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THE MAGAZINE OF S O U T H E A S T M I S S O U R I S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y Fall 2006 ”The mission of The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is to bring the vitality that is Southeast Missouri State University into the lives of its alumni and friends…and it promotes the cause of the University most effectively through its editorial focus on interesting people and interesting ideas… Experience Southeast… Experience Success.”

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The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University is made possible by members of the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association and donors to the Southeast Missouri University Foundation.

enerations change. Throughout my 30-plus years at Southeast, I have seen a few of them come and go. As you will read in this issue of

“The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State

University,” today’s students are referred to as “21st

Century learners,” and I believe there is no more appropriate title

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for their generation.

CO-EDITORS Doug McDermott Director of Marketing & Constituent Relations dmcdermott@semo.edu

Computers. iPods. Instant messaging. In their lives (and all our lives as well), information is on-demand. Southeast stands ready

Diane Sides Director of University Relations dosides@semo.edu

to provide the technological tools to use this information and gain tremendous knowledge.

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Juan Crites Director of Public Services/Publications Wayne Smith Vice President for University Advancement/ Executive Director of the Foundation Jane C. Stacy Director of Alumni Services & Development Art Wallhausen Associate to the President

I sometimes ask myself, what happened to the days of the typewriter and the Dictaphone? When did students’ lives begin to fast forward? Reality happens, but I don’t mourn the loss of these items. Rather, I embrace the fact that the University constantly evolves for our students. Their success clarifies that we are,

CONTRIBUTORS Shad Burner Elisabeth Dunphy Michelle Ha Ann Hayes

indeed, on track, continually growing and changing to prepare them for this fast-paced, global society.

PHOTOGRAPHY Mike Grace Brad Schamness Rob Stahlinski

2006 will celebrate your successes and the variety of careers that

DESIGN Teresa Connell

make Southeast’s alumni population so dynamic. Homecoming

UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT Dr. Kenneth W. Dobbins

2006 will be one for the record books…and we hope you’ll be

Also inside, I hope you’ll be sure to read how Homecoming

there! As always…

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Michael Price, President Joan Gohn, Vice President

Come home soon!

SOUTHEAST MISSOURI UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION Robert Shuck, Chairman Harry Rediger, Vice Chairman

Jane C. Stacy ’72 Director of Alumni Services & Development

L E T T E R S P O L I C Y The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University welcomes submissions by alumni and friends. Class notes and letters may be edited for length and content. Please send all correspondence to editor@ semoalumni.com or to The Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University, One University Plaza MS7300, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701.

ON THE COVER A walk across Southeast’s campus reveals many things, the most important of which is a dynamic group of students who embrace learning and are poised for success. Co-editor Doug McDermott and contributor Shad Burner walked the campus during the first week of the fall semester in hopes of identifying “the face” of the 21st Century learner. They believe they found it.

© 2006 Southeast Missouri State University. Content may not be reprinted without written permission of the editors.

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DEPARTMENTS LETTERS 4 CAMPUS CHRONICLES 5 ALUMNI ALMANAC 27 CLASS NOTES 28 ROWDY’S NEST 31

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Standing Tall Among the Ivy Student opts for education ’Best Buy’

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The Face of the 21st Century Learner

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Education turns high tech

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A Confirmed Leader Southeast alum appointed Marine Corps commandant

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The evolution of Kent Library

The Making of a Titan Football scholarship leads to NFL position

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L E T T E R S Taking Pride in Academic Hall

Stories of Dome Brings Back Fond Memories I offer this special memory of the Dome. Dr. Grauel, my English instructor, gave the assignment of an essay with the Dome as the topic, and my class got the privilege of climbing those many wooden steps so we could look out the windows. We felt quite special to get that opportunity! During the next four years, my memories include the Sorosis Society, the Black Mask Dramatic Club and the big celebration when the Sadie Kent Library was opened. Upon my graduation, I taught kindergarten in Flat River for two years and, after Pearl Harbor, joined the Women’s Army Corps. My military duties included a move to Daytona Beach, Fla., to help set up the 2nd Training Center for the WAAC. There I met Corp. Richard Powers and he encouraged me to exchange military life for “wedded bliss.” Now, 60 some years later, I live in central Michigan, and can answer the trivia question “What city can claim Rush Limbaugh as a past resident?” I recognized Ed Janosik’s name of the Diamond Club. Does he remember Ellen Cherry? — Ellen C. Powers ’39 Gladwin, Mich.

Southeast alum, Ellen C. Powers, in 1941

Where’s My Favorite Part? I’ll complement to format and the attractive color of the new magazine. However, my favorite part of the former publication was always reading about what other classmates by the different years were doing. I was very surprised to see such a very small amount in this publication. Are people just not submitting things anymore? — Diane Lapinski ’74 Maryville, Ill. [ EDITOR’S NOTE ]

You are correct. The magazine receives fewer submissions than in years past. We hope your letter will encourage other alumni to submit their class notes online at semoalumni.com or by mail.

[ EDITOR’S NOTE ]

Mrs. Powers, we called Ed Janosik, and he remembers you!

For four of my five years at Southeast Missouri State, I was a student janitor at Academic Hall and worked for the head custodian, Herman Shaefer. I came to know practically EVERY SQUARE INCH of the building. As part of a small crew of other student janitors, we cleaned restrooms, washed windows and changed light bulbs, and scrubbed and sealed those mosaic floor tiles that you described in the story — all of them — with an 18-inch power buffer twice a year. We jokingly referred to ourselves as custodial maintenance engineers. You related many interesting facts about Academic Hall in your story. Here are some facts you may find amusing: • Before modern central air and heat was installed, the Academic Hall was heated by hot water that was piped over from the campus power plant. One of our responsibilities during the winter was to manually open very large valves at 7 a.m. each morning to start the flow of HOT water through the radiators in the building. After only an hour we closed the valves. Even on the coldest days, it was enough to keep Academic Hall warm for the other 23 hours of the day. (I once went off to a 9 a.m. business class on the third floor and forgot to close the valves. Someone in class remarked about how hot the room was getting. I panicked and raced out of class without giving an explanation. With a master key, I was able to get

through the locked auditorium doors and below the stage to close the valves!) • With no air conditioning, pigeons flew in the open windows of the auditorium leaving droppings on the seats. Once during a graduation ceremony in the late ’50s or early ’60s, two pigeons caused havoc in the packed auditorium. The college president commanded Schaefer do whatever it took to get rid of the two pigeons that had landed on the arch above the stage. With a .22 rifle, he fired once, hitting both birds, which fell to the stage below. Can you imagine what would happen if someone fired a gun near the front door of a university today? When I took the job as a lowly student janitor in Academic Hall, it was with the idea that I’d get a better job when one opened up. I soon came to realize that there wasn’t a better job for a student ANYWHERE on campus! The pride we took in helping to take care of the “Grand Lady” at the top of the hill — even in our small way — made the $1.60 an hour we were paid icing on the cake. If I hadn’t needed the money so much at the time, I’d have walked into the student employment office and told them that they should CHARGE US for the PRIVILIGE of helping to make Academic Hall the landmark that it surely was, and still is. Even though I’m now president of my company in Austin, Texas, I have a sincere appreciation for the efforts of all people that make an organization function. If you don’t have room to run this letter, at least tell the readers that everyone, even the janitors, have been proud of Academic Hall through the years. — Steve Brookins ’74, ’75 Austin, Texas

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ANOTHER RECORD BROKEN: TOTAL SOUTHEAST ENROLLMENT NEARS 10,500

Congratulations on our new magazine. It’s very impressive! We’ve needed a sophisticated, entertaining and informative publication like this one for years. I want to quibble about a couple of minor errors in the magazine as well, but this letter is not intended for publication:

Total undergraduate and graduate student enrollment at Southeast Missouri State University is up 1.8 percent over this time last year, according to the official fourth-week census report issued Sept. 19, making 2006 the 12th straight year of increased enrollment.

(1) On page five in the section entitled “Nationally known Speakers Welcomed”, the last paragraph says that only two U.S. Supreme Court Justices have ever visited the campus. I do know that U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas gave a lecture in Academic Hall Auditorium that I attended as a student, sometime between 1963 and 1965. If I remember this, I’m sure others do, too.

The report shows combined undergraduate and graduate student headcount at a record 10,477, up from 10,292 at this time last year. Total undergraduate student headcount stands at 8,977, up .1 percent from 8,968 at this time last year. Total graduate student headcount is 1,500, up 13.3 percent from fall 2005. Degree seeking master’s degree student headcount is 725, up 11.5 percent from this time last year. Students seeking specialist degrees total 115, up 49.4 percent from fall 2005. Doctoral student headcount stands at 11, the same figure as this time last year. Non-degree seeking master’s degree student headcount is 649, up 10.8 percent.

(2) On page 19 in the “Academic Hall Fast Facts” inset, there are two references to the “1903 World’s Fair in St. Louis,” which was held in 1904. That didn’t bother me so much as the fact that the correct year of that fair appears on the following page.

Southeast’s beginning freshmen headcount is 1,518, down 9.6 percent from this time last year. Continuing freshmen headcount stands at 911, down 1.1 percent from fall 2005. Sophomore headcount is 1,764, up 6.3 percent from this time last year. Junior headcount is 1,660, down .5 percent from fall 2005. Senior headcount is 2,290, up 3.6 percent from this time last year.

These again are minor points, but thanks to Dr. Edmiston in 1961, as well as other faculty, things like these still jump out at me as I read. I call it “the SEMO curse,” but it helped me make a pretty good living for 35 years.

KOHLFELD FAMILY NAMED ‘FRIEND OF UNIVERSITY’

Thanks again for the premiere publication of this impressive magazine.

The Kohlfeld family of Cape Girardeau, Mo., which owns Kohlfeld Distributing Inc. in Jackson, Mo., was selected for the 2006 “Friend of the University” Award by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation.

— Joe Jackson ’65 Frohna, Mo. [ EDITOR’S NOTE ]

The “Friend of the University” award, which recognizes those who support and who are closely associated with the mission, purposes, plans and programs of the University, is the highest honor bestowed by the Southeast Missouri University Foundation.

Joe, thanks for keeping us on our toes and for agreeing to let us publish your letter.

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Family members who received the award include Leo Kohlfeld, who pioneered the Kohlfeld distributorship, and his sons, Mike Kohlfeld, president of Kohlfeld Distributing, and Mark Kohlfeld, vice president of sales for the company. Their wives, Blanche, Barbara and Bobbie, were also recognized.

From left, family members Mike, Leo and Mark Kohlfeld

“This award is very unexpected,” Mike said. “I was very surprised, but it means a lot to us. When you give, you don’t expect to get anything back. If you attach strings to it, it becomes self-serving. This is simply our family’s attempt to do our part to insure our University’s strength.”

