takes place. Cerchio notes that in the backstage area, an intricate system of theatrical rigging (often called a “fly system”) ensures that all visual aspects of production— lighting, scenery, drapes, backdrops, etc.—are able to be efficiently placed

s o u t h e a s t

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with minimal distraction from the actual performance. When the actors leave and musicians take the stage, the Bedell can easily be transformed into a beautiful concert hall with the help of an acoustical shell. The acoustical shell is an amazing 24-feet tall wood wall and ceiling that can be lowered onto stage and raised off in minutes. The shell transforms the entire setting by adding a wonderful tone and richness to the music. In addition, it will create a magnificent visual background for the performance, as the shell is equipped with a built in lighting system. The Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall is named for Donald C. Bedell of Sikeston, Mo., an area businessman who was named a “Friend of the University” by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation in 2003, and has been a member of the Foundation Board of Directors since 2002. Bedell is also a member of the President’s Council. The Southeast Missouri Symphony Orchestra will perform several times on the stage of the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall this year.

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John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center Providing unlimited event opportunities

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rts lovers will be able to extend their stay for events at the new River Campus thanks to the new John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center. The Center provides a venue for preand post-concert receptions, as well as dinners, meetings and conferences. “Many performing arts facilities don’t have a place for pre- and post-events,” said Bob Cerchio, assistant director of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. “We are very fortunate” to have a Convocation Center, Cerchio said. “Its greatest strength is the flexibility it gives us to support performances with other types of gatherings.” The John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center also will be the site for workshops and discussion sessions with featured artists, he said. t h e

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“Its use will be limited only by the imagination of those who want to use it,” Cerchio said. The John and Betty Glenn Convocation Center is located on the west side of the River Campus complex. Its exterior entrance and signage face north toward Morgan Oak Street and its distinctive curved red brick wall is on the west side of the building, facing Fountain Street. It also has an interior entrance and lobby area adjoining the main lobby of the River Campus Cultural Arts Center. The Center is a 2,400-plus-squarefoot facility fully equipped with a catering kitchen and two dining rooms that can be configured for separate events. A technology package and a screen are available for presentations. The north dining room is 1,935 square feet and seats 144 at round tables. The more

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intimate south dining area is 500 square feet and will seat 24 at round tables. The south dining facility will also be used as a private dining area for performing artists. The Convocation Center is named for John and Betty Glenn, both alumni of Southeast and long-time generous contributors to the University. Mr. Glenn was named a “Friend of the University” in 1995 for his generous financial contributions to University projects such as seven endowed scholarships and his support for the John and Betty Glenn Auditorium located in Robert A. Dempster Hall. He was also a 1986 recipient of the Alumni Merit Award and was named to the President’s Council in 1989. Mr. Glenn has served as a member of the Foundation Board of Directors since 2002 and was named an emeritus member in 2005.

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Robert and Gertrude Shuck Recital Hall

Blending the best of the old with the new

Wendy Kurka Rust Flexible Theatre

Offering variety of performance environments

W

hile many people have attended a theatre performance, not many have experienced a performance in a flexible theatre, with the unique atmosphere only “black box” theatres can offer, according to Dr. Rob Dillon, professor of theatre and dance at Southeast. The Wendy Kurka Rust Flexible Theatre, located in the Cultural Arts Center at the River Campus, will offer the perfect opportunity for audiences to do just that. The flexible theatre is, as its name implies, adaptable in nature. All 200 seats and the stage have the flexibility to be configured in many ways to allow for various viewing arrangements. “The flexibility gives us the capacity to arrange the theatre to fit the performance, including a traditional proscenium arrangement, theater in the round, placing the audience around three sides of the stage, or scattering the audience throughout a playing area,” Dillon said. “We can adapt and change and shift things around; we can even sit the audience partly in the action. The flex theatre will offer unlimited possibilities for performance environments – I don’t think we’ll ever exhaust the possibilities,” he said. “Students need exposure to a wide variety of things,” Dillon said. “The flexibility makes it exciting educationally. It will be a great opportunity for students to work with experimental and cutting-edge theatre. They will get to pull everything back and make it more intense.” The students will have their first opportunity to do just that when the theatre’s first show, “Coyote Ugly,” opens Nov. 28. Audiences will have the opportunity to see plays they would not typically see on tour or in large performance halls, and carefully crafted details also will ensure guests enjoy a better

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theatre experience in the process. Double foyer doors at the entrance to the theatre will prevent distractions caused by noise and light when patrons enter and exit during performances. State-of-the-art technology also will complement the quality of shows performed in the flexible theatre. A control room at the rear of the theatre provides for stage management, lighting control and sound control. Sound can also relocate temporarily into the auditorium as needed for rehearsal or performances by plugging the control console into built-in faceplates located at floor level. To maximize efficient use of resources, the flexible theatre shares its front-of-house public spaces and back-of-house support spaces with the other performance spaces in the building. “The technology is pretty cutting-edge,” Dillon said. “We are blessed with excellent technical people and a good supply of instruments. Everything ought to be pretty darn good. “The flex theatre is another part of the River Campus equation, and it all equals nicer facilities for our patrons, our students and the arts,” he added. “Everyone in the region will go to the same place for concerts, plays and the museum. It’s going to be nice; people will love it.” The flexible theatre facility, made possible through the generous financial support of Gary W. Rust, Jon K. Rust, Rex Rust and the Rust Family, is to be named for Wendy Kurka Rust, who has been a long-time supporter of the arts and of theatre education at the University. Mrs. Rust, her husband and six children, have been active participants in the cultural, educational and athletic life of the University and the community as a whole. Mr. and Mrs. Rust are members of the President’s Council and were named “Friends of the University” in 2004 by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation.

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r. Gary Miller, director of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts, calls the new Robert and Gertrude Shuck Recital Hall at the River Campus “A diamond in the Shuck.” The space once used as the Seminary chapel at the former St. Vincent’s College and Seminary is now a state-of-the-art 205-seat recital hall that blends the best of the old with the new. “We are privileged to be in an old building that is a new building,” said Miller, “and it is so beautiful.” The Seminary buildings date to 1845 and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The chapel has now been converted into an acoustically and aesthetically remarkable music recital hall in the south wing of the original historic seminary structure. The Recital Hall is located on the third floor of the historic structure. It features 2,600 square feet on the main level and 350 square feet in a balcony, with elevator access to both. The hall features a sleek, maple hardwood floor, white walls accented with rich red oak panels and the original stained glass windows from the Seminary chapel. “Because we’ve got a lot of flat white surface contrasted with the wood panels, the stained glass windows infuse great color to the room,” Miller said. “They also provide natural shade. “I’m a lover of stained glass,” he says. “These windows have a wonderful character. They define the room. They make that space absolutely unique. They cast an indelible mark that makes this a truly wonderful place.” Adding to the historic ambiance of the room are three poplar beams in the ceiling which date from the original Seminary chapel and remain exposed above the recital hall floor. The ceiling, which rises 26 feet from the stage, retains its original arch shape commonly found in historic Italian architecture, Miller said. Miller says the acoustics make the recital hall a tremendous teaching tool in the formation of music students. “This is our technology,” he says of the Recital Hall. “A good room that is well lit and acoustically handsome is a musician’s technology. It is a teaching enhancement.” The Shuck Recital Hall will be used for mid-sized musical performances, including student degree recitals, t h e

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faculty recitals and collaborative events performed by groups such as the Southeast Baroque Ensemble and the Southeast Brass Quintet. The main floor of the Shuck Recital Hall has upper and lower level seating sections, with an aisle separating the two. The lower level will seat 132; the upper seats 55. “It is a wonderful size,” Miller said. “It’s intimate enough to accommodate students’ peers, family and faculty members at student recitals, but not so large that it seems like nobody is there.” The hall also features a balcony which can seat about 20 audience members. A small sound recording booth is located there. A permanent sound recording booth is a welcome addition in the recital hall, Miller said, adding that in the past, equipment was set up for each event and removed at its conclusion. Miller says the balcony also could be used by antiphonal choirs, which were fashionable during the Renaissance. An antiphonal choir sings or chants in alternation with a choir on the main stage. A nine-foot grand piano will be permanently situated on the recital hall stage. The stage itself can be extended with a lift in the small orchestra pit. The stage will likely also house a harpsichord and rehearsal piano, which will be used daily as accompaniment for the University Choir. Also featured behind stage is a rack to be used for amplified sound. Just beneath the recital hall, is a “green room,” an area set aside to accommodate performers or musicians when they are not required on the stage. “We had no place to get dressed for performances,” Miller said. “I’ve been here 27 years, and it hasn’t changed a bit. All of a sudden, having a ‘green room’ makes us normal.” Performers can use a set of private stairs, taking them from the green room directly to the backstage area of the recital hall. The new music recital hall was made possible through the generosity of Robert “Bob” Shuck and was named for his parents, Robert F. and Gertrude L. Shuck. Bob Shuck is a 1994 recipient of Southeast’s Alumni Merit Award. He has served on the University Foundation Board of Directors since 1995, served as chair from 2004 to 2006 and is a member of the University President’s Council.

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Robert and Gertrude Shuck Recital Hall

Blending the best of the old with the new

Wendy Kurka Rust Flexible Theatre

Offering variety of performance environments

W

hile many people have attended a theatre performance, not many have experienced a performance in a flexible theatre, with the unique atmosphere only “black box” theatres can offer, according to Dr. Rob Dillon, professor of theatre and dance at Southeast. The Wendy Kurka Rust Flexible Theatre, located in the Cultural Arts Center at the River Campus, will offer the perfect opportunity for audiences to do just that. The flexible theatre is, as its name implies, adaptable in nature. All 200 seats and the stage have the flexibility to be configured in many ways to allow for various viewing arrangements. “The flexibility gives us the capacity to arrange the theatre to fit the performance, including a traditional proscenium arrangement, theater in the round, placing the audience around three sides of the stage, or scattering the audience throughout a playing area,” Dillon said. “We can adapt and change and shift things around; we can even sit the audience partly in the action. The flex theatre will offer unlimited possibilities for performance environments – I don’t think we’ll ever exhaust the possibilities,” he said. “Students need exposure to a wide variety of things,” Dillon said. “The flexibility makes it exciting educationally. It will be a great opportunity for students to work with experimental and cutting-edge theatre. They will get to pull everything back and make it more intense.” The students will have their first opportunity to do just that when the theatre’s first show, “Coyote Ugly,” opens Nov. 28. Audiences will have the opportunity to see plays they would not typically see on tour or in large performance halls, and carefully crafted details also will ensure guests enjoy a better

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theatre experience in the process. Double foyer doors at the entrance to the theatre will prevent distractions caused by noise and light when patrons enter and exit during performances. State-of-the-art technology also will complement the quality of shows performed in the flexible theatre. A control room at the rear of the theatre provides for stage management, lighting control and sound control. Sound can also relocate temporarily into the auditorium as needed for rehearsal or performances by plugging the control console into built-in faceplates located at floor level. To maximize efficient use of resources, the flexible theatre shares its front-of-house public spaces and back-of-house support spaces with the other performance spaces in the building. “The technology is pretty cutting-edge,” Dillon said. “We are blessed with excellent technical people and a good supply of instruments. Everything ought to be pretty darn good. “The flex theatre is another part of the River Campus equation, and it all equals nicer facilities for our patrons, our students and the arts,” he added. “Everyone in the region will go to the same place for concerts, plays and the museum. It’s going to be nice; people will love it.” The flexible theatre facility, made possible through the generous financial support of Gary W. Rust, Jon K. Rust, Rex Rust and the Rust Family, is to be named for Wendy Kurka Rust, who has been a long-time supporter of the arts and of theatre education at the University. Mrs. Rust, her husband and six children, have been active participants in the cultural, educational and athletic life of the University and the community as a whole. Mr. and Mrs. Rust are members of the President’s Council and were named “Friends of the University” in 2004 by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation.

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D

r. Gary Miller, director of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts, calls the new Robert and Gertrude Shuck Recital Hall at the River Campus “A diamond in the Shuck.” The space once used as the Seminary chapel at the former St. Vincent’s College and Seminary is now a state-of-the-art 205-seat recital hall that blends the best of the old with the new. “We are privileged to be in an old building that is a new building,” said Miller, “and it is so beautiful.” The Seminary buildings date to 1845 and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The chapel has now been converted into an acoustically and aesthetically remarkable music recital hall in the south wing of the original historic seminary structure. The Recital Hall is located on the third floor of the historic structure. It features 2,600 square feet on the main level and 350 square feet in a balcony, with elevator access to both. The hall features a sleek, maple hardwood floor, white walls accented with rich red oak panels and the original stained glass windows from the Seminary chapel. “Because we’ve got a lot of flat white surface contrasted with the wood panels, the stained glass windows infuse great color to the room,” Miller said. “They also provide natural shade. “I’m a lover of stained glass,” he says. “These windows have a wonderful character. They define the room. They make that space absolutely unique. They cast an indelible mark that makes this a truly wonderful place.” Adding to the historic ambiance of the room are three poplar beams in the ceiling which date from the original Seminary chapel and remain exposed above the recital hall floor. The ceiling, which rises 26 feet from the stage, retains its original arch shape commonly found in historic Italian architecture, Miller said. Miller says the acoustics make the recital hall a tremendous teaching tool in the formation of music students. “This is our technology,” he says of the Recital Hall. “A good room that is well lit and acoustically handsome is a musician’s technology. It is a teaching enhancement.” The Shuck Recital Hall will be used for mid-sized musical performances, including student degree recitals, t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

faculty recitals and collaborative events performed by groups such as the Southeast Baroque Ensemble and the Southeast Brass Quintet. The main floor of the Shuck Recital Hall has upper and lower level seating sections, with an aisle separating the two. The lower level will seat 132; the upper seats 55. “It is a wonderful size,” Miller said. “It’s intimate enough to accommodate students’ peers, family and faculty members at student recitals, but not so large that it seems like nobody is there.” The hall also features a balcony which can seat about 20 audience members. A small sound recording booth is located there. A permanent sound recording booth is a welcome addition in the recital hall, Miller said, adding that in the past, equipment was set up for each event and removed at its conclusion. Miller says the balcony also could be used by antiphonal choirs, which were fashionable during the Renaissance. An antiphonal choir sings or chants in alternation with a choir on the main stage. A nine-foot grand piano will be permanently situated on the recital hall stage. The stage itself can be extended with a lift in the small orchestra pit. The stage will likely also house a harpsichord and rehearsal piano, which will be used daily as accompaniment for the University Choir. Also featured behind stage is a rack to be used for amplified sound. Just beneath the recital hall, is a “green room,” an area set aside to accommodate performers or musicians when they are not required on the stage. “We had no place to get dressed for performances,” Miller said. “I’ve been here 27 years, and it hasn’t changed a bit. All of a sudden, having a ‘green room’ makes us normal.” Performers can use a set of private stairs, taking them from the green room directly to the backstage area of the recital hall. The new music recital hall was made possible through the generosity of Robert “Bob” Shuck and was named for his parents, Robert F. and Gertrude L. Shuck. Bob Shuck is a 1994 recipient of Southeast’s Alumni Merit Award. He has served on the University Foundation Board of Directors since 1995, served as chair from 2004 to 2006 and is a member of the University President’s Council.

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Welcome to the

CroSSroADS of Peopl e

Rosemary Berkel and H a r r y L . Cr i s p I I S o u t h e a s t M i s s o u r i R e gi o na l M u s e u m o f fe r s v i s i to r s c l o s e r l o o k at a rea h isto r y

CroSSroADS of Transportation in the area devoted to transportation, visitors will learn about transportation in this region by steamboat, rail and highways.

Interactive and Open to the Public

CroSSroADS of Educat i on

CroSSroADS o f Cu l t u re hat is characteristic of this region? What is the essence of southeast Missouri? These are the questions University officials brainstormed as they developed a theme for the new Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum, which is set to open during Homecoming weekend at the new River Campus. After numerous planning sessions, surveys of community members and interviews with historians and scientists, “we came to the theme ‘crossroads,’” said Dr. Stanley Grand, director of the Crisp Museum. Grand said their research pointed to evidence that southeast Missouri is a “crossroads” of geology and geography, of its early peoples, empires (settlers), its modes of transportation, the North and the South, religious sects, education and agriculture. “It is our thesis,” Grand said, “that this area is a crossroads. We believe this concept will give visitors a framework to think about this region.” The new 14,000-square-foot museum contains more than 5,900 square feet of exhibition space and is “meant to be dynamic and interactive,” Grand says. Located adjacent to the Bedell Performance Hall, the Crisp Museum will feature a variety of areas, exploring each of the “crossroads” themes of southeast Missouri. Visitors will find a 36-seat theatre with bench-style seating at the entrance of the museum, where they will be invited to view a short film about the region as they start their visit. The 17-minute film will be shown three times an hour. The permanent exhibition gallery is designed with an interior open space with each of the featured “crossroads” in designated areas around the perimeter. Interpretive text panels accompany the displays.

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in the area devoted to empires, visitors will learn about french, spanish, american and british settlers as an important component of the early history of this region. featured here will be a rosato painting of frenchman louis lorimier, the founder of cape Girardeau. an audiovisual element is incorporated near this painting that will allow visitors to touch interactive buttons to learn more about the early peoples of this region, such as the native americans and the spanish fur traders. french and spanish artifacts on display in this area will include a chain mail shirt, a conquistador helmet, a gold coin borrowed from the louisiana state museum, and items lent by the felix valle state historic site in ste. Genevieve, mo.

the museum also will highlight southeast missouri as a crossroads for education. over the years, the area has provided both parochial and nonsectarian training, Grand said, as evidenced by the training of seminarians for the priesthood at st. vincent’s college and seminary, the forerunner to river campus, as well as the training of teachers at the southeast missouri normal school, the predecessor of southeast missouri state university.

CroSSroADS “during the civil War,” Grand said, “both union and confederate forces sought to control southeast missouri. this area was a crossroads of the north and the south.” the north-south crossroads area will highlight civil War battles in the region, including the battle of cape Girardeau and the battle of island no. 10. an interactive map of these battles will be displayed, and visitors may press buttons to see short videos about each one.

of R e li gi on visitors also will learn about southeast missouri as a crossroads of religious groups – catholics, southern baptists, the missouri synod of lutherans and other non-traditional and nondenominational groups, among others. “residents of southeast missouri have long nurtured religion,” Grand said. “billy sunday (the famous early-20th-century evangelist) came here on two occasions and conducted revivals (one of which was held in academic hall).”

CroSSroADS o f G eo gra phy

in the area highlighting the geographical and geological area of southeast missouri, visitors will find an interactive topographical map showing a portion of the mississippi river. by touching various buttons, visitors will learn about specific sections of the river and interpretive texts will guide them.

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of Agri cult ure rounding out the crossroads theme will be an area devoted to agriculture, which, Grand says, is closely related to and takes visitors full circle, returning them to the first featured crossroad of geology and geography. highlighting the agriculture area will be a five-minute video on the sharecroppers strike of 1939.

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in the area on the early peoples of this region, visitors will learn about the paleoindian, archaic, Woodland and mississippian peoples. highlighting the early peoples area will be a full-scale mississippian hut with three lifelike characters, designed by Guy louis Xiv of Quebec, canada. “they are very realistic,” Grand said, adding visitors can touch buttons beside the hut, which, one by one, light the characters as they tell their stories. displayed throughout the museum will be murals by artist michael rosato of baltimore. “they are very dramatic and large,” Grand said, explaining that rosato conducted extensive historical research and visited the area before painting the murals.

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three interactive kiosks – devoted to transportation, geology and other regional topics -- will be situated in the museum, with the intent of providing visitors with in-depth learning on such topics as how a steam engine works and the history of steamboats on the mississippi river. the museum also will include 1,900 square feet of temporary exhibition space, where, primarily, traveling fine arts exhibits will be displayed. the first traveling exhibit in the temporary exhibition space will open sunday, oct. 21, in connection with homecoming weekend. the exhibit is a collection of american paintings from the hainsworth collection and includes examples of hudson river school scenes, american impressionism, ashcan painters, and regionalism, with a study by missouri artist thomas hart benton. this area has been made available through a generous contribution from douglas, heather and charley Greene in memory of Janet paar Greene, an artist and southeast alumna. doug Greene is a member of the southeast missouri university foundation board, a member of the president’s council and was a 2005 recipient of the distinguished service award. the new museum also will house the thomas beckwith collection, which contains 900 whole ceramic vessels and effigy fragments plus about 1,500 lithics. the collection provides unique insights into the culture and lives of prehistoric native peoples of this region. the museum is named after rosemary berkel crisp and harry l. crisp ii, a couple whose remarkable generosity has already been seen in their gift to expand and renovate the university’s nursing building and to provide a building for the southeast missouri state university-malden campus. the crisps have devoted themselves to providing access to higher education throughout the southeast missouri region through memberships on numerous community college, foundation, university and statewide boards. mrs. crisp received the “friend of the university” award from southeast in 1986 by the foundation, harry l. received the honor in 2005. both are charter members of the foundation’s board of directors. mr. and mrs. crisp are also charter members of the president’s council, the foundation organization to recognize major donors.

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1


Welcome to the

CroSSroADS of Peopl e

Rosemary Berkel and H a r r y L . Cr i s p I I S o u t h e a s t M i s s o u r i R e gi o na l M u s e u m o f fe r s v i s i to r s c l o s e r l o o k at a rea h isto r y

CroSSroADS of Transportation in the area devoted to transportation, visitors will learn about transportation in this region by steamboat, rail and highways.

Interactive and Open to the Public

CroSSroADS of Educat i on

CroSSroADS o f Cu l t u re hat is characteristic of this region? What is the essence of southeast Missouri? These are the questions University officials brainstormed as they developed a theme for the new Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Southeast Missouri Regional Museum, which is set to open during Homecoming weekend at the new River Campus. After numerous planning sessions, surveys of community members and interviews with historians and scientists, “we came to the theme ‘crossroads,’” said Dr. Stanley Grand, director of the Crisp Museum. Grand said their research pointed to evidence that southeast Missouri is a “crossroads” of geology and geography, of its early peoples, empires (settlers), its modes of transportation, the North and the South, religious sects, education and agriculture. “It is our thesis,” Grand said, “that this area is a crossroads. We believe this concept will give visitors a framework to think about this region.” The new 14,000-square-foot museum contains more than 5,900 square feet of exhibition space and is “meant to be dynamic and interactive,” Grand says. Located adjacent to the Bedell Performance Hall, the Crisp Museum will feature a variety of areas, exploring each of the “crossroads” themes of southeast Missouri. Visitors will find a 36-seat theatre with bench-style seating at the entrance of the museum, where they will be invited to view a short film about the region as they start their visit. The 17-minute film will be shown three times an hour. The permanent exhibition gallery is designed with an interior open space with each of the featured “crossroads” in designated areas around the perimeter. Interpretive text panels accompany the displays.

