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Uqalugaawich W H E R E

SECOND QUARTER, 2016

P E O P L E

VOLUME 37

S H A R E

I N F O R M A T I O N

ISSUE 2

Betty N. Brower says a prayer before the annual meeting in Kaktovik.

Qiksiksrautiqabniqput Avanmun Respect for Each Other – We embrace and respect the cultural diversity of our organization through sharing and team building for continued trust and connection.

asrc.com


Contents T A B L E

O F

1 Making the connection: opinion editorial by Tara Sweeney ..................................... 3 ASRC announces new acquisition ........................................................................... 5 Questions about ASRC’s 401(k) plan? ..................................................................... 6 Announcement from the ASRC Stock Department ................................................... 7 AEF announces 2016 scholarship winners ............................................................. 8 AEF congratulates graduates of 2016 ...................................................................10 2016 high school leadership award winners .........................................................10 2016 annual meeting prize winners ......................................................................11 ASRC 2016 annual meeting in Kaktovik ................................................................12 ASRC Federal security team recognized for excellence .........................................14 Shareholder spotlight: Rosemary Berg .................................................................16 Barrow team competes in tournament ..................................................................17 President’s message ...............................................................................................

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President’s message Although we are only halfway through 2016, when it comes to the Corporation, the year is already shaping up to serve as an excellent reminder of the vital importance of early preparation and teamwork. Many of the same challenges we faced in 2015 have followed us into the New Year; these economic hurdles range from continued low oil prices to uncertainty in the structure of the state’s oil tax credit program. Unfortunately, it’s likely we’ll be doing business inside a low oil price environment well into this year and beyond. Challenges for our people are nothing new. I’m confident, thanks to the leadership of our board of directors and hard-working staff, ASRC will remain profitable through this difficult time and emerge from this down cycle stronger and more focused. Though there are disappointments, we do have plenty to be thankful for. The 24-hour daylight has awakened the season of renewal across the North Slope; from the pectoral sandpiper to the red-necked phalarope, dozens of species of migrating shorebirds are nesting on the warming coastal tundra. Across the western uplands, the horizon is dotted with hundreds of thousands of tuttu, or caribou, as they begin the long calving migration. We should also give thanks for our plentiful spring whale harvest. By any measure, the spring whale hunt across our North Slope communities was a tremendous success. While we were hit with very unpredictable weather and ice conditions early, by the end of the 2016 whaling season an incredible 25 bowheads were successfully landed in our region. Five of the whales were from my hometown of Point Hope, with another seven in Wainwright, 12 in Barrow and one in Point Lay. This compares to only 10 whales landed region-wide in 2015 and 15 in 2014. Congratulations to the crews who remained safe and helped stock nutritious meat in our villages that will be used long after the seasonal snow falls.

“ By any measure, the spring whale hunt across our North Slope communities was a tremendous success.”

And speaking of whaling crews, we were joined throughout the past couple of seasons in Point Hope by Wasilla photographer Bill Hess, who chronicled the work surrounding our spring hunt. ASRC is working with Bill to produce a special edition of Uiñiq Magazine and I look forward to sharing the final product with those across the region. continued on page 2 SECOND QUARTER, 2016

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As a Corporation, we also benefit from the utilization of teamwork and preparation. I’m pleased to see we are already seeing the value of last year’s acquisitions of Arctic Pipe Inspection and Data Networks Corporation. Having these companies under the ASRC umbrella has added to our bottom line, and the financial returns are helping to offset serious challenges in some of our other business segments. As mentioned earlier, one of the most significant challenges continues to be the price of North Slope crude; this is true not just for ASRC but also the state of Alaska. The combination of dropping prices, declining production and unchecked spending has left the state with a budget deficit of around $3.8 billion. Unfortunately, this budget crisis affects every Alaskan – whether you’re looking for work, applying for a mortgage or relying on an annual Permanent Fund dividend payment. That’s why we are so adamant about pushing lawmakers to use the earnings of the Permanent Fund to pay for essential state services. Even dramatic and impactful cuts to spending, combined with income and even sales taxes, won’t solve the budget problem. I believe using a portion of the Fund earnings is the right thing to do in order to cut our deficit as well as protect future dividend payments and urge the legislature to fix the problem now before it gets much worse. It was rewarding to see so many of you during our village travel as well as our annual meeting in Kaktovik. Thank you for your input and for helping to make ASRC a stronger company. I look forward to the transition to summer and the continued blessings provided by our land and our region. God bless, and taikuu.  Rex A. Rock Sr. President, CEO