UNIVERSITY RELEASES REVIEW ON WOMEN’S BASKETBALL INQUIRY Dr. Ken Dobbins, president of Southeast Missouri State University, outlined results of a review of the women’s basketball team and possible NCAA violations in a press conference June 30. The review was based on an inquiry commissioned by the Ohio Valley Conference (OVC). Dobbins announced that on the basis of the preliminary report, the University will begin self-imposed sanctions on the women’s program while awaiting the final report and a reaction from the NCAA are expected soon. In addition, the president announced violations in the men’s basketball program that were not related to the women’s issues, but were discovered during the inquiry into the women’s program. These violations involved student athlete travel. The University will pay a $12,600 fine and the men’s program will lose five recruiting days in the coming academic year under a recommended selfimposed sanction. For the full news release and to read the report to the OVC, visit: www.semo.edu/news/index_10229.htm C O N T I N U E D

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REDHAWK ATHLETICS TO BE BROADCAST ON ST. LOUIS RADIO AND STREAMED WORLDWIDE For the first time ever, Southeast Missouri State University football and men’s basketball games are being broadcast live throughout the St. Louis area and videostreamed worldwide. The games will be aired on St. Louis’1380 ESPN Radio which also broadcasts a threeminute show on Southeast athletics that airs three times every Friday, and will be streamed on the Ohio Valley Conference’s (OVC) new premium Web site which can be accessed at www.ovcsports.com.

Southeast public relations senior, Kina Coutavas, works on a project in the Macintosh lab in the Department of Communication. The public relations program is one of only nine in the world recognized with accreditation and certifictation.

MAKING NEWS Southeast PR Program Ranks in Top 9 Worldwide

This summer, the public relations program in the Department of Communication helped Southeast become one of only nine schools worldwide to have the double distinction of accreditation from the Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC) and Certification in Education for Public Relations (CEPR) from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). Southeast is the only university in Missouri with the CEPR designation, joining Ball State University (Indiana), Brigham Young University (Utah), California State University-Fullerton, University of Alabama, University of Maryland, University of Memphis, Virginia Commonwealth and Western Kentucky University as the only schools with both mass communication

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accreditation and public relations certification. The PRSA announcement of CEPR credentials comes a year after the Department of Communication completed an in-depth review by ACEJMC, joining only 109 other institutions worldwide in securing the prestigious accreditation in mass communication. Only one other institution in Missouri, the University of Missouri-Columbia, has ACEJMC accreditation. Both are based on a six-year review of curriculum, faculty, students, alumni and facilities.

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“It is exciting to know our athletic teams will get added exposure in the St. Louis area,” said Dr. Ken Dobbins, president of Southeast Missouri State University. “St. Louis is very important to Southeast. More than 40 percent of last year’s beginning freshmen were from St. Louis and we have 16,000 alumni living in the St. Louis area. There are more than 800 former Southeast athletes living in the greater St. Louis area and currently 20 percent of both the football team members and the basketball squad are from St. Louis.” Dave Greene, manager of 1380 ESPN, said his station is excited about the new relationship with Southeast Missouri State. “I know our staff is looking forward to telling the story of Southeast athletics,” he said. ”It will be great to have the games on our station and the shows each Friday will keep area Southeast fans up to date on Redhawks athletics.” Currently, the OVC plans to make available all regular-season and league championship conference contests in football and men’s and women’s basketball, as well as all home non-conference games and select nonconference road contests in those three sports. Streaming video for select baseball, soccer, softball, volleyball and other sports will also be provided. U N I V E R S I T Y

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Online subscriptions will be available on an annual, seasonable and per-event basis. Fans can select from live-streaming video for selected regular-season and conference championships as well as highlights, coaches’ shows, press conferences and other events. Jeff Vernetti, a Southeast graduate who works for 1380 ESPN, will produce the Friday ESPN shows on Southeast athletics.

ATHLETIC TRAINING EDUCATION PROGRAM REACCREDITED FOR 5 YEARS The Athletic Training Education Program at Southeast Missouri State University has been reaccredited for five years by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Southeast’s athletic training program, based in the Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation, was first accredited by the Commission in 1998. Beginning in January 2004, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association required all candidates for the Board of Certification for athletic training exam to graduate from an accredited program. Certification of athletic trainers ensures high standards of care in professional practice. “Accreditation means the program can exist. In order to practice as a certified athletic trainer, students sitting for the certification exam have to graduate from an accredited program,” said Dr. Joe Pujol, chair of the Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation. “We know we have a quality program,” Pujol said, adding the first-time pass rate on the certification exam by Southeast students far exceeds the national average. In a letter to Southeast President Kenneth W. Dobbins, Paula Turocy, CAATE chair, commended Southeast for its commitment to the advancement of quality education in athletic training and for its dedication to the preparation of highly qualified athletic training professionals through effective clinicals and internships.

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S.H.O.W. MOBILE ‘On The Road’ to Improve Health in Southeast Missouri

Using a $650,000 federal earmark announced by U.S. Sen. Jim Talent, the College of Health and Human Services created Southeast Health on Wheels-now referred to as the S.H.O.W. Mobile. In partnership with area health and social service agencies, the S.H.O.W. Mobile staff performs screenings for diabetes, cholesterol, blood pressure, and speech, hearing, dental and vision problems and works to educate its clients on health issues. The S.H.O.W. Mobile also gives Southeast students in several academic departments a variety of opportunities for experiential learning. The S.H.O.W. Mobile is now traveling to Mississippi, Pemiscot, New Madrid and Dunklin counties. Talent, as well as U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson, attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony on campus July 17.

Division IA schools. Outstanding dance teams from Kansas State University, Wichita State University, Iowa State University, University of Nebraska-Omaha and the University of Wyoming were among the teams competing for the award.

SUNDANCERS WIN BID TO NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS The Southeast Missouri State University Sundancers won the Division I college dance team competition at the National Dance Alliance (NDA) collegiate dance team camp Aug. 8-11 at Kansas State University, earning them a paid bid to compete in the NDA Collegiate Dance Team National competition April 4-8 in Daytona Beach, Fla. In addition, the Southeast Dance Team was awarded the Best Overall Team Trophy. To win this honor, the Southeast dancers competed against Division I, Division II and

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“We have some of the best dancers in the nation on our team at Southeast,” said Danielle Alspaugh, a former Sundancer and dance team captain. “I am proud of the hard work they have invested this summer representing Southeast at camp and practicing for games and events. The team is eager to start performing and cheering for Southeast athletic teams. We have started this year off with a bang.” The finals will be broadcast by CBS Sports.

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Joe Gholson of Harrisburg, Ill., has never looked back after choosing Southeast Missouri State University over other college offers, including West Point Military Academy and Tulane University.

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holson is beginning his sophomore year at Southeast as a pre-med major. The valedictorian of his high school class and a proven leader in sports and extracurricular activities, Gholson had nowhere to go but up. During his senior year of high school, Gholson was offered full-ride scholarships to colleges and had to make the choice between attending several schools, with the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and Tulane University presenting him with outstanding offers. His first and ultimate choice was Southeast Missouri State University. Apparently, Gholson is not alone in his choice. A recent article in the Washington Post questions whether Ivy League and other elite schools are worth the sizable investment. It suggests parents should conduct a cost-benefit analysis of their child’s education plans. The article in the Washington Post, entitled “Heaven’s Gate: Will gaining admission to one of the nation’s elite colleges guarantee a prosperous future - or just a mountain of debt?” written by Dante Chinni, cites a study conducted in the late 1990s by a Princeton economist and a researcher with the Andrew Mellon Foundation. The study compared 1,976 freshmen at 34

colleges. They separated out a subgroup of those freshmen who had applied to the same set of elite colleges. They then took members of that subgroup, who are now graduates of elite and public schools, and compared their wages in 1995. The results showed the income levels of these graduates to be “essentially the same.” The article also references another study which shows that fewer executives at Fortune 100 companies received their undergraduate degrees from an Ivy League institution in 2001 than in 1980. According to the article, “at the same time, the percentage of executives with undergraduate degrees from public colleges and universities climbed from 32 percent in 1980 to 48 percent in 2001.” In 2001, 48 percent of those executives had received degrees from public colleges and universities. The percentage C. John Wilder, chief executive officer of the Fortune 500 company of executives TXU Corporation and a Southeast with graduate, is among this group. Other notable Southeast graduates undergraduate include astronaut Linda Godwin, degrees from Cedric The Entertainer, and Lt. Gen. public colleges James Conway, recently confirmed as commandant of the U.S. Marine and Corps. universities The average cost of an Ivy League degree is about $40,000 per climbed to year. In 2006, U.S. News and 48% in 2001. World Report recognized Southeast in the top tier of its “America’s Best Colleges,” also mentioning “LeastIndebted” students and a national “Best Buy” among its top characteristics. With more than 150 areas of study, Southeast holds options for students with a wide variety of career interests. Southeast holds an extensive list of elite national and international program accreditations, including accreditations in mass communications, business, engineering, physics, music, social work, nursing and chemistry. The Princeton Review listed the Donald L. Harrison College of Business among the top business programs in the nation for the past two years. Kaplan’s Guide (2003 Edition) named Southeast a “Hidden Treasure,” one of only 30 institutions nationwide. The annual cost of a Southeast degree may be only one quarter of the price of an Ivy League degree, with the figure based on the average cost for a Missouri resident. Southeast officials say the quality and results of that education allow a favorable comparison with the blue-blooded institutions of old. Thus, it is common today to find top students in the state’s public universities. “When I was a junior or a senior in high school, I looked at the Princeton Review, and West Point was ranked hardest to get into,” Gholson said. “I was invited, and attended, a camp for a week called an ’Invitational Academic Workshop.’ West Point would be considered on par with Ivy League schools, the difference is the military component.” C O N T I N U E D