1

t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

in the area devoted to empires, visitors will learn about french, spanish, american and british settlers as an important component of the early history of this region. featured here will be a rosato painting of frenchman louis lorimier, the founder of cape Girardeau. an audiovisual element is incorporated near this painting that will allow visitors to touch interactive buttons to learn more about the early peoples of this region, such as the native americans and the spanish fur traders. french and spanish artifacts on display in this area will include a chain mail shirt, a conquistador helmet, a gold coin borrowed from the louisiana state museum, and items lent by the felix valle state historic site in ste. Genevieve, mo.

the museum also will highlight southeast missouri as a crossroads for education. over the years, the area has provided both parochial and nonsectarian training, Grand said, as evidenced by the training of seminarians for the priesthood at st. vincent’s college and seminary, the forerunner to river campus, as well as the training of teachers at the southeast missouri normal school, the predecessor of southeast missouri state university.

CroSSroADS “during the civil War,” Grand said, “both union and confederate forces sought to control southeast missouri. this area was a crossroads of the north and the south.” the north-south crossroads area will highlight civil War battles in the region, including the battle of cape Girardeau and the battle of island no. 10. an interactive map of these battles will be displayed, and visitors may press buttons to see short videos about each one.

of R e li gi on visitors also will learn about southeast missouri as a crossroads of religious groups – catholics, southern baptists, the missouri synod of lutherans and other non-traditional and nondenominational groups, among others. “residents of southeast missouri have long nurtured religion,” Grand said. “billy sunday (the famous early-20th-century evangelist) came here on two occasions and conducted revivals (one of which was held in academic hall).”

CroSSroADS o f G eo gra phy

in the area highlighting the geographical and geological area of southeast missouri, visitors will find an interactive topographical map showing a portion of the mississippi river. by touching various buttons, visitors will learn about specific sections of the river and interpretive texts will guide them.

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CroSSroADS

of War

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of Agri cult ure rounding out the crossroads theme will be an area devoted to agriculture, which, Grand says, is closely related to and takes visitors full circle, returning them to the first featured crossroad of geology and geography. highlighting the agriculture area will be a five-minute video on the sharecroppers strike of 1939.

t h e

in the area on the early peoples of this region, visitors will learn about the paleoindian, archaic, Woodland and mississippian peoples. highlighting the early peoples area will be a full-scale mississippian hut with three lifelike characters, designed by Guy louis Xiv of Quebec, canada. “they are very realistic,” Grand said, adding visitors can touch buttons beside the hut, which, one by one, light the characters as they tell their stories. displayed throughout the museum will be murals by artist michael rosato of baltimore. “they are very dramatic and large,” Grand said, explaining that rosato conducted extensive historical research and visited the area before painting the murals.

M A G A Z I N E

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three interactive kiosks – devoted to transportation, geology and other regional topics -- will be situated in the museum, with the intent of providing visitors with in-depth learning on such topics as how a steam engine works and the history of steamboats on the mississippi river. the museum also will include 1,900 square feet of temporary exhibition space, where, primarily, traveling fine arts exhibits will be displayed. the first traveling exhibit in the temporary exhibition space will open sunday, oct. 21, in connection with homecoming weekend. the exhibit is a collection of american paintings from the hainsworth collection and includes examples of hudson river school scenes, american impressionism, ashcan painters, and regionalism, with a study by missouri artist thomas hart benton. this area has been made available through a generous contribution from douglas, heather and charley Greene in memory of Janet paar Greene, an artist and southeast alumna. doug Greene is a member of the southeast missouri university foundation board, a member of the president’s council and was a 2005 recipient of the distinguished service award. the new museum also will house the thomas beckwith collection, which contains 900 whole ceramic vessels and effigy fragments plus about 1,500 lithics. the collection provides unique insights into the culture and lives of prehistoric native peoples of this region. the museum is named after rosemary berkel crisp and harry l. crisp ii, a couple whose remarkable generosity has already been seen in their gift to expand and renovate the university’s nursing building and to provide a building for the southeast missouri state university-malden campus. the crisps have devoted themselves to providing access to higher education throughout the southeast missouri region through memberships on numerous community college, foundation, university and statewide boards. mrs. crisp received the “friend of the university” award from southeast in 1986 by the foundation, harry l. received the honor in 2005. both are charter members of the foundation’s board of directors. mr. and mrs. crisp are also charter members of the president’s council, the foundation organization to recognize major donors.

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Do you know a prospective student?

SoutheaSt Family achievement award Alumni children, grandchildren can attend at in-state rates

Students

I

f you’re lucky enough to be a dancer at the River Campus, you have the best view in the house, according to Lees Hummel, assistant professor of dance and choreography in Southeast’s Department of Theatre and Dance. “One side of the dance studio is all windows, which overlook the river and the bridge,” Hummel said. “The view is just gorgeous.” The natural light and the view combined with the studio’s technical features create a wonderful atmosphere for dance students, according to Hummel. “It feels like a nice space to be moving around in,” she said. “You feel lighter; it makes you feel like dancing.” While the view may be the most obvious of the studio’s features, it’s only icing on the cake. High-quality floors and sound are the two most important aspects of a good dance studio, according to Hummel, and the new dance studio at River Campus has both. “You’ve got to have a good floor and you’ve got to be able to hear your music,” Hummel said. The studio, which is adjacent to the flexible theatre in the cultural arts center, features a custom-constructed “sprung” floor. Sprung floors have some “give” in them to protect the dancers’ legs and feet from shin splints and other

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injuries, according to Hummel. This is accomplished by using special building techniques to raise the dance floor two to four inches rather than placing it directly on the concrete floor. The studio’s updated sound system offers more options for dance students and faculty, as well as providing the technology that touring dance companies, who will use the space for rehearsals and warm-ups, will expect, she said. The studio is flexible as well, providing performance space in addition to classroom and rehearsal space. “We have grids to hang lights, risers for seating and curtains to cover the mirrors,” Hummel said. “It is easily turned into a performance space for approximately 125 people. We are planning to do the student-choreographed dance concert in the studio this fall.” Having space designated and designed for their function also makes things easier, Hummel says. “Having access to the studio 24/7 without having to work around other departments’ schedules makes it easier to hold night and weekend rehearsals,” she said. “Having a whole complex and campus dedicated to the arts is beneficial to all different areas of art,” Hummel said. “We can easily mingle with each other, and it is easier for all of us to appreciate s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

each other’s art forms than it is with us scattered in different buildings all across campus. The arts are always abstract, and it’s difficult trying to fit how students learn those art forms into a regular collegiate university setting. Training for the arts is very different from training for mainstream academia. Having a campus dedicated to the arts is going to bring more students wanting to seriously train in these areas to Southeast.” “River Campus is going to be a special place in Missouri,” Hummel predicts. “It will solidify Cape as a town that supports the arts and it will bring a lot of energy and excitement to the area.” This area has been made available through a generous contribution from President Ken and Jeanine Dobbins.

s tat e

Southeast has announced the creation of a new scholarship program designed for out-of-state students who are children or grandchildren of Southeast graduates. Nearly every day, a graduate of Southeast returns to the campus with their high school aged children who are now completing their own college search. For in-state students, Southeast has been an affordable choice. Yet for many out-of-state families, the cost can be prohibitive. The new Southeast Family Achievement Award, valued at approximately $4,700 annually, will make it possible for out-of-state students to attend Southeast at the in-state rate. As with all admitted students, students who qualify for the Southeast Family Achievement Award will automatically be considered for a Southeast

merit scholarship of higher value at the time of admission. APPLICATION PROCESS AND AWARD CRITERIA To be considered for this scholarship, list the name(s) of a parent or grandparent who has graduated from Southeast on the application for admission. BEGINNING fRESHMEN CRITERIA: • Achieve a composite ACT score of 21 or an SAT CR+M score of 980 •Achieve a high school cumulative grade point average of 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale) • Live in on-campus housing the first two years • Enroll full-time Students transferring from a community college may also be considered for the Southeast Family Achievement Award.

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APPLICATION DEADLINE Southeast’s Early Admission Consideration and Scholarship Guarantee Deadline is December 15, 2007. Applicants will continue to be considered on a first-come, first-served basis until June 1, 2008. For more information, contact admissions@semo.edu or call (573) 651-2590. A complete description of the Southeast Family Achievement Award is available at: http://www. semo.edu/financing/scholarships.htm.

At the St. Louis Outreach Office, employers can find the crossroads of talent and opportunity. As St. Louis Career Specialist, Nolan Brunnworth assists organizations large and small with internships, resume referrals and recruiting events.

Name: Nikki Eggleston Major: Accounting Activites: Student Ambassador Charter President: Redhawks Optimist Club Sundancer Internship: AT&T Yellow Pages u n i v e r s i t y

tell them about the upcoming Show me Days on oct. 6, 2007; Nov. 3, 2007; Feb 3, 2008; and April 6, 2008. show me days include an academic fair, student life fair, interest sessions, campus tour and a complimentary lunch. register at www.semo.edu and click on “visit” or call (573) 6512590.

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Looking for an impact player like Nikki? Give the Outreach Office a call today! 16020 Swingley Ridge Rd. Suite 300 Chesterfield 636.449.5068 www.semo.edu/careerlinkages

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Do you know a prospective student?

SoutheaSt Family achievement award Alumni children, grandchildren can attend at in-state rates

Students

I

f you’re lucky enough to be a dancer at the River Campus, you have the best view in the house, according to Lees Hummel, assistant professor of dance and choreography in Southeast’s Department of Theatre and Dance. “One side of the dance studio is all windows, which overlook the river and the bridge,” Hummel said. “The view is just gorgeous.” The natural light and the view combined with the studio’s technical features create a wonderful atmosphere for dance students, according to Hummel. “It feels like a nice space to be moving around in,” she said. “You feel lighter; it makes you feel like dancing.” While the view may be the most obvious of the studio’s features, it’s only icing on the cake. High-quality floors and sound are the two most important aspects of a good dance studio, according to Hummel, and the new dance studio at River Campus has both. “You’ve got to have a good floor and you’ve got to be able to hear your music,” Hummel said. The studio, which is adjacent to the flexible theatre in the cultural arts center, features a custom-constructed “sprung” floor. Sprung floors have some “give” in them to protect the dancers’ legs and feet from shin splints and other

1

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injuries, according to Hummel. This is accomplished by using special building techniques to raise the dance floor two to four inches rather than placing it directly on the concrete floor. The studio’s updated sound system offers more options for dance students and faculty, as well as providing the technology that touring dance companies, who will use the space for rehearsals and warm-ups, will expect, she said. The studio is flexible as well, providing performance space in addition to classroom and rehearsal space. “We have grids to hang lights, risers for seating and curtains to cover the mirrors,” Hummel said. “It is easily turned into a performance space for approximately 125 people. We are planning to do the student-choreographed dance concert in the studio this fall.” Having space designated and designed for their function also makes things easier, Hummel says. “Having access to the studio 24/7 without having to work around other departments’ schedules makes it easier to hold night and weekend rehearsals,” she said. “Having a whole complex and campus dedicated to the arts is beneficial to all different areas of art,” Hummel said. “We can easily mingle with each other, and it is easier for all of us to appreciate s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

each other’s art forms than it is with us scattered in different buildings all across campus. The arts are always abstract, and it’s difficult trying to fit how students learn those art forms into a regular collegiate university setting. Training for the arts is very different from training for mainstream academia. Having a campus dedicated to the arts is going to bring more students wanting to seriously train in these areas to Southeast.” “River Campus is going to be a special place in Missouri,” Hummel predicts. “It will solidify Cape as a town that supports the arts and it will bring a lot of energy and excitement to the area.” This area has been made available through a generous contribution from President Ken and Jeanine Dobbins.

s tat e

Southeast has announced the creation of a new scholarship program designed for out-of-state students who are children or grandchildren of Southeast graduates. Nearly every day, a graduate of Southeast returns to the campus with their high school aged children who are now completing their own college search. For in-state students, Southeast has been an affordable choice. Yet for many out-of-state families, the cost can be prohibitive. The new Southeast Family Achievement Award, valued at approximately $4,700 annually, will make it possible for out-of-state students to attend Southeast at the in-state rate. As with all admitted students, students who qualify for the Southeast Family Achievement Award will automatically be considered for a Southeast

merit scholarship of higher value at the time of admission. APPLICATION PROCESS AND AWARD CRITERIA To be considered for this scholarship, list the name(s) of a parent or grandparent who has graduated from Southeast on the application for admission. BEGINNING fRESHMEN CRITERIA: • Achieve a composite ACT score of 21 or an SAT CR+M score of 980 •Achieve a high school cumulative grade point average of 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale) • Live in on-campus housing the first two years • Enroll full-time Students transferring from a community college may also be considered for the Southeast Family Achievement Award.

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APPLICATION DEADLINE Southeast’s Early Admission Consideration and Scholarship Guarantee Deadline is December 15, 2007. Applicants will continue to be considered on a first-come, first-served basis until June 1, 2008. For more information, contact admissions@semo.edu or call (573) 651-2590. A complete description of the Southeast Family Achievement Award is available at: http://www. semo.edu/financing/scholarships.htm.

At the St. Louis Outreach Office, employers can find the crossroads of talent and opportunity. As St. Louis Career Specialist, Nolan Brunnworth assists organizations large and small with internships, resume referrals and recruiting events.

Name: Nikki Eggleston Major: Accounting Activites: Student Ambassador Charter President: Redhawks Optimist Club Sundancer Internship: AT&T Yellow Pages u n i v e r s i t y

tell them about the upcoming Show me Days on oct. 6, 2007; Nov. 3, 2007; Feb 3, 2008; and April 6, 2008. show me days include an academic fair, student life fair, interest sessions, campus tour and a complimentary lunch. register at www.semo.edu and click on “visit” or call (573) 6512590.

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M A G A Z I N E

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Looking for an impact player like Nikki? Give the Outreach Office a call today! 16020 Swingley Ridge Rd. Suite 300 Chesterfield 636.449.5068 www.semo.edu/careerlinkages

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Pressing the Boundaries University Press provides more than books

S

outheast Missouri State University Press is rarely the topic of conversation. The world of editing, book designs and more editing doesn’t seem to strike a chord with most people, and that’s assuming they even know that Southeast has a press in the first place. In the unusual event that the Press does get a little talk time, it is generally thought that, like most universities, they publish primarily scholarly books. This is not the case at all at Southeast. Dr. Susan Swartwout, director of the Southeast Missouri State University Press, says that she did not want Southeast to fall into the structure of most universities and publish only scholarly books. “We believe that a university press can be more than a publisher of scholarly literature,” said Dr. Swartwout. “We’ve found that such a press is of great benefit to the community and region, the parent university, and the students.”

MORE THAn JUST SCHOLARLy LITERATURE The Press, which was founded in 2001, primarily publishes regional books, many of which would never see a bookshelf otherwise. They work with mostly local authors, helping move their work from a computer screen to the book store. The Gold of Cape Girardeau by Morley Swingle was the first book published by the Southeast Missouri State University Press. Swingle, prosecuting attorney of Cape

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A qUICK START

After the success of The Gold of Cape Girardeau, it was evident the Press was going to become a lasting edition at Southeast. They have since published 12 books with several more slated for publication in the upcoming years, including the release of Swingle’s follow-up book, Bootheel Man, in fall 2007. The Press has found great success working with authors who write about regional history. Other award-winning books from the Press are: Matthews: Historic Adventures of a Pioneer Family by Edward C. Matthews III, which also won the Governor’s Award in 2006, as well as the 2005 Kniffen Book Award, an award given annually to the best-authored book in the U.S. and Canada in the field of material culture or cultural geography; and Seven Laurels by Linda Busby Parker, which won the James Jones First Novel Award and the Langum Award for Historical Fiction, two national awards that honor insight into modern culture and historical fiction, respectively. The Press has also published several books of poetry, including: Hurricane Blues: Poems about Katrina and Rita; Balancing on a Bootheel: New Voices in Poetry from Southeast Missouri; and Strange Privacies: Poems, among others.

TAKInG On nEW CHALLEnGES

Girardeau County, did extensive research on the history of the region, which he used as the background for his fictional thriller novel. A first-time novelist, Swingle was elated to get the opportunity to work with a professional press right here in Cape. “It was wonderful to work with the Press,” said Swingle. “Dr. Swartwout is a terrific person, who spends a lot of time nurturing the writer—giving positive encouragement and correcting manuscripts. I just couldn’t be happier with everything she did in helping me make the manuscript as good as it could possibly be.” According to Dr. Swartwout, The Gold of Cape Girardeau, which was released at

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an author’s signing party, helped “kick the Press off in a big way.” Both Swingle and the University Press had positive experiences with their first foray into the literary world. “It’s something you’ve dreamed about so long, something that changes your life and it really has been one of the most satisfying things I’ve ever done,” said Swingle. The Gold of Cape Girardeau went on to sell over 7,000 copies and win the Missouri Governor’s Award in 2005. The award is given annually to an individual or group whose book or publication has increased understanding and appreciation of Missouri’s history and culture.

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In 2006, the University Press took on a new challenge when they published their first cookbook: Stirring Words by Tom Harte. While it may not seem that a cookbook would be different than any other publication, it brought about a whole new set of problems. “I was really afraid to do a cookbook,” said Swartwout. “I had no idea how it could be marketed. But I knew Tom’s food essays were wonderful, so I definitely wanted to give it a try.” Dr. Tom Harte, who is a retired speech communication professor at Southeast, has been working as a food columnist for the Southeast Missourian in Cape Girardeau for ten years. He also started My Daddy’s Cheesecake from his kitchen and has given many cooking demonstrations at Dierberg’s in St. Louis as well as in Cape Girardeau. Harte’s column is more than just simply rehashing a recipe. Harte researches and writes about the history of a food of choice in each column, creating what he refers to t h e

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o f

“We believe that a university press can be more than a publisher of scholarly literature.”

as a “food essay.” Each essay is followed with books themselves, so the minor fit my interone or two recipes using the chosen food. ests perfectly,” said Henley, who started the Harte wanted to bring this same style to Stir- program to complement her major in English. ring Words. Henley enjoyed her practicum with the “I wanted this to be more than just a Press so much that she did all she could to cookbook,” said Harte. “I have always loved remain involved with the press when it ended. learning about food, and it was my hope that “After my practicum, I was able to take others will enjoy the essays and learn independent studies to continue my some new recipes along the experiences with the Press,” said way.” Henley. “I then became a Fueled by the populargraduate assistant for the ity of his many newspaPress when I entered the per articles, Harte’s graduate program in book was an instant English.” local success. People As demands grew all across Cape Giand time shortened, it rardeau were talking became apparent that the about food history and Press needed more than trying the recipes from students and a part-time Stirring Words. employee. Henley became the “It was all such a wonderfirst full-time employee upon ful experience,” said completing her master’s Harte. “Working with Mandy Henley, assistant editor and office degree in English. the Press was a real joy. manager at the Southeast Missouri State In the short history of They were extremely the Southeast Missouri University Press, began working with the professional and detail Press as a student State University Press, oriented.” several students of the Harte says that the program have gone on to Press did much more than just stick their work in the publishing field. The Press has name on the cover; they were highly involved opened new academic doors at Southeast, by in the editing process as well. providing the practical experience necessary to “There is actually an editing style just for become qualified in the publishing industry. cookbooks,” said Harte. “The staff at the The Press has also helped Southeast gain Press really worked hard to be sure that the attention all across the country through such book was consistent and in the proper format media forums as the American Historical throughout.” Review, The Boston Globe, New Orleans TimesPicayune and Southern Cultures magazine, to name a few. HELPInG STUDEnTS SUCCEED “This Press is really an amazing success The Press serves not only as a first-rate story,” said Harte. “I would stack the quality publisher in the southeast Missouri region of the books published here against almost but also as a working laboratory for students any press around.” interested in learning the art and skills of literary publishing. The Press supports a Minor degree program in Small-press Publishing for undergraduate students at Southeast. Visit Harte, Swingle and other Mandy Henley, now the assistant editor University Press authors at and office manager at the Southeast Missouri Southeast Write now: A Celebration State University Press, started as a student of Southeast Authors during the with the program. Homecoming festivities. See page “I’ve been obsessed with books my entire 22 for details. life—not only reading them, but also with the

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Pressing the Boundaries University Press provides more than books

S

outheast Missouri State University Press is rarely the topic of conversation. The world of editing, book designs and more editing doesn’t seem to strike a chord with most people, and that’s assuming they even know that Southeast has a press in the first place. In the unusual event that the Press does get a little talk time, it is generally thought that, like most universities, they publish primarily scholarly books. This is not the case at all at Southeast. Dr. Susan Swartwout, director of the Southeast Missouri State University Press, says that she did not want Southeast to fall into the structure of most universities and publish only scholarly books. “We believe that a university press can be more than a publisher of scholarly literature,” said Dr. Swartwout. “We’ve found that such a press is of great benefit to the community and region, the parent university, and the students.”

MORE THAn JUST SCHOLARLy LITERATURE The Press, which was founded in 2001, primarily publishes regional books, many of which would never see a bookshelf otherwise. They work with mostly local authors, helping move their work from a computer screen to the book store. The Gold of Cape Girardeau by Morley Swingle was the first book published by the Southeast Missouri State University Press. Swingle, prosecuting attorney of Cape

0

t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

A qUICK START

After the success of The Gold of Cape Girardeau, it was evident the Press was going to become a lasting edition at Southeast. They have since published 12 books with several more slated for publication in the upcoming years, including the release of Swingle’s follow-up book, Bootheel Man, in fall 2007. The Press has found great success working with authors who write about regional history. Other award-winning books from the Press are: Matthews: Historic Adventures of a Pioneer Family by Edward C. Matthews III, which also won the Governor’s Award in 2006, as well as the 2005 Kniffen Book Award, an award given annually to the best-authored book in the U.S. and Canada in the field of material culture or cultural geography; and Seven Laurels by Linda Busby Parker, which won the James Jones First Novel Award and the Langum Award for Historical Fiction, two national awards that honor insight into modern culture and historical fiction, respectively. The Press has also published several books of poetry, including: Hurricane Blues: Poems about Katrina and Rita; Balancing on a Bootheel: New Voices in Poetry from Southeast Missouri; and Strange Privacies: Poems, among others.