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Making the connection Opinion editorial by Tara Sweeney In many parts of the industrialized world, from Beijing to Boston, you are able to read this column at your own convenience – its digital distribution as simple as a few taps on your smartphone or tablet. Even streaming high definition or ultra-high definition video poses few problems. But for millions of others, especially those living across the Arctic, making the connection is much more difficult – if not downright impossible. They are the ones waiting on their local technology to catch up to the 21st century and the opportunities carried along with it. The technology is broadband, or what we commonly call high-speed internet. Far from just the answer to bringing you closer to glitch-free Netflix or Minecraft, broadband opens the doors of opportunity across an incredibly wide ranging and much more diverse spectrum. With high-speed internet, whole communities benefit through educational opportunities, safety measures made possible through better, more reliable communications and even telemedicine. And that’s just the start. On a larger scale, broadband can mean a better way of life, economic growth and job creation. Highspeed internet has been a game-changer, but far too many communities are still not able to participate. Being from the North Slope of Alaska, I have seen how this negatively affects my region. A lack of internet efficiency disproportionately affects rural communities in my state, which experience some of the highest internet and bandwidth costs in the world, yet still receive some of the poorest service. A study

in 2014 found Barrow residents paid more than seven times the cost of those in San Francisco for satellite-based internet that was considerably slower, lower in quality and noticeably less reliable. The same is true in other Arctic areas.

Broadband can mean a better way of life, economic growth and job creation. High-speed internet has been a gamechanger, but far too many communities are still not able to participate. At a time when the world is opening up, the lack of reliable communications continues to close some communities off, even as there is an increasing focus on the north. As broadband usage continues to skyrocket across the globe (the latest research shows worldwide internet usage goes up by around 9 percent a year), communities without reliable access to this technology will become more and more isolated – not just geographically, but also from the interconnected economy and society the internet brings together. Expanding broadband access and adoption can be the lifeblood for economic, social, civic, and political growth and connection. But bringing this technology to the Arctic is challenging; this is true both in terms of logistics and cost. That’s why I’ve helped to organize the first Top of the World Broadband Summit in Barrow, Alaska – coming up in mid-July. Hosted by the Arctic Economic Council, of which I proudly serve as chair, continued on page 4

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the two-day conference will look into not just the challenges of connectivity, but also the government’s role in, and commitment to, broadband development. We’ve invited policy leaders, regulators, industry experts and government officials to attend and I look forward to hearing what they have to say. As dynamic as the internet was designed to be, so must be our range of open-minded solutions to bringing high-speed internet into every home, business and school across the Arctic.

aims to eventually link Europe and Asia with fiber-optic broadband cable through the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic. Offshoot points will provide service to rural Alaska communities and the oilfield complex of Prudhoe Bay, bringing affordable high-speed internet access to the Alaska Arctic for the first time. As reliable communications technologies will only become more vital for modern communities to thrive, I see this as an exciting project with enormous potential and I look forward to monitoring its progress.

Fortunately, progress is already being made.

Looking ahead, I envision an Arctic, whether your home is in Norway, Iceland, Russia, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Canada or the U.S., that shares the vision of available broadband and is digitally connected. It is the only way of ensuring our communities reach their full potential. It may also be the only way to ensure their long-term sustainability.

Earlier this spring, Quintillion Holdings, LLC – an Anchorage, Alaska-based telecommunications company, began overseeing the construction of terrestrial as well as subsea fiber-optic cable networks in northern Alaska. When complete, the 1,200-mile undersea fiber-optic cable will provide faster and more reliable broadband connections to northern Alaska and the Interior. The Quintillion Subsea Cable Project

Tara Sweeney is the chair of the Arctic Economic Council. She is also executive vice-president of external affairs at ASRC. Originally published in the Alaska Dispatch on July 9, 2016.

In 2014, one third to more than half of households across the North Slope were negatively impacted by the effects of drug and alcohol abuse. This affects not only families, but entire communities. – Health Indicators in the North Slope Borough, June 2014 –

If you or a loved one is in need of help, do not hesitate to contact one of the following resources: • • •

Call the Alaska Suicide Prevention Careline at 1-877-266-HELP (4357) or Text “4HELP” to 839863 Call the North Slope Borough Hotline at 1-800-478-0267 Call the North Slope Borough Behavioral Health Center at 907-852-0366

PreventionCrew

THIS MESSAGE HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY THE NORTH SLOPE BOROUGH DRUG PREVENTION COALITION

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ASRC announces new acquisition Builders Choice is now a member of the ASRC family of companies ASRC is pleased to announce the acquisition of Builders Choice, Inc. by our whollyowned subsidiary ASRC Construction Holding Company, LLC. Headquartered in Anchorage, Alaska, BCI was founded 20 years ago and is now Alaska’s leading provider of customized modular solutions. The company serves a diverse group of customers, including state, local and federal government agencies, oil and gas producers and service providers, mining companies and residential real estate developers. In addition to its facility in Anchorage, BCI operates a manufacturing plant in Vermillion, South Dakota. In 2013, the company began selling building materials and engineered roof trusses from stores in Anchorage, Wasilla and Soldotna.

