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THIR D QUA R TER , 2019 VOLUME 49

Where people share information

A SRC .COM

Feature story

Statewide commercials highlight diverse capabilities of ASRC. Read more on page 6.

Shareholder spotlight: ACE EDWA RDS Entrepreneurial Spirit Read more on page 12.

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Table of contents President’s message..............................................................................................1 ASRC Industrial Services earns top 100 ranking...................................................3 ASRC leads “Top 49ers” list for 25th consecutive year.........................................3 Tug-barge named after one of ASRC’s founders...................................................4 ASRC attends Native Hawaiian convention..........................................................4 New television ad campaign hits the air ..............................................................6 Our Journey of Success - The Growth and Transformation of ASRC................... 8 Navigating the North summit ............................................................................... 9 Arctic broadband “PoP” paves way for new research....................................... 10 RSI team surpasses 10,500 soil samples............................................................ 11 Quyanaq Dr. Pearl Brower.................................................................................. 11 Shareholder spotlight......................................................................................... 12 2019 National Flight Academy............................................................................ 14 North Slope Marketplace Business Boot Camp................................................ 15 GeoFORCE graduates second cohort................................................................. 16

Qutchiksuakun Savagniq HIGH PERFORMANCE We achieve superior business results and stretch our capabilities to reach even higher levels.

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President’s message RE X A . ROCK SR .

Without question, this was a pleasant summer to enjoy and remember across our great state. An unusually long, stable pattern of high temperatures and abundant sunshine affected our weather from the Southern Panhandle to the North Slope – a streak that included setting the warmest July on record across Alaska. In Anchorage, it hit 90 degrees on July 4 for the first time in history. In our region’s community of Utqiaġvik, the temperature didn’t drop below freezing for an incredible 85 days. It was a memorable season for the Corporation as well. In early August, we hosted the first-ever Navigating the North Innovation Summit in downtown Anchorage, bringing together business, industry and government leaders to focus on the many opportunities across Alaska – from those in telecommunications and technology to Arctic economic development and public-private partnerships. I’d like to thank the many speakers for their involvement, including former FCC Chairman Rob McDowell and Shay Hawkins – Opportunity Zone expert and former legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Tim Scott. I would also like to thank staff inside the ASRC family of companies who not only presented but also made the event possible – Richard Glenn, EA’s Marie Duriez, Patuk Glenn with our CED Department, AES’ Liam Zsolt, Eric Velte with AFHC and Alaska Growth Capital’s Mary Miner. Thank you as well to our friend, Senator Dan Sullivan, for his closing remarks. Congratulations to the organizers for such a successful summit and I look forward to this becoming an annual

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event. You can read more about the Navigating the North event later in this newsletter. This summer, we launched a new round of statewide television commercials featuring ASRC Federal as well as Petro Star Inc. and the work these subsidiaries perform in their respective markets – from Beltsville, Maryland to Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Congratulations to the External Affairs department for producing these beautiful commercials and thank you to the staff at AFHC and PSI for your assistance. Also, a special thanks to those featured in the commercials, including ASRC Federal’s vice president of strategic initiatives, Clay Morad, and Petro Star’s operations director at the North Pole Refinery, Stephan Brower. If you would like to see the commercials for yourself, you can find them on our newly-designed corporate website at asrc.com. In late September, ASRC was once again recognized by local business leaders as well as the State Chamber of Commerce as the top locally-owned and operated corporation in Alaska. This marks Continued on page 2

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the 25th consecutive year ASRC has been ranked #1 on the Top 49ers list. This level of stability and success wouldn’t be possible without the leadership from our board of directors and senior leadership team, as well as the many talented and hard-working employees across our family of companies. It’s an honor to be recognized, and I’d like to send along my well-wishes to the other successful statewide businesses on that list. To better understand ASRC’s long Journey of Success since incorporation, you’ll notice a special insert included with this newsletter. Inside this removable booklet, you’ll find charts that explain the changing dynamic of your Corporation – from an emerging business shortly after the signing of ANCSA that was heavily reliant on resource development opportunities in Alaska – to the one today focused on growth and diversification in markets both in the Last Frontier as well as the Lower 48. I hope you’ll take a look at this booklet and use it as a reference moving forward. I’d like to pass along my congratulations to our own Executive Vice President of External Affairs, Richard Glenn, for receiving the news from the University of Alaska Fairbanks that he is being presented with an honorary doctorate of laws degree. This is the highest