TAKInG On nEW CHALLEnGES

Girardeau County, did extensive research on the history of the region, which he used as the background for his fictional thriller novel. A first-time novelist, Swingle was elated to get the opportunity to work with a professional press right here in Cape. “It was wonderful to work with the Press,” said Swingle. “Dr. Swartwout is a terrific person, who spends a lot of time nurturing the writer—giving positive encouragement and correcting manuscripts. I just couldn’t be happier with everything she did in helping me make the manuscript as good as it could possibly be.” According to Dr. Swartwout, The Gold of Cape Girardeau, which was released at

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

an author’s signing party, helped “kick the Press off in a big way.” Both Swingle and the University Press had positive experiences with their first foray into the literary world. “It’s something you’ve dreamed about so long, something that changes your life and it really has been one of the most satisfying things I’ve ever done,” said Swingle. The Gold of Cape Girardeau went on to sell over 7,000 copies and win the Missouri Governor’s Award in 2005. The award is given annually to an individual or group whose book or publication has increased understanding and appreciation of Missouri’s history and culture.

u n i v e r s i t y

fa l l

2 0 0 7

In 2006, the University Press took on a new challenge when they published their first cookbook: Stirring Words by Tom Harte. While it may not seem that a cookbook would be different than any other publication, it brought about a whole new set of problems. “I was really afraid to do a cookbook,” said Swartwout. “I had no idea how it could be marketed. But I knew Tom’s food essays were wonderful, so I definitely wanted to give it a try.” Dr. Tom Harte, who is a retired speech communication professor at Southeast, has been working as a food columnist for the Southeast Missourian in Cape Girardeau for ten years. He also started My Daddy’s Cheesecake from his kitchen and has given many cooking demonstrations at Dierberg’s in St. Louis as well as in Cape Girardeau. Harte’s column is more than just simply rehashing a recipe. Harte researches and writes about the history of a food of choice in each column, creating what he refers to t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

“We believe that a university press can be more than a publisher of scholarly literature.”

as a “food essay.” Each essay is followed with books themselves, so the minor fit my interone or two recipes using the chosen food. ests perfectly,” said Henley, who started the Harte wanted to bring this same style to Stir- program to complement her major in English. ring Words. Henley enjoyed her practicum with the “I wanted this to be more than just a Press so much that she did all she could to cookbook,” said Harte. “I have always loved remain involved with the press when it ended. learning about food, and it was my hope that “After my practicum, I was able to take others will enjoy the essays and learn independent studies to continue my some new recipes along the experiences with the Press,” said way.” Henley. “I then became a Fueled by the populargraduate assistant for the ity of his many newspaPress when I entered the per articles, Harte’s graduate program in book was an instant English.” local success. People As demands grew all across Cape Giand time shortened, it rardeau were talking became apparent that the about food history and Press needed more than trying the recipes from students and a part-time Stirring Words. employee. Henley became the “It was all such a wonderfirst full-time employee upon ful experience,” said completing her master’s Harte. “Working with Mandy Henley, assistant editor and office degree in English. the Press was a real joy. manager at the Southeast Missouri State In the short history of They were extremely the Southeast Missouri University Press, began working with the professional and detail Press as a student State University Press, oriented.” several students of the Harte says that the program have gone on to Press did much more than just stick their work in the publishing field. The Press has name on the cover; they were highly involved opened new academic doors at Southeast, by in the editing process as well. providing the practical experience necessary to “There is actually an editing style just for become qualified in the publishing industry. cookbooks,” said Harte. “The staff at the The Press has also helped Southeast gain Press really worked hard to be sure that the attention all across the country through such book was consistent and in the proper format media forums as the American Historical throughout.” Review, The Boston Globe, New Orleans TimesPicayune and Southern Cultures magazine, to name a few. HELPInG STUDEnTS SUCCEED “This Press is really an amazing success The Press serves not only as a first-rate story,” said Harte. “I would stack the quality publisher in the southeast Missouri region of the books published here against almost but also as a working laboratory for students any press around.” interested in learning the art and skills of literary publishing. The Press supports a Minor degree program in Small-press Publishing for undergraduate students at Southeast. Visit Harte, Swingle and other Mandy Henley, now the assistant editor University Press authors at and office manager at the Southeast Missouri Southeast Write now: A Celebration State University Press, started as a student of Southeast Authors during the with the program. Homecoming festivities. See page “I’ve been obsessed with books my entire 22 for details. life—not only reading them, but also with the

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Join us for some classic tailgating fun! Location: Outside of Houck Stadium on Bellevue and Wehking Alumni Center parking area. Cost: FREE For more info: Contact Bobby Brune at (573) 986-6139 or rjbrune@semo.edu

Southeast Tailgate Party

Copper Dome Society/ Merit Award Recognition Program

9:30 a.m.

Copper Dome Society members, alumni and friends are invited to attend program honoring Merit Award recipients. Tours of performance venues and museum will follow the program and will include performances by students and faculty of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. Enjoy cuisine provided by Chartwells at the various performance venues. Location: River Campus Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall Cost: $25 per person. FREE for Copper Dome Society Members (Limit 2 tickets per family.) Limit of 900 seats. For more info: Contact the Southeast Missouri University Foundation at (573) 651-2252.

SATURDAY

7:30 a.m. Alumni and friends are invited to attend breakfast honoring Distinguished Service Award recipients. Location: Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center 926 Broadway Tours of facility begin at 10 a.m. Cost: $10 per person For more info: Contact the Alumni Association at (573) 651-2259. o f

Location: Kent Library For more info: Contact Dr. Susan Swartwout at (573) 651-2641 or sswartwout@semo.edu

Tours of Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center

Luncheon for Classes of 1956, 1957, 1958 and 1959

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center 926 Broadway For more info: Contact the Alumni Association at (573) 651-2259.

11 a.m.

All Alumni Breakfast

their books included, please send a copy in advance to: Southeast Write Now, Southeast Missouri State University Press, One University Plaza, MS 2650, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

Location: Capaha Park to Main Street For more info: Contact Angie Grissom at (573) 651-2259 or agrissom@semo.edu

Southeast Write Now: A Celebration of Southeast Authors

OCTOBER 20

M A G A Z I N E

Southeast’s Homecoming Parade is recognized as one of the largest in the region, and this year’s parade will be an exciting celebration of Southeast pride. Entries must be submitted by Oct. 12.

Join the Alumni Association and the University Press to celebrate the works of Southeast’s thriving writing community. From 11 a.m. to noon, a panel of University Press authors will answer your questions about writing and getting published. A light lunch will be served following the panel presentation. Books published by the University Press and by Southeast students, alumni and faculty will be on display. Enjoy a cup of coffee, chat with your favorite Southeast authors and meet a few new ones! Any Southeast writers who wish to have

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Diamond Club Reception

Look for the giant tent for free pre-game food and festivities. This event is sponsored by Kohlfeld Distributing, River Radio and Pepsi and will feature music by “Flashback,” one of the Heartland’s finest rock ‘n roll bands. You won’t want to miss this opportunity to reminisce with a wide variety of music - from the oldies to current tunes. This event also will feature a pre-game warm-up by the incomparable Golden Eagles Marching Band, the Southeast cheerleaders and Sundancers.

Homecoming Parade

6 p.m.

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Tours of the new River Campus will be available at 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. for those who cannot attend the Grand Opening on Sunday at 3 p.m.

• Athletics Tailgate Gathering

OCTOBER 19



1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Location: River Campus For more info: Contact Bob Cerchio at (573) 651-2846 or rcerchio @semo.edu

11 a.m

FRIDAY

River Campus Tours

11:30 a.m. Classmates of the late 1950s are invited to attend a luncheon and celebrate the 50th Reunion of the Class of 1957. Location: Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center 926 Broadway Cost: $12 per person For more info: Contact Shelby Shell, Class of 1957 Chair, at (573) 335-1349 or Jane Stacy at (573) 651-2930 or jcstacy@semo.edu

Booster Club Tailgate Party Noon Join the Boosters for their pre-game tailgate. Special guests will be the members of the 1957 football team. Location: Booster Corral at Houck Stadium For more info: Contact Greg Brune at (573) 651-2005 or gbrune @semo.edu

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3 p.m. Alumni 70 years of age or older are invited to join together for a time of fun and remembering. Appetizers and cash bar available. Location: Marquette Tower 338 Broadway Cost: $10 per person For more info: Contact Trudy Lee at (573) 651-5935 or tglee@semo.edu

• Phi Beta Sigma Xi Iota Chapter

Alumni Tailgate Party For more info: Contact Keith Foster at (573) 382-0380 or kthfoster@yahoo.com; Perry Harris at (573) 837-5627 or perry. harris@rubbermaid.com; or George Demyers at (573) 380-0501.

Football Game Southeast Redhawks vs. Murray State Racers

• Alpha Phi Alpha Tailgate Party

1 p.m.

For more info: Contact Terry Allen at (901) 309-3752, (901) 219-2535 or tlavan06@yahoo.com.

Be there for the action as the Southeast Redhawks take on the Murray State Racers. Pregame: Introduction of the members of the 1957 football team. Halftime: Crowning of the Man and Woman of the Year.

• Residence Life Reunion Tailgate Were you a former Residence Life staff member? If that answer is yes, you won’t want to miss the Residence Life Reunion Tailgate. Join current Residence Life staff for food, fun and memories. For more info: Contact Bruce Skinner at (573) 651-2274 or bskinner@semo.edu

Location: Houck Stadium For tickets: Call (573) 651-2113 or 1-866SEMO-TIK or visit gosoutheast.com

SPeCIAL eNTeRTAINMeNT

Rodney Carrington Saturday October 20 8 p.m. Show Me Center

1957 Football Team Reunion MIAA Champions 4 p.m.

Reserved Seats: $36.75 Students: $29.75 Tickets available at the Show Me Center Box Office (573) 651-5000 or on the web @ showmecenter.biz t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

Location: Marquette Tower 338 Broadway For more info: Contact Greg Brune at (573) 651-2005 or gbrune@ semo.edu m i s s o u r i

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Join us for some classic tailgating fun! Location: Outside of Houck Stadium on Bellevue and Wehking Alumni Center parking area. Cost: FREE For more info: Contact Bobby Brune at (573) 986-6139 or rjbrune@semo.edu

Southeast Tailgate Party

Copper Dome Society/ Merit Award Recognition Program

9:30 a.m.

Copper Dome Society members, alumni and friends are invited to attend program honoring Merit Award recipients. Tours of performance venues and museum will follow the program and will include performances by students and faculty of the Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts. Enjoy cuisine provided by Chartwells at the various performance venues. Location: River Campus Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall Cost: $25 per person. FREE for Copper Dome Society Members (Limit 2 tickets per family.) Limit of 900 seats. For more info: Contact the Southeast Missouri University Foundation at (573) 651-2252.

SATURDAY 7:30 a.m. Alumni and friends are invited to attend breakfast honoring Distinguished Service Award recipients. Location: Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center 926 Broadway Tours of facility begin at 10 a.m. Cost: $10 per person For more info: Contact the Alumni Association at (573) 651-2259. o f

Location: Kent Library For more info: Contact Dr. Susan Swartwout at (573) 651-2641 or sswartwout@semo.edu

Tours of Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center

Luncheon for Classes of 1956, 1957, 1958 and 1959

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center 926 Broadway For more info: Contact the Alumni Association at (573) 651-2259.

11 a.m.

All Alumni Breakfast

their books included, please send a copy in advance to: Southeast Write Now, Southeast Missouri State University Press, One University Plaza, MS 2650, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

Location: Capaha Park to Main Street For more info: Contact Angie Grissom at (573) 651-2259 or agrissom@semo.edu

Southeast Write Now: A Celebration of Southeast Authors

OCTOBER 20

M A G A Z I N E

Southeast’s Homecoming Parade is recognized as one of the largest in the region, and this year’s parade will be an exciting celebration of Southeast pride. Entries must be submitted by Oct. 12.

Join the Alumni Association and the University Press to celebrate the works of Southeast’s thriving writing community. From 11 a.m. to noon, a panel of University Press authors will answer your questions about writing and getting published. A light lunch will be served following the panel presentation. Books published by the University Press and by Southeast students, alumni and faculty will be on display. Enjoy a cup of coffee, chat with your favorite Southeast authors and meet a few new ones! Any Southeast writers who wish to have

s o u t h e a s t

m i s s o u r i

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Diamond Club Reception

Look for the giant tent for free pre-game food and festivities. This event is sponsored by Kohlfeld Distributing, River Radio and Pepsi and will feature music by “Flashback,” one of the Heartland’s finest rock ‘n roll bands. You won’t want to miss this opportunity to reminisce with a wide variety of music - from the oldies to current tunes. This event also will feature a pre-game warm-up by the incomparable Golden Eagles Marching Band, the Southeast cheerleaders and Sundancers.

Homecoming Parade

6 p.m.

t h e

Tours of the new River Campus will be available at 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. for those who cannot attend the Grand Opening on Sunday at 3 p.m.

• Athletics Tailgate Gathering

OCTOBER 19



1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Location: River Campus For more info: Contact Bob Cerchio at (573) 651-2846 or rcerchio @semo.edu

11 a.m

FRIDAY

River Campus Tours

11:30 a.m. Classmates of the late 1950s are invited to attend a luncheon and celebrate the 50th Reunion of the Class of 1957. Location: Newly Relocated Wehking Alumni Center 926 Broadway Cost: $12 per person For more info: Contact Shelby Shell, Class of 1957 Chair, at (573) 335-1349 or Jane Stacy at (573) 651-2930 or jcstacy@semo.edu

Booster Club Tailgate Party Noon Join the Boosters for their pre-game tailgate. Special guests will be the members of the 1957 football team. Location: Booster Corral at Houck Stadium For more info: Contact Greg Brune at (573) 651-2005 or gbrune @semo.edu

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3 p.m. Alumni 70 years of age or older are invited to join together for a time of fun and remembering. Appetizers and cash bar available. Location: Marquette Tower 338 Broadway Cost: $10 per person For more info: Contact Trudy Lee at (573) 651-5935 or tglee@semo.edu

• Phi Beta Sigma Xi Iota Chapter

Alumni Tailgate Party For more info: Contact Keith Foster at (573) 382-0380 or kthfoster@yahoo.com; Perry Harris at (573) 837-5627 or perry. harris@rubbermaid.com; or George Demyers at (573) 380-0501.

Football Game Southeast Redhawks vs. Murray State Racers

• Alpha Phi Alpha Tailgate Party

1 p.m.

For more info: Contact Terry Allen at (901) 309-3752, (901) 219-2535 or tlavan06@yahoo.com.

Be there for the action as the Southeast Redhawks take on the Murray State Racers. Pregame: Introduction of the members of the 1957 football team. Halftime: Crowning of the Man and Woman of the Year.

• Residence Life Reunion Tailgate Were you a former Residence Life staff member? If that answer is yes, you won’t want to miss the Residence Life Reunion Tailgate. Join current Residence Life staff for food, fun and memories. For more info: Contact Bruce Skinner at (573) 651-2274 or bskinner@semo.edu

Location: Houck Stadium For tickets: Call (573) 651-2113 or 1-866SEMO-TIK or visit gosoutheast.com

SPeCIAL eNTeRTAINMeNT

Rodney Carrington Saturday October 20 8 p.m. Show Me Center

1957 Football Team Reunion MIAA Champions 4 p.m.

Reserved Seats: $36.75 Students: $29.75 Tickets available at the Show Me Center Box Office (573) 651-5000 or on the web @ showmecenter.biz t h e

M A G A Z I N E

o f

s o u t h e a s t

Location: Marquette Tower 338 Broadway For more info: Contact Greg Brune at (573) 651-2005 or gbrune@ semo.edu m i s s o u r i

s tat e

u n i v e r s i t y

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ALUMNI A L M A N A C Merit Awards to Honor Alumni, Faculty Eight alumni and one faculty member will receive Merit Awards presented by the Southeast Missouri State University

Alumni Association Oct. 19 at the Copper Dome Society/Merit Recognition Program. Since 1958, Alumni Merit Awards have been presented to Southeast graduates who have brought distinction to themselves and to the University. The Faculty Merit Award is presented for excellence in teaching. The Alumni Merit Award recipients are as follows: R. David Crader, Robert Crawford, Cynthia Davie, Shari Francis, Dr. George Hand, Jr., Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles, Rosetta Kyles and W. Russell Withers. Rosetta Kyles and Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles are the first mother-son award recipients in the University’s history. The Faculty Merit Award winner is Dr. Tamara Baldwin.

A lumni merit award R. David Crader ’73, who majored in agriculture and business, is the chief executive officer and chairman of the board of Bank of Missouri. Crader began his banking career in 1974 and is a 2006 graduate of The Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State University master’s program. He is vice chairman of the Missouri Independent Bankers Association and a board member of the Missouri Bankers Association Foundation. Crader also plays an active role in his community. His involvement includes, but is not limited to, serving as president of Teen Challenge Mid-America, as vice president of the Missouri Veterans Home Foundation, as secretary of the Saint Francis Medical Center Foundation and as treasurer of the Perry County School District #32 Foundation. Robert Crawford ’57, who majored in business administration, is retired director of professional relations at Procter & Gamble. In 1957, Crawford began his 37-year career with Procter & Gamble as a sales representative. Crawford was promoted to western sales manager in 1960 and to national professional sales manager in 1967. In 1987, Crawford was promoted to his final position with P&G, which he retired from in 1994. Since retiring,

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Crawford has served as a consultant to Professional Dental Technologies, Inc., in Batesville, Ark., Harftst Associates, Inc. in Troy, Mich., and Laser Centers of America in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the 1957 class chair for the 2007 Homecoming project, as well as a board member of Southeast Missouri University Foundation. Crawford served on a number of advisory committees and boards of directors including the American Academy of Periodontology Foundation, American Dental Association Health Foundation, Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Northwestern University Dental School, among others. As a student at Southeast, Crawford was president of Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity in 1956 and president of the student body in 1957. Cynthia (Steffens) Davie ’78, who majored in secondary education with an emphasis in speech pathology, is vice president at the Center for Comprehensive Services, Inc. — Carbondale, Ill./Paducah, Ky. locations. The Center for Comprehensive Services is part of MENTOR ABI, a national network that provides post-acute residential brain injury rehabilitation services. Davie began her career with the Center for Comprehensive Services 28 years ago as a graduate assistant. She was named a director at the Center in 1996 and became vice president in 2001. Since 1985, Davie has given several presentations at conferences OF

SOUTHEAST

nationwide. In addition, she served as an adjunct professor to Southeast Missouri State University from 1993 to 2001 and at Southern Illinois University Carbondale from 1988 to 2001. Davie is certified with the American SpeechLanguage-Hearing association and is a licensed speech pathologist with the state of Illinois. She is also a member of the Brain Injury Association of America and Delta Kappa Gamma Honorary Education Sorority. Shari (Macku) Francis ’70, who majored in education, is the vice president for state relations for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) in Washington D.C. NCATE is the only agency authorized by the U.S. Dept. of Education to accredit colleges and universities of teacher education. Francis works with state departments of education and educator standards boards to establish and maintain agreements for conducting joint state and NCATE evaluations of teacher education institutions. She was an elected member of the board of directors for the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards and serves as NCATE’s liaison to the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification, the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Prior to joining NCATE, Francis was a classroom teacher and reading specialist in Arnold, Mo., served in the U.S. Dept. of

MISSOURI

STATE

UNIVERSITY

ALUMNI A L M A N A C Education Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, and worked as a senior staff member of the National Education Association in Washington, D.C. Francis was a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority while attending Southeast. Dr. George Hand, Jr. ’58, who majored in biology education, is professor emeritus of cell biology at the University of Alabama School of Medicine (UASOM). Dr. Hand retired as assistant dean for medical admissions of the UASOM in 2001. He was chair of the UASOM admissions committee for 13 years and served more than 20 years as course master for medical microanatomy. Dr. Hand was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, a national medical honor society, and to Phi Kappa Phi national honor society. He was awarded UASOM’s Most Caring Professor Award, Best Basic Science Teacher Award and Outstanding Teacher Award. Hand received his M.A. in education (science) from Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., in 1961. He earned his Ph.D. in embryology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1967, where he served as a teaching fellow. In 1969, Hand completed a two-year National Institutes of Health post-doctoral fellowship at the California Institute of Technology. Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles ’87, who majored in mass communication, is better known as actor and comedian, Cedric “The Entertainer.” Kyles has had major roles in such hit films as Be Cool with John Travolta, Barbershop with Ice Cube, Madagascar (animated feature) and Intolerable Cruelty with George Clooney. He was most recently in the movie Talk To Me with Don Cheadle. Upcoming projects include The Better Man with Martin Lawrence, Night Watch opposite Keanu Reeves, Johnson Family FALL

2 0 0 7

Vacation 2, Madagascar 2 and Flash co-starring Nelly. Kyles was star and producer of the box office hit, Johnson Family Vacation, in 2004. A few of his accolades include the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) Award of Excellence in Television Programming for his Fox Television series, “Cedric The Entertainer Presents…” and four NAACP Image Awards for “Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy” on “The Steve Harvey Show.” In 2002, Kyles released his first comedy book, which sold out across the country. He founded Cedric “The Entertainer” Charitable Foundation, Inc., in 1996, which provides scholarships and outreach programs to enhance the lives of inner-city youth and their families in his hometown of St. Louis, Mo. Kyles was a member the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity while at Southeast. Rosetta (Boyce) Kyles ’75, who received her M.A. in education, is retired after 32 years as an educator. She taught for eight years in her hometown of Caruthersville, Mo., prior to moving to St. Louis where she worked with the Ferguson-Florissant School District. She held the position of Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, and was a certified reading specialist through the University of Missouri-St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. Kyles is a board member of the Cedric “The Entertainer” Charitable Foundation, Inc. and remains an advocate for the reading education of young children. She is currently working on a project, which entails writing faith-based curriculum for all ages.