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success is a comfortable environment because every student has the opportunity to get as much out of textbooks and lectures at Southeast as they do anywhere.” Gholson’s comments echo an Aug. 21 article in TIME magazine titled "Who Needs Harvard?," suggesting that many of today’s college students are looking beyond Ivy League schools to universities where they best “fit.” It also suggests that many smaller, lesser known institutions are providing students with top-quality educational experiences, comparable or better than that which they would receive at an Ivy League school and with a more reasonable price tag. Gholson confirms this assertion, as evidenced by his score last year on the American Chemical Society (ACS)

during the admissions process. “I could call Southeast and ask about scholarships and immediately talk to someone about them,” he said. “If I wanted to talk to a biology professor, I could immediately talk to them. No one ever made me feel unimportant or a burden. I noticed right away that it was really easy to talk to someone with any problem, question or concern.” Gholson said Southeast also offered C O N T I N U E D F R O M P A G E 9 many opportunities outside of the Gholson says he was offered not only a classroom. full-ride scholarship to West Point for his “Here, you are given the opportunity to undergraduate degree, but also the option of do what you want extracurricularly, and if attending the subsequent medical school of they don’t have it, you can make it,” his choice at no cost. Gholson was given Gholson said. “I decided I wanted to create admissible status to West Point, however he a pre-med honor society. Washington withdrew his application before he was University, St. Louis University, and officially appointed Central Methodist to the position by are the only ones The best predictor of success is a comfortable his local with pre-med honor environment, because every student has the representative. In societies in addition, he would have opportunity to get as much out of textbooks Missouri. I went to Dean received a Second Lieutenant (Chris) McGowan and told and lectures at Southeast as they do anywhere. him about it. He wrote out a Commission’s pay after his four years at West Point, which check for $500, and it was that he says is approximately $40,000 a year. examination, which he says is a nationally easy. There’s an opportunity to do Gholson said the discipline aspect of normed test comparing Southeast students whatever a person wants to do here.” West Point was attractive. As the captain to students in other universities across the And Gholson does plenty. He was a of cross country, wrestling and track teams nation. Gholson says the test was given by freshman senator for Student Government, at his high school and his senior class his chemistry professor as part of the class, a member of the Boxing Club, a member of president, he said he knew he would like and he scored in the top five percent in the Big Brother/Big Sisters and a member of the leadership aspect of the school, not to nation for chemistry majors taking the test. the Southeast Student Medical Society. In mention getting paid while going to “I learned all the information on the test fact, as a freshman, he won the Freshman medical school. After careful from my classes, and since it’s done by Chemistry Student of the Year Award. This consideration, however, Gholson said he ACS, it certifies people anywhere, from year, he is a Student Government found the military school opportunity to Harvard all across the country,” Gholson committee-head on the executive board, a require too lengthy a service obligation. He said, “I feel that scoring in the top four to Presidential Ambassador, president of the also said he would rather be serving his five percent shows Southeast did a great Southeast Student Medical Society and country as a doctor than a soldier. job of preparing me. I got my score with a president of the Boxing Club. He is the At Gholson’s alma mater, one fullfairly minimal amount of effort, just only student representative on the tuition scholarship is given each year to a looking over the information the night University Studies Council and is on the student wishing to attend an Ivy League before. Apparently, I learned a lot Dining Services Advisory Committee. He school, with stipulations that the individual throughout the course. also plans on being co-president of the preattend an institution far from Illinois “I came to Southeast on a Governor’s med honor society, Alpha Epsilon Delta, he borders. Gholson, however, saw no Scholarship," Gholson said, "and it gave me has been creating with fellow classmate advantage to attending these universities. the opportunity to not worry about being in Andrew Valleroy. Outside of these “I believe a person gets what they want debt. I could have money in my pocket activities, Gholson says he tutors for the to out of their education,” Gholson said. while going to undergraduate school at University through the Learning “They use the same textbooks at Ivy Southeast.” Enrichment Center and washes semi-trucks League schools as they do at Southeast and Southeast was not the only institution on weekends for extra spending money. even at community colleges. While Ivy offering Gholson a full-ride scholarship. After earning his bachelor’s degree, League schools’ professors may be more Another regional university offered Gholson plans to attend medical school, well-known for cutting-edge research, the Gholson a similar scholarship, which with Mayo Medical School, Washington undergraduate education is more basic. I covered tuition, room, board and all fees, University Medical School and University feel a comfortable environment is more and was also conveniently located in his of Illinois - Chicago all options for him at important than a prestigious establishment home state. But Gholson said he liked the this point. Gholson says, in the future, he of Ivy League. The best predictor of personal attention he received at Southeast hopes to be an ophthalmologist.

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Creativity thrives in the graphic design/3-D imaging and animation studio with software options such as Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and Wacom drawing pen and pad.

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LEARNER How Southeast is going high-tech to advance education

T Southeast students can now venture into the world of 3-D imaging and increase their graphic skills to a professional level.

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here is no formal process to coin the terms that become synonymous with generations. No government committee meets to develop the catch phrase that will follow Americans the rest of their lives. Rather, terms such as “Baby Boomers,” “The Jazz Age,” and “Generation X,” become part of society’s vocabulary through frequent use among media, popular culture and authors.

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Authors Neil Howe and William Strauss are given credit for much of the research that has led to the creation of generational nicknames and helped to better clarify the attributes of a majority of today’s college students, the tech-savvy “Millenials.” These students, born after 1982, are reliant upon technology that is easy to use and communication that is fast-paced. Having been raised in a world of Internet and iPods, their conceptual framework for learning has forced Southeast Missouri State University to take notice. There is no question that these “21st Century Learners” are indeed different C O N T I N U E D

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from students before, and that their success beyond college is reliant upon continual evolution of the University’s facilities, faculty and technological infrastructure. T E C H N O LO G Y T R A N S C E N D S DISCIPLINES

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ware that the 21st Century learner thrives on technology, Southeast provides students the most current advances, not only in the areas of science and polytechnic studies where such methods are commonly expected, but in the liberal arts as well. Students use the Disklavier to record accompaniment to their pieces These advances are allowing allowing them to experience the full sound in practice. professors to change the manner in which they build curriculum and interact with “The genesis of the idea to reach out to students students. with different learning styles using today’s technology came from the students themselves,” Dr. Karie Hollerbach incorporates innovative Hollerbach said. “Some students in my online technologies such as podcasting and audio/visual streaming into her online courses in the Department section of Mass Communication Theory and Research said that it would make a difference to of Communication. These technologies give her them if they could hear me deliver the lectures lectures a 21st-Century-edge while maintaining, through the use of her voice, the human contact that versus reading them on the screen. Others asked if is so much a part of effective classroom interaction. there could be printer-friendly versions of the lecture notes, while a few more wanted to be able Hollerbach uses technology to address varying to see me as a part of the online learning student learning styles, whether the student is a experience.” visual, auditory or kinesthetic learner. For the visual learner, she provides texts of lesson plans on the course Web page, along with video segments of L O O K I N G B A C K , M O V I N G F O R WA R D herself explaining some of the more difficult concepts. Auditory learners benefit from the n the Department of History, no longer are stustreamed audio feed of lectures over the Internet, dents simply reading about the great events and which they can download to an iPod or Mp3 player. cataclysmic wars that shaped modern civilizaFinally, hands-on activities, such as analyzing tion. Thanks to technology, they are also reliving surveys, accessing polls and posting feedback in them. the online forum attract the kinesthetic learner. In Dr. Steven Hoffman’s American history class, students simulate World War II using a computer game called “Making History.” The game allows students to choose sides and make battle decisions in an effort to change the outcome of the war. Southeast is one of the first universities to incorporate this type of software into the history curriculum. The simulation is designed to give students an idea of the ramifications of battle decisions and why events happened the way they did. In May 2006, several history students

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Students in the Donald L. Harrison College of Business can practice and videotape PowerPoint presentations in the new lab.

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Professors, like Dr. Karie Hollerbach, are now more equipped to teach and prepare students for the advanced technological world.

participated in the first entirely online history conference for the American Association for History and Computing Conference (AAHC). Southeast students contributed a variety of media, including video presentations, e-posters and papers, which could be viewed online by all participants. This conference was the first of its kind, according to Hoffman. “This organization wanted to make that first step and put it out there,” he says, “I imagine you will see more of this in the future,” Hoffman said. A R T I S T F I N D N E W C A N VA S F O R C R E AT I V I T Y

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nce thought of as an exclusively hands-on endeavor, technology is forever changing the world of visual art, making it a much more malleable form of expression for students. Student artists are now using software for many of their creative works, allowing them to spend more time in the creative process and less time preparing for it, as images can be manipulated and conformed to the artist’s specific tastes in a truly unprecedented and timely way. Students studying graphic design, illustration, typography and Web design, as well as three-dimensional imaging and animation, are finding benefit from such software as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, GoLive, InDesign, NewTek LightWave and Final Cut Pro. Students use an advanced laboratory where each station contains two large monitors, a scanner and a Wacom Digital Pad.

“In my experience, technology is hugely beneficial in terms of artistic expression,” said Adam Hauck, a senior art major from St. Louis who is studying threedimensional computer imaging and animation. “The tools used in creating artwork are no longer limited to those bought at the local art supply store. The computer, mouse and graphics tablet are all becoming necessary in keeping up with the times. That’s not to say the old tools should be cast aside,” he cautioned. “They are just as important. In working with complex programs like Photoshop and Illustrator, the artist still needs to know fundamentals like drawing, color theory and composition, but artists must come up with new media to develop their work, and what better way to do it than with a computer?” Similarly, students have found benefit with using computer simulation in weaving without losing the time crafted skills of hand-weaving. Students are first required to learn to weave by hand in the mechanical room before being allowed to design, test and develop structures on the WeaveMaker, a simulation computer program that enables students to test weave structure designs in the classroom. With this program, weaving samples that formerly took years to develop can now be completed in a matter of hours. Lindsey Baker ’06, who earned a bachelor of fine arts degree in fibers, is enthusiastic about the impact of technology on her field. “The textiles market has drastically C O N T I N U E D

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Students use Pinnacle software in Robert A. Dempster Hall’s new presentation lab to edit and create special features.

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Podcasting allows busy students to watch class lectures from anywhere in the world. Below, student Dan Presson watches Dr. Karie Hollerbach lecture from his laptop.

A nursing student analyzes vital signs using SimMan, an interactive mannequin that can be programmed with disease symptoms and various physical irregularities. The instructor can select SimMan’s symptoms with a remote control device. This $25,000 investment provides our nursing students with training technology that few universities and hospitals provide.

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HIGH-TECH TRAINING SimMan Provides Training Assistance for Future Nurses SimMan, a $25,000 teaching and diagnostic tool, has revolutionized the manner in which nursing is studied at Southeast Missouri State University. SimMan is a mannequin that simulates cardiac and respiratory irregularities, trauma and diseases, giving students the opportunity to practice critical thinking, symptom evaluation, procedure prioritization, diagnostic methodology and administration of treatment. Lisa Job, instructor of nursing at Southeast, says, ”SimMan’s features will support the students’ ability to reach the correct diagnosis based on active observation, assessment, and hands-on activities, as opposed to being prompted by instructor cues.”

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moved toward computerized design,” Baker said. “It is exciting to see the integration of my creative abilities with the overwhelming possibilities of technology.” Baker, a native of Scott City, Mo., is now furthering her education in Philadelphia University’s prestigious textile design graduate program. MUSIC TO STUDENTS’ EARS

breath sounds, and checking carotid pulse and airway complications. As students practice their clinical skills, SimMan records the nature and timing of student treatment responses on its event log, providing documented feedback to assist student learning. The purpose of undergraduate nursing education-to prepare students for careers in healthcare-is facilitated by such technologically advanced teaching tools. To that end, Southeast is committed to incorporating the latest technology into the learning process.