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tribute that UAF can present and is an incredible recognition of Richard’s contributions to the university as well as to our people and the State of Alaska. As some may know, Richard earned a master’s degree in geology from UAF in 1991. The official honorary doctorate ceremony will be during next spring’s commencement in Fairbanks. Lastly, with the memorable summer months behind us, I wish nothing but the best for those involved in the fall 2019 whaling season, and congratulate the crews which have had early success in the communities of Nuiqsut and Kaktovik. Thank you for continuing to be involved with your Corporation. Together, we make ASRC a stronger company. Taikuu.

Rex A. Rock Sr. President and CEO


ASRC Industrial Services earns top 100 ranking The Engineering News Record recently released its ranking of the top 200 environmental firms for 2019. The ranking is based on revenue earned during the year ended December 31, 2018. For the first time in ASRC Industrial’s (“AIS”) history, the company is ranked #85. AIS’ newest family member, EQM, ranks at #117 based on its stand-alone activity. Adding EQM to the AIS family should raise AIS to the #60 - #65 range in the 2020 ranking. 

AIS believes this achievement is a testament to the amazing companies and people that have become part of the AIS family since it began the pursuit of the AIS vision fewer than three years ago. You can review the full ENR Top 200 at the following link: enr.com/toplists/2019-Top-200-EnvironmentalFirms-1

ASRC leads “Top 49ers” list for 25th consecutive year Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is pleased to once again be recognized by the Alaska State Chamber of Commerce, Alaska Business magazine and local business leaders as the top Alaskan-owned and operated corporation. This is the 25th consecutive year that ASRC has ranked #1 on the “Top 49ers” list, based on the prior year’s gross revenues. The list was released in late September during a luncheon in downtown Anchorage, and can be seen in its entirety in the October 2019 edition of Alaska Business magazine.

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Tug-barge named after one of ASRC’s founders Crowley ordered an Alaska-class articulated tug-barge (ATB) in January for its Alaska petroleum operations and the vessel system has a familiar name. Called the “Oliver Leavitt”, the barge has a capacity of 100,000 barrels, with the pusher tug being called “Aveogan”, which is Leavitt’s Iñupiaq name. Leavitt previously served as ASRC’s vice president of lands as well as government affairs. He also served as the chairman of the Corporation’s board of directors and is still on the board today. A ship-shape bow was incorporated into the Oliver Leavitt that is intended to enhance its ability to maneuver in icy conditions. The barge was also designed to achieve high-cargo capacity with minimal draught. In addition, several features were incorporated into the Oliver Leavitt barge to ensure it exceeds international and US Environmental Protection Agency

(EPA) requirements. Crowley said the design of the vessel will “serve Alaska with safe and dependable fuel transportation.” Both the barge and the tug were designed by Jensen Maritime and built by Bollinger Marine Fabricators. The ATB is expected to be launched by the end of this year. Crowley will operate the ATB on charter to ASRC subsidiary Petro Star Inc.

ASRC attends Native Hawaiian convention The 18th Annual Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (CNHA) convention was held in late September. ASRC’s External Affairs team attended this prestigious event to meet with the indigenous leaders of native Hawaiians. The convention, which was mirrored after the Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention, brings together cultural practitioners, educators, health care and housing providers, business leaders, kupuna and future leaders from the next generation. It is the largest convening of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in Hawaii. ASRC participated in various panels during the convention and met privately with the kupuna Elders and future CNHA leaders to discuss a future policy

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cooperative between the two Native groups. ASRC looks forward to a rekindled alliance with the Native Hawaiians and extends our sincerest gratitude for being able to attend their convention.