W. Russell Withers ’58, who majored in English and history, is the owner of Withers Broadcasting Companies. Withers began his career as a disc jockey for KGMO Radio in Cape Girardeau, Mo., in 1956. After serving two years in the U.S. Army, Withers began working for LIN Broadcasting Corporation in 1959. In 1963, Withers became president of Gregg Cablevision, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of LIN Broadcasting, where he franchised and built 50 cable television systems in seven states. In 1967, Withers became president of Schertle Galleries, Inc., and franchised 150 art galleries in the United States and Canada. He served as the executive vice president of Laser Link Corporation, New York from 1969-72, where Withers took Laser Link Corp. public. In 1972, he founded Withers Broadcasting Companies, which owns and operates 12 radio stations covering southeast Missouri, southern Illinois and western Kentucky. Withers also owns a number of other radio and television stations in Iowa, Michigan, Texas, New Mexico and West Virginia. He was named Brodacaster of the Year in 2005 by the Illinois Broadcasters Association and Broadcaster of the Year in 2006 by the West Virginia Broadcasters Association. In June 2007, Withers was elected radio board chairman for the National Association of Broadcasters. He has been listed in Who’s Who in Finance and Industry, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in Entertainment and Who’s Who in the World. Withers sits on the Board of Trustees of the Lincoln Academy of Illinois and was recently reappointed to a third term as a regent by Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

faculty merit award Dr. Tamara Baldwin ’78, ’80, became a Southeast faculty member in 1980 as an adjunct instructor in the Department of Communication. In 1991, she became an assistant professor, which sparked a quick climb to associate professor and ultimately full professor in 2000. Aside from teaching, Dr. Baldwin also has written several articles that have appeared in such publications as Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, the Intelligencer, American Journalism and the Southeast Missourian. Baldwin belongs to many professional organizations including the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Broadcast Education Association. Baldwin has been highly involved with the American Journalism Historians Association and will be president-elect in October 2007. Dr. Baldwin currently sits on the University Studies Committee, Women’s Studies Committee, Library Committee and the Multicultural Task Force at Southeast. She is the co-founder and co-advisor for the southeast chapter of the Association for Women in Communication student chapter. In addition, Baldwin became a part of the Honors Faculty at Southeast in 2006. Baldwin is married to Dr. Henry Sessoms Sr., professor emeritus of English at Southeast.

We’ve Moved! The newly relocated Wehking Alumni Center is at 926 Broadway in the former First Baptist Church building in front of Houck Stadium. Come by and see us any time — we will be happy to show you around!

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ALUMNI A L M A N A C Merit Awards to Honor Alumni, Faculty Eight alumni and one faculty member will receive Merit Awards presented by the Southeast Missouri State University

Alumni Association Oct. 19 at the Copper Dome Society/Merit Recognition Program. Since 1958, Alumni Merit Awards have been presented to Southeast graduates who have brought distinction to themselves and to the University. The Faculty Merit Award is presented for excellence in teaching. The Alumni Merit Award recipients are as follows: R. David Crader, Robert Crawford, Cynthia Davie, Shari Francis, Dr. George Hand, Jr., Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles, Rosetta Kyles and W. Russell Withers. Rosetta Kyles and Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles are the first mother-son award recipients in the University’s history. The Faculty Merit Award winner is Dr. Tamara Baldwin.

A lumni merit award R. David Crader ’73, who majored in agriculture and business, is the chief executive officer and chairman of the board of Bank of Missouri. Crader began his banking career in 1974 and is a 2006 graduate of The Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State University master’s program. He is vice chairman of the Missouri Independent Bankers Association and a board member of the Missouri Bankers Association Foundation. Crader also plays an active role in his community. His involvement includes, but is not limited to, serving as president of Teen Challenge Mid-America, as vice president of the Missouri Veterans Home Foundation, as secretary of the Saint Francis Medical Center Foundation and as treasurer of the Perry County School District #32 Foundation. Robert Crawford ’57, who majored in business administration, is retired director of professional relations at Procter & Gamble. In 1957, Crawford began his 37-year career with Procter & Gamble as a sales representative. Crawford was promoted to western sales manager in 1960 and to national professional sales manager in 1967. In 1987, Crawford was promoted to his final position with P&G, which he retired from in 1994. Since retiring,

24

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Crawford has served as a consultant to Professional Dental Technologies, Inc., in Batesville, Ark., Harftst Associates, Inc. in Troy, Mich., and Laser Centers of America in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the 1957 class chair for the 2007 Homecoming project, as well as a board member of Southeast Missouri University Foundation. Crawford served on a number of advisory committees and boards of directors including the American Academy of Periodontology Foundation, American Dental Association Health Foundation, Harvard School of Dental Medicine and Northwestern University Dental School, among others. As a student at Southeast, Crawford was president of Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity in 1956 and president of the student body in 1957. Cynthia (Steffens) Davie ’78, who majored in secondary education with an emphasis in speech pathology, is vice president at the Center for Comprehensive Services, Inc. — Carbondale, Ill./Paducah, Ky. locations. The Center for Comprehensive Services is part of MENTOR ABI, a national network that provides post-acute residential brain injury rehabilitation services. Davie began her career with the Center for Comprehensive Services 28 years ago as a graduate assistant. She was named a director at the Center in 1996 and became vice president in 2001. Since 1985, Davie has given several presentations at conferences OF

SOUTHEAST

nationwide. In addition, she served as an adjunct professor to Southeast Missouri State University from 1993 to 2001 and at Southern Illinois University Carbondale from 1988 to 2001. Davie is certified with the American SpeechLanguage-Hearing association and is a licensed speech pathologist with the state of Illinois. She is also a member of the Brain Injury Association of America and Delta Kappa Gamma Honorary Education Sorority. Shari (Macku) Francis ’70, who majored in education, is the vice president for state relations for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) in Washington D.C. NCATE is the only agency authorized by the U.S. Dept. of Education to accredit colleges and universities of teacher education. Francis works with state departments of education and educator standards boards to establish and maintain agreements for conducting joint state and NCATE evaluations of teacher education institutions. She was an elected member of the board of directors for the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards and serves as NCATE’s liaison to the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification, the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Prior to joining NCATE, Francis was a classroom teacher and reading specialist in Arnold, Mo., served in the U.S. Dept. of

MISSOURI

STATE

UNIVERSITY

ALUMNI A L M A N A C Education Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, and worked as a senior staff member of the National Education Association in Washington, D.C. Francis was a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority while attending Southeast. Dr. George Hand, Jr. ’58, who majored in biology education, is professor emeritus of cell biology at the University of Alabama School of Medicine (UASOM). Dr. Hand retired as assistant dean for medical admissions of the UASOM in 2001. He was chair of the UASOM admissions committee for 13 years and served more than 20 years as course master for medical microanatomy. Dr. Hand was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha, a national medical honor society, and to Phi Kappa Phi national honor society. He was awarded UASOM’s Most Caring Professor Award, Best Basic Science Teacher Award and Outstanding Teacher Award. Hand received his M.A. in education (science) from Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., in 1961. He earned his Ph.D. in embryology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1967, where he served as a teaching fellow. In 1969, Hand completed a two-year National Institutes of Health post-doctoral fellowship at the California Institute of Technology. Cedric “The Entertainer” Kyles ’87, who majored in mass communication, is better known as actor and comedian, Cedric “The Entertainer.” Kyles has had major roles in such hit films as Be Cool with John Travolta, Barbershop with Ice Cube, Madagascar (animated feature) and Intolerable Cruelty with George Clooney. He was most recently in the movie Talk To Me with Don Cheadle. Upcoming projects include The Better Man with Martin Lawrence, Night Watch opposite Keanu Reeves, Johnson Family FALL

2 0 0 7

Vacation 2, Madagascar 2 and Flash co-starring Nelly. Kyles was star and producer of the box office hit, Johnson Family Vacation, in 2004. A few of his accolades include the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) Award of Excellence in Television Programming for his Fox Television series, “Cedric The Entertainer Presents…” and four NAACP Image Awards for “Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy” on “The Steve Harvey Show.” In 2002, Kyles released his first comedy book, which sold out across the country. He founded Cedric “The Entertainer” Charitable Foundation, Inc., in 1996, which provides scholarships and outreach programs to enhance the lives of inner-city youth and their families in his hometown of St. Louis, Mo. Kyles was a member the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity while at Southeast. Rosetta (Boyce) Kyles ’75, who received her M.A. in education, is retired after 32 years as an educator. She taught for eight years in her hometown of Caruthersville, Mo., prior to moving to St. Louis where she worked with the Ferguson-Florissant School District. She held the position of Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, and was a certified reading specialist through the University of Missouri-St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. Kyles is a board member of the Cedric “The Entertainer” Charitable Foundation, Inc. and remains an advocate for the reading education of young children. She is currently working on a project, which entails writing faith-based curriculum for all ages.

W. Russell Withers ’58, who majored in English and history, is the owner of Withers Broadcasting Companies. Withers began his career as a disc jockey for KGMO Radio in Cape Girardeau, Mo., in 1956. After serving two years in the U.S. Army, Withers began working for LIN Broadcasting Corporation in 1959. In 1963, Withers became president of Gregg Cablevision, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of LIN Broadcasting, where he franchised and built 50 cable television systems in seven states. In 1967, Withers became president of Schertle Galleries, Inc., and franchised 150 art galleries in the United States and Canada. He served as the executive vice president of Laser Link Corporation, New York from 1969-72, where Withers took Laser Link Corp. public. In 1972, he founded Withers Broadcasting Companies, which owns and operates 12 radio stations covering southeast Missouri, southern Illinois and western Kentucky. Withers also owns a number of other radio and television stations in Iowa, Michigan, Texas, New Mexico and West Virginia. He was named Brodacaster of the Year in 2005 by the Illinois Broadcasters Association and Broadcaster of the Year in 2006 by the West Virginia Broadcasters Association. In June 2007, Withers was elected radio board chairman for the National Association of Broadcasters. He has been listed in Who’s Who in Finance and Industry, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in Entertainment and Who’s Who in the World. Withers sits on the Board of Trustees of the Lincoln Academy of Illinois and was recently reappointed to a third term as a regent by Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

faculty merit award Dr. Tamara Baldwin ’78, ’80, became a Southeast faculty member in 1980 as an adjunct instructor in the Department of Communication. In 1991, she became an assistant professor, which sparked a quick climb to associate professor and ultimately full professor in 2000. Aside from teaching, Dr. Baldwin also has written several articles that have appeared in such publications as Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, the Intelligencer, American Journalism and the Southeast Missourian. Baldwin belongs to many professional organizations including the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Broadcast Education Association. Baldwin has been highly involved with the American Journalism Historians Association and will be president-elect in October 2007. Dr. Baldwin currently sits on the University Studies Committee, Women’s Studies Committee, Library Committee and the Multicultural Task Force at Southeast. She is the co-founder and co-advisor for the southeast chapter of the Association for Women in Communication student chapter. In addition, Baldwin became a part of the Honors Faculty at Southeast in 2006. Baldwin is married to Dr. Henry Sessoms Sr., professor emeritus of English at Southeast.

We’ve Moved! The newly relocated Wehking Alumni Center is at 926 Broadway in the former First Baptist Church building in front of Houck Stadium. Come by and see us any time — we will be happy to show you around!

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alumni ALMANAC

iAMsoutheast

SOuTHeAST ALuMNI ONLINe COMMuNITy

www.semoalumni.com

T

he way people communicate is evolving everyday, and the rising popularity of MySpace and Facebook shifts focus toward a new method of networking with peers and classmates. To meet this growing demand, Southeast Missouri State University has rolled out its new alumni online community - iAMsoutheast.

recently, a contest was held to name the new alumni online community. hundreds of names were submitted by southeast alumni and friends. the submissions were narrowed to five and posted for voting. With more than 1,600 votes in just over a week, iamsoutheast proved to be the favorite. Jennifer layton mccluskey ’94, who majored in speech communication, submitted the winning name. the phrase has a significant meaning to mccluskey. mccluskey’s clever phrase, iamsoutheast, came to her after pondering the idea of a catchy title. a light bulb clicked on as she quickly snagged the “i” for the title from the ever-popular ipod. “With the community being focused on alumni, i knew ‘alma mater’ was something we all have in common, which led to the am,” said mccluskey. “When i put those two together, iam, well, southeast naturally followed because it’s truly what i believe. i am southeast!” mccluskey began her college experience at southeast with enthusiasm that would take her through the fulfilling journey. one of her most exciting memories at southeast was sorority bid day freshman year. mccluskey was very active in delta delta delta sorority and Greek life on campus. she also values her work study experience in the university center because of its



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heavy influence on her career decision. after changing her major four times, mccluskey found her calling in helping struggling students identify their passion and careers. “i knew i wanted to work at a college and work with high energy, determined, driven students,” said mccluskey. the beginning of her junior year, mccluskey spoke to her work study supervisor and said, “i want to do what you do when i grow up, so what should i major in?” he suggested she pursue a master’s degree in higher education administration after completing her bachelor’s. determined to follow that career path, mccluskey entered graduate school at southern illinois university carbondale immediately following her southeast graduation. after working for universities in connecticut, arkansas and colorado, mccluskey found a home as the director of retention initiatives at maryville university in st. louis, where she is doing exactly what she set out to do. this position also allowed her to complete her ph.d. in 2005 at the university of missouri st. louis. mccluskey truly exemplifies the spirit of southeast. every day she represents what it means to come from the halls of her alma mater. “i might be the only southeast alum that someone meets; therefore, i sure hope when they meet me that they walk away knowing how much o f

s o u t h e a s t

class NOTES

iAMsoutheast is an interactive online community that allows you to stay personally and professionally connected to other Southeast alums. Finding old classmates and other alumni with similar interests, hobbies or professions through iAMsoutheast is easy. Simply fill out your profile, invite a few friends, join groups and watch your network grow!

Get started

1. Website

Go to semoalumni.com Find the iAMsoutheast box in the upper left corner.

in 3

easy steps

2. Login

Click First Time Login Type in your last name and find yourself in the list.

3. ID Number Enter the 11 digit number above your name and address on the back of this magazine.

If you are unable to login or have questions please call the Alumni Center at (573) 651-2259 i love the place and all it offered to me,” said mccluskey. iamsoutheast is a new way to stay connected with over 57,000 alumni worldwide. With this new technology, alums are able to update their records, interact with other alumni who share similar interests, hobbies or professions, and register for events. mccluskey is most excited about reconnecting with her sorority, delta, delta, delta, through the online groups and message boards offered on iamsoutheast. “it will be great fun to see where people are now and what everyone has been up to for the past 15 years!” said mccluskey. mccluskey is a member of the southeast alumni association st. louis executive committee. she and husband, brian, have a son, braden, and are expecting their second child in January.

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Dr. Jennifer (Layton) McCluskey ’94 Degrees: • Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication - Southeast Missouri State University 1994 • Master of Science in Education – Southern Illinois University Carbondale 1996 • Doctorate in Education – University of Missouri – St. Louis 2005 Campus Involvement: Residence Life, Delta Delta Delta Sorority and Work Study in University Center Family: Married Brian in 2003. They have one son, Braden, and are expecting their second. Current Employment: Director of Retention Initiatives and assistant vice president for enrollment at Maryville University University Awards: young Alumni Merit Award from the College of Liberal Arts in 2006

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1950s

in St. Louis, Mo.

Charles Dart ‘53 is a physician residing in Ventura, Calif.

thomas Gwaltney ‘57 retired as professor emeritus from Eastern Michigan University.

Jimmy Lohr ‘56 is a retired football coach from Southeast Missouri State University. He and wife, Jane (Sanders) ’64, live in Colchester, Ill.

raona Hentz (miller) ‘57 is retired from Poplar Bluff Public School and resides in Poplar Bluff, Mo.

paul Adams ‘57 worked 38 years in Missouri public schools prior to his retirement. He and wife, Betty, have four children and live in University City, Mo. Annabelle Anderson (Lee) ‘57 retired as director of the library from Jacksonville College in Jacksonville, Texas. Husband, Campbell ‘55, is also retired from Jacksonville College where he was a professsor of history and government.

Harold Hodges ‘57 is retired from teaching and resides in Sikeston, Mo. marilyn Hulsey (miller) ‘57 is retired and living in Ironton, Mo. Donald Hunt ‘57 is a retired professor from Southeast Missouri State University. He and wife, Sylvia, live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. william Johnson ‘57 is retired from Texas Instruments, Inc. and resides in Garland, Texas with wife, Marjorie.

Billy Ashcraft ‘57 is retired from the U.S. Department of Justice where he was regional director for the DEA. He, and wife, Anna, live in Overland Park, Kan.

patricia Lysell (mcilvaney) ‘57 is retired from Planned Parenthood of North Texas and lives with husband, Michael, in Richardson, Texas.

C. Duane Aubuchon ‘57 is retired and living in Chesterfield, Mo., with wife, Florence.

mary Kathryn markey (Kirkpatrick) ’57 is a retired elementary school teacher and resides in Bartlett, Tenn.

william Beggs ‘57 retired as president of Pioneer Development & Orchard Company. He and wife, Shirley, live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. John Bell ‘57 retired from Missouri State University, Springfield, Mo., in 1988. He and wife, Nancy ‘58, reside in Lady Lake, Fla. Gene Bess ‘57 is director of athletics and head basketball coach at Three Rivers Community College. He and wife, Neloa, reside in Poplar Bluff, Mo., and have two children, Janell and Brian. robert Crawford ‘57 is retired from Procter & Gamble. He and wife, Brenda ’57, have three children and reside in Cincinnati, Ohio. patsy Edmunds (Sachse) ‘57 retired after teaching home economics for 38 years. Since retiring, she has worked as an interior designer for a custom home builder and traveled the world with her husband. John Ellis ‘57 is the vice president of Belz Enterprises. He resides in Germantown, Tenn., with wife, Betty. They have one son, John. Doris Ford (Ludwig) ‘57 has retired from speech and language pathology with Cape Girardeau Public Schools, and resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo. George Guffey ‘57 retired from Fox C-6 School District where he was assistant superintendent. In 1998, an elementary school was built in the school district and named in his honor. He and wife, mary ‘59, live

t h e

Nellie mcGill (pollock) ‘57 is a retired teacher living in Cape Girardeau, Mo., while husband, Glenn ’57, is employed with the Workforce Investment Board. They have three children, Timothy, Cynthia and Mark. James miller ‘57 is retired director of physical facilities at the College of Charleston. He and wife, margaret miller (Jones) ’57, a retired literacy coordinator, reside in Charleston, S.C. Eugene myers ‘57 is a retired teacher living with wife, Dorothy, in Eureka, Mo. mary Ann pensel (Feezor) ‘57 is retired after spending 30 years as culinary arts instructor for Cape Girardeau Public Schools. Husband, ray ’56, is also retired from Cape Girardeau Public Schools. Dixie Scott ‘57 retired from teaching after 39 years. She is still involved in school activities and is a substitute teacher. She resides in Braggadocio, Mo. marian Seabaugh ‘57 is retired form the Kirkwood School District and resides in Ballwin, Mo. Betty Smith (miller) ‘57 is a retired sixth-grade teacher from Meadow Heights School and resides in Patton, Mo. Carole thomas (Kief) ‘57 is retired and lives in Davie, Fla. Carol timmons (vogt) ‘57 is a retired elementary teacher from

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o f

Lynette Williamson (Lewis) ‘57

Webster Groves School District and resides in Sarasota, Fla. Darlene trochanowski (vorwith) ‘57 is a retired teacher living in La Mesa, Calif., with husband, Andrew. wiley walker ‘57 retired as principal of Rock Bridge High School and resides in Columbia, Mo., with wife, Linda (white) ‘57, who is a retired educator Betty warren (Green) ‘57 is retired and resides in Bonne Terre, Mo., with husband, Phillip. Clinton wunderlich ‘57 has been in the real estate business for over 45 years. He resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo., with wife, Doris. michael Zadick ‘57 is chairman of MED-ELEC Holding Corporation in Texas and has been involved in health care products manufacturing and hospital management since 1959. James Frisella ‘58 has coached students from kindergarten to junior college. This year marks his 60th season of coaching. He resides in St. Louis, Mo. Lavonne Huter ‘58 currently resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

1960s Gary Nichols ‘60 is director of training and development for Boehringer Ingelheim, Ltd. He and wife, Marilou, live in Keswick, Va.

Since 2002, Lynette Williamson (Lewis) ’57 and husband, Bob, have traveled much of Europe and the U.S. east coast on their Dutch trawler motor yacht, “Legrace.” In June 2007, the couple sailed the canals of New York and portions of Lake Ontario. The adventurers entered Canada and cruised the Trent Severn Canal, and then Georgian Bay onto the North Channel of Lake Huron in July. They headed south on Lake Michigan, and ended up in Cape Girardeau in mid September. The Williamsons plan on stopping in Alabama for the winter. The two were featured in the Nov./Dec. 2003 issue of Passage Maker, the trawler and ocean motorboat magazine. Prior to retirement, Lynette was a school teacher of learning disabled children at Churchill School in Ladue, Mo. Bob worked for Boeing, and from 1999-2002, the two lived and worked in Prague, Czech Republic while Bob was on a work assignment. Lynette taught part time at the Komensky Academy for American and British missionary children. When her Czech language improved, she taught English Conversation in a Czech high school. While in Europe, the travelers toured most of Europe including the Netherlands, Belgium and France. The Williamsons were heavily involved with international students during their time in the U.S. While in St. Louis, they hosted 18 different foreign exchange high school students, whom they visited on their travels in Europe. For two years, Lynette worked with Southeast Missouri State University’s foreign student advisor as the University’s liaison in helping welcome international students to the U.S. whenever they arrived at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. They have two children, Bryant Williamson in Florissant, Mo., and Alayna Nordstrom in Scotland. Harold rieser ‘66 is retired and lives in St. Louis, Mo., with wife, Erika. phyllis Hansen (Crites) ‘67 is an extension agent with Montana State University in Billings, Mont.

robert Carman ‘62 is a retired teacher and lives in Florissant, Mo., with wife, Nada.