Since this lifelike tool has the capability of speech, it affords patient-caregiver interaction. The mannequin not only simulates critical emergency situations for nursing students, but also makes it possible for students to practice vital skills such as ventilating a patient, intubation, checking blood pressure, listening to heart and

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echnology is changing the way music is composed, performed and recorded. Currently, music students use Finale and Sibelius software to compose pieces, enabling them to immediately hear their compositions. They can make needed adjustments right away and more easily produce legible scores. Sophomore music performance major Candice Summers of Dexter, Mo., says she is excited about the projects involving Finale software that her music professors are assigning. Whether told to create her own composition or rework a time-tested classic, she says, “Either way, you are creating a piece of music that is truly yours. To do these assignments properly, I had to use the Nursing instructor Lisa Job assists a student as he analyzes SimMan’s vital signs displayed on the laptop computer. The instructor can select SimMan’s symptoms with a remote control device.

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Internet often to look up background information on the songs’ original composers, and familiarize myself with fun computer programs such as Finale.” The department is fortunate to have a Yamaha Disklavier. also. This is an unusual hybrid instrument which is an acoustic baby grand piano that has been completely fitted with midi technology. The piano can record and playback music acoustically, or be used as a synthesizer. The staff accompanist may use the Disklavier to create an electronic file of the accompaniments. The student can then use the file to play back their accompaniment on a computer or another electronic piano. Thus, students can rehearse their pieces even when an accompanist is not available. Practice sessions are personalized with SmartMusic, an interactive, computer-based system. It provides recorded accompaniment for students and is able to respond to students’ input. It follows every accelerando, retard and rubato. With such technology, students have all the advantages of an accompanist for rehearsal without having to coordinate schedules or bear the cost of paying for one. Many music students have heard their instructors tell them “the recording never lies,” as it can provide insight into a great deal about students’ performances that they would not be able to hear on their own. Southeast’s digital recorders have enabled students to send audition recordings that opened doors for them to play for a variety of nationally and internationally renowned musicians such as Rhonda Larson, the Grammy-award flutist scheduled to make an appearance with the Southeast Symphony Orchestra during the upcoming concert season. “Web research and music notation programs have probably had the most impact” [on the music curriculum,] said Whether creating an original or using digital Robert Fruehwald, professor of composition recordings in lieu of a live audition, music at Southeast. "We had all advanced technology opens doors for students to compete and of these things already five perform both here and abroad. years ago, [but] they have gotten better and are used more routinely now.” “Anytime you are talking about designing something for performance, it’s automatically high-tech,” says Gary Miller, director of the School for the Visual and Performing Arts. “Although music is not as technology-oriented as some other fields of the performing and visual arts, it, nonetheless, makes use of lighting and acoustic equipment. The new River Campus T H E

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BELOIT COLLEGE’S MINDSET LIST® FOR THE CLASS OF 2010

W H AT M I L L E N I A L S DON’T REMEMBER Each August since 1998, Beloit College in Wisconsin has released the Beloit College Mindset List. A creation of Beloit’s Keefer Professor of the Humanities Tom McBride and Public Affairs Director Ron Nief, it looks at the cultural touchstones that have shaped the lives of today’s first-year students. According to Beloit, the list ”is meant to be thought-provoking and fun, yet accurate. It often provides the base for good opening seminar discussions as faculty and students address the challenges of examining important issues from differing perspectives.” Members of the class of 2010, entering college this fall, were mostly born in 1988. For them, many of these items hold true: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

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The Soviet Union has never existed and therefore is about as scary as the student union. They have known only two presidents. For most of their lives, major U.S. airlines have been bankrupt. Manuel Noriega has always been in jail in the U.S. They have grown up getting lost in "big boxes." There has always been only one Germany. They have never heard anyone actually "ring it up" on a cash register. They are wireless, yet always connected. A stained blue dress is as famous to their generation as a third-rate burglary was to their parents’. Thanks to pervasive headphones in the back seat, parents have always been able to speak freely in the front. A coffee has always taken longer to make than a milkshake. Smoking has never been permitted on U.S. airlines. Faux fur has always been a necessary element of style. The Moral Majority has never needed an organization. They have never had to distinguish between the St. Louis Cardinals baseball and football teams. DNA fingerprinting has always been admissible evidence in court. They grew up pushing their own miniature shopping carts in the supermarket. They grew up with and have outgrown faxing as a means of communication. "Google" has always been a verb. Text messaging is their email. Milli Vanilli has never had anything to say. Mr. Rogers, not Walter Cronkite, has always been the most trusted man in America. Bar codes have always been on everything, from library cards and snail mail to retail items. Madden has always been a game, not a Superbowl-winning coach. Phantom of the Opera has always been on Broadway. ”Boogers” candy has always been a favorite for grossing out parents. There has never been a "skyhook" in the NBA. Carbon copies are oddities found in their grandparents’ attics. Computerized player pianos have always been tinkling in the lobby. Non-denominational mega-churches have always been the fastest growing religious organizations in the U.S. They grew up in mini-vans. Reality shows have always been on television. They have no idea why we needed to ask "...can we all get along?" They have always known that "In the criminal justice system the people have been represented by two separate yet equally important groups." Young women’s fashions have never been concerned with where the waist is. They have rarely mailed anything using a stamp. Brides have always worn white for a first, second, or third wedding. Being techno-savvy has always been inversely proportional to age. "So" as in "Sooooo New York," has always been a drawn-out adjective modifying a proper noun, which in turn modifies something else. Affluent troubled teens in Southern California have always been the subjects of television series. They have always been able to watch wars and revolutions live on television. Ken Burns has always been producing very long documentaries on PBS. They are not aware that "flock of seagulls hair" has nothing to do with birds flying into it. Retin-A has always made America look less wrinkled. Green tea has always been marketed for health purposes. Public school officials have always had the right to censor school newspapers. Small white holiday lights have always been in style. Most of them never had the chance to eat bad airline food. They have always been searching for "Waldo." The really rich have regularly expressed exuberance with outlandish birthday parties. S T A T E

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Kent Library developing research and learning laboratory to provide increased access to information

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hile card catalogs and quiet reflection characterized the early library experience, today’s students are demanding new methods of research and learning. In response, Southeast is developing The Information Commons at Kent Library, a sophisticated research and learning lab designed with the needs of the 21st Century learner in mind. Information commons, which began emerging on college campuses in the late 90s, are designed to bring together all phases of project production, from brainstorming as a group, to researching print and online resources,

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creating a media presentation and practicing the presentation delivery. According to Dr. Sarah Cron, dean of Academic Information Services and director of Kent Library, the information commons concept is the way of the future for libraries. “Students will be able to research and learn in an environment that is more closely aligned with the professional world,” Cron said. “It is imperative that we always give our students the opportunity to perform at the highest level.” New computer stations will allow several students to gather around a single computer, making group assignments easier and more effective. Group study rooms are being built to give students a place to practice PowerPoint and other forms of presentations. A media editing room will give students the opportunity to learn and work on various types of editing equipment. The Information Commons at Kent Library will be decorated with vibrant colors, U N I V E R S I T Y

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comfortable chairs and couches, tables and ottomans. Larger work spaces will provide students room to relax while studying. The modern look is designed to eliminate the institutionalized setting and be more attractive to the 21st Century learner while also complying with the growing demands of the professional world. In contrast to a traditional library, students at The Information Commons at Kent Library will be encouraged to talk and work together in groups. Locations in the library will remain for individual, quiet research, but bigger computer stations, group rooms and a modern design in The Information Commons will encourage a livelier, cooperative learning atmosphere. Students are already utilizing the newly renovated main floor of Kent Library, now known as “Sadie’s Place,” taking advantage of comfortable areas for reading and research while enjoying coffee and other refreshments.

only search part of the Internet… By paying tuition (and other, assorted fees) students have access to these databases [private Web] wherein they can locate and gather information from peer-reviewed academic and non-academic sources.” Dr. Glen Williams, associate professor of communication studies, is pleased to see Southeast making information literacy training a priority for students. “Being able to find quality information is central to any profession,” Williams said. “We must ensure that our students learn the most upto-date research methods, as well as how to evaluate sources.” “We’re fortunate, also, to have tenure-track faculty lines for our library that allow us to attract well-trained faculty from the finest schools,” Williams said. “We have good reasons to be proud of our library program at Southeast.”

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n recent years, information gathering for research has drastically changed. Scholarly print journals from all over the globe can now be accessed with the click of a mouse. Online access to journals has made searching for scholarly literature more effective and efficient for students. With new advances in information technology, it is imperative that students and professors stay up to date. Library faculty, professional staff and student workers at The Information Commons at Kent Library will be available to help patrons of all technology comfort levels learn how to use these new tools. “It is alright to mourn the decline of print journal holdings, but we should also celebrate the improved access to information,” said Michelle Dubaj, instruction librarian. Only a decade ago, students relied on 2,500 print journals in Kent Library and interlibrary loan services for articles beyond those holdings. Now, students not only have 1,800 print journals in the library, but full-text access to more than 24,000 journals online, almost ten times the information readily available ten years ago. “With more information to choose from, Southeast’s use of online technology requires critical thinking skills that will give our students an advantage when they apply for a job,” Dubaj said. According to a study by Southeast faculty members Claudia Ruediger and Dr. Glen Williams, students benefit from library instruction that promotes critical thinking in research. “Students need first to understand that Google, and other similar search apparatuses T H E

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hile not the first university to have an information commons, Southeast is still at the fore-front of this revolution, consulting with other institutions about which information commons’ components are the most successful. According to Cron, there are only a handful of these facilities across the country, but the success rate is very high. “The idea of an information commons, a place where students and faculty can gather and complete a project from beginning to end, is still rather new,” Cron said, “but those information commons that have already been built are incredibly successful.” Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, opened an information commons in summer 2003, and during the following academic year, library usage increased 81 percent from statistics gathered three years earlier. Their library has also become a center of information literacy with nearly 90 percent of first-year seminar classes including an information literacy session. The University of Missouri-Columbia has also seen success since the completion of its information commons. In only one academic year, the Ellis Library witnessed a 43 percent increase in the number of students using the facility. According to Mary Ryan, head of Ellis Reference Services at Mizzou, the increase can only be attributed to the information commons.

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A CONFIRMED LEADER Southeast alum to lead Marine Corps Lt. General James T. Conway, a 1969 Southeast graduate, was confirmed by the U.S. Senate Aug. 2, 2006, to become the 34th commandant of the United States Marine Corps. Conway was nominated for the post by President George W. Bush June 13. In addition, Conway also received promotion to the rank of general, and he received his fourth star.