“Over the past 20 years, BCI has built a reputation as a customer-focused, valueadded solutions provider,” said Doug Smith, president and CEO of ACHC. “The acquisition of BCI fills a number of ACHC’s capability gaps and immediately increases alignment between our service offerings and the needs of our customers.” “Today is an exciting day for BCI and its employees,” said Mark Larson, BCI president and CEO. “I believe the combination of ASRC’s financial support and relationships across multiple industries will provide opportunities for growth and expansion of BCI’s products and services.”

“On behalf of ASRC’s board of directors, I am pleased to welcome BCI’s employees to the ASRC family of companies,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. “This acquisition demonstrates ASRC’s continued commitment to the state of Alaska. Despite the challenges posed by the current economic environment, ASRC believes Alaska’s longterm future is bright.”

Members of the BCI management team, including Mark and Sandi Larson, will maintain their respective roles post-acquisition. In his role as president and CEO of BCI, Mark will report to Doug Smith, president and CEO of ACHC.

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Questions about ASRC’s 401(k) retirement plan? All full-time and part-time employees of ASRC are eligible to participate in the ASRC 401(k) plan. The plan allows employees to set aside contributions from their income on a pre-tax basis for their retirement. Participation in the plan is not automatic. To take advantage of the plan’s great features, an employee must enroll. Enrollment is easy, can be done online and it only takes a few minutes.

Q: WHO CAN ENROLL IN ASRC 401(K) RETIREMENT PLAN? A: All part-time and full-time employees are eligible to participate, if they are at least

18 years old. All employees receive an enrollment kit from Schwab Retirement Plan Services Company when they are eligible. You can enroll in the plan earlier by going online to our secure Schwab Retirement Plan Services Company website at www. workplace.schwab.asrc and clicking the “enroll” button.

You can also contact Participant Services at 1-800-777-4015 and enroll over the phone.

Q: HOW MUCH CAN BE CONTRIBUTED TO A 401(K)? A: Participants in the ASRC plan can contribute up to 75 percent of their gross income,

up to the annual IRS code limit. The annual limit in 2016 for all plans you contribute to is $18,000, and for participants turning age 50 or older in 2016, the limit is $24,000.

Q: DOES ASRC CONTRIBUTE TO THE ASRC 401(K) RETIREMENT PLAN? A: ASRC matches up to four percent of a participant’s eligible compensation in the

form of an employer contribution. The ASRC plan also has a generous feature where all the contributions made by the participant and the company are always 100 percent vested. This means any employer contributions by ASRC belong to the participant at all times.

Q: CAN PEOPLE MAKE CHANGES TO 401(K) CONTRIBUTIONS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR? A: Yes, anyone can increase or decrease contributions at any time, either online or by

calling Participant Services.

Q: IS IT POSSIBLE TO BORROW MONEY FROM THE 401(K) PLAN? A: You can borrow money if you have more than $2,000 in the plan.

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Q: HOW CAN I GET MY 401(K) RETIREMENT SAVINGS? A: You have several options to you when you reach retirement age or if you leave the

company before then. Basically, if your employment ends or if you are of the age of 59 ½, your options consist of one of the following: • a full distribution • a rollover • combination of both: rollover a portion, or take a distribution of the rest

The option is up to you. Contact Schwab Retirement Plan Services Company for further details.

Q: CAN MY MONEY STAY IN THE ASRC 401(K) RETIREMENT PLAN INDEFINITELY? A: Yes, you can keep your money in your account if the balance is greater than $5,000.

Please note that upon reaching age 70 ½, the IRS requires participants to take a Required Minimum Distribution.

Q: WHO DO I CONTACT FOR ASSISTANCE WITH THE ASRC 401(K) RETIREMENT PLAN? A: Please contact Schwab Retirement Plan Services Company Participant Services

at 800-724-7526.