Susan rodman (terrell) ‘67 is retired and living in Leland, N.C., with husband, Frank.

william Giessing ‘63 is retired from Southwestern Bell Telephone Company and is living in Chandler, Ariz., with wife, Polly.

Darrel Seabaugh ‘67 is employed by Procter & Gamble. He and wife, Bette, reside in Jackson, Mo., and have three children, Rachel, Timothy and Abigail.

David Justus ‘63 is a microbiologist at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He and wife, Joyce, reside in Louisville, Ky. Ginny Kendig (tilker) ‘63 and husband, Harry, have two children, Deborah and Gina.

mary Hiner (Brandt) ‘68 is a coordinator at Hazelwood School District. She and husband, William, live in Florissant, Mo., and have two children, William Jr. and Leah Brandt. monte phillips ‘69 is a lawyer at Monte Phillips LLC and resides in Doniphan, Mo.

Gene Brunkhorst ‘64 is coordinator of student teaching at Southeast Missouri State University. Barbara purschke ‘69 is a selfemployed portait artist and resides He and wife, Betty, have four sons. in Union, Mo. Charlotte Gibson (Schumacher) Dorothy wyatt (roth) ‘69 is an ‘64 and husband, Bruce, reside occupational health consultant for in Cincinnati, Ohio and have two Dupont, Inc. and resides in Bartlett, children. Tenn. ronald Keeney ‘64 became vice president of pediatric product development at INC Research in Raleigh, N.C., in December 2006.

1970s

Clyde miner ‘66 is project manager Jo Ebest (Schnell) ‘70 is a middle for Harris County. He and wife, school language arts teacher in Joyce, reside in Friendswood, Texas. San Antonio, Texas. In 2006, she was nominated as Outstanding

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Teacher of the Year in a five state area. Augustus Hough ‘70 is an English teacher in Port St. Lucie, Fla., and wife, Judith Hough (Johannaber) ’70, is an art teacher. They work for St. Lucie County Schools, and live in Stuart, Fla. Susan pletscher ‘70 is a research assisstant at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. Carl wilkins ‘70 is corporate operations director for Life Care Services, LLC in Chapel Hill, N.C. He and wife, Charlotte, have two children. Gary williams ‘70 and wife, Mary, are both retired and live in Woodway, Texas. michael Bounk ‘71 is a geologist at the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and lives in Tipton, Iowa. Colleen Harris (Grasser) ‘71 is a school counselor in Missouri. She and husband, Leonard, have three children. mary ryan (ortmann) ‘71 is the president and chief executive officer of St. Andrew’s Resources for Seniors in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, John, have three children. James truesdell ‘71 is president of Brauer Supply Company in St. Louis, Mo. He is also an adjunct

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alumni ALMANAC

iAMsoutheast

SOuTHeAST ALuMNI ONLINe COMMuNITy

www.semoalumni.com

T

he way people communicate is evolving everyday, and the rising popularity of MySpace and Facebook shifts focus toward a new method of networking with peers and classmates. To meet this growing demand, Southeast Missouri State University has rolled out its new alumni online community - iAMsoutheast.

recently, a contest was held to name the new alumni online community. hundreds of names were submitted by southeast alumni and friends. the submissions were narrowed to five and posted for voting. With more than 1,600 votes in just over a week, iamsoutheast proved to be the favorite. Jennifer layton mccluskey ’94, who majored in speech communication, submitted the winning name. the phrase has a significant meaning to mccluskey. mccluskey’s clever phrase, iamsoutheast, came to her after pondering the idea of a catchy title. a light bulb clicked on as she quickly snagged the “i” for the title from the ever-popular ipod. “With the community being focused on alumni, i knew ‘alma mater’ was something we all have in common, which led to the am,” said mccluskey. “When i put those two together, iam, well, southeast naturally followed because it’s truly what i believe. i am southeast!” mccluskey began her college experience at southeast with enthusiasm that would take her through the fulfilling journey. one of her most exciting memories at southeast was sorority bid day freshman year. mccluskey was very active in delta delta delta sorority and Greek life on campus. she also values her work study experience in the university center because of its



t h e

M A G A Z I N E

heavy influence on her career decision. after changing her major four times, mccluskey found her calling in helping struggling students identify their passion and careers. “i knew i wanted to work at a college and work with high energy, determined, driven students,” said mccluskey. the beginning of her junior year, mccluskey spoke to her work study supervisor and said, “i want to do what you do when i grow up, so what should i major in?” he suggested she pursue a master’s degree in higher education administration after completing her bachelor’s. determined to follow that career path, mccluskey entered graduate school at southern illinois university carbondale immediately following her southeast graduation. after working for universities in connecticut, arkansas and colorado, mccluskey found a home as the director of retention initiatives at maryville university in st. louis, where she is doing exactly what she set out to do. this position also allowed her to complete her ph.d. in 2005 at the university of missouri st. louis. mccluskey truly exemplifies the spirit of southeast. every day she represents what it means to come from the halls of her alma mater. “i might be the only southeast alum that someone meets; therefore, i sure hope when they meet me that they walk away knowing how much o f

s o u t h e a s t

class NOTES

iAMsoutheast is an interactive online community that allows you to stay personally and professionally connected to other Southeast alums. Finding old classmates and other alumni with similar interests, hobbies or professions through iAMsoutheast is easy. Simply fill out your profile, invite a few friends, join groups and watch your network grow!

Get started

1. Website

Go to semoalumni.com Find the iAMsoutheast box in the upper left corner.

in 3

easy steps

2. Login

Click First Time Login Type in your last name and find yourself in the list.

3. ID Number Enter the 11 digit number above your name and address on the back of this magazine.

If you are unable to login or have questions please call the Alumni Center at (573) 651-2259 i love the place and all it offered to me,” said mccluskey. iamsoutheast is a new way to stay connected with over 57,000 alumni worldwide. With this new technology, alums are able to update their records, interact with other alumni who share similar interests, hobbies or professions, and register for events. mccluskey is most excited about reconnecting with her sorority, delta, delta, delta, through the online groups and message boards offered on iamsoutheast. “it will be great fun to see where people are now and what everyone has been up to for the past 15 years!” said mccluskey. mccluskey is a member of the southeast alumni association st. louis executive committee. she and husband, brian, have a son, braden, and are expecting their second child in January.

m i s s o u r i

s tat e

u n i v e r s i t y

Dr. Jennifer (Layton) McCluskey ’94 Degrees: • Bachelor of Arts in Speech Communication - Southeast Missouri State University 1994 • Master of Science in Education – Southern Illinois University Carbondale 1996 • Doctorate in Education – University of Missouri – St. Louis 2005 Campus Involvement: Residence Life, Delta Delta Delta Sorority and Work Study in University Center Family: Married Brian in 2003. They have one son, Braden, and are expecting their second. Current Employment: Director of Retention Initiatives and assistant vice president for enrollment at Maryville University University Awards: young Alumni Merit Award from the College of Liberal Arts in 2006

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1950s

in St. Louis, Mo.

Charles Dart ‘53 is a physician residing in Ventura, Calif.

thomas Gwaltney ‘57 retired as professor emeritus from Eastern Michigan University.

Jimmy Lohr ‘56 is a retired football coach from Southeast Missouri State University. He and wife, Jane (Sanders) ’64, live in Colchester, Ill.

raona Hentz (miller) ‘57 is retired from Poplar Bluff Public School and resides in Poplar Bluff, Mo.

paul Adams ‘57 worked 38 years in Missouri public schools prior to his retirement. He and wife, Betty, have four children and live in University City, Mo. Annabelle Anderson (Lee) ‘57 retired as director of the library from Jacksonville College in Jacksonville, Texas. Husband, Campbell ‘55, is also retired from Jacksonville College where he was a professsor of history and government.

Harold Hodges ‘57 is retired from teaching and resides in Sikeston, Mo. marilyn Hulsey (miller) ‘57 is retired and living in Ironton, Mo. Donald Hunt ‘57 is a retired professor from Southeast Missouri State University. He and wife, Sylvia, live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. william Johnson ‘57 is retired from Texas Instruments, Inc. and resides in Garland, Texas with wife, Marjorie.

Billy Ashcraft ‘57 is retired from the U.S. Department of Justice where he was regional director for the DEA. He, and wife, Anna, live in Overland Park, Kan.

patricia Lysell (mcilvaney) ‘57 is retired from Planned Parenthood of North Texas and lives with husband, Michael, in Richardson, Texas.

C. Duane Aubuchon ‘57 is retired and living in Chesterfield, Mo., with wife, Florence.

mary Kathryn markey (Kirkpatrick) ’57 is a retired elementary school teacher and resides in Bartlett, Tenn.

william Beggs ‘57 retired as president of Pioneer Development & Orchard Company. He and wife, Shirley, live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. John Bell ‘57 retired from Missouri State University, Springfield, Mo., in 1988. He and wife, Nancy ‘58, reside in Lady Lake, Fla. Gene Bess ‘57 is director of athletics and head basketball coach at Three Rivers Community College. He and wife, Neloa, reside in Poplar Bluff, Mo., and have two children, Janell and Brian. robert Crawford ‘57 is retired from Procter & Gamble. He and wife, Brenda ’57, have three children and reside in Cincinnati, Ohio. patsy Edmunds (Sachse) ‘57 retired after teaching home economics for 38 years. Since retiring, she has worked as an interior designer for a custom home builder and traveled the world with her husband. John Ellis ‘57 is the vice president of Belz Enterprises. He resides in Germantown, Tenn., with wife, Betty. They have one son, John. Doris Ford (Ludwig) ‘57 has retired from speech and language pathology with Cape Girardeau Public Schools, and resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo. George Guffey ‘57 retired from Fox C-6 School District where he was assistant superintendent. In 1998, an elementary school was built in the school district and named in his honor. He and wife, mary ‘59, live

t h e

Nellie mcGill (pollock) ‘57 is a retired teacher living in Cape Girardeau, Mo., while husband, Glenn ’57, is employed with the Workforce Investment Board. They have three children, Timothy, Cynthia and Mark. James miller ‘57 is retired director of physical facilities at the College of Charleston. He and wife, margaret miller (Jones) ’57, a retired literacy coordinator, reside in Charleston, S.C. Eugene myers ‘57 is a retired teacher living with wife, Dorothy, in Eureka, Mo. mary Ann pensel (Feezor) ‘57 is retired after spending 30 years as culinary arts instructor for Cape Girardeau Public Schools. Husband, ray ’56, is also retired from Cape Girardeau Public Schools. Dixie Scott ‘57 retired from teaching after 39 years. She is still involved in school activities and is a substitute teacher. She resides in Braggadocio, Mo. marian Seabaugh ‘57 is retired form the Kirkwood School District and resides in Ballwin, Mo. Betty Smith (miller) ‘57 is a retired sixth-grade teacher from Meadow Heights School and resides in Patton, Mo. Carole thomas (Kief) ‘57 is retired and lives in Davie, Fla. Carol timmons (vogt) ‘57 is a retired elementary teacher from

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o f

Lynette Williamson (Lewis) ‘57

Webster Groves School District and resides in Sarasota, Fla. Darlene trochanowski (vorwith) ‘57 is a retired teacher living in La Mesa, Calif., with husband, Andrew. wiley walker ‘57 retired as principal of Rock Bridge High School and resides in Columbia, Mo., with wife, Linda (white) ‘57, who is a retired educator Betty warren (Green) ‘57 is retired and resides in Bonne Terre, Mo., with husband, Phillip. Clinton wunderlich ‘57 has been in the real estate business for over 45 years. He resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo., with wife, Doris. michael Zadick ‘57 is chairman of MED-ELEC Holding Corporation in Texas and has been involved in health care products manufacturing and hospital management since 1959. James Frisella ‘58 has coached students from kindergarten to junior college. This year marks his 60th season of coaching. He resides in St. Louis, Mo. Lavonne Huter ‘58 currently resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

1960s Gary Nichols ‘60 is director of training and development for Boehringer Ingelheim, Ltd. He and wife, Marilou, live in Keswick, Va.

Since 2002, Lynette Williamson (Lewis) ’57 and husband, Bob, have traveled much of Europe and the U.S. east coast on their Dutch trawler motor yacht, “Legrace.” In June 2007, the couple sailed the canals of New York and portions of Lake Ontario. The adventurers entered Canada and cruised the Trent Severn Canal, and then Georgian Bay onto the North Channel of Lake Huron in July. They headed south on Lake Michigan, and ended up in Cape Girardeau in mid September. The Williamsons plan on stopping in Alabama for the winter. The two were featured in the Nov./Dec. 2003 issue of Passage Maker, the trawler and ocean motorboat magazine. Prior to retirement, Lynette was a school teacher of learning disabled children at Churchill School in Ladue, Mo. Bob worked for Boeing, and from 1999-2002, the two lived and worked in Prague, Czech Republic while Bob was on a work assignment. Lynette taught part time at the Komensky Academy for American and British missionary children. When her Czech language improved, she taught English Conversation in a Czech high school. While in Europe, the travelers toured most of Europe including the Netherlands, Belgium and France. The Williamsons were heavily involved with international students during their time in the U.S. While in St. Louis, they hosted 18 different foreign exchange high school students, whom they visited on their travels in Europe. For two years, Lynette worked with Southeast Missouri State University’s foreign student advisor as the University’s liaison in helping welcome international students to the U.S. whenever they arrived at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. They have two children, Bryant Williamson in Florissant, Mo., and Alayna Nordstrom in Scotland. Harold rieser ‘66 is retired and lives in St. Louis, Mo., with wife, Erika. phyllis Hansen (Crites) ‘67 is an extension agent with Montana State University in Billings, Mont.

robert Carman ‘62 is a retired teacher and lives in Florissant, Mo., with wife, Nada.

Susan rodman (terrell) ‘67 is retired and living in Leland, N.C., with husband, Frank.

william Giessing ‘63 is retired from Southwestern Bell Telephone Company and is living in Chandler, Ariz., with wife, Polly.

Darrel Seabaugh ‘67 is employed by Procter & Gamble. He and wife, Bette, reside in Jackson, Mo., and have three children, Rachel, Timothy and Abigail.

David Justus ‘63 is a microbiologist at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He and wife, Joyce, reside in Louisville, Ky. Ginny Kendig (tilker) ‘63 and husband, Harry, have two children, Deborah and Gina.

mary Hiner (Brandt) ‘68 is a coordinator at Hazelwood School District. She and husband, William, live in Florissant, Mo., and have two children, William Jr. and Leah Brandt. monte phillips ‘69 is a lawyer at Monte Phillips LLC and resides in Doniphan, Mo.

Gene Brunkhorst ‘64 is coordinator of student teaching at Southeast Missouri State University. Barbara purschke ‘69 is a selfemployed portait artist and resides He and wife, Betty, have four sons. in Union, Mo. Charlotte Gibson (Schumacher) Dorothy wyatt (roth) ‘69 is an ‘64 and husband, Bruce, reside occupational health consultant for in Cincinnati, Ohio and have two Dupont, Inc. and resides in Bartlett, children. Tenn. ronald Keeney ‘64 became vice president of pediatric product development at INC Research in Raleigh, N.C., in December 2006.

1970s

Clyde miner ‘66 is project manager Jo Ebest (Schnell) ‘70 is a middle for Harris County. He and wife, school language arts teacher in Joyce, reside in Friendswood, Texas. San Antonio, Texas. In 2006, she was nominated as Outstanding

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Teacher of the Year in a five state area. Augustus Hough ‘70 is an English teacher in Port St. Lucie, Fla., and wife, Judith Hough (Johannaber) ’70, is an art teacher. They work for St. Lucie County Schools, and live in Stuart, Fla. Susan pletscher ‘70 is a research assisstant at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. Carl wilkins ‘70 is corporate operations director for Life Care Services, LLC in Chapel Hill, N.C. He and wife, Charlotte, have two children. Gary williams ‘70 and wife, Mary, are both retired and live in Woodway, Texas. michael Bounk ‘71 is a geologist at the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and lives in Tipton, Iowa. Colleen Harris (Grasser) ‘71 is a school counselor in Missouri. She and husband, Leonard, have three children. mary ryan (ortmann) ‘71 is the president and chief executive officer of St. Andrew’s Resources for Seniors in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, John, have three children. James truesdell ‘71 is president of Brauer Supply Company in St. Louis, Mo. He is also an adjunct

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CLASS N O T E S faculty member at Webster University and St. Louis University Business School. Jeff Baker ‘72 is a clinical psychologist living in League City, Texas. Leslie Elpers (Moss) ‘72 is the president of Ability Network in Ste. Genevieve, Mo. She and husband, Frank ’71, reside in Chesterfield, Mo. Charles Taylor ‘72 is the dean of the School of Business at Edgewood College. He and wife, Camila, reside in Madison, Wis. Doranna Wells (Gramling) ‘72 is working for Arbonne in California. She and husband, Richard, reside in Harriman, Tenn. Dianne Pankau (Johnson) ‘73 is a math teacher at Hermann High School in Hermann, Mo., where she lives with husband, Richard.

Becky Stiles (Stahly) ‘75 is a nurse at Kennestone Hospital. Husband, David ’74, is employed by General Motors. They have two children, Michael and Lauren, and reside in Woodstock, Ga. Philip Svoboda ‘75 has been working as an Internet sales manager at Chevrolet Cadillac in Carbondale, Pa. He and wife, Deborah, have two children and live in Clarks Summit, Pa. Rebecca Belli (Tope) ‘76 is a music teacher in North Carolina, and recently began working on a master’s degree in school administration. She and husband, Mark, have three children. Joseph Torrisi ‘76 is a community education specialist for St. Louis Public Schools at Shaw VPA Community Education Center in St. Louis, Mo.

CLASS N O T E S Wanda Walkenhorst ‘78 is retired and lives in New Haven, Mo. Kevin Blaske ‘79 resides in Murrieta, Calif., with wife, Guia. Robert Brown ‘79 resides in St. Charles, Mo., with wife, Tamsen. Maureen Clancy-May ‘79 is the superintendent of the Bayless School District in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with husband, Ken. Robert Cushman ‘79 is vice president of Concordia Plan Services and resides in St. Charles, Mo., with wife, Kathy. John Engram ‘79 is president of Engram Farms, Inc., and Lakeside Ag, LLC in Sikeston, Mo. He and wife, Mary, have two children. Lois Flint (Wineberg) ‘79 is teacher in charge for North Monterey County Unified School Distric in Prunedale, Calif.

Samson Dunlap ‘74 is supervisor of athletics for St. Louis Public Schools.

Deborah Weaver (Bryant) ‘76 is manager for regulatory litigation support for Entergy Services, Inc. and resides in Metairie, La.

Michael Hefferon ‘74 is business manager at Fluid-Air Products, Inc. in St. Louis, Mo., and is living in St. Charles, Mo., with wife, Teresa.

Charles Geier ‘79 is the executive director of sales at Tollgrade Communications. He and wife, Anne, live in St. Louis, Mo.

Cheryl Bennett (Limbaugh) ‘77 is a customer service representative for Awana Clubs International and resides in Barlett, Ill.

Janette Hancock (Jacobs) ‘79 is married to Steve Hancock and resides in Fenton, Mo.

Deborah Kanyo (Jordan) ‘74 teaches a progressive program in music technology where students use computers to create music using sound loops at Alton Middle School. She and her husband James Kanyo reside in Alton, Ill.

Janet Haines (Hulshof) ‘77 is the owner of Wings Creative Advertising & Design in Sikeston, Mo., where she resides with husband, Lee.

Chester Pratt ‘74 is the principal at Pratt, Mitchell & Co., P.C. in Salem, Mo., where he lives with wife, Barbara. David Schoenbeck ‘74 is senior vice president for Babies “R” Us. He and wife, Ellen, reside in Franklin Lakes, N.J. Jennifer Tobin (Heldmann) ‘74 is a guidance counselor. She and husband, John, have two children, and live in Yuma, Ariz. Jill Van Camp (Nischwitz) ‘74 is the energy & environment assistant at Schnuck Markets, Inc. in St. Louis, Mo., where she resides with husband, James. William Black ‘75 is professor and associate head of theatre at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tenn. Karen Fesler (Trantham) ‘75 is the president of Fesler, Inc. and resides in Coralville, Iowa. Jeannette Hanewinkel (Dunn) ‘75 retired from Hillsboro R-3 district in May of 2007 after teaching elementary education for 31years. She and husband, Bob, live in Hillsboro, Mo. Nancy Hollander (Ott) ‘75 has retired from public school teaching and is an adjunct instructor in early childhood at State Fair Community College in Sedalia, Mo.

28

THE

Joyce Jackson ‘77 is employed by Anheuser-Busch, Inc. She and husband, Stephen Jennings, have a daughter, Lauren. Victoria Jackson (Mahn) ‘77 is a hospital surveyor for the State of Missouri. She and her son reside in Arnold, Mo. Thomas Mitchell ‘77 is the vice chancellor for university advancement and president of the Irvine Foundation at the University of California - Irvine. He and wife, Margaret, live in Newport Beach, Calif. Karen Scharf (Waldhof) ‘77 moved from the Denver area to Tulsa, Okla. in 2006. Karen Cook (Fullilove) ‘78 is a fitness tech at Curves in Montgomeryville, Pa. She and husband, Phillip, reside in Landsdale, Pa.

Karen Poe ‘84 is an optometric assistant for Brost & Associates Family Eyecare and resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

1980s Michael Clynch ‘80 is the senior mortgage planner for Midwest Bank Centre. He and wife, Sherry, reside in Moscow Mills, Mo. Debra Crocker (Barnhill) ‘80 is a fiscal and administrative manager for the Department of Mental Health in Sikeston, Mo., where she resides with husband, Mark. Susan Freeman (McGuire) ‘80 is a school counselor residing in O’Fallon, Mo., with husband, Timothy. Melissa Herbeck (Marshall) ‘80 works for Great West Healthcare in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Larry, live in Columbia, Ill. Catherine Hubert (Bernier) ‘80 is a registered nurse at St. John’s Mercy Medical Center. She has two children and resides in Ballwin, Mo. Mary McClenning ‘80 is a consumer safety inspector for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and resides in Florissant, Mo.