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onway, who completed two tours of duty in Iraq as the commander of the I Marine Expeditionary Force, most recently served as the director of operations for the Joint Staff at the Pentagon. “I will strive to ensure our nation continues to have a Marine Corps that is capable and ready, both to win this generation’s war on terrorism and to settle the inevitable crisis for which the nation calls upon our Corps of Marines,” Conway told members of the Senate Armed Services Committee during his confirmation hearing. “America deserves nothing less.” Conway will replace retiring General Michael Hagee, whose term has seen turmoil with accusations of civilian killings by Marines in Haditha and Hamdania and questions of troop morale and debate about the likely success of U.S. military efforts in the Anbar province of Iraq. “My role when I come before you [Senate] is to always tell the truth; only the truth,” Conway said. “I pledge that you will always have my honest assessment of what is required to maintain the health of our Marine Corps and the security of our great nation.” When asked about the state of readiness in the Marine Corps, Conway responded, “The state of readiness of the forces in Iraq are top-notch…they are fully ready for the missions that are assigned.” Conway will be in command of more than 175,000 active Marines, 28,620 of whom were recruited since October, 2005, a total surpassing the Marine Corps year-to-date recruiting goal. This appointment tops an impressive resume which has roots on the Southeast campus. General Conway graduated from Southeast Missouri State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology. While at Southeast, he served as president of both Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity and the Interfraternity Council. After graduating, Conway served as an infantry officer with the 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines, Camp Pendleton, as a rifle platoon commander and as the Battalion’s 106mm recoilless-rifle platoon commander. In 1972, he was reassigned as executive officer of the Marine Detachment aboard the USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63). He served at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego as a series and company commander in the Recruit Training Regiment, as the aide to the commanding general, and as director, Sea School. Conway has also served as senior aide to the chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and deputy director of Operations J-3 for Combating Terrorism. In 1998, he was appointed the president of the Marine Corps T H E

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University at Quantico, Va. More recently, Conway served as the commanding general of the I Marine Expeditionary Force in Iraq. Conway graduated with honors from The Basic School, the U.S. Army Infantry Officers’ Advanced Course, the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and the Air War College. His personal decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with gold stars in lieu of second and third awards, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal and the Combat Action Ribbon.

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Conway will be in command of more than 175,000 active Marines, 28,620 of whom were recruited since October, 2005.

Conway’s family has significant Marine Corps ties. He is married to Annette (Drury) ’70, an adviser for the Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund, an organization that provides financial assistance to injured Marines, sailors and their families, and the couple has three children. Sons, Brandon and Scott, are both Marines with combat tours in Iraq who have earned Bronze Star medals, and daughter, Samantha, is married to a Marine. M I S S O U R I

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At the end of his high school senior year in 2000, San Diego-raised Eugene Amano had yet to receive a scholarship to play college football. He hoped to walk on to the football team at San Diego State or the University of New Mexico.

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hen phoned by a Southeast football coach about prospective junior college players in the area, his Rancho Benardo High School coach attempted to sell Southeast on Amano. Little did Amano know at the time, this call would set in motion a series of events that would eventually make him a Tennessee Titan. After reviewing game film, Southeast offered Amano a scholarship opportunity without even flying him in for an official visit. “Southeast is the only school that gave me an opportunity, a shot to play football, to get a scholarship,” Amano said. Amano chose to move from San Diego to Cape Girardeau to pursue his dream of playing college football and getting an education. “It really was ‘go to SEMO half-way across the country’ or to go to a junior college in San Diego,” Amano said. “I felt that this was a great opportunity to show what I could do, so I took it.”

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Amano says there was definitely a culture shock making the move to Cape Girardeau. “It was hard at first getting used to the people, but after a little bit, it was just like any other place,” Amano said. Amano found comfort hanging out with teammates, and learned early on how to balance his commitments on and off the field. “I learned a long time ago that nothing is given to you. You have to work for everything you get,” Amano said. “Obviously, playing at Southeast, a small school, I felt like I had to work twice as hard to get noticed and get my opportunities.” Amano did get noticed for his hard work, playing every game in college, and starting every game from the middle of his freshman year through the end of his career at Southeast. Starting as a guard, Amano transitioned to center in his senior year. At that position, Amano won the 1-AA Dave Rimington Award, given annually to the top center in college football at each level of competition. Amano credits Mike Chavez, former Southeast offensive line coach who left in 2006 to pursue a career in law enforcement, for getting him to the top of the collegiate ranks. “[Chavez] taught me all the technique, and he moved me to the center position during training camp my junior year,” Amano said. “He had faith in me moving my position that late — three days before my first game. He taught me what I do know, and I owe a lot to him.” During that time, Amano was also named first-team All-American by the American Football Coaches Association, The NFL Draft Report and Football Gazette. He was named second-team All-Ohio Valley Conference sophomore and junior seasons. With 27 hours remaining toward his degree, Amano was selected by the Tennessee Titans in the seventh round of the 2004 NFL draft.

“I was at home, actually asleep, when they called to tell me,” Amano said. “After a long anticipated wait, once I got the call, I was excited and my family was excited that I was getting an opportunity to show what I can do.” But Amano says his family was very adamant that even though he was entering the NFL, he complete his degree. “I made it a big point to go back to school to get it all done as soon as I could because I knew the longer I waited, the harder it would have been to find time to do it,” Amano said. C O N T I N U E D O N P A G E 2 2

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During the off-season, Amano worked toward the completion of his degree, which he received in May, 2006, through online classes, independent studies and an intern-ship in his area of study, criminal justice. “I worked with the Franklin Police Department in Nashville, worked with their undercover drug unit, with undercover police officers,” Amano said. Amano, who hopes to find work as a federal agent or with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) after football, says that working in the field was an eye-opening experience. “Watching dealings of that type of world…I got to see the other side of how it works. It was a lifetime opportunity working with those guys, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

Santa Claus is Comin’ To Town

Ask Doug Greene, and he will say the answer is easy, the “Santa” remote.

What is red and white, less than 3 inches tall, illustrates the spirit of entrepreneurship at Southeast Missouri State University, and is currently on a loading dock awaiting distribution from overseas suppliers?

Greene, an entrepreneur and owner of Skytech Enterprises, is known as the ’father of remote controls for the gas fireplace industry,’ having developed more than 25 unique remote control systems for gas fireplaces and logs in the U.S., Canada and Europe. The Wireless Santa Remote is a remote control in the image of Santa Claus that turns holiday lights on and off with the touch of the button, all to the tune of “We Wish You a Merry Christmas.” With a desire to see Southeast students expand their entrepreneurial skills, Greene donated the molds and technology for the remote control to Southeast Missouri State University in hopes that it could engage students in creating a business plan for the product, establish marketing channels and communication pieces, and grow the business. “If done properly, this project could generate significant revenue for the University,” Greene said.“It’s not just technology, but a chance to set up a real business…maybe even involve other alumni.” The Missouri Research Corporation is facilitating the project, bringing students from a variety of academic disciplines together to advance the aims of “Redhawk Enterprises,” the business entity established to take the remote control to market.

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It’s just a fun field…interesting and fun. Definitely not what movies depict, but still, you don’t know what’s going to happen. And that’s what I like about it,” Amano said. Entering his third NFL season, after playing all but one game in his previous two years, Amano says he hopes to expand his role in the offense. “I want to perform well, and just to get better,” Amano said. “There’s always room to get better.” Amano feels pride in being part of the Tennessee Titans. “Watching guys like Steve McNair, Eddie George, Frank Wycheck - guys who played here, built the organization up…It was quite an experience walking in the locker room and seeing those guys’ names,” Amano said. “Just being surrounded by talented people, it’s unreal. But I’m part of it now, so it’s pretty cool.”

“This is such a cool project,” said Jim Sinnott, general manager of Redhawk Enterprises.“I’ve never had a job where I could bring so many diverse and exited team members to the table to move a product to market.” Sinnott was hired in May by the Missouri Research Corporation to steward the remote control distribution project. “The first group involved was an entrepreneurship class in the College of Business,” Sinnott said,“and now, we have students from the School of Polytechnic Studies and computer science department helping with the Web site, students from the art department working with packaging designs and, hopefully, students from management information systems will soon be helping us develop our customer database and accounting system.” Greene’s vision for expanding the business includes Redhawk Enterprises developing and selling other remote control devices of similar purpose but with different themes, such as mascots of other colleges and universities, children’s themes or even mobility aids for seniors. Greene is a longtime supporter of Southeast whose involvement with the University began with his late wife, Janet Paar Greene, an alumna. In 1999, the Greenes established a scholarship for students in English education, and later, upon Janet’s passing, Greene established two generous deferred gifts in support of the arts at the new River Campus. Greene and his new wife, Heather, continued to support Southeast with their $50,000 Challenge Grant in the University Foundation’s 2005 annual fund campaign and gift of the tooling and technology for the Santa remote project in 2006. Visit redhawkremotes.com for more information. U N I V E R S I T Y

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Alumni Association Events

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OCTOBER 20 6:30 pm MERIT AWARD/COPPER DOME SOCIETY SOCIAL AND DINNER Meet the Merit Award recipients at the pre-dinner social, followed by dinner at 7 pm honoring the 2006 Merit Award recipients and Copper Dome Society members. For more info or reservations, contact the Alumni Association at 573-651-2259 or University Foundation at 573-651-2252.

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SATURDAY O C T O B E R 21 7:30 am ALL ALUMNI BREAKFAST For more info or reservations, contact Jane Stacy at 573-651-2930

The butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker…” The Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association has chosen Homecoming 2006 to celebrate the variety of careers held by Southeast alumni by selecting the theme, Connections@Work. “This year’s Homecoming will be a memorable one,” said Jane Stacy, director of alumni services and SCHEDULE development. “We’ve had OF EVENTS a great response and anticipate a huge alumni For the most showing.” up-to-date schedule Homecoming 2006: of Homecoming events, visit Connections@Work will semoalumni.com or be filled with events and call (573) 651-2259. reunions for people in every age group. From big name entertainment to award ceremonies and football games, Southeast alumni will be able to gather for a time of fun and nostalgia. T H E

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“After students leave campus at graduation and scatter to new careers in new towns, it becomes harder to remain connected,” said Doug McDermott, director of marketing for the Alumni Association. “The best time for alumni of all ages to get together to keep their friendships alive, Homecoming will provide alumni the opportunity to reconnect through a variety of career-based activities.” F R I D AY K I C K S O F F A C T I V I T I E S FOR ALUMNI

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he Donald L. Harrison College of Business will be host to an executive forum at noon on Friday. This informal panel discussion with business executives, moderated by Rex Rust, co-president of Rust Communications, is free and open to the public. The event will be held in Robert A.

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9:30 am HOMECOMING PARADE For more info, contact Angie Grissom at 573-651-2259 or agrissom@semo.edu 11 am SOUTHEAST TAILGATE PARTY For more info, contact Bobby Brune at 573-986-6139 or rjbrune@semo.edu 11 am PICNIC ON THE TERRACES For more info, contact Jane Stacy at 573-651-2930 12 noon BOOSTER CLUB TAILGATE PARTY For more info, contact the Southeast Booster Club at 573-651-2252 1 pm FOOTBALL GAME Southeast vs. Eastern Kentucky! For tickets, call 573-651-2113 or 866-SEMO-TIK or visit gosoutheast.com F A L L

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REUNIONS Homecoming Brings Together a Variety of Groups

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Dempster Hall. Also in the career theme, the “Docs” Reception will be a gathering for alumni holding medical, law, veterinary medicine, educational and any other doctoral degrees. The reception, to be held at 5 p.m. Friday at the Show Me Center concourse, will give Southeast “docs” the opportunity to connect

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everal events are designed to reunite former Vet Corps members at this year’s Homecoming. At 5 p.m. Friday, they will check in and enjoy a reception at VFW Post 3838, located 1049 North Kingshighway. Saturday, Vet Corps members will revive the once popular “Pig Roast.” They will say their good byes at the American Legion Hall at 11 a.m. Sunday morning. Contact Bill Humphries, Thomas Meyer or Tom Giles at 573-334-2876 or tmrealty@swbell.net for more information.