Announcement from ASRC Stock Department The ASRC Stock Department would like to remind you of the importance of keeping your stock record information up to date. This will ensure that the Stock Department can provide you with current stock events, contact you when needed and can disperse your stock payments on time. Other reasons for updating your record include: change of address, change in banking information, marriage/or name changes, stock will changes, custodial changes and any other significant life changes. ASRC has made it more convenient for you to view your stock record, change your information, and request stockholder information electronically through our online portal at ASAP.IamInupiaq.com. You can update your record at the ASRC offices in Anchorage, Fairbanks, North Slope villages and Barrow. We also request that you contact us in the event of the loss of a loved one who is an ASRC shareholder. For more information, contact the ASRC Stock Department at 1-800-770-2772. Quyanaqpak!

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AEF announces 2016 scholarship winners Arctic Education Foundation (AEF) is proud to announce Chelsea M. Brower of Kaktovik as the 2016 Anaġi Leadership Award winner, and Kimberly Kivvaq Pikok of Barrow as the 2016 Ivalu Scholarship recipient. Chelsea Brower is the daughter of Charlie Brower Sr. and Marjorie Brower; her grandparents are Archie and Betty Brower, and Robert MacKenzie and Elizabeth Kowana. Her maternal grandparents are originally from Canada. Chelsea graduated from Harold Kaveolook School in May 2016 with a 3.73 grade point average, and has been accepted to the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She will be earning her Bachelor’s of Science degree in biological sciences at UAF starting this fall. Chelsea became interested in the sciences through her participation in the GeoForce Alaska program from 2012-2015. Chelsea has also been a Kaktovik youth ambassador. While being an ambassador,

“ Community service shapes whom you are as a person while giving us an opportunity to give back to our community. Furthermore, volunteering in my community and even in other places makes me feel connected to my culture by demonstrating the twelve Iñupiaq core values.”

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she was provided the opportunity to talk to tourists about the polar bears that inhabit the Kaktovik area. Kimberly Pikok was born in Knoxville, Tennessee and has lived in Barrow all of her life. Her parents are Lloyd and Frances Pikok Sr., and her grandparents are Rhoda and Tommy Pikok Sr., and Birdie and Chuck Evans. She recently graduated from Barrow High School in May 2016 as the class valedictorian. Throughout her high school career, she participated in several activities such as GeoFORCE, Arctic Youth Ambassadors, leadership conferences and student exchanges. Kimberly will be attending the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the fall to study business administration to get one step closer to her dream of bringing concerts and music festivals to areas of Alaska outside of Anchorage or Palmer. “Community service shapes whom you are as a person while giving us an opportunity to give back to our community. Furthermore, volunteering in my community and even in other places makes me feel connected to my culture by demonstrating the twelve Iñupiaq core values.” We wish Chelsea and Kimberly the best of luck in their college degree pursuit! Aarigaa! Kiita! ANAĠI LEADERSHIP AWARD

This award honors retired ASRC president & CEO, Jacob Anaġi Adams. This award is an exclusive scholarship given to an ASRC shareholder that exemplifies leadership in every aspect of their life while embracing Iñupiaq values.

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Jacob Anaġi Adams established a solid corporate foundation upon which ASRC could build. Guided by our Iñupiaq values, Adams demonstrated his leadership and commitment to the communities of the North Slope. His dedication to improving the lives for the Arctic Slope residents through his commitment to public service has provided tremendous benefits to all residents within the state of Alaska. The Anaġi Leadership Award is designed to cover tuition, fees, books, room and board for higher education or vocational training expenses. It is awarded to an exemplary candidate that demonstrates leadership skills through their commitment to public service by: • • • •

promoting healthy communities embracing the spirit of volunteerism promoting the cross generational transmission of values demonstrating organizational leadership

IVALU SCHOLARSHIP

This scholarship was created to honor eligible applicants who are making noteworthy and influential contributions to their community through their community cultural service

commitment of their personal time to projects and activities which strongly incorporate the Iñupiaq values. The applicant selected should serve as a role model of implementing and following the 12 Iñupiaq core values while performing community cultural service activities. The Iñupiaq values are listed as follows: • compassion • avoidance of conflict • knowledge of language • spirituality • sharing • hunting traditions • cooperation • respect for nature • respect for our Elders and each other • family and kinship • humility • humor The Ivalu Scholarship amount is up to $15,000 per year, and will be awarded for four consecutive years. The award will cover tuition, fees, books, room and board, and shall be used for college or training expenses. One scholarship is awarded each year and only one award is given per person throughout their lifetime.