Tina Klocke (Burniski) ’82 Tina Klocke (Burniski) ’82 has a tough, demanding job in a soft, cuddly environment. At the office, Klocke is surrounded by stuffed animals where she is a top executive at Build-A-Bear Workshop in St. Louis As an initial team member at Build-A-Bear, Klocke helped bring the young company to its current success. In the beginning, she was hired by an accounting firm to work three days at Build-A-Bear and two days a week on other things. She soon found that the startup company would need her expertise six to seven days a week. So she stayed. “I did more than accounting – inventory at the warehouse, determining distribution of product, answering the phone, booking parties, picking up our (retail store) deposit from the Galleria and taking it to the bank,” said Klocke in an interview with the St. Louis Business Journal. Klocke helped take Build-A-Bear public with its $172 million initial public offering. Klocke’s peers in the accounting profession named her one of Missouri CPA Women to Watch and she is a board member of the Central Institute for the Deaf. She and husband, James, have two sons, Jim, 18, who plays baseball for Southeast Missouri State University, and six-year old Michael. She and her family live in St. Louis, Mo.

.

Wendell Moon ‘85 is an information assurance consultant for STG, Inc. He has three children, Nicholas, Christine and Benjamin.

Mary Farmer (Cobb) ‘81 is the president and chief executiver officer at Magna-Tel, Inc. She and husband, Keith, live in Scott City, Mo.

Anthony Thomas ‘82 is the president of Thomas Printing Supplies, Inc. in Independence, Ohio.

Tammy Neidenberg (Herrington) ‘86 is the owner of Crealutions and resides in Ellsinore, Mo.

Michael Quinn ‘81 is owner of Quinn Unlimited, LLC. He and wife, Donielle, reside in St. Peters, Mo.

Douglas Cannon ‘83 is working for the Springfield News-Leader in Springfield, Mo.

Thomas Rickard ‘81 is the vice president of business development at A3IM, Inc. He and wife, Susan, live in Friendswood, Texas.

Cynthia Coats (Vickers) ‘83 is service operations manager for Kelly Services in St. Louis, Mo.

Allen Saum ‘81 is employed by the Oracle Corporation and resides in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Jimmy Bowen ‘82 is married and works at Orthopedic Associates of Southeast Missouri in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Kevin Willoughby ‘83 is plant manager at Unimin Corporation in McIntyre, Ga. He and wife, Tracy, reside in Macon, Ga.

Mark Brooks ‘82 is employed by Gasconade County R-1 School District in Hermann, Mo. He and wife, Jill Cozort, have two children, Ashley and Isaac.

Milton Davis ‘84 is a first officer with Aloha Airlines. He and his family live in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Alan Dombrowski ‘82 was recently selected to the board of directors of The Golf Foundation of Missouri, and is vice president for the Hawthorn Physicians Services Corporation in St. Louis, Mo.

Jeri Wenneker ‘80 is a teacher and coach for the University City School District in St. Louis, Mo.

Timothy Lewis ‘82 is the chief of police in Festus, Mo., where he resides with wife, Linda.

Vivian Brent (Keller) ‘81 is retired

Cynthia Mendoza (Bostic) ‘82 is the

Lee Koenig ‘84 is IT project lead for Enterprise Rent-A-Car in Clayton, Mo. He and wife, Pamela Crane, have two children.

Paul Layman ‘82 is vice president of sales at the Campbell Soup Company and resides in Loveland, Ohio.

UNIVERSITY

Richard Pikey ‘83 was recently promoted to director of operations at Wainwright Industries, Inc. in St. Peters, Mo. Elzena Simmons (Bradshaw) ‘83 is a teacher at the Cape Girardeau Public Schools.

David Thomas ‘78 is an eighth grade social studies teacher in the Ritenour School District. He and wife, Pam, reside in Maryland Heights, Mo.

STATE

Sihan Hashim ‘85 is employed by Iben Engineering. He and his wife have three children, Mohd Shafig, Mohd Ridzwan and Fatin Nabillah, and reside in Malaysia.

David Conway ‘86 is in sales at Dale Printing. He and wife, Brenda, live in Arnold, Mo.

Rose Weidenbenner ‘80 celebrated 25 years as a Sister of Mercy in the St. Louis Regional Community, and serves as a team member in community leadership.

MISSOURI

Jerry Estes ‘85 is the plant production manager at Turkey Hill Dairy. He and wife, Elizabeth, reside in Windsor, Pa.

Scott Schreiner ‘82 is a CPA/ Consultant for Axis Integrated Solutions in St. Charles, Mo.

Diana Dye (Meyer) ‘81 is a program nurse at REM Developmental Services in Mt. Vernon, Iowa, where she lives with husband, Daniel.

Desma Reno (Hastings) ‘78 is a professor of nursing at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, Mo. She and husband, Danny, reside in Jackson, Mo.

SOUTHEAST

James Carley ‘85 is the director of delivery services at RH Donnelley in Overland Park, Kan., where he resides with wife, Wendy.

George Squires ‘85 is the president of Pure Water Technology and lives in Yucaipa, Calif.

Renee Richards (Meyer) ‘80 is a marketing and sales director at Berra Insurance Group. She resides in Ballwin, Mo.

OF

Dennis Bohnert ‘85 is the vice president at First State Community Bank in Perryville, Mo.

cost accountant at Nordenia, USA. She and husband, Ramon, reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

from education and resides in Lakeland, Fla., with husband, Bill.

Connie Marshall (Berkbigler) ‘78 is the research lab manager at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.

M A G A Z I N E

Betty Schearf (Hotop) ‘84 is the vice president of E&E Co., Ltd., and lives with husband, Bryan, in Oak Point, Texas.

Gregory Stroyan ‘88 is the senior engineer at Compucom, Inc. and resides in St. Charles, Mo. Jacquelyn Ackert (Craig) ‘89 is an associate circuit judge for the State of Illinois. She and husband, John, live in Dixon, Ill. Ronald Daniels ‘89 is a major in the United States Air Force, stationed in Knoxville, Tenn., with wife, Julie ‘90, who is a substitute teacher. They have two daughters. Debra Neighbors (Sansoucie) ‘89 is the computer instructor at Mingo Job Corps. She and husband, Bradley, live in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Heidi Newmaker ‘89 is a nurse anesthetist at Watson Clinic LLP and resides in Lakeland, Fla. Jerald Sermon ‘89 is a senior technical director with CIBER, Inc. He and wife, Marcelina, reside in Germantown, Tenn. Steven Summers ‘89 is an insurance analyst for American International Group and resides in Ballwin, Mo.

1990s

Linda Decker ‘87 works at Macys Midwest in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with husband, Ralph.

Eddiemae Brown ‘90 is a supervisor and team leader of technical support at Metlife Insurance Company and resides in St. Louis, Mo.

Gina Mills ‘87 works in special education for St. Louis Public Schools and resides in St. Peters, Mo. Carolyn Rhodes (Puricelli) ‘87 is a teacher for Brentwood Public Schools. She and husband, Roy, have two children and live in Ballwin, Mo. Christine Simone ‘87 is a registered nurse at St. Luke’s Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Rodney, have one daughter. Truman Brinkley ‘88 is the quality manager at Nordyne in Poplar Bluff, Mo., where he resides with wife, Beth. Laura DeLuca (Gentle) ‘88 is a benefits officer for the U.S. Department of Treasury in Washington, D.C. Husband, Daniel ‘87, is an actor, director and producer. They have two children.

James Pisoni ‘84 is the owner of Southwest Group Protective Services in Dallas, Texas and resides in Allen, Texas.

Robert Gilot ‘88 is the regional business director at Novo Nordisk. He and wife, Gerri, have four children and live in St. Peters, Mo.

2 0 0 7

Basem Rammaha ‘88 is the chairman and chief executive officer at The R Group. He and wife, Iman, live in Dearborn Heights, Mich.

Stephanie Crawford (Williams) ‘87 is a quality inspector at Lear Corp. and lives in Florissant, Mo.

Rita Lewis (Rankin) ‘84 is a traveling nurse with Advantage RN in West Chester, Ohio. She and husband, James, live in St. Charles, Mo.

FALL

Bethany James (Willis) ‘88 recently accepted a position as a credit analyst with U.S. Bank in Cape Girardeau, Mo., where she lives with husband, Thomas.

THE

Melissa Dirr ‘90 is an architectural historian at Nebraska State Historical Society. She and husband, Michael, have a son and live in Lincoln, Neb. Lynese Hoffman (Cargill) ‘91 is executive vice president and chief financial officer for Common Ground Public Relations. She and husband, Brian, have two children, and live in Chesterfield, Mo. Kimberly Jackson (Plunkett) ‘90 is an assistant principal for Belton School District. Husband, Mark ’02, is the athletic director for Center School District. They reside in Belton, Mo. Jennifer LeGrand (McIntyre) ‘90 and husband, Kevin, have four children and live in St. Louis, Mo. James Lummus ‘90 is a corporate controller for Rawlings Sporting Goods in St. Louis, Mo. David Martin ‘91 is a global supply chain strategy program leader at GE Healthcare and resides in

M A G A Z I N E

OF

Menomonee Falls, Wis. Corey Muench ‘91 is a professor at Capilano College and resides in Vancouver, B.C.

David Grupe ‘94 is sales manager for Allied Insurance. He and wife, Sarah Pack ’94, have three children, and live in Sedalia, Mo.

Janice Um ‘91 is a legal assistant at LeBoeuf, Lanb, Greene & MacRae. She and husband, John, have a daughter, Grace, and reside in Jacksonville.

Michelle Hahn (Herter) ‘94 is public information coordinator for the City of Cape Girardeau, Mo. Husband, Lance ‘94, is employed by Procter & Gamble Corporation. They have two children.

Dean Cowan ‘92 is currently a vice president for American International Group. He and wife, Linda Schnetzer, live in New York, N.Y.

Laura Jurica (Bartlett) ‘94 is an artist prep support/show finisher at Walt Disney World. She and husband, Cory, live in Davenport, Fla.

Judith Davis (Fain) ‘92 is center director for Sylvan Learning Center in Poplar Bluff, Mo. She and husband, Alan, have one child.

Todd McNab ‘94 is an account director for Townsend Agency. He and wife, Julie, have two children, and live in Naperville, Fla.

Kathryn Haupt (Ferrell) ‘92 is marketing director for Midwest Grain & Barge. She and husband, Jody, reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Debra Runzi (Young) ‘94 and husband, Andrew, reside in Festus, Mo.

Karin Markwell (Tsang) ‘92 and husband, Charles, have two children, and reside in Kirkland, Wash. Brian McCutchen ‘92 was recently promoted to national park superintendent of the Knife River Indian Villages National Park in North Dakota. Karla Miller (Colbert) ‘92 is a registered nurse at Barnes-Jewish St. Peters Hospital and lives in Hawk Point, Mo. Mark Reiss ‘92 is corporate auditor for AT&T Audit Services in St. Louis, Mo.

Elizabeth Boatright ‘95 is employed by Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Mo.

Karen Perry ‘93 is a teacher for the Ritenour School District and resides in Ballwin, Mo. Rhett Pierce ‘93 is the regional sales manager at the JD Martin Company in Dallas, Texas. Jennifer Schicker (Boedeker) ‘93 is the children’s services coordinator for the YMCA of Greater St. Louis. She and husband, Richard, have two children. Christopher Thomas ‘93 is a manager at Pricewaterhouse Coopers and resides in Colorado Springs, Colo. William Gorman ‘94 is employed by the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club. He and wife, Bernadette ’95, have two children, Liam and Libby, and reside in Waukesha, Wis.

SOUTHEAST

MISSOURI

STATE

Danielle Jany ‘96 is a communication specialist at Monsanto Company and lives in St. Louis, Mo. Marshall Lewis ‘96 is a senior analyst at AT&T and lives in Oakville, Mo. Melinda Margrabe ‘96 is a customer service associate at J.C. Penney Company, Inc. and lives in Florissant, Mo. Aaron Pohlmann ‘96 is assistant vice president for Southwest Bank in O’Fallon, Mo. He married Lisa Jacks in 2005. Matthew Poole ‘96 is employed by Progressive Farm Credit Services. Wife, Teresa ’98, is a kindergarten

Continued on page 30

Carolyn DeGroote (Anderson) ‘93 is center director for Day Nursery Association in Plainfield, Ind., and has two children.

Carnell Jones ‘93 is the registrar at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He and wife, April, live in Rumford, R.I.

Christine Stark (Lockwood) ‘95 is a nutrition consultant at Child Day Care Association and resides in St. Louis, Mo., with husband, Keith.

Cindy Thurman (Roche) ‘95 is the vice president of Royal Banks of Missouri. She and husband, Joseph, live in Fenton, Mo.

Marlow Barton ‘95 is an ESL teacher with the Northwest R-1 School District. She has two children, Emily and Christopher, and married David in 2006. They reside in Maryland Heights, Mo.

Kevin Gorham ‘93 recently accepted a position as a United States postal inspector with the St. Louis division of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

Kimberly Riley (Whitworth) ‘95 is a teacher with Francis Howell School District in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Chris, had their third child in June 2007.

Michelle Tanurchis ‘95 is a personnel coordinator at Delmar Gardens in St. Louis, Mo.

Shelby Weaver (Gaines) ‘94 is employed at Ozarks Federal Savings and Loan of Fredericktown, Mo.

Julie Chapman (Kee) ‘95 is a teacher and campus advisor to the English Honorary Society at the University of Central Missouri.

Husband, Keith ‘94, is a teacher and coach with the Warrensburg School District.

Brian Koonce ’89 Brian Koonce ’89 assumes heavy responsibilities as he performs his duties in the United States Air Force. He is the assistant program director of Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Training at David Grant Medical Center in Calif., and is slated to assume the position of program director in July 2008. Upon college graduation, Koonce entered the U.S. Air Force as an oncology nurse. In 1992, he transferred to Eglin AFB in Ft. Walton Beach, Fla., working as an oncology nurse in the intensive care unit. During that time, he was accepted into nurse anesthesia school at the Uniformed Services University. Koonce was awarded the Clinical Excellence Award in 1999, after completing his residency at Wright-Patterson Medical Center. In 2000, he began teaching at the Uniformed Services University before being deployed to Kuwait City, Kuwait in June 2000 to provide anesthesia care to U.S. Troops and Dept. of Defense employees. In 2002, Koonce was deployed to Seeb AB, Oman in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Koonce returned to Offutt AFB in Nebraska, February 2003, to serve as the clinical coordinator for nurse anesthesia students. There, he initiated the first ever military clinical training site for the Bryan/LGH Nurse Anesthesia Program. In June 2005, Koonce was named to his current position in a program that is ranked second out of 107 in the nation. Koonce, who is deemed the practice expert in the USAF, was selected in February 2007 as the Nurse Anesthesia Consultant for the USAF Surgeon General. Koonce was promoted to Lt. Col. and will begin wearing the rank in midyear 2008. He is an active member of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, serving on the Federal Services Ad Hoc Committee. He and wife, Karen, reside at Travis AFB, California.

UNIVERSITY

FALL

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29


CLASS N O T E S faculty member at Webster University and St. Louis University Business School. Jeff Baker ‘72 is a clinical psychologist living in League City, Texas. Leslie Elpers (Moss) ‘72 is the president of Ability Network in Ste. Genevieve, Mo. She and husband, Frank ’71, reside in Chesterfield, Mo. Charles Taylor ‘72 is the dean of the School of Business at Edgewood College. He and wife, Camila, reside in Madison, Wis. Doranna Wells (Gramling) ‘72 is working for Arbonne in California. She and husband, Richard, reside in Harriman, Tenn. Dianne Pankau (Johnson) ‘73 is a math teacher at Hermann High School in Hermann, Mo., where she lives with husband, Richard.

Becky Stiles (Stahly) ‘75 is a nurse at Kennestone Hospital. Husband, David ’74, is employed by General Motors. They have two children, Michael and Lauren, and reside in Woodstock, Ga. Philip Svoboda ‘75 has been working as an Internet sales manager at Chevrolet Cadillac in Carbondale, Pa. He and wife, Deborah, have two children and live in Clarks Summit, Pa. Rebecca Belli (Tope) ‘76 is a music teacher in North Carolina, and recently began working on a master’s degree in school administration. She and husband, Mark, have three children. Joseph Torrisi ‘76 is a community education specialist for St. Louis Public Schools at Shaw VPA Community Education Center in St. Louis, Mo.

CLASS N O T E S Wanda Walkenhorst ‘78 is retired and lives in New Haven, Mo. Kevin Blaske ‘79 resides in Murrieta, Calif., with wife, Guia. Robert Brown ‘79 resides in St. Charles, Mo., with wife, Tamsen. Maureen Clancy-May ‘79 is the superintendent of the Bayless School District in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with husband, Ken. Robert Cushman ‘79 is vice president of Concordia Plan Services and resides in St. Charles, Mo., with wife, Kathy. John Engram ‘79 is president of Engram Farms, Inc., and Lakeside Ag, LLC in Sikeston, Mo. He and wife, Mary, have two children. Lois Flint (Wineberg) ‘79 is teacher in charge for North Monterey County Unified School Distric in Prunedale, Calif.

Samson Dunlap ‘74 is supervisor of athletics for St. Louis Public Schools.

Deborah Weaver (Bryant) ‘76 is manager for regulatory litigation support for Entergy Services, Inc. and resides in Metairie, La.

Michael Hefferon ‘74 is business manager at Fluid-Air Products, Inc. in St. Louis, Mo., and is living in St. Charles, Mo., with wife, Teresa.

Charles Geier ‘79 is the executive director of sales at Tollgrade Communications. He and wife, Anne, live in St. Louis, Mo.

Cheryl Bennett (Limbaugh) ‘77 is a customer service representative for Awana Clubs International and resides in Barlett, Ill.

Janette Hancock (Jacobs) ‘79 is married to Steve Hancock and resides in Fenton, Mo.

Deborah Kanyo (Jordan) ‘74 teaches a progressive program in music technology where students use computers to create music using sound loops at Alton Middle School. She and her husband James Kanyo reside in Alton, Ill.

Janet Haines (Hulshof) ‘77 is the owner of Wings Creative Advertising & Design in Sikeston, Mo., where she resides with husband, Lee.

Chester Pratt ‘74 is the principal at Pratt, Mitchell & Co., P.C. in Salem, Mo., where he lives with wife, Barbara. David Schoenbeck ‘74 is senior vice president for Babies “R” Us. He and wife, Ellen, reside in Franklin Lakes, N.J. Jennifer Tobin (Heldmann) ‘74 is a guidance counselor. She and husband, John, have two children, and live in Yuma, Ariz. Jill Van Camp (Nischwitz) ‘74 is the energy & environment assistant at Schnuck Markets, Inc. in St. Louis, Mo., where she resides with husband, James. William Black ‘75 is professor and associate head of theatre at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tenn. Karen Fesler (Trantham) ‘75 is the president of Fesler, Inc. and resides in Coralville, Iowa. Jeannette Hanewinkel (Dunn) ‘75 retired from Hillsboro R-3 district in May of 2007 after teaching elementary education for 31years. She and husband, Bob, live in Hillsboro, Mo. Nancy Hollander (Ott) ‘75 has retired from public school teaching and is an adjunct instructor in early childhood at State Fair Community College in Sedalia, Mo.

28

THE

Joyce Jackson ‘77 is employed by Anheuser-Busch, Inc. She and husband, Stephen Jennings, have a daughter, Lauren. Victoria Jackson (Mahn) ‘77 is a hospital surveyor for the State of Missouri. She and her son reside in Arnold, Mo. Thomas Mitchell ‘77 is the vice chancellor for university advancement and president of the Irvine Foundation at the University of California - Irvine. He and wife, Margaret, live in Newport Beach, Calif. Karen Scharf (Waldhof) ‘77 moved from the Denver area to Tulsa, Okla. in 2006. Karen Cook (Fullilove) ‘78 is a fitness tech at Curves in Montgomeryville, Pa. She and husband, Phillip, reside in Landsdale, Pa.

Karen Poe ‘84 is an optometric assistant for Brost & Associates Family Eyecare and resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

1980s Michael Clynch ‘80 is the senior mortgage planner for Midwest Bank Centre. He and wife, Sherry, reside in Moscow Mills, Mo. Debra Crocker (Barnhill) ‘80 is a fiscal and administrative manager for the Department of Mental Health in Sikeston, Mo., where she resides with husband, Mark. Susan Freeman (McGuire) ‘80 is a school counselor residing in O’Fallon, Mo., with husband, Timothy. Melissa Herbeck (Marshall) ‘80 works for Great West Healthcare in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Larry, live in Columbia, Ill. Catherine Hubert (Bernier) ‘80 is a registered nurse at St. John’s Mercy Medical Center. She has two children and resides in Ballwin, Mo. Mary McClenning ‘80 is a consumer safety inspector for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and resides in Florissant, Mo.

Tina Klocke (Burniski) ’82 Tina Klocke (Burniski) ’82 has a tough, demanding job in a soft, cuddly environment. At the office, Klocke is surrounded by stuffed animals where she is a top executive at Build-A-Bear Workshop in St. Louis As an initial team member at Build-A-Bear, Klocke helped bring the young company to its current success. In the beginning, she was hired by an accounting firm to work three days at Build-A-Bear and two days a week on other things. She soon found that the startup company would need her expertise six to seven days a week. So she stayed. “I did more than accounting – inventory at the warehouse, determining distribution of product, answering the phone, booking parties, picking up our (retail store) deposit from the Galleria and taking it to the bank,” said Klocke in an interview with the St. Louis Business Journal. Klocke helped take Build-A-Bear public with its $172 million initial public offering. Klocke’s peers in the accounting profession named her one of Missouri CPA Women to Watch and she is a board member of the Central Institute for the Deaf. She and husband, James, have two sons, Jim, 18, who plays baseball for Southeast Missouri State University, and six-year old Michael. She and her family live in St. Louis, Mo.

.

Wendell Moon ‘85 is an information assurance consultant for STG, Inc. He has three children, Nicholas, Christine and Benjamin.

Mary Farmer (Cobb) ‘81 is the president and chief executiver officer at Magna-Tel, Inc. She and husband, Keith, live in Scott City, Mo.

Anthony Thomas ‘82 is the president of Thomas Printing Supplies, Inc. in Independence, Ohio.