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aturday morning begins bright and early, with an all-alumni breakfast at 7:30 a.m. in the former First Baptist Church Sanctuary located at 926 Broadway. The breakfast is $9 per person and will

Southeast football players who played for Coach Bob Smith from 1984 to 1988 will have a chance to come together once again on Friday evening. The reunion will be held at 9 p.m. The location is yet to be determined. Contact Trent Lane at (573) 675-3485 for more information. An Honors Reception for past and present Governor’s Scholars, Honors Scholars, Honors students and Honors faculty will be held Saturday at 11 a.m. in Kent Library. To RSVP, visit www.semo.edu/honors. For more information, contact Craig Roberts at (573) 651-2513 or croberts@semo.edu. The class of 1956 will celebrate their 50-year reunion on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. The luncheon, which will be held at the University Center, costs $11 per person. Contact Karen Grebing at 573-651-2433 to get more information or reserve a seat in advance.

Southeast vs. Eastern Kentucky

HOMECOMING

Alumni 70 years and older are invited to attend the Diamond Club Reception Saturday at 3 p.m. inside the Marquette Tower in downtown Cape Girardeau. The cost is $10 per person for appetizers and a cash bar.

FOOTBALL

SEMOALUMNI.COM Homecoming 2006: Connections@Work is quickly approaching. For the most up-to-date schedule of events, visit the Alumni Association Web site at semoalumni.com or call (573) 651-2259.

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Saturday, Oct 21 @ 1pm TICKETS 573-651-2113 or 866-SEMO-TIK gosoutheast.com

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Faulkner-Twain Drama Scheduled

TOGETHER AGAIN

A dramatic presentation based on the writings of Mark Twain and William Faulkner will be presented Friday, October 20, at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom.

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“Mr. Twain, Meet Mr. Faulkner,” scripted and directed by Dr. Roseanna Whitlow, instructor of communication studies, is being produced in conjunction with the Faulkner and Twain conference being hosted by the Center for Faulkner Studies.

honor this year’s Distinguished Service Award recipients. They are June (White) Barton, Bob Keathley, Yvonne Keathley, Dr. “Dr. Whitlow has put together a Jerry Kinder, Wedel Nilson and wonderful script,” said Dr. Robert Harry Rediger. For more inforHamblin, director of the Faulkner mation or to make reservations, Center. “It is a moving tribute to contact the Alumni Association two of the world’s great writers.” at (573) 651-2259. The cast of the production will The “Let’s Get the Show on include both students and the Road” Homecoming Parade community members. Admission will commence at 9:30 a.m. at is free, and the public is invited. the corner of Broadway and West End Blvd. The parade will run east on Broadway from West End Blvd. to Main Street. It will then continue south on Main. Southeast’s Homecoming Parade is recognized as one of the largest in the region, and this year’s parade will be an exciting celebration of Southeast pride. The parade marshal will be John Tlapek ’81, president of the Southeast Missouri State University Board of Regents and majority owner and chairman of the board of Auto Tire and Parts Company, Schaeffer Enclosure Co., and Cape Electrical Supply Co. Tlapek is also president of Summit Equity Group, a private equity firm based in St. Louis, Mo. The parade dignitary will be Gen. Seth McKee, former Southeast student, who retired in 1973 as Commander in Chief, North American Air Defense Command (NORAD), a military command consisting of U.S. and Canadian air defense forces. Other special entries in the parade this year are the Vet Corps and the fraternal brothers of Phi Beta Sigma. For more information and to submit entries, contact Angie Grissom at (573) 651-2259 or agrissom@semo.edu. A number of tailgate parties will help fans get pumped up to cheer on the Southeast Redhawks, beginning at 11 a.m. outside of Houck Stadium. This year’s parties include the College of Education/Southeast Public Radio Chili Cookoff and Challenge. Participants will cast their votes for the best chili on campus during this third annual event. Entries from staff, faculty, students, volunteers and on-air personalities will vie for this year’s prize. For more information, contact Dana Bailey at (573) 651-2408 or dbailey@semo.edu or Amanda Lincoln at (573) 651-5078 alincoln@semo.edu. Other tailgate parties include the Department of Criminal Justice Tailgate Party, the Phi Beta Sigma Tailgate Party and the Alpha Phi Alpha Tailgate Party. In addition to these, current Alumni Association members are invited to attend the Booster Club Tailgate Party at noon, in the Booster Corral at Houck Stadium. There will CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 T H E

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Vet Corps Reunites for Homecoming 2006 rom 1967-75 the Vet Corps was one of the most recognized student groups at Southeast. Comprised of men who returned from serving in Vietnam, the Vet Corps’ membership was of no particular socioeconomic or racial background, but instead a common experience as young people in war. “We were at a pivotal time in our lives,” said Buzz Thompson ’75.“I went from bagging groceries one day to being in charge of several thousand dollars worth of equipment the next.” Many of these men sought camaraderie upon their return to college, and felt that forming their own group, as opposed to joining a traditional fraternity, would provide that. “After the service, a lot of the students our age had graduated and moved on,” said Tom Meyer ’75, former member. “Being able to have friends around who knew what you went through was an important part of adapting back into the college life.” Many members of the Vet Corps spent three to four years serving their country during what would have been the middle of their college career. This forever changed their outlook on college and life in general. “In the military you learn to trust the person beside you,” Thompson said. “When your life is in the hands of someone else it really changes the way you look at friendship. Even though you may not have known any of the other Vet Corps members when you were in the service, you knew that they were the only other students on campus who could relate to your experiences.” This attitude shaped the environment of the Vet Corps. Through the allure of strong friendships and mutual trust, the group quickly became one the biggest and most popular student organizations on campus.

LEFT TO RIGHT: Tom Giles, Buzz Thompson and Thomas Meyer

“We were a popular group that carried a lot of clout,” said Mike Beard ’71, former Vet Corps president.“We had the power to get things done and enough people to do it.” Tom Giles ’71, former Vet Corps member, said that he developed close friends in the Vet Corps.“I have remained friends with several of the guys that I met in the Vet Corps,” Giles said.“These guys represent an important connection to my past and I look forward to reliving old memories at this year’s Homecoming.”

Mike Beard, Former Vet Corps president

Giles and many of the other Vet Corps members specifically look forward to recreating their signature event, the pig roast.“The pig roast was the biggest party of the year,” Beard said.“We all looked forward to it, and I’m sure that the one at Homecoming 2006 will be no different.” The Vet Corps will also be greatly represented at the front of this year’s parade. With an invitation to all veterans who have attended Southeast, a tremendous turn out is expected.“We set the goal of 1,000 participants in the parade, and each day that goal is becoming more and more realistic,” Meyer said. While he is excited about the prospective turnout, Meyer also stressed that they would still have fun if only a handful of people showed up. S T A T E

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be a picnic on Academic Terraces from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and all former students are invited to tour the Southeast Explorer and the S.H.O.W. Mobile. Live music and hot dogs with all the trimmings will be available. All alumni who work in the health care profession are invited as special guests. In addition, Southeast alumni are invited to “Rally Round” the new Sadie’s Place inside Kent Library at 11 a.m. Special collection areas will be hosted by various colleges and professional groups, and refreshments will be provided by Kent Library. For the SCHEDULE “docs” in the crowd, a OF EVENTS commemorative picture will be taken For the most of all present at 11:30 up-to-date schedule a.m. of Homecoming A rousing pep rally events, visit will be held at noon semoalumni.com or on Academic Terraces, call (573) 651-2259

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led by Barry Bernhardt, Golden Eagles Director. All former members of the Golden Eagles are asked to join in the walk to the stadium and onto the field to sing the Alma Mater. The annual Homecoming football game will kick off at 1 p.m. in Houck Stadium as the Southeast Redhawks take on the Eastern Kentucky Colonels. Members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity will be recognized at halftime as will all former members of the Golden Eagles Marching Band who have participated in one of the bands directed by 2006 Faculty Merit Award Recipient Barry Bernhardt. There will be a pre-game introduction of SEMO Vet Corps past members at the end of the field. For tickets, call (573) 651-2113 or toll-free at (866) SEMO-TIK, or visit www.gosoutheast.com. On Saturday, mid-afternoon hunger can be satisfied at Dr. Tom Harte’s cookbook signing, which will be held on the fourth floor concourse of the University Center at

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2 p.m. Harte’s book was published by Southeast’s University Press. Harte is professor emeritus of speech communication and theatre, and host of Café Concerto on Southeast Public Radio. SUNDAY PROVIDES WIND-DOWN

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unday will provide an opportunity for those returning to Cape Girardeau to enjoy a tour of the city. Those who board the bus at 10 a.m. at the Wehking Alumni Center, 1401 North Sprigg St., will visit the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge, the Mississippi River Tales Mural, the Red House Interpretive Center and the River Campus. After the tour, lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. at the Marquette Tower, followed by a tour of the renovations in the old Marquette Hotel. Reservations are required. Contact Jane Stacy at jcstacy@semo.edu. Phi Beta Sigma will hold church services at the Baptist Student Union at 11

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Merit Awards to Honor Alumni, Faculty Seven alumni and a faculty member will receive Merit Awards presented by the Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association Oct. 26 at the Copper Dome Society/Merit Award Dinner. Since 1958, Alumni Merit Awards have been presented to Southeast graduates who have brought distinction to themselves and to the University. The Faculty Merit Award is presented for excellence in teaching.

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Dr. David Amberger ’80, who majored in biology, is the only pathologist in Hawaii on the list of Best Doctors in America. Amberger founded Aloha Laboratories in 1992 and established an unparalleled anatomic laboratory serving Hawaii, one of only two laboratories in the nation selected by Harvard Medical School Pathology for an off-site elective rotation in anatomic pathology. He holds board certification in anatomic and clinical pathology, as well as dermatopathology, and is a member of the Hawaii Dermatological Society and the Hawaii Society of Pathology.

Gary Downing ’72, who majored in marketing, is chief executive officer of Lansinoh Laboratories. Downing began his career with Richardson-Vicks in sales and was promoted in 1982 to national sales manager of broker operations. In 1984, Downing became vice president of sales and marketing for Oral-B Laboratories. In 1989, he ran the consumer products division of Rhone- Poulenc Rorer, and, in 1995, became chief executive officer of Medtech Lab, a company he created with two partners. Downing has served on the board of directors of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association for 15 years.