“ I am very thankful for the support of AEF as well as the whole North Slope community! I look forward to continually serving my community and giving back to those who have helped me along the way. I finally did it!” Chastity Olemaun Office Manager, engineering & professional services at AES

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AEF congratulates 2016 graduates PEARL BROWER PhD Indigenous Studies UAF

VIENNA KAGAK AA, General Studies Fond du Lac Tribal Community College

BLAKE PORTER AAS, Funeral Services Lake Washington Inst. of Technology

NICOLE KANAYURAK MA Marine Affairs University of Washington

BERNICE OYAGAK BBA, Management UAS

JENIFER THORNTON AA, Medical Billing Clark College

IMAN MARSHALL Certificate of Nursing Wor-Wic Community College

DON GRAY MA, Leadership City University

KAYLA CHARTERS BA, Communications California State University, Fullerton

LORENA NASHAKNIK AAS, Office Administration Ixisaġvik College

JILLIAN FELDER AA, Liberal Arts Ixisaġvik College

CHASTITY OLEMAUN BS, Business Administration Charter College

BOBBYJO EDWARDSEN BS, Radiologic Sciences Midwestern State University

STEPHANIE AGUVLUK AAS, Accounting Ixisaġvik College

JALENE KANAYURAK BS, Nursing University of New England

RUSSELL DARLING AAS, Process Technology Kenai Peninsula College

ANDREW TOOYAK MA, Jurisprudence of Energy Law The University of Tulsa College of Law

CLARISSA ELBERTAI BA, Interdisciplinary Studies UAS

2016 high school leadership award winners TUNNANA W. AHGOOK Anaktuvuk Pass Justus Mekiana Leadership Award – $2,000

SHELDON MATUMEAK Nuiqsut Alice Woods Leadership Award – $1,000

ALYSON FREITAS Atqasuk Peter Shugluk Leadership Award – $2,000

TAMARA D. KOENIG Point Hope David & Dinah Frankson Leadership Award – $2,000

KURT GUNDERSON Atqasuk Elizabeth Hollingsworth Leadership Award – $1,000

JUSTIN D. KOONUK Point Hope Jakie Koonuk Leadership Award – $1,000

JOSEPH IVANOFF Atqasuk Johnny Nayukok Leadership Award – $1,000

SELENA M. LANE Point Hope Daniel Lisbourne Leadership Award – $1,000

ANGEL TELFAIR Barrow Edward E. Hopson Leadership Award – $2,000

JUSTINA TRACEY Point Lay Dorcas & Warren Neakok Leadership Award – $2,000

DAVID ELAVGAK Barrow Joe Upicksoun Leadership Award – $1,000

HARRY HANK Point Lay Ben Neakok Leadership Award – $1,000

KIMBERLY PIKOK Barrow Dr. Oliver Leavitt Leadership Award – $1,000

FRANCES NASHOOKPUK Wainwright Florence Ahmaogak Leadership Award – $2,000

CHELSEA BROWER Kaktovik Dr. Harold Kaveolook Leadership Award – $2,000

LOREAN DRIGGS Wainwright David Bodfish Sr. Leadership Award – $1,000

AUSTIN KAYOTUK Kaktovik Isaac Akootchook Leadership Award – $1,000

ARIEL BODFISH Wainwright Billy Patkotak Leadership Award – $1,000

DARIN HOPSON Nuiqsut Sam Taalak Leadership Award – $2,000

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2016 annual meeting prize winners Early bird prize winners ($300)

Drawing prize winners

ABAD, AYNZLI SHAYE Q. ABAD

LAMBRECHT, JOHN QUINTEN

CALHOUN, AUTUMN RAVEN – $5,000

AISHANNA, KATHERYN J. A. T.

LAMPE GOING, JONAH MICHAEL

PEREZ, SANTIANNA ROSE – $4,900

AKOOTCHOOK, LILLIAN

LANE, ROSEANNE HEATHER L. E.

OKPEAHA JR., BILLY RAY – $4800

AKPIK, BILLY W.

LEAVITT, STEPHANIEGAIL D.

LINN, ADAM NINGEOK – $4700

ANNISKETT, BRYAN RYAN

MANN, GRANTA THOMPSON

KAGAK, COURTNEY MAE – $4,600

AVEOGANNA, ROBERTA HILARY

MATOOMEALOOK, WARNER LINDY

ATTUNGOWRUK, AMY K. – $4,500

AVEOGANNA JR., JEFFREY ROBERT

MATTHEWS, AMY LYNNE

HEILMAN, ERIC MATTHEW – $4,400

BORDEAUX, ARTHUR CHARLES

MAUPIN, DORCAS ELIZABETH L.

REXFORD, MATTHEW E. – $4,300

BROWER, LEWANNE ANNIE K.

MCMULLEN, LENA

FISHER, KYLE JON – $4,200

BROWER, REBECCA BERNA K.

MEKIANA, JODY MARIE

SEGEVAN, DANIEL FELTON – $4,100

BROWER, WENDELL S.