Tammy Neidenberg (Herrington) ‘86 is the owner of Crealutions and resides in Ellsinore, Mo.

Michael Quinn ‘81 is owner of Quinn Unlimited, LLC. He and wife, Donielle, reside in St. Peters, Mo.

Douglas Cannon ‘83 is working for the Springfield News-Leader in Springfield, Mo.

Thomas Rickard ‘81 is the vice president of business development at A3IM, Inc. He and wife, Susan, live in Friendswood, Texas.

Cynthia Coats (Vickers) ‘83 is service operations manager for Kelly Services in St. Louis, Mo.

Allen Saum ‘81 is employed by the Oracle Corporation and resides in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Jimmy Bowen ‘82 is married and works at Orthopedic Associates of Southeast Missouri in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Kevin Willoughby ‘83 is plant manager at Unimin Corporation in McIntyre, Ga. He and wife, Tracy, reside in Macon, Ga.

Mark Brooks ‘82 is employed by Gasconade County R-1 School District in Hermann, Mo. He and wife, Jill Cozort, have two children, Ashley and Isaac.

Milton Davis ‘84 is a first officer with Aloha Airlines. He and his family live in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Alan Dombrowski ‘82 was recently selected to the board of directors of The Golf Foundation of Missouri, and is vice president for the Hawthorn Physicians Services Corporation in St. Louis, Mo.

Jeri Wenneker ‘80 is a teacher and coach for the University City School District in St. Louis, Mo.

Timothy Lewis ‘82 is the chief of police in Festus, Mo., where he resides with wife, Linda.

Vivian Brent (Keller) ‘81 is retired

Cynthia Mendoza (Bostic) ‘82 is the

Lee Koenig ‘84 is IT project lead for Enterprise Rent-A-Car in Clayton, Mo. He and wife, Pamela Crane, have two children.

Paul Layman ‘82 is vice president of sales at the Campbell Soup Company and resides in Loveland, Ohio.

UNIVERSITY

Richard Pikey ‘83 was recently promoted to director of operations at Wainwright Industries, Inc. in St. Peters, Mo. Elzena Simmons (Bradshaw) ‘83 is a teacher at the Cape Girardeau Public Schools.

David Thomas ‘78 is an eighth grade social studies teacher in the Ritenour School District. He and wife, Pam, reside in Maryland Heights, Mo.

STATE

Sihan Hashim ‘85 is employed by Iben Engineering. He and his wife have three children, Mohd Shafig, Mohd Ridzwan and Fatin Nabillah, and reside in Malaysia.

David Conway ‘86 is in sales at Dale Printing. He and wife, Brenda, live in Arnold, Mo.

Rose Weidenbenner ‘80 celebrated 25 years as a Sister of Mercy in the St. Louis Regional Community, and serves as a team member in community leadership.

MISSOURI

Jerry Estes ‘85 is the plant production manager at Turkey Hill Dairy. He and wife, Elizabeth, reside in Windsor, Pa.

Scott Schreiner ‘82 is a CPA/ Consultant for Axis Integrated Solutions in St. Charles, Mo.

Diana Dye (Meyer) ‘81 is a program nurse at REM Developmental Services in Mt. Vernon, Iowa, where she lives with husband, Daniel.

Desma Reno (Hastings) ‘78 is a professor of nursing at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, Mo. She and husband, Danny, reside in Jackson, Mo.

SOUTHEAST

James Carley ‘85 is the director of delivery services at RH Donnelley in Overland Park, Kan., where he resides with wife, Wendy.

George Squires ‘85 is the president of Pure Water Technology and lives in Yucaipa, Calif.

Renee Richards (Meyer) ‘80 is a marketing and sales director at Berra Insurance Group. She resides in Ballwin, Mo.

OF

Dennis Bohnert ‘85 is the vice president at First State Community Bank in Perryville, Mo.

cost accountant at Nordenia, USA. She and husband, Ramon, reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

from education and resides in Lakeland, Fla., with husband, Bill.

Connie Marshall (Berkbigler) ‘78 is the research lab manager at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.

M A G A Z I N E

Betty Schearf (Hotop) ‘84 is the vice president of E&E Co., Ltd., and lives with husband, Bryan, in Oak Point, Texas.

Gregory Stroyan ‘88 is the senior engineer at Compucom, Inc. and resides in St. Charles, Mo. Jacquelyn Ackert (Craig) ‘89 is an associate circuit judge for the State of Illinois. She and husband, John, live in Dixon, Ill. Ronald Daniels ‘89 is a major in the United States Air Force, stationed in Knoxville, Tenn., with wife, Julie ‘90, who is a substitute teacher. They have two daughters. Debra Neighbors (Sansoucie) ‘89 is the computer instructor at Mingo Job Corps. She and husband, Bradley, live in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Heidi Newmaker ‘89 is a nurse anesthetist at Watson Clinic LLP and resides in Lakeland, Fla. Jerald Sermon ‘89 is a senior technical director with CIBER, Inc. He and wife, Marcelina, reside in Germantown, Tenn. Steven Summers ‘89 is an insurance analyst for American International Group and resides in Ballwin, Mo.

1990s

Linda Decker ‘87 works at Macys Midwest in St. Louis, Mo., where she lives with husband, Ralph.

Eddiemae Brown ‘90 is a supervisor and team leader of technical support at Metlife Insurance Company and resides in St. Louis, Mo.

Gina Mills ‘87 works in special education for St. Louis Public Schools and resides in St. Peters, Mo. Carolyn Rhodes (Puricelli) ‘87 is a teacher for Brentwood Public Schools. She and husband, Roy, have two children and live in Ballwin, Mo. Christine Simone ‘87 is a registered nurse at St. Luke’s Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Rodney, have one daughter. Truman Brinkley ‘88 is the quality manager at Nordyne in Poplar Bluff, Mo., where he resides with wife, Beth. Laura DeLuca (Gentle) ‘88 is a benefits officer for the U.S. Department of Treasury in Washington, D.C. Husband, Daniel ‘87, is an actor, director and producer. They have two children.

James Pisoni ‘84 is the owner of Southwest Group Protective Services in Dallas, Texas and resides in Allen, Texas.

Robert Gilot ‘88 is the regional business director at Novo Nordisk. He and wife, Gerri, have four children and live in St. Peters, Mo.

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Basem Rammaha ‘88 is the chairman and chief executive officer at The R Group. He and wife, Iman, live in Dearborn Heights, Mich.

Stephanie Crawford (Williams) ‘87 is a quality inspector at Lear Corp. and lives in Florissant, Mo.

Rita Lewis (Rankin) ‘84 is a traveling nurse with Advantage RN in West Chester, Ohio. She and husband, James, live in St. Charles, Mo.

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Bethany James (Willis) ‘88 recently accepted a position as a credit analyst with U.S. Bank in Cape Girardeau, Mo., where she lives with husband, Thomas.

THE

Melissa Dirr ‘90 is an architectural historian at Nebraska State Historical Society. She and husband, Michael, have a son and live in Lincoln, Neb. Lynese Hoffman (Cargill) ‘91 is executive vice president and chief financial officer for Common Ground Public Relations. She and husband, Brian, have two children, and live in Chesterfield, Mo. Kimberly Jackson (Plunkett) ‘90 is an assistant principal for Belton School District. Husband, Mark ’02, is the athletic director for Center School District. They reside in Belton, Mo. Jennifer LeGrand (McIntyre) ‘90 and husband, Kevin, have four children and live in St. Louis, Mo. James Lummus ‘90 is a corporate controller for Rawlings Sporting Goods in St. Louis, Mo. David Martin ‘91 is a global supply chain strategy program leader at GE Healthcare and resides in

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Menomonee Falls, Wis. Corey Muench ‘91 is a professor at Capilano College and resides in Vancouver, B.C.

David Grupe ‘94 is sales manager for Allied Insurance. He and wife, Sarah Pack ’94, have three children, and live in Sedalia, Mo.

Janice Um ‘91 is a legal assistant at LeBoeuf, Lanb, Greene & MacRae. She and husband, John, have a daughter, Grace, and reside in Jacksonville.

Michelle Hahn (Herter) ‘94 is public information coordinator for the City of Cape Girardeau, Mo. Husband, Lance ‘94, is employed by Procter & Gamble Corporation. They have two children.

Dean Cowan ‘92 is currently a vice president for American International Group. He and wife, Linda Schnetzer, live in New York, N.Y.

Laura Jurica (Bartlett) ‘94 is an artist prep support/show finisher at Walt Disney World. She and husband, Cory, live in Davenport, Fla.

Judith Davis (Fain) ‘92 is center director for Sylvan Learning Center in Poplar Bluff, Mo. She and husband, Alan, have one child.

Todd McNab ‘94 is an account director for Townsend Agency. He and wife, Julie, have two children, and live in Naperville, Fla.

Kathryn Haupt (Ferrell) ‘92 is marketing director for Midwest Grain & Barge. She and husband, Jody, reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

Debra Runzi (Young) ‘94 and husband, Andrew, reside in Festus, Mo.

Karin Markwell (Tsang) ‘92 and husband, Charles, have two children, and reside in Kirkland, Wash. Brian McCutchen ‘92 was recently promoted to national park superintendent of the Knife River Indian Villages National Park in North Dakota. Karla Miller (Colbert) ‘92 is a registered nurse at Barnes-Jewish St. Peters Hospital and lives in Hawk Point, Mo. Mark Reiss ‘92 is corporate auditor for AT&T Audit Services in St. Louis, Mo.

Elizabeth Boatright ‘95 is employed by Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Mo.

Karen Perry ‘93 is a teacher for the Ritenour School District and resides in Ballwin, Mo. Rhett Pierce ‘93 is the regional sales manager at the JD Martin Company in Dallas, Texas. Jennifer Schicker (Boedeker) ‘93 is the children’s services coordinator for the YMCA of Greater St. Louis. She and husband, Richard, have two children. Christopher Thomas ‘93 is a manager at Pricewaterhouse Coopers and resides in Colorado Springs, Colo. William Gorman ‘94 is employed by the Milwaukee Brewers Baseball Club. He and wife, Bernadette ’95, have two children, Liam and Libby, and reside in Waukesha, Wis.

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Danielle Jany ‘96 is a communication specialist at Monsanto Company and lives in St. Louis, Mo. Marshall Lewis ‘96 is a senior analyst at AT&T and lives in Oakville, Mo. Melinda Margrabe ‘96 is a customer service associate at J.C. Penney Company, Inc. and lives in Florissant, Mo. Aaron Pohlmann ‘96 is assistant vice president for Southwest Bank in O’Fallon, Mo. He married Lisa Jacks in 2005. Matthew Poole ‘96 is employed by Progressive Farm Credit Services. Wife, Teresa ’98, is a kindergarten

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Carolyn DeGroote (Anderson) ‘93 is center director for Day Nursery Association in Plainfield, Ind., and has two children.

Carnell Jones ‘93 is the registrar at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He and wife, April, live in Rumford, R.I.

Christine Stark (Lockwood) ‘95 is a nutrition consultant at Child Day Care Association and resides in St. Louis, Mo., with husband, Keith.

Cindy Thurman (Roche) ‘95 is the vice president of Royal Banks of Missouri. She and husband, Joseph, live in Fenton, Mo.

Marlow Barton ‘95 is an ESL teacher with the Northwest R-1 School District. She has two children, Emily and Christopher, and married David in 2006. They reside in Maryland Heights, Mo.

Kevin Gorham ‘93 recently accepted a position as a United States postal inspector with the St. Louis division of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

Kimberly Riley (Whitworth) ‘95 is a teacher with Francis Howell School District in St. Louis, Mo. She and husband, Chris, had their third child in June 2007.

Michelle Tanurchis ‘95 is a personnel coordinator at Delmar Gardens in St. Louis, Mo.

Shelby Weaver (Gaines) ‘94 is employed at Ozarks Federal Savings and Loan of Fredericktown, Mo.

Julie Chapman (Kee) ‘95 is a teacher and campus advisor to the English Honorary Society at the University of Central Missouri.

Husband, Keith ‘94, is a teacher and coach with the Warrensburg School District.

Brian Koonce ’89 Brian Koonce ’89 assumes heavy responsibilities as he performs his duties in the United States Air Force. He is the assistant program director of Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Training at David Grant Medical Center in Calif., and is slated to assume the position of program director in July 2008. Upon college graduation, Koonce entered the U.S. Air Force as an oncology nurse. In 1992, he transferred to Eglin AFB in Ft. Walton Beach, Fla., working as an oncology nurse in the intensive care unit. During that time, he was accepted into nurse anesthesia school at the Uniformed Services University. Koonce was awarded the Clinical Excellence Award in 1999, after completing his residency at Wright-Patterson Medical Center. In 2000, he began teaching at the Uniformed Services University before being deployed to Kuwait City, Kuwait in June 2000 to provide anesthesia care to U.S. Troops and Dept. of Defense employees. In 2002, Koonce was deployed to Seeb AB, Oman in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Koonce returned to Offutt AFB in Nebraska, February 2003, to serve as the clinical coordinator for nurse anesthesia students. There, he initiated the first ever military clinical training site for the Bryan/LGH Nurse Anesthesia Program. In June 2005, Koonce was named to his current position in a program that is ranked second out of 107 in the nation. Koonce, who is deemed the practice expert in the USAF, was selected in February 2007 as the Nurse Anesthesia Consultant for the USAF Surgeon General. Koonce was promoted to Lt. Col. and will begin wearing the rank in midyear 2008. He is an active member of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, serving on the Federal Services Ad Hoc Committee. He and wife, Karen, reside at Travis AFB, California.

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CLASS N O T E S teacher. They have one child, John, and live in Kennett, Mo. Leslie Quarles (Nail) ‘96 is a coordinator of supported employment at Missouri MersGoodwill, Inc. She and husband, Christopher, have one child, Presley, and live in Fenton, Mo. Lisa Sturm (Weshinskey) ‘96 and husband, Brian, have two children, and reside in Columbia, Ill. Tracy Willoughby (Chambers) ‘96 is a first grade teacher in Macon, Ga., where she lives with husband, Kevin. Karen Bearley (Matzenbacher) ‘97 and husband, Jeff, celebrated the birth of a second daughter in January 2007. Karen is a paralegal with a law firm in St. Louis, Mo. Nathan Cross ‘97 is a territory manager with Western Union. He and wife, Jennifer, have one daughter and live in Smithton, Ill. Michelle Dunkman (Perry) ‘97 is the account manager at Health Fitness Corporation and lives in Burlington, Ky., with husband, John.

in Redondo Beach, Calif. Amy Croxford (Rutledge) ‘98 works for Peoria Public Schools. She lives with her husband and son in Peoria, Ill. Shelly Hanlon (Laforte) ‘98 and husband, Roy, had a son in 2004, and live in Noblesville, Ind. Marissa LeClaire ‘98 is associate director of student activities at Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo. Jeffrey Robinson ‘98 is director of business development for Direct Source Solutions. Wife, Lori Zesch ’85, is a senior budget analyst for DaimlerChrysler. They reside in St. Louis, Mo. Ronald Smith ‘98 is employed by Parkway South High School in St. Louis, Mo. Ron and wife, Heather, had their second daughter in March 2007. Christopher Carlton ‘99 is the vice president of food and agribusiness corporate banking at U.S. Bank. He and wife, Jill, live in Minneapolis, Minn.

Heather Freshwater (Bess) ‘97 and husband, Jerry, celebrated the birth of Jace Dillon in June 2007.

Stacey Hicks (Curtis) ‘99 is a family specialist/trainer with Educare of Southeast Missouri State University.

Sebrina Glenn (Allen) ‘97 is assistant director of residence life at The University of North Carolina – Greensboro.

Marcus Norby ‘99 is district sales coordinator at AFLAC in St. Louis, Mo., where he lives with wife, Genevieve.

Laura Goodman (Stoffel) ‘97 is employed by Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield. She and husband, Bradley, reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Paola Juarez ‘97 works for CH Robinson Worldwide, Inc., and lives in San Miguel De Allende, Mexico. Evette Miller ‘97 is a human relations officer for the State of Missouri in Jefferson City, Mo. Nicole Obert (Schoob) ‘97 is a research assistant at Texas A&M University at Galveston. She and husband, Daniel, live in League City, Texas. Gregory Phillips ‘97 is manager of affilitate sales & marketing for Fox Cable Networks. He married Jaime Bodart in 2006. Christopher Robertson ‘97 is an associate at Scruggs Law Firm in Oxford, Miss. He and wife, Jamie, have one child, Sophia. Christopher Robnett ‘97 is a general manager with MFA, Inc. He married Jamie in 2006 and resides in Mexico, Mo. Brenten Byrd ‘98 is the senior residential supervisor at St. Joseph Village Campus. He and wife, Lisa, reside in Round Rock, Texas. Don Carter ‘98 is an aerospace engineer for Raytheon Corporation

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2000s Jane Allsworth ‘00 is an administrative assistant for AmerenUE. She and husband, Thomas, live in St. Louis, Mo. Nadege Desa ‘00 is a business analyst for Monsanto and lives in Echandens, Switzerland. Dinia Jenkins ‘00 received her M.A. in community counseling in 2007, and she is a group home manager for the Community Counseling Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo. She and husband, John, have three children. Theresa Leggett ‘00 is a service coordintor for the Missouri Department of Mental Health and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Leslie Mueller ‘00 is a second grade teacher at Wright City School District and resides in Wentzville, Mo., with husband, John. Mary Nagle ‘00 is the assisstant director of admissions at Logan University and College of Chiropractic. She married Jered in May 2007 and they live in Grover, Mo.

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CLASS N O T E S Daniel Nickels ‘00 is a high school art teacher and is working to be a high school counselor. He lives in Newhall, Calif.

Mark Green ‘95

Tina Reames ‘00 is a math teacher at Cobden High School. She and her husband live in Carbondale, Ill.

Mark Green ’95, sheds light on the agriculture community as he heads up his company, Farmergy Inc., in St. Louis, Mo. Green is president and chief executive officer of the consulting firm that focuses on helping farmers and ranchers implement solar and wind power solutions for their operations. Green is widely recognized as a visionary entrepreneur with a demonstrated track record in start-up ventures and divisional development within existing organizations. Green co-founded Farmergy in June 2006 with initial capital of $250,000, and has since earned double that in revenue from its consulting business. In January 2007, Farmergy purchased Missouri Valley Renewable Energy in Hermann, Mo., mainly to gain client base and experienced personnel at the company. “We have completed eight installations of wind, solar and solar thermal since the purchase in January,” said Green, who worked in agricultural marketing before forming Farmergy. Green is responsible for managing daily Farmergy operations and business plan implementation. His expertise includes channel marketing and business strategy, as well as interactive product development for major agricultural clients such as BASF, John Deere Credit, Monsanto and Purina Mills. He and wife, Keelan, live in St. Louis.

Hazel Stricker ‘00 is a yoga and fitness instructor at Rancho La Puerta and resides in Tecate, Calif. Crystal Twidwell ‘00 is a teacher at Oak Grove High School and lives in Oak Grove, Mo. Sherri Voerg (Warren) ‘00 is a teacher and resides in Goose Creek, S.C., with husband, Derrick. Nicholas Brockmeyer ‘01 is a partner at Brockmeyer Law Offices. He is also president of Platinum Sports & Entertainment Management and owner of The Vine in St. Charles, Mo. Ellen Carlson (Talley) ‘01 is working at Big Brothers Big Sisters. She and husband, Eric, have two children, Bella and Trinity, and live in Jackson, Mo. Bjarni Ernst ‘01 is currently the marketing manager at Intermate A/S and lives in Copenhagen, Denmark. Ann Glenn (Parker) ‘01 is a special education teacher with Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools and lives in Old Hickory, Tenn. Leah Shrum (Glueck) ‘01 works as an abuse prevention advocate for the Southeast Regional Support Center. She has two children and lives in Jackson, Mo., with husband, Loy.

KPLR-TV. She and husband, Brett, have a child, Peyton, and reside in St. Louis, Mo. Patricia Van Dyne (Sander) ‘02 is a staff accountant for Brown, Smith, Wallace, LLC and resides in Hazelwood, Mo. Angela Cockrell ‘03 is sales coordinator for Heartland Food Products and resides in Westwood Hills, Kan. Malicia Dillon ‘03 is employed by Mallinckrodt and resides in Florissant, Mo.

Nina Soricelli (Mire) ‘01 and husband, John, celebrated the birth of a son in November 2006. They live in Murfreesboro, Tenn.

Paul Dobbins ‘03 is a property manager at Centro US in St. Louis, Mo. He and wife, Stacey ’04, live in St. Louis.

Lindsey Wulfing ‘01 is a property manager for Colliers Turley Martin Tucker. She married William in May 2007 and they live in Kirkwood, Mo.

Alexis Muckerman ‘03 is a sales representative at Anheuser-Busch in Denver, Colo.

Christopher Adams ‘02 is the senior web designer for Kansas.gov, which is the official Web site of the State of Kansas, www.kansas.gov He resides in Topeka, Kan. Elizabeth Foster (Hutchcraft) ‘02 has recently received her M.B.A. from Florida State University in April 2007. She is an accountant/ business analyst with Sallie Mae. Abigail Lewis (Bembower) ‘02 is a preschool teacher at Wee Care Preschool & Childcare. She and her husband reside in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Julie Littles (Milner) ‘02 and husband, Brock, have one child, Jace, and live in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Megan Richardson (Wagner) ‘02 is an assistant traffic manager at

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Mary Pratt (Manning) ‘03 married Justin in June 2004. They live in Muncie, Ind. Alicia Riley ‘03 completed her master’s degree at Southeast in 2006 and is project coordintor at Collier, Turley, Martin, Tucker in St. Louis, Mo. Laura Schemel (Hollenbeck) ‘03 is a marketing research analyst for ALSAC/St. Jude. She and husband, Mike ’04, reside in Memphis, Tenn. William Stewart ‘03 is counselor and coordinator for the Substance Abuse Prevention & Education Program at Southeast Missouri State University. Landra Talbot (Boone) ‘03 is a case manager with the Department of Child Services and lives in Lafayette, Ind.