Dr. Edward Cleino ’38, who majored in music at Southeast, taught percussion and music education at the University of Alabama from 1949 to 1978 and is professor emeritus of music and music education. In 1957, Cleino began his 18year-partnership with Alabama Public Television to produce and distribute a weekly show entitled "Music Time" that offered music lessons to more than 60,000 children in 200 schools. Cleino was principal percussionist of the St. Louis Philharmonic in 1934, the Nashville Symphony from 1946 to 1949 and the Birmingham Symphony from 1949 to 1951.

Donald Heeb ’57, who majored in physical education, is retired athletic director, head football and golf coach of Vianney High School. During his 30year-tenure, he earned awards, including Coach of the Year and Missouri Athletic Director of the Year, and he also was inducted into the St. Louis Football Hall of Fame. Heeb began his career in 1958 at Mercy High School. In 1986, he served on the East Coaching Staff of the Missouri Lions High School all-star game in Jefferson City, Mo. In 1997, he received the St. Louis Officials Award, becoming the first person in the history of the Association to be honored as both a coach and an official.

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Mark Hitt ’82, who majored in agribusiness, has traveled to 12 countries in North and South America, Europe and Asia during his 16 years at the Missouri Department of Agriculture. As international marketing director, he and his staff help Missouri farmers, food processors and forestry product companies expand their export sales. Hitt also coordinates Missouri offices in Guadalajara, Mexico, Taipei, Taiwan and Jefferson City.

Lt. Gen. Clyde Vaughn ’68, who majored in physical education, assumed duties as director of the Army National Guard in 2005. Vaughn, the only Missouri National Guardsman to ever attain the federally recognized rank of lieutenant general, guides the formulation, development and implementation of all programs and policies affecting the Army National Guard, a force of 350,000 soldiers in 54 states, territories and the District of Columbia. He was commissioned through the Missouri National Guard Officer Candidate School program in 1974 and served in a variety of command and staff positions as a traditional guardsman and on active duty. He has served extensively in Central and South America on several deployed task forces. His general officer assignments were as deputy director of operations, Readiness and Mobilization, and the deputy director of Military Support under the G3 of the U.S. Army. He then served as deputy director of the Army National Guard, and most recently, he was assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for National Guard matters.

Kathy Kremer Toon ’74, who majored in secondary education with a major in speech education, teaches homeless children of downtown San Diego, often going to the streets to find them. For her work, Toon has been honored as one of 38 California teachers of the year. When she first came to San Diego, she taught students in Juvenile Hall who were confined to their cells due to the severity of their crimes. Then, she moved to a residential treatment center to teach the severely emotionally disturbed. Toon’s goal is to make school a safe haven for her students and a place they can feel safe and successful.

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Barry Bernhardt, who joined the Southeast faculty in 1990, directs the Golden Eagles Marching Band, the Southeast Wind Symphony, the Southeast Show Band and the Southeast Chamber Winds. He is a founding member of the Southeast Faculty Brass Quintet, chairman of the Department of Music Scholarship, Student Recruitment and Retention Committee, and is the director of Summer Music Camps. He has performed with the Paducah Symphony Orchestra, the Moody Blues, Colin Raye, the Temptations, the Jim Widner Big Band, Clark Terry, the Southeast Faculty Jazz Combo and many others. Bernhardt has been on the production staff of Bowl Games of America for 17 years and has written and conducted halftime shows for the San Francisco, Gator, Liberty, Alamo, Holiday, Sugar and Orange bowls. He wrote and conducted the Gator Bowl Halftime Show in January for NBC-TV. He also has conducted halftime performances for three NCAA National Championship football games. S T A T E

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N O T E S Want to see even more class notes? We do, too!

Ed Janosik '39 and Jean Twitty '74 are co-hosts of the morning show on KWTO Radio in Springfield, Mo. Eleanor Langsdorf (Goeke) ’33 is a retired math teacher in Austin, Texas.

1940s Robert Kaempfer ’46 is a retired lieutenant colonel of the United States Air Force in Sawano, Wis. Allie King (Franks) ’46 is a retired elementary teacher in Long Beach, Calif. Elizabeth McIntosh (Dunn) ’46 retired after 25 years teaching business and economics at Central Methodist University, and she lives in Fayette, Mo.

1950s Mary Baumstark (McConkey) ’52 is retired in Omaha, Neb. Jay Purcell ’54 and wife Joanne (Warren) ’56 are retired in Houston, Texas. Dr. Rod O’Connor ’55 is an environmental chemist and owner of Chemical Consulting Services. O’Conner and wife, Shirley (Sander) ’56, live in Texas and celebrated their 51st wedding anniversary this year. Paul Copeland ’56 is a retired principal of 25 years in Union, Mo., where he lives with wife of 49 years, Mary Anna. Donald Doerle ’56 is a retired educator and lives in Mundelein, Ill, with wife, Dorothy. Gerald Geringer ’56 is retired CEO of Southwest Medical Center and a former Kansas state representative, and he lives in Junction City, Kan. Carolyn Kuethe (Hutton) ’56 is a retired home economics teacher who lives in Edwardsville, Ill., with husband, Melvin. Mary Turner (Grebing) ’56 is retired chairperson of the English department at Granite City Illinois School District, and she lives in Camdenton, Mo., with husband, Al. William Page ’57 is a retired teacher, keynote speaker and independent educational consultant in Nashville, Tenn. Gerald Birkmann ’59 recently opened a new optometry office in New Melle, Mo. Birkmann lives in Washington, Mo.

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1960s Arthur Geldbach ’61 is owner of GFS and Associates. Geldbach and wife, Constance ’62, reside in Las Vegas, Nev. Rose Bartel (Dunnegan) ’63 is retired in Pleasanton, Calif. Emma Bollinger (Swiger) ’66 is retired from Festus School District in Festus, Mo. Bollinger and husband, Gerald, live in Festus, Mo., and have five children. Elsie Buttrey (Nothdurft) ’66 and husband, Dave, live in Fisk, Mo., and own and operate Buttrey Truck Sales. Robert Cowles ’66 is an associate professor at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo. Dennis Davis ’66 has been a private practice attorney and partner in Stinson Morrison Hecker since 1996. He resides in Kansas City, Mo. Mary Duda (Mohrman) ’66 retired to Florida in 2005, after serving as training manager for the Illinois Department of Children & Family Services. James Evrard ’66 is chief financial officer and treasurer for Sonardyne in Kingwood, Texas, and has three grown children with wife, Mary. Bill ’66 and Harriet Fader (Schweisguth) ’66 are retired teachers in Wentzville, Mo. Teryle Forrest ’66 is a retired Bristol-Myers Squibb antibiotic fermentation supervisor. Married to retired teacher, Mary Catharine (Schramek) ’66, they reside in Union Hall, Va. Thomas Ganahl ’66 is retired from Tyco Healthcare, and with wife, Kathleen, has four children and five grandchildren. They live in Scottsdale, Ariz., and enjoy traveling in their motor home. Daniel Kertz ’66 is a retired Treasury Department bank examiner in Festus, Mo. James Korbelik ’66 is retired from teaching in St. Louis, Mo., and wife, Wylaine (Vornbrock) ’66 is retired from AT&T. They live in Jordan, Ark.

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Eleanor Langsdorf (Goeke) ’66 is a retired alternative education program math teacher in Austin, Texas. Deanna Long (Woeltje) ’66 is childcare policy and procedure analyst for the State Department of Health and Senior Services in Jackson, Mo. Jack Maxwell ’66 is director of field services and young farmer activities for the Missouri Farm Bureau Federation in Jefferson City, Mo. Patricia Murray ’66 is retired from teaching at Southeast Missouri State University and is co-owner and counselor at Regional Employee Assistance Program in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Jimmie New ’66 is a home builder with Monterey Custom Homes in Chesterfield, Mo., is married to Darlene and has two children. Barbara Plumb ’66 is a retired English teacher from Ritenour High School in St. Louis, Mo. Larry Points ’66 is retired chief of park interpretation at Assateague Island National Seashore for the National Park Service, and is an author of children’s nature books. Points resides in Delmar, Md. Donald Rhodes ’66 is an attorney in Bloomfield, Mo., and is married to Sandra (Fowler) ’64. Martha Short (Ammann) ’66 is an educational consultant, retired teacher and current adjunct faculty member at two universities. Short lives in Jackson, Mo. William Stacy ’66 is a retired U.S. Army historian in Army Claremont, Calif. Jerry Waddle ’66 is retired superintendent of schools and current associate professor of education at Southeast. Dianne Wallace (Jordan) ’66 is a retired math and English teacher from Ritenour School District in St. Louis, Mo., and husband, Ronald (’66) is a retired industrial technology teacher from Webster Groves School District. Linda White (Knowles) ’66 is a retired social worker in Bloomington, Minn.

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Thomas Wood ’66 is a senior consultant with American City Business Journals and lives in Chesterfield with wife, Julie Wood (Evans) ’66. He is senior consultant with American City Business Journals. Tom is a past Southeast Alumni Merit Award winner. Steven Curtis ’67 is director of the School of Music at University of Oklahoma. Richard ’71 and Kathryn Hinkebein (Flavin) ’67 are retired in Wentzville, Mo. Evelyn Vetter ’68, head librarian and assistant professor at Missouri State University-West Plains, has been named to Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers, Who’s Who of American Women and Who’s Who in America.

1970s Susan Koch (Koeln) ’70 is principal at Simi Valley Unified School District in Simi Valley, Calif., is married to Richard and has three children. George Rambo ’71 is vice president information technology at American Capitol Insurance in Houston, Texas. Laura Rodriguez (Sextro) ’71 is retired from the University of California at Santa Cruz and lives in Soquel, Calif., with husband, John Boisseranc. Linda Suedekum (Lindy) ’71 is a retired teacher from Jackson R-2 School District and resides in Cape Girardeau, Mo., with husband, Jerry (’66) who is also retired from teaching. Susan Weston (Ryan) ’72 is a retired teacher and lives in Cape Girardeau, Mo. with husband, Edward. Kerry DeGregorio (Reed) ’73 is director of casework and constituent services for Congressman W. Todd Akin and lives in St. Louis, Mo. Margaret Fuller (Brooks) ’74 is a teacher at Piggott Public Schools in Arkansas., was named Wal-Mart Teacher of the Year in 2002, and has been listed in Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers the last three years. Bertha Muenks (Hayward) ’74 is deputy director of Southern Hills Counseling Center in Jasper, Ind., and was appointed chairman of the Indiana Social Worker, Marriage and Family Therapist, Mental Health Counselor Board. Kenneth Tallent ’74 is vice president and general manager of Finocchiaro Wine Company in Omaha, Neb.

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John Ebbesmeyer ’80 is senior membership executive at the RitzCarlton Club and lives in Orlando, Fla. Keith Maddox ’80 is executive vice president of Delmar Financial Company in St. Louis, Mo. William Bowe ’81 is vice president of business development at Blast Companies and is married to Jean (Mullersman) ’82, kidney transplant coordinator at Barnes Jewish Hospital. The Bowes have three children and live in St. Louis. Deborah Braman (Gaghyan) ’81, teacher in the Wentzville School District, was named 2006 Wal-Mart Teacher of the Year for Lake St. Louis, Mo. Cynthia Stone (Lewis) ’81 received a doctor of education degree from the University of Texas-El Paso, and lives in El Paso, Texas, with husband, Ronald.