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New television ad campaign hits the air STATEWIDE COMMERCIALS HIGHLIGHT DIVERSE CAPABILITIES OF ASRC

In mid-August, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation began airing two new 30-second television commercials showcasing the wide-ranging work performed by subsidiaries ASRC Federal and Petro Star Inc. The ASRC Federal commercial features shareholder Clay Morad, AFHC’s Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, and was shot in Beltsville, Maryland earlier this summer. The Petro Star commercial features shareholder Stephan Brower, PSI’s Operations Director at the North Pole Refinery, and was shot in North Pole, Dutch Harbor, Valdez and Anchorage. “Over the past four years, we’ve produced commercials featuring the communities that ASRC represents across the North Slope,” said Richard Glenn, ASRC EVP of External Affairs. “In 2019 we started a new phase of the campaign – highlighting each of our business segments across Alaska as well as the Lower 48. While it isn’t easy fitting a cross-section of a subsidiary’s capabilities into 30 seconds, I’m pleased with how they’ve turned out and glad they’ve been so well-received.”

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The External Affairs department would like to thank ASRC Federal as well as Petro Star for their involvement in the 2019 ad campaign. You can find the commercials at asrc.com.


ASRC’s latest ad campaign focused on two subsidiaries: ASRC Federal and Petro Star Inc. (PSI). ASRC Federal is focused on providing government services and is headquartered in the metro DC area; PSI is a refining and fuel marketing operation with headquarters in Anchorage. Both companies have demonstrated impressive earnings strength and growth since their inception.

Mark Gray

Doug Chapados

President and CEO of ASRC Federal

President and CEO of Petro Star Inc.

As chief executive officer of ASRC Federal, Mark Gray leads a family of companies with 7,000 employees across 40 states focused on providing services to federal government customers.

Doug Chapados began his career at Petro Star in 1984 as its third employee. Prior to becoming president/ CEO in 2004, he served in a number of leadership positions throughout the organization, including North Pole Refinery manager, vice president of refining, and vice president of marketing.

Since joining the company in 2014, he has driven the corporate strategy to include notable organic growth as well as the successful integration of two acquisitions, helping to expand the company’s capabilities and customer base. “ASRC Federal and all of our employees are dedicated to delivering on our commitments to our shareholders as quantified in the strategic plan, remaining true to our culture and supporting the important missions of our government customers,” says Gray.

Chapados oversees more than 300 employees at Petro Star. He is passionate about maintaining safe and operationally efficient facilities while providing benefit and opportunities to ASRC and its shareholders. “Petro Star continues to strengthen its foundation in Alaska, delivering stable returns and quality employment opportunities to ASRC shareholders, and will do so for many years to come,” says Chapados.

He also supports a number of community and industry organizations in an executive capacity, including the American Heart Association and American Corporate Partners, an organization that provides corporate mentors to individuals transitioning from the military to a civilian career.

During his 34-year tenure, he has either overseen or contributed to every major milestone and acquisition throughout Petro Star’s history.

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“Through the support of ASRC, Petro Star has invested in significant infrastructure enhancements that diversify its product offerings, expand the geographic scope, grow existing customer relationships and increase logistical efficiencies. We will continue to drive results in these key areas through innovation and accountability, honoring the confidence ASRC has shown in our operations.”

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Our Journey of Success - The Growth and Transformation of ASRC As Arctic Slope Regional Corporation inches closer to its 50th anniversary, the further it pulls away from the original image of a local North Slope business, shy of experience in the corporate world but packed with pride and an enormous amount of potential. In the early days, oil and gas exploration leases would provide the economic fuel for the Corporation – allowing ASRC’s first subsidiaries to grow and eventually stand on their own. During this formative time, natural resource development would provide a substantial percentage of the Corporation’s revenue – but through time – that proportion would be overtaken due to the growth and diversification of other business lines – some of which would successfully expand outside of Alaska and across the Lower 48. Thanks to the forethought of the Corporation’s early leaders, as well as the leadership of the board of directors and executive team, ASRC is celebrating its 25th consecutive

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year of being the largest, most successful locally-owned and operated business in Alaska. As you’ll see in a special booklet, “Our Journey of Success”, provided with this newsletter, ASRC’s level of success has not been reached by accident. However, it’s now aiming its gaze even higher with aggressive goals established in the 2018-2023 Strategic Plan. We welcome you to read “Our Journey of Success” to see for yourself the changes ASRC has experienced since incorporation. A digital version of this booklet can also be viewed on asrc.com.