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James Walker ‘03 is a CADD Instructor at North St. Francois County High School. He and wife, Melissa, have two children, and live in Fredericktown, Mo. Jennifer Asher ‘04 is a registered dietician and teaches nutrition at Tarrant College in Arlington, Texas. Amanda Deckerd ‘04 is a kindergarten teacher at Advance Elementary School. She and husband, Darin, live in Perryville, Mo. Amy Holmes (Vrbosky) ‘04 is manager of The Copper Cup in Bloomington, Ind. Kunal Kapoor ‘04 is the director of Dhruv Inc. in New Delhi, India. Shannon Lee ‘04 is co-manager of Delias and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Michelle Otte ‘04 is a billing analyst for Big River Telephone LLC and lives in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Michelle Powers ‘04 is a social worker at Missouri Delta Medical Center in Sikeston, Mo. Sara Rahn ‘04 is employed by Anheuser-Busch. She and husband, Joel, reside in St. Louis, Mo. Sara Saupe (Yingling) ‘04 is an administrative assistant at Gregory Construction, Inc. in Jackson, Mo. She and husband, Jesse, live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Michael Schemel ‘04 is assistant superintendent at TPC Southwind in Memphis, Tenn., where he lives with wife, Laura (Hollenbeck) ’03. Emily Schlick ‘04 is a program recruiter at CDI Corp. She and husband, Chris, reside in St. Charles, Mo.

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Benjamin Spirk ‘04 is a senior in the audit and advisory department for Anders, Minkler, & Diehl LLC in St. Louis, Mo. He and Amanda Pracht ‘05 were married in 2005. Ronda Taylor ‘04 is a probation officer for the State of Missouri in Charleston, Mo. Douglas Thomas ‘04 is an insurance broker. He and wife, Tanya, celebrated the birth of a son in December 2006 and reside in Ste. Genevieve, Mo. Raymond Aubuchon ‘05 was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Navy in September 2006. Matthew Buhr ‘05 is a registered nurse at St. Mary’s Health Center in St. Louis, Mo. Jacquie Cline ‘05 is employed with the City of St. Charles School District and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Kenndis Joy ‘05 is a community support worker with BJC Behavior Health in St. Louis, Mo. Benjamin Martin ‘05 is an assistant football coach at Chadron State College in Chadron, Neb. Kristin Moore ‘05 is program coordinator for the City of Eureka Parks and Recreation in Eureka, Mo. Tricia Murphy ‘05 is a relationship associate with The Private Bank at Bank of America in Clayton, Mo. Audra Pulis ‘05 is a vocational rehabilitation counselor at DARS-DRS and resides in Irving, Texas. Jeanne Scheffel (Cain) ‘05 is a teacher at Immaculate Conception School. She and her family live in Jackson, Mo. Carolyn Schiwitz ‘05 is a traffic manager for Mississippi River Radio in Cape Girardeau, Mo., where she lives with husband, Jesse. Delores Simmons ‘05 is a dispatcher with New Wave Communications in Sikeston, Mo. Jennifer Starkey ‘05 is project coordinator for Maritz Research in Fenton, Mo. She married Christopher Starkey ‘06 in May 2006. Daniel Williams ‘05 is an independent agent at Banker’s Life and Casualty in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Emily Wilson ‘05 is a stage management intern at The Julliard School in New York, N.Y. Michael Barrett ‘06 is an admissions representative at Allied College and lives in Florissant, Mo. Lea Bennett ‘06 is a staff accountant in Marble Hill, Mo. Logan Bonacorsi ‘06 is a market and strategy analyst at Arch Coal Inc., living in Edwardsville, Ill. Tracy Burke ‘06 is a certified teacher working for Poplar Bluff Schools, where she lives with husband, Doyle.

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Shad Burner ‘06 and Layne (Strattman) ‘06, were married in June, 2007. Burner is the coordinator of marketing at the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association and wife, Layne, is a K-5 special education teacher at Shawnee Elementary North. Brandon Couch ‘06 is an assistant golf professional at Meadow Brook Country Club and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Laura Hammond ‘06 is a property admininstrator at Colliers Turley Martin Tucker in Earth City, Mo. She resides in Chesterfield, Mo. Angela Harper ‘06 works at The Boeing Company in St. Louis, Mo., and lives in St. Peters, Mo. Ashley Hayes ‘06 is an assistant manager at Target and resides in Belleville, Ill. Erin Hente ‘06 is a bank teller at Bank of America in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Eric Hoffman ‘06 is a senior loan officer at First Option Mortgage in St. Louis, Mo., and resides in St. Charles, Mo. Crystal Jones ‘06 an account executive at Butler County Publishing Co., Inc. She resides in Puxico, Mo. Lauren Kelley ‘06 is a graduate assistant at Southeast Missouri State University. Brandon Lewis ‘06 is a planning coordinator specialist at Our Favorites Catering in New Madrid, Mo. Mitchell Newhouse ‘06 is account manager at CMS Communications, Inc., and resides in Ellisville, Mo. Tai Richards ‘06 is a property administrator at Colliers Turley Martin Tucker and lives in Fenton, Mo. Cristen Robinson ‘06 is a customer care associate at American Family Insurance in St. Louis, Mo. Gina Sharamitaro ‘06 is a financial analyst at L.J. Hart & Company in St. Louis, Mo. Alicia Shockley ‘06 is a procurement agent at Boeing Company in St. Louis, Mo. Amy Stallings ‘06 is employed at Capaha Bank in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Jonathan Thomasson ‘06 is a social studies teacher, Bible teacher, and boys’ varsity soccer and basketball coach at Eagle Ridge Christian School. He and wife, Sara, have two children, and live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Melissa Van Velkinburgh ‘06 is an intern and staff accountant in MPP&W, P.C. in St. Louis, Mo. Jennifer Vandeven ‘06 is a customer service officer at Montgomery Bank in Chaffee, Mo.

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­ ell, I don’t want to keep you in suspense. W I landed the role in Big River and now I’m spending most of my time rehearsing. When you are going to be a part of history (the first musical at the River Campus) you want to put your best foot forward! And, from what I’ve seen, it’s gonna be a hit! But don’t worry, you won’t have to search for a bird’s eye view to catch all the great performances. Every seat in the house has a great view! The River Campus isn’t the only thing that seems to be a hit. Redhawks are flocking to the University, and in record numbers! And with the University offering more courses and extracurricular activities than you can shake a tailfeather at, who can blame them?! I am so excited to see all the new faces, but with limited nest space, there just isn’t enough room for this big bird to spread his wings. Fortunately, there’s some more growth we can all look forward to (especially in these cramped quarters). With the possibility of new housing facilities on campus, we Redhawks can stretch our feathers and enjoy the great campus life offered at Southeast even more! In fact, I don’t plan on spending much time in my nest at all this year. I can’t tell you all the details yet, but it looks like I’m gonna have to go buy a new business suit for the spring. As much as I love my Redhawks gear, a bird’s got to dress to impress once in a while.

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CLASS N O T E S teacher. They have one child, John, and live in Kennett, Mo. Leslie Quarles (Nail) ‘96 is a coordinator of supported employment at Missouri MersGoodwill, Inc. She and husband, Christopher, have one child, Presley, and live in Fenton, Mo. Lisa Sturm (Weshinskey) ‘96 and husband, Brian, have two children, and reside in Columbia, Ill. Tracy Willoughby (Chambers) ‘96 is a first grade teacher in Macon, Ga., where she lives with husband, Kevin. Karen Bearley (Matzenbacher) ‘97 and husband, Jeff, celebrated the birth of a second daughter in January 2007. Karen is a paralegal with a law firm in St. Louis, Mo. Nathan Cross ‘97 is a territory manager with Western Union. He and wife, Jennifer, have one daughter and live in Smithton, Ill. Michelle Dunkman (Perry) ‘97 is the account manager at Health Fitness Corporation and lives in Burlington, Ky., with husband, John.

in Redondo Beach, Calif. Amy Croxford (Rutledge) ‘98 works for Peoria Public Schools. She lives with her husband and son in Peoria, Ill. Shelly Hanlon (Laforte) ‘98 and husband, Roy, had a son in 2004, and live in Noblesville, Ind. Marissa LeClaire ‘98 is associate director of student activities at Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo. Jeffrey Robinson ‘98 is director of business development for Direct Source Solutions. Wife, Lori Zesch ’85, is a senior budget analyst for DaimlerChrysler. They reside in St. Louis, Mo. Ronald Smith ‘98 is employed by Parkway South High School in St. Louis, Mo. Ron and wife, Heather, had their second daughter in March 2007. Christopher Carlton ‘99 is the vice president of food and agribusiness corporate banking at U.S. Bank. He and wife, Jill, live in Minneapolis, Minn.

Heather Freshwater (Bess) ‘97 and husband, Jerry, celebrated the birth of Jace Dillon in June 2007.

Stacey Hicks (Curtis) ‘99 is a family specialist/trainer with Educare of Southeast Missouri State University.

Sebrina Glenn (Allen) ‘97 is assistant director of residence life at The University of North Carolina – Greensboro.

Marcus Norby ‘99 is district sales coordinator at AFLAC in St. Louis, Mo., where he lives with wife, Genevieve.

Laura Goodman (Stoffel) ‘97 is employed by Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield. She and husband, Bradley, reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Paola Juarez ‘97 works for CH Robinson Worldwide, Inc., and lives in San Miguel De Allende, Mexico. Evette Miller ‘97 is a human relations officer for the State of Missouri in Jefferson City, Mo. Nicole Obert (Schoob) ‘97 is a research assistant at Texas A&M University at Galveston. She and husband, Daniel, live in League City, Texas. Gregory Phillips ‘97 is manager of affilitate sales & marketing for Fox Cable Networks. He married Jaime Bodart in 2006. Christopher Robertson ‘97 is an associate at Scruggs Law Firm in Oxford, Miss. He and wife, Jamie, have one child, Sophia. Christopher Robnett ‘97 is a general manager with MFA, Inc. He married Jamie in 2006 and resides in Mexico, Mo. Brenten Byrd ‘98 is the senior residential supervisor at St. Joseph Village Campus. He and wife, Lisa, reside in Round Rock, Texas. Don Carter ‘98 is an aerospace engineer for Raytheon Corporation

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2000s Jane Allsworth ‘00 is an administrative assistant for AmerenUE. She and husband, Thomas, live in St. Louis, Mo. Nadege Desa ‘00 is a business analyst for Monsanto and lives in Echandens, Switzerland. Dinia Jenkins ‘00 received her M.A. in community counseling in 2007, and she is a group home manager for the Community Counseling Center in Cape Girardeau, Mo. She and husband, John, have three children. Theresa Leggett ‘00 is a service coordintor for the Missouri Department of Mental Health and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Leslie Mueller ‘00 is a second grade teacher at Wright City School District and resides in Wentzville, Mo., with husband, John. Mary Nagle ‘00 is the assisstant director of admissions at Logan University and College of Chiropractic. She married Jered in May 2007 and they live in Grover, Mo.

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CLASS N O T E S Daniel Nickels ‘00 is a high school art teacher and is working to be a high school counselor. He lives in Newhall, Calif.

Mark Green ‘95

Tina Reames ‘00 is a math teacher at Cobden High School. She and her husband live in Carbondale, Ill.

Mark Green ’95, sheds light on the agriculture community as he heads up his company, Farmergy Inc., in St. Louis, Mo. Green is president and chief executive officer of the consulting firm that focuses on helping farmers and ranchers implement solar and wind power solutions for their operations. Green is widely recognized as a visionary entrepreneur with a demonstrated track record in start-up ventures and divisional development within existing organizations. Green co-founded Farmergy in June 2006 with initial capital of $250,000, and has since earned double that in revenue from its consulting business. In January 2007, Farmergy purchased Missouri Valley Renewable Energy in Hermann, Mo., mainly to gain client base and experienced personnel at the company. “We have completed eight installations of wind, solar and solar thermal since the purchase in January,” said Green, who worked in agricultural marketing before forming Farmergy. Green is responsible for managing daily Farmergy operations and business plan implementation. His expertise includes channel marketing and business strategy, as well as interactive product development for major agricultural clients such as BASF, John Deere Credit, Monsanto and Purina Mills. He and wife, Keelan, live in St. Louis.

Hazel Stricker ‘00 is a yoga and fitness instructor at Rancho La Puerta and resides in Tecate, Calif. Crystal Twidwell ‘00 is a teacher at Oak Grove High School and lives in Oak Grove, Mo. Sherri Voerg (Warren) ‘00 is a teacher and resides in Goose Creek, S.C., with husband, Derrick. Nicholas Brockmeyer ‘01 is a partner at Brockmeyer Law Offices. He is also president of Platinum Sports & Entertainment Management and owner of The Vine in St. Charles, Mo. Ellen Carlson (Talley) ‘01 is working at Big Brothers Big Sisters. She and husband, Eric, have two children, Bella and Trinity, and live in Jackson, Mo. Bjarni Ernst ‘01 is currently the marketing manager at Intermate A/S and lives in Copenhagen, Denmark. Ann Glenn (Parker) ‘01 is a special education teacher with Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools and lives in Old Hickory, Tenn. Leah Shrum (Glueck) ‘01 works as an abuse prevention advocate for the Southeast Regional Support Center. She has two children and lives in Jackson, Mo., with husband, Loy.

KPLR-TV. She and husband, Brett, have a child, Peyton, and reside in St. Louis, Mo. Patricia Van Dyne (Sander) ‘02 is a staff accountant for Brown, Smith, Wallace, LLC and resides in Hazelwood, Mo. Angela Cockrell ‘03 is sales coordinator for Heartland Food Products and resides in Westwood Hills, Kan. Malicia Dillon ‘03 is employed by Mallinckrodt and resides in Florissant, Mo.

Nina Soricelli (Mire) ‘01 and husband, John, celebrated the birth of a son in November 2006. They live in Murfreesboro, Tenn.

Paul Dobbins ‘03 is a property manager at Centro US in St. Louis, Mo. He and wife, Stacey ’04, live in St. Louis.

Lindsey Wulfing ‘01 is a property manager for Colliers Turley Martin Tucker. She married William in May 2007 and they live in Kirkwood, Mo.

Alexis Muckerman ‘03 is a sales representative at Anheuser-Busch in Denver, Colo.

Christopher Adams ‘02 is the senior web designer for Kansas.gov, which is the official Web site of the State of Kansas, www.kansas.gov He resides in Topeka, Kan. Elizabeth Foster (Hutchcraft) ‘02 has recently received her M.B.A. from Florida State University in April 2007. She is an accountant/ business analyst with Sallie Mae. Abigail Lewis (Bembower) ‘02 is a preschool teacher at Wee Care Preschool & Childcare. She and her husband reside in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Julie Littles (Milner) ‘02 and husband, Brock, have one child, Jace, and live in Poplar Bluff, Mo. Megan Richardson (Wagner) ‘02 is an assistant traffic manager at

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Mary Pratt (Manning) ‘03 married Justin in June 2004. They live in Muncie, Ind. Alicia Riley ‘03 completed her master’s degree at Southeast in 2006 and is project coordintor at Collier, Turley, Martin, Tucker in St. Louis, Mo. Laura Schemel (Hollenbeck) ‘03 is a marketing research analyst for ALSAC/St. Jude. She and husband, Mike ’04, reside in Memphis, Tenn. William Stewart ‘03 is counselor and coordinator for the Substance Abuse Prevention & Education Program at Southeast Missouri State University. Landra Talbot (Boone) ‘03 is a case manager with the Department of Child Services and lives in Lafayette, Ind.

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James Walker ‘03 is a CADD Instructor at North St. Francois County High School. He and wife, Melissa, have two children, and live in Fredericktown, Mo. Jennifer Asher ‘04 is a registered dietician and teaches nutrition at Tarrant College in Arlington, Texas. Amanda Deckerd ‘04 is a kindergarten teacher at Advance Elementary School. She and husband, Darin, live in Perryville, Mo. Amy Holmes (Vrbosky) ‘04 is manager of The Copper Cup in Bloomington, Ind. Kunal Kapoor ‘04 is the director of Dhruv Inc. in New Delhi, India. Shannon Lee ‘04 is co-manager of Delias and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Michelle Otte ‘04 is a billing analyst for Big River Telephone LLC and lives in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Michelle Powers ‘04 is a social worker at Missouri Delta Medical Center in Sikeston, Mo. Sara Rahn ‘04 is employed by Anheuser-Busch. She and husband, Joel, reside in St. Louis, Mo. Sara Saupe (Yingling) ‘04 is an administrative assistant at Gregory Construction, Inc. in Jackson, Mo. She and husband, Jesse, live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Michael Schemel ‘04 is assistant superintendent at TPC Southwind in Memphis, Tenn., where he lives with wife, Laura (Hollenbeck) ’03. Emily Schlick ‘04 is a program recruiter at CDI Corp. She and husband, Chris, reside in St. Charles, Mo.

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Benjamin Spirk ‘04 is a senior in the audit and advisory department for Anders, Minkler, & Diehl LLC in St. Louis, Mo. He and Amanda Pracht ‘05 were married in 2005. Ronda Taylor ‘04 is a probation officer for the State of Missouri in Charleston, Mo. Douglas Thomas ‘04 is an insurance broker. He and wife, Tanya, celebrated the birth of a son in December 2006 and reside in Ste. Genevieve, Mo. Raymond Aubuchon ‘05 was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Navy in September 2006. Matthew Buhr ‘05 is a registered nurse at St. Mary’s Health Center in St. Louis, Mo. Jacquie Cline ‘05 is employed with the City of St. Charles School District and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Kenndis Joy ‘05 is a community support worker with BJC Behavior Health in St. Louis, Mo. Benjamin Martin ‘05 is an assistant football coach at Chadron State College in Chadron, Neb. Kristin Moore ‘05 is program coordinator for the City of Eureka Parks and Recreation in Eureka, Mo. Tricia Murphy ‘05 is a relationship associate with The Private Bank at Bank of America in Clayton, Mo. Audra Pulis ‘05 is a vocational rehabilitation counselor at DARS-DRS and resides in Irving, Texas. Jeanne Scheffel (Cain) ‘05 is a teacher at Immaculate Conception School. She and her family live in Jackson, Mo. Carolyn Schiwitz ‘05 is a traffic manager for Mississippi River Radio in Cape Girardeau, Mo., where she lives with husband, Jesse. Delores Simmons ‘05 is a dispatcher with New Wave Communications in Sikeston, Mo. Jennifer Starkey ‘05 is project coordinator for Maritz Research in Fenton, Mo. She married Christopher Starkey ‘06 in May 2006. Daniel Williams ‘05 is an independent agent at Banker’s Life and Casualty in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Emily Wilson ‘05 is a stage management intern at The Julliard School in New York, N.Y. Michael Barrett ‘06 is an admissions representative at Allied College and lives in Florissant, Mo. Lea Bennett ‘06 is a staff accountant in Marble Hill, Mo. Logan Bonacorsi ‘06 is a market and strategy analyst at Arch Coal Inc., living in Edwardsville, Ill. Tracy Burke ‘06 is a certified teacher working for Poplar Bluff Schools, where she lives with husband, Doyle.

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Shad Burner ‘06 and Layne (Strattman) ‘06, were married in June, 2007. Burner is the coordinator of marketing at the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association and wife, Layne, is a K-5 special education teacher at Shawnee Elementary North. Brandon Couch ‘06 is an assistant golf professional at Meadow Brook Country Club and resides in St. Louis, Mo. Laura Hammond ‘06 is a property admininstrator at Colliers Turley Martin Tucker in Earth City, Mo. She resides in Chesterfield, Mo. Angela Harper ‘06 works at The Boeing Company in St. Louis, Mo., and lives in St. Peters, Mo. Ashley Hayes ‘06 is an assistant manager at Target and resides in Belleville, Ill. Erin Hente ‘06 is a bank teller at Bank of America in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Eric Hoffman ‘06 is a senior loan officer at First Option Mortgage in St. Louis, Mo., and resides in St. Charles, Mo. Crystal Jones ‘06 an account executive at Butler County Publishing Co., Inc. She resides in Puxico, Mo. Lauren Kelley ‘06 is a graduate assistant at Southeast Missouri State University. Brandon Lewis ‘06 is a planning coordinator specialist at Our Favorites Catering in New Madrid, Mo. Mitchell Newhouse ‘06 is account manager at CMS Communications, Inc., and resides in Ellisville, Mo. Tai Richards ‘06 is a property administrator at Colliers Turley Martin Tucker and lives in Fenton, Mo. Cristen Robinson ‘06 is a customer care associate at American Family Insurance in St. Louis, Mo. Gina Sharamitaro ‘06 is a financial analyst at L.J. Hart & Company in St. Louis, Mo. Alicia Shockley ‘06 is a procurement agent at Boeing Company in St. Louis, Mo. Amy Stallings ‘06 is employed at Capaha Bank in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Jonathan Thomasson ‘06 is a social studies teacher, Bible teacher, and boys’ varsity soccer and basketball coach at Eagle Ridge Christian School. He and wife, Sara, have two children, and live in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Melissa Van Velkinburgh ‘06 is an intern and staff accountant in MPP&W, P.C. in St. Louis, Mo. Jennifer Vandeven ‘06 is a customer service officer at Montgomery Bank in Chaffee, Mo.

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­ ell, I don’t want to keep you in suspense. W I landed the role in Big River and now I’m spending most of my time rehearsing. When you are going to be a part of history (the first musical at the River Campus) you want to put your best foot forward! And, from what I’ve seen, it’s gonna be a hit! But don’t worry, you won’t have to search for a bird’s eye view to catch all the great performances. Every seat in the house has a great view! The River Campus isn’t the only thing that seems to be a hit. Redhawks are flocking to the University, and in record numbers! And with the University offering more courses and extracurricular activities than you can shake a tailfeather at, who can blame them?! I am so excited to see all the new faces, but with limited nest space, there just isn’t enough room for this big bird to spread his wings. Fortunately, there’s some more growth we can all look forward to (especially in these cramped quarters). With the possibility of new housing facilities on campus, we Redhawks can stretch our feathers and enjoy the great campus life offered at Southeast even more! In fact, I don’t plan on spending much time in my nest at all this year. I can’t tell you all the details yet, but it looks like I’m gonna have to go buy a new business suit for the spring. As much as I love my Redhawks gear, a bird’s got to dress to impress once in a while.

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Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association One Univeristy Plaza MS 7300 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4799

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 Permit No. 1000

Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University  

Fall 2007 Issue #4

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