William Vandeven ’81 is president of Midwest Independent Bank in Jefferson City, Mo. Mark Hoeman ’82 is president of Hoeman Capital Management. He and wife, Karen, reside in Chesterfield, Mo. and have two children. Rita Lewis (Rankin) ’84 received a bachelor of science in health service management degree from Eastern Carolina University in May, 2006, and is a nurse with Aureeus Medical/Nursing. Lewis lives in St. Charles, Mo. Joey McCormick is placement coordinator for the 33rd Judicial District Juvenile Probation Department., and lives in Burnet, Texas, with wife, Stephanie, and two daughters. Corporal Alan Barborek ’85 is director of boating safety education and oversees the Commission and Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Program for the Missouri Water Patrol.

Clara Proskey (Parks) ’85 is manager of medical staff services at St. Alexius Hospital in St. Louis, Mo. Proskey and husband, Tim, have two children and live in Glendale, Mo. John Cleary ’87 is an account executive for Big River Communications; owns Olde Town Enterprise Group, a small construction company; and lives in Eureka, Mo., with wife, Lisa (Stevens) ’87, a stay-at-home-mom. Thomas Neff ’88 is environmental review coordinator for Kansas City, Mo., and lives in Morningside, Mo. Joseph Wehmeyer ’88, a former elementary teacher, is senior editor for Pearson Cott Foresman Publishing in Glenview, Ill. Pamela Anglin (Miller) ’89 is area director of USDA Rural Development for the 14-county Southeast Missouri district, based in Dexter, Mo. Michael Harrison ’89 is a counter intelligence technician with the U.S. Army and lives in San Antonio, Texas. C O N T I N U E D

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Jukka Majanen ’89 is director of marketing - executive education at the Asian campus of INSEAD, an international business school in Singapore. Teresa (Hampton) Connell ’89 is a graphic designer for KFVS12, a CBS affiliate in Cape Girardeau, Mo.

1990s William Battle ’90, sports editor for the Washington Missourian, won the National Newspaper Association first place award for best sports photo, first place for non-daily newspapers with circulation of 12,000 or more, and the sports section won first place among non-daily newspapers with circulation of 12,000 or more. Battle resides in Washington, Mo. Susan Lesher (Hantak) ’91 is a teacher with the Mehlville School District in St. Louis, Mo. Timm Schowalter ’92 was named partner with the law firm of Lashly & Baer, P.C. in St. Louis, Mo. Brent Lyon ’93 is regional manager for Schaeffler Group in Dallas, Texas, and currently lives in Highland Villlage, Texas, with wife, Diane, and four children. Dana McDonald (Dickerson) ’93 is a real estate and health law attorney at Gallagher, Evelius & Jones LLP, and resides in Baltimore, Md., with husband, Lance, and son, Benjamin. U.S. Air Force Major Douglas Welter ’93 is serving at Osan Air Base, South Korea, and is married to Rebecca (Semsrott) ’92. Kathleen Wilds (Hayes) ’93 is a financial planner for Raytheon Missile Systems in Tuscon, Ariz. Chad Haferkamp ’94 is an applications engineer at McCarthy Building Companies, and was recently appointed to the board of the Central States Oracle Applications User Group. Haferkamp lives in O’Fallon, Mo. with wife, Roz, and three children. Shannon Kitchen ’94 is Southeast Missouri outreach coordinator for the St. Louis Chapter of The Alzheimer’s Association. Mike Kittinger ’94 is senior analyst at AmerenUE and lives in St. Louis with wife, Kelly (Hickey) ’92. Kathy Kufskie (Rigdon) ’94 is assistant professor of psychology at Southwestern Illinois College, and is married to Michael ’94, sales manager for Paul Cerame Ford. The Kufskies live in Maryville, Ill.

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Christopher Morrill ’94 is an investigator with St. Paul Travelers Insurance in Memphis, Tenn., and resides in Cordova, Tenn. Jerry Freshwater ’95 is assistant principal at Justice Middle School in Marion, Ind., and wife, Heather (Bess) ’97, is a case manager with Pam Simmermeyer Case Managment. Cindy Thurman (Roche) ’95 is vice president and credit and compliance officer for Royal Banks of Missouri and lives in Fenton, Mo. Bridget Brady (Kranefuss) ’96 received a master’s degree in elementary education from Southern Baptist University. Brady resides in Valley Park, Mo. Deena Fischer (McCutchen) ’96 is director of public relations and marketing at SSM St. Joseph Hospital in Lake Saint Louis, Mo. Toni Hill (Dawson) ’96 is superintendent of the Portageville (Mo.) School District. Bridget Kranefuss ’96 and husband, Jeff, welcomed a son on April 4, 2006, and live in Valley Park, Mo. Christine Mah (Petitt) ’96, business administrator at Carnegie Mellon University, lives in Pittsburgh, Pa., with husband, Calvin. Angela Shahan (Christian) ’96 teaches fourth grade gifted and talented students in Beaumont, Texas. Clay Woemmel ’96 is assistant director of career and employment services at The University of Memphis in Memphis, Tenn. Christopher Blair (Schoessel) ’97, musician and songwriter, is president of Barrett Entertainment Group in Nashville, Tenn. Steven McAnelly ’97 is vice president of Capaha Bank in Cape Girardeau, Mo and is married to Connie (Schlosser). Deborah Taylor (Turner) ’97 is administrator and chief executive officer at Landmark Hospital in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Michael Windeknecht ’97 is area manager for XTRA Lease, LLC, in Irving, Texas, and resides in Richland Hills, Texas, with wife, Tammy (Fornkohl), and three children. Rosemarie Edwards ’98 is an IT auditor at MIB Banc Services LLC a subsidiary of Midwest Independent Bancshares, Inc., and lives in Jefferson City, Mo. Jerris Mapes (Penrod) ’98 is assistant city attorney for the city of Killeen, Texas, and is an adjunct professor at Tarleton State University Central Texas. O F

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Laura Nicholson ’98 joined Husch & Eppenberger LLC as an associate attorney in general business litigation and health law practice. Nicholson lives in Lowell, Mass. Peggy Hoppe (Stocker) ’99 is a primate keeper at the St. Louis Zoo in St. Louis, Mo. Kathleen Mays (Clark) ’99 is chief financial officer for Delta Center, Inc., and lives in Anna, Ill., with husband Brian. Amy Riley (Cross) ’99, design director for Modern Business Interiors in St. Charles, Mo., and husband, Jaison Riley, welcomed daughter Emma Marie Sept. 29, 2005. Drew Tinnin ’99, coordinator of orientation and welcome programs at the University of Michigan, received the National Orientation Director Association’s Outstanding New Professional Award and lives in Yypsilanti, Mich. Anne Willis (Hassen) ’99 and husband, Clint, of Jackson, Mo., welcomed their second son, Owen Matthew.

2000s Darren Burgfeld ’00 is Texas tour manager for Emergenza US Entertainment, an international music festival company, in Dallas, Texas. Kimberly Roedl (Dame) ’00 is assistant director at Creative Kids, Inc. in Columbia, Ill., and lives with husband, Steve. Jonathan Lintner ’00 is a student at Southern Illinois University Law School. Wife, Holly (Yeager) ’00 is Resource Development Manager for United Way of Southeast Missouri. They have three children and reside in Cape Girardeau, Mo. Joanna Shaver (Mabry) ’00 is coordinator of campus programming at Southeast Missouri State University, and lives in Scott City, Mo., with husband, Phillip ’02, operations manager for Rhodes 101 Stop. Tina Simer ’00 is a math teacher at Cobden Junior and Senior High School and is married to James M. Reames. Erin McCullough ’02 is a print/production assistant at Universal Map in Lake Mary, Fla.

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Jenell Anderson ’03 is associate editor for alumni and development communications at Millikin University, received the Council for Advancement and Support of Education Ray Willemain Fellowship in 2005, and is married to Gary Hironimus. Angela Yoder ’03 is a children’s social worker with the Division of Social Services in Hillsboro, Mo. Katie Beers ’04 is a lab technician for Monsanto Corporation in St. Louis, Mo. Lisa Donovan (Schaefer) ’04 is a certified nurse assistant at Bethesda Dilworth in Kirkwood, Mo., and lives in St. Louis, Mo., with husband, Andrew ’06. Kevin Lankheit ’04 received a master’s degree in geological science from Murray State University with an emphasis on remote sensing, and currently works Pennyrile Area Development District in Hopkinsville, Ky. Elizabeth Powers ’04 received a master’s degree in petroleum geology from Kansas State University and works in exploration and production of unconventional play at Shell Oil. Robert Schmelig ’04 is a market analyst with Edward Jones and resides in Creve Coeur, Mo. Jennifer Sokolova (Landers) ’04 lives in Risco, Mo., with husband, Yevgeny. Audrey Brannan (Royster) ’05 is administrator of Americare St. Francis Park Assisted Living Facility in Kennett, Mo. William Cohn ’05 is a loan officer for First State Community Bank and lives in Kennett, Mo. Erick Schuermann ’05 attends Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine and expects to graduate in 2009.

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LIGHTS. CAMERA.

ACTION!

Wait, wait. Where’s the makeup lady? And when’s the craft services table going to be set up? Y’know, I could start to enjoy this…But I’m only kidding. Even though I became a big TV star this past summer, I won’t get a big head…or beak for that matter. But I gotta tell you, it was the opportunity of a lifetime when Dave Price, the top-notch morning weather guy from CBS’s The Early Show, visited Cape Girardeau and let me share the spotlight. I got to be there in front of millions of people when he sent out the weather forecast on that warm June day. And all my family and flock of avian friends told me that

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I looked great when they saw me. They said the camera didn’t even add 10 pounds. (What a relief. I’m still working off that birthday cake I told you about in the last issue!) It was amazing watching Dave and his crew (Yeah, he let’s me call him “Dave”) get down to business in making a live television show. I don’t know how he makes it look so easy. I almost tweeted like a baby bird when I saw the red light come on the camera…and I wasn’t even in the shot. (Note to self: Better take some video classes if I want to get good, so I can be Dave’s replacement when he retires many years from now.) I guess I’m a little biased in thinking that Cape Girardeau was the best stop on Dave’s 16-city tour, but it had to have been. Not only were the coolest people in town decked out on the banks of the mighty Mississippi, but it was Flag Day. You couldn’t shake a stick at the patriotism in that crowd. AllAmerican town; that’s what Dave was looking for, and he got it. Red, white and blue. This TV star’s got the “Red” covered!

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Southeast Missouri State University Alumni Association One University Plaza MS 7300 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701-4799

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 Permit No. 1000

Magazine of Southeast Missouri State University  

Fall 2006 Issue #2

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