MOBERG-THOMPSON, CHRISTOPHER Q.

WONG, GAIL ARDEN – $4,000

CALDWELL, EMILY ROSE

NASHOOKPUK, MISTY RAYNE

FRANKSON, THOMAS P. – $3,900

CAPTAIN, JOYCE K.

NAYAKIK, ZACHARY KOL EVIKANA NIGRUUN

MORRY-MEKIANA, JOSH TALIQ – $3,800

CROSBY, KAMI KAY ELIZABETH

NAYAKIK, SHARON S.

NORTON, MINNIE – $3,700

DRIGGS, PATTILYN ISABEL

NUKAPIGAK, MAMIE RUTH TUIGAN

BROWN, JESSICA NEL – $3,600

DUFF, CHRISTOPHER M.

NUNGASAK, BENJAMIN WILLIAM

KILLIGVUK, KONRAD PIKOK – $3,500

EBUE, TEAGAN EZEKIEL

OKPIK, LUCY ANN

HOPSON, SANDEE DENISE – $3,400

EVIKANA, ALICE MAE

OLEMAUN, GEORGE

NASHAKNIK, DAMIAN JAKE – $3,300

FRANKSON, GIDEON PETER

OVIOK, NANCY F.

GOING, HENRY LEE – $3,200

FRANKSON, SUSIE ELEANOR

OVIOK, TERZA DEVA S M.

REYES, ALYSSA LYNN – $3,100

GARDNER, JULIA JEAN

PANIGEO, KIMBERLY BETTY

AGNASAGGA, CHARLIE FISHER – $3,000

GEORGE-ITTA, HEZIKIAH DAVID

PANIGEO, KIRI MAHEALANI

UNGAROOK, MARGARET – $2,900

GREGORY GEIST, SUSAN LOUISE

PANIK, DAVID JAMES

OKTOLLIK NASHOOKPUK JR.,

GRIFFIN, PATRICK SAKPIK

PATKOTAK, PAULINE KATHERINE

HENRY DEREK TITUS JOHN – $2,800

HARRIS, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

PAUSANNA, HANNAH A.

GORDON, PEARL FAITH – $2,700

HEBELER, DANIKA ROSE OYAGAALUK

PEREZ, SKYLER ALEJANDRO T.

PANIK II, JERRY – $2,600

HOLLINGSWORTH, ELIZABETH

PHILLIPS, NATHANIAL SHAWN

STEVER, SARAH MARIE – $2,500

HOPSON, JENNA MAUD

RAMIREZ, REANNA FAITH

BROWER, TAD MICHAEL K. – $2,400

HOPSON, MICHAEL JENS

REXFORD, DANIEL WESLEY

BROWER, LEWIS CAITLYN DE – $2,300

HUGHEY, BETTY

REXFORD-KALEAK, KALEA MOLLY R.

LEAVITT, EDWARD – $2,200

ITTA, ROSEANNE MARTINA K.

SHAPSNIKOFF JR., ADAM GABRIEL

SAMPSON-VINCENT, EFFIE K. – $2,100

JOHNSON, BEAH LLOYD LEE

SHUGLUK, JACOB A.

LANE, BENJAMIN JACOB JOSEPH – $2,000

JUDKINS, ISAIA COLE T. A. K.

SIMMONDS, JOANNE

AHMAOGAK, ROBERT CALVIN – $1,900

KAGAK, FRITZ PAUL

SOLOMON, DEBORAH LUCY

AHSOAK, HERMAN LANE – $1,800

KALLEN, PORTER LEE

SOLOMON, KIANA LAYNE

PIMENTAL, KAWAILANI KU’ULEIALOHA – $1,700

KANAYURAK, BARROW MERLE

SPICER, RACHEL LOUISE

PANIK, MURIEL VEE – $1,600

KANAYURAK, FREDERICK JOSEPH

STEWART, MARTHA BROWER

FISCHER, LINDSEY KAITLYN – $1,500

KANAYURAK, JUSTIN SAMUEL A.

STOUTE, AVRIELLE JAZLYN

KUNAKNANA, MOLLY JANE – $1,400

KANAYURAK, ADELYN JOANN

SUNDAI, LEILA ODESSA

EKAK, FREDDIE – $1,300

KASAK, CORA MARIE

TAGAROOK, NANCY RENEE

OYAGAK, CAROLYN – $1,200

KAYOTUK, TIFFANI NICHOLE

THIBEDEAU, STEPHANIE LYNN

STANDIFER, ADELISE BLAKE – $1,100

KIGNAK, ELOUISE

TIEPELMAN, SYLVIA FAYE PIQUQ

ANDREWS, ANTON E. – $1,000

KIMBALL, ROBERT MARSHALL

TOOYAK, STEPHANIE KAYLEE

OKPEAHA JR, PATRICK – $900

KIOUS, ANGELA OLIVE

TUNIK, BRYANNA GWENN

PANNICK, BILLY A. – $800

KIPPI, TRUDY DAWN AVU

UNGAROOK, KENNETH WISTA

FRANKSON, MARTIN ROY – $700

KIPPI, NADINE A.