Navigating the North summit The inaugural event brought together nearly 85 business, technology and communications leaders with special remarks given by Lt. Governor Kevin Meyer, U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan and Congressman Don Young.

ASRC hosted Navigating the North in Anchorage last August – a first of its kind summit that brought together innovative businesses to discuss the future of Alaska. Many speakers, including speakers from ASRC, came together to motivate entrepreneurs, students and leaders alike to ignite ideas and bring attention to underutilized and emerging resources.

If you are interested in becoming a part of this event for 2020, please email Marie Duriez with the External Affairs team at MaDuriez@asrc.com.

Topics presented and discussed included broadband, opportunity zones, entrepreneurship and even data centers in the Arctic. The event kicked off with a special presentation by Mac McHale, Chief Revenue Officer of Quintillion, who told the story of bringing broadband connectivity to the North Slope. Quintillion was also the networking reception sponsor for Navigating the North. Other stakeholders in the broadband community spoke about the role telecommunications is currently playing in the Arctic and its importance to future development opportunities. Shay Hawkins with Opportunity Fund Association and Kristina Wilcox with Women’s High Tech Coalition presented on opportunity zones. The QOZ (Qualified Opportunity Zones) experts spoke about how opportunity zones are beneficial to the rural areas of Alaska, what the overall platform is, and some challenges involved with working in such a sparsely populated and challenging place. Some of the Corporation’s very own employees – Patuk Glenn with ASRC, Mary Miner with Alaska Growth Capitol and Liam Zsolt with ASRC Energy Services – were speakers at the Navigating the North summit. Visual notes provided by: Agnew::Beck

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Arctic broadband “PoP” paves way for new research Utqiaġvik, Alaska is the northernmost point in the U.S. and a critical location for international Arctic research. Its history includes many decades of study by academia, all major U.S. science agencies and international partners, making it a baseline location for Arctic research the world over. However, historically poor network connectivity has limited the science and operations that can be performed in Utqiaġvik. Using the internet requires a point of presence (PoP) – a local access point that allows users to connect to the internet via a service provider. Leaders from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ASRC Federal and Quintillion gathered at the Iñupiat Heritage Center in Utqiaġvik on Saturday, Sept. 7 to celebrate the official broadband Arctic PoP launch, which will provide substantially more high-speed, reliable internet services to the remote region. “This enables us to essentially improve the research infrastructure there, which will lead to a better understanding of our planet and climate change,” explained Tom Heinrichs, Deputy Station Manager of the Fairbanks Command and Data Acquisition Station. NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) has two antennas located in Utqiaġvik, which are operated remotely from the Fairbanks Command and Data Acquisition Station. Polar-orbiting satellites circle the Earth from pole-topole 14 times daily and download data as they pass over ground stations in the Arctic and Antarctic. High latitude ground stations, such as those in Alaska and Antarctica, see the polar-orbiting satellites more times per day than lower latitude ground stations. This fiber optic internet means weather forecasters and scientists can receive data from the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) missions more quickly. “With the new fiber network, we have seen an increase in the amount of data downlinked from satellites, as well as a decrease in latency,” said Stephen Volz, Assistant Administrator of NESDIS. “This infrastructural

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improvement opens up many possibilities for NOAA.” Prior to the PoP launch data flows from the North Slope to the rest of the world via domestic satellite links were notoriously slow, with high latency and low bandwidth. “The new fiber has upgraded the bandwidth from 1.5 megabits per second to 20 megabits per second,” Vanessa Griffin, Director of Satellite and Product Operations explained. “So [that’s] 10 times faster data,” Griffin added. With that extra bandwidth, Heinrichs said one of the short-term benefits is the ability to deliver higherresolution products to the National Weather Service (NWS) more effectively in near real-time. Before Quintillion finished laying the final stretch of fiber optic cable in 2017, Heinrichs compared the speed of data transfer to using a satellite phone.  “When you use a satellite phone, there’s a noticeable delay in terms of when you talk to someone and they respond to you,” he said. “It’s the same thing with data.” In the long-term, Heinrichs said the expanded capabilities provide an opportunity for NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) to explore new types of research that weren’t previously possible with the low-bandwidth, high-cost connections.  “The OAR Earth System Research Laboratory hosts the NESDIS antennas alongside their atmospheric research instrumentation,” Heinrichs said. “The internet PoP collaboration among OAR, NESDIS and the NWS in Utqiaġvik enables us all to do more and better work in the Arctic. It’s a great example of line offices working together, sharing costs and facilities, and leading to enhanced science and operations.”  While the local community is already benefiting from better internet connectivity, Heinrichs said more research and satellite operations in the region could also boost the economy by bringing more jobs to the area.


RSI team surpasses 10,500 soil samples The RSI EnTech, LLC (RSI) characterization team supporting the UCOR contract at the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) recently completed a significant characterization milestone. RSI’s team received accolades from their customer UCOR for this achievement. The team supporting Zone 1 and Zone 2 remedial actions surpassed the safe collection and documentation of more than 10,500 samples as part of ongoing sampling operations that started in 2015. Nearly half of these samples have been collected in fiscal year 2019, showing the team’s commitment to meeting DOE’s vision of completing the clean-up efforts at ETTP by 2020. Samples collected include Geoprobe® soil samples to depths of up to 30 feet, concrete samples to support the removal of various ETTP slabs, remedial action completion, surface confirmation soil samples, and various infrastructure samples including water, sediments and sludges.  Field activities could not have been successful without the support of the RSI Sample Management Office (SMO) subcontracting and coordinating with various laboratories, data management specialists supporting sample paperwork generation, and RSI Transportation making sure the collected samples were packaged and shipped properly to the laboratories.

Quyanaq Dr. Pearl Brower After 12 years of serving as president of Iḷisaġvik College, Dr. Pearl “Kiyawn” Brower has announced her resignation effective July 2020. On behalf of Iḷisaġvik College, students, staff, faculty and our North Slope communities, quyanaq President Brower for your distinguished service to the North Slope’s higher education institution and regional training center. We wish you luck and are thankful for your contributions to ensuring the North Slope is equipped with a well-trained and educated workforce.

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Shareholder spotlight ACE EDWA RDS Entrepreneurial Spirit

It’s a mild August day in Utqiaġvik as Ace Edwards checks his emails and company Facebook page for any new reservations. They typically come later in the afternoon, though. As the owner of Arctic Hummer Adventures, he tries to be ready to take a tour group out to Point Barrow at a moment’s notice. That can be difficult to do when he isn’t in town. Another company that Ace has a stake in, AK Pipe and Restoration, LLC, requires him to travel to Anchorage to meet with business partners and strategize about the future of the company. “Sometimes I wish there were two of me,” he laughs. Becoming an entrepreneur who owns two very different companies wasn’t always Ace’s plan. Earlier this year, after 8,000 hours of on-the-job training and two exams, he became a licensed journeyman electrician at the age of 24. While working construction in Utqiaġvik after high school, Ace noticed that the onsite electricians didn’t have to do things like haul loads of heavy plywood or sheetrock. He was also intrigued by the challenge their type of work presented – problem solving and puzzle work – so he chatted with a few of the electricians and was eventually directed to the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, or IBEW. He was accepted into the IBEW electrical apprenticeship program and began the four-year

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“It was a lot of learning, years and years of learning. Even as a journeyman now, I’m still learning from other contractors. It never ends.” – Ace Edwards journey to becoming a licensed electrician. In addition to the on-the-job training, once a year Ace participated in eight weeks of classroom training in Anchorage to