UNGUDRUK, JEREMY JOSEPH

MENDIOLA, SHANTEL LOREN – $600

KIPPI-EDWARDSEN, ANDREA C.

UPICKSOUN, ALLEN AHGAKEAN

BURNELL, GEORGE – $500

KLATKA, CYNTHIA ADA

VALENZUELA, ELISEO MICAH

DIAS, DENALI MARLENE – $500

KOONALOAK JR., VICTOR

YENNEY, MARY JEAN

FISCHER, IONE NICOLE – $500

KOSBRUK, ROSALINA IRENE-MARIE

KIGNAK, SALOMI LEA’ E. – $500

KUNAKNANA, HATTIE MAE

OKPEAHA, BERNICE – $500

If you have any questions, please contact the ASRC Stock Department at 1-800-770-2772. SECOND QUARTER, 2016

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ASRC 2016 annual meeting Kaktovik, Alaska

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ASRC Federal security team recognized for excellence If you have ever had the need to get a personal security clearance or a facility security clearance, you have undoubtedly called Colleen Nicholson, ASRC Federal’s vice president of security. Colleen, who has been supporting ASRC and ASRC Federal since joining the company in 2005, is recognized in her field as a subject matter expert and throughout the company as “the miracle worker� due to her efficiency in getting security clearances pushed through the Defense Security Service (DSS) system in record breaking time. Colleen and her security team, which includes Jen Drummond, Hubie Farrell and Fran McKenna, are responsible for implementing and maintaining standards that ensure the protection of classified information, materials and programs. The security team provides personnel badges, controls the access to all ASRC Federal facilities, processes visit authorization requests and works with employees to help them obtain needed security clearances. This month, Colleen and her team accepted the Cogswell award on behalf of ASRC Federal Primus. This award is the most prestigious honor the DDS may bestow to cleared industry. Of the more than 10,000 cleared

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contractors, 500 companies were deemed as eligible for consideration and 42 companies were selected to receive the award. To be considered for this award, companies must establish and maintain a security program that goes well beyond the minimum national industrial security program requirements. A facility must be nominated by their assigned industrial security representative and have two consecutive superior industrial security review ratings. In addition, companies must show a sustained degree of excellence and innovation in their overall security program management, implementation and oversight. Beginning in 2007, a facility also had to respond to the annual personnel security investigation survey as a prerequisite for further consideration.

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Once nominated, companies go through a vigorous national vetting process that includes external vetting and a national team review. The national review team then consolidates and ranks the nominations and that ranked listing is submitted to the director of DSS for final approval. Colleen’s key to establishing and implementing a nationally recognized security program is based on her personal values and how she lives her life. Taking care of people and maintaining relationships are at the top of her list. According to Colleen, “it’s important to never burn bridges.” She started with the government in 1984 working as a GS2 administrative clerk. Three weeks later there was an opening for a special

agent with the DSS. At the time, she was the youngest female agent to complete the six week training course. From there, she went on to work in personnel security, conducting investigations out in the field and then supporting the Office of Naval Intelligence. Always looking for the next challenge, she requested to move into industrial security and began investigating companies. Her varied experiences put her in contact with both government and industry specialists. These numerous contacts are the ones she relies on today to help make her and her team successful. By maintaining relationships, she has fostered the ability to reach out to resources beyond our organization when needed.

We stand together At Voice of the Arctic Iñupiat, we understand that the best way to protect the interests of Arctic Slope Iñupiat is to work together, to speak as one to address the cultural and economic needs of our people. Collectively, we stand together in support of resource development that stimulates the North Slope economy and protects our Native way of life. We fight to preserve our culture by supporting activities that promote economic stability and allow for the protection of our land, waters and subsistence resources. We are the people of the Arctic Slope. We are the unified Voice of the Arctic Iñupiat.

voiceofthearcticinupiat.org

Our voice. Our vision.

Arctic Slope Native Association Arctic Slope Regional Corporation Atqasuk Corporation City of Anaktuvuk Pass

City of Atqasuk City of Barrow City of Kaktovik City of Point Hope

City of Wainwright Iḷisaġvik College Kaktovik Iñupiat Corporation Native Village of Atqasuk

SECOND QUARTER, 2016

Native Village of Point Hope Native Village of Point Lay North Slope Borough Nunamiut Corporation

VOLUME 37

Olgoonik Corporation Tikigaq Corporation Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation Wainwright Tribal Council

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Shareholder spotlight: Rosemary Berg The road to Miss Alaska, United States At the age of eight, Rosemary “Utuana” Berg dreamed of becoming a public speaker – not for fame or notoriety, but for the possibility of inspiring others. Her dream became a reality in 2012, when Rosie was appointed Miss Tikiġaq by the Elders and community leaders of Point Hope. She went on to represent the community in the Miss World Eskimo Indian Olympics pageant, where she competed against other Alaska Native women for the title of Miss WEIO. With her knowledge of Native culture and her well-developed platform, Rosie was crowned the winner. “That was truly the beginning of my journey,” says Rosie. “Becoming Miss WEIO is a prestigious title for a young Native woman in Alaska that gave me the platform I needed to speak to, and on behalf of, the Native population.” In the years following Miss WEIO, family and friends encouraged Rosie to consider a national pageant, such as Miss America. Rosie says, “I thought about it, then counted myself out. I didn’t truly believe I could compete and succeed on a national level.”

“ I want to help women discover their beauty, identity and purpose by overcoming the obstacles that make us feel unloved or unworthy. We must dare to face the things that challenge us most.”

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Photo credit: Dacia Idom

Today, Rosie’s outlook has changed. With time, travel and prayer, Rosie says she has overcome her fears and is more motivated than ever to achieve her dreams. In July of this year, she will compete in the Miss United States pageant as Miss Alaska, an opportunity she calls “surreal.” “As soon as I got the news I thought, everything I’ve lived through and everything I stand for in life, I can now share,” recalls Rosie. “I’ve always wanted to be an advocate and a voice for women – now I have the perfect platform to do so.” Rosie’s message is one of encouragement and motivation for women of all ages and backgrounds. It’s called “dare to be darling,” and it stems from Rosie’s own experiences and challenges she’s overcome throughout life.

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“I want to help women discover their beauty, identity and purpose by overcoming the obstacles that make us feel unloved or unworthy,” says Rosie. “We must dare to face the things that challenge us most.”

in our villages having someone like them to look up to and inspire them to chase after their dreams – whether that’s being in a pageant or being an astronaut - it becomes less scary.”

Although she admits being nervous about the upcoming pageant, Rosie says her family, friends and community are her greatest motivation. Both her biological and adopted families have shown unwavering support, becoming more interested in all-things pageant related with each day.

Rosie says she’s eager to represent both Alaska and the Native community as she prepares for the Miss United States pageant in Las Vegas from July 31 through August 7. Rosie is a graduate of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and is pursuing her master’s degree in organizational leadership.

“Of course this is scary,” Rosie says, “but when I think about my nieces and young girls

Barrow team competes in tournament The 2016 Bethel Unified Invitational 3-on-3 basketball tournament took place at Bethel Regional High School April 22 and 23 – pitting six schools from three different school districts against each other. The following schools competed: Barrow High School, Bethel Regional High School, Kongiganak School, Nunapitchuk School, Quinhagak School and West Anchorage High School. In total, 22 athletes and 24 partners participated in the tournament. The round-robin schedule ended with the finishing teams seeded into a double elimination tournament bracket. The championship game was a hard fought battle between Bethel and Barrow, with Bethel pulling out the win. After the championship game, the awards ceremony included trophies for the top teams and individual awards. Edith Maupin of Barrow won the award for “best defensive player.” Attending from Barrow High School were students: Sara Wolgemuth (Unified Partner), David Mathews (Unified Partner), Dalton Kippi, Edith Maupin and Emily Brower. The coach for the team was the athletic director, Jeremy Goodwin. Pictured above: (Back row) Donald Zanoff, Arnold Brower, Jeremy Goodwin, (Front Row) Edith Maupin, Sara Wolgemuth, Dalton Kippi, Emily Brower and David Mathews

SECOND QUARTER, 2016

VOLUME 37

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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

P.O. Box 129 Barrow, Alaska 99723 asrc.com

ASRC Elder and shareholder rates Rates effective until September 15, 2016 SHAREHOLDER RATE: $ 184.00 + 5% tax (single occupancy) NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $ 239.00 + 5% tax (single occupancy)

· Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability · Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked · Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate

All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate. For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

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ASRC 2Q 2016 Newsletter  

ASRC 2Q 2016 Newsletter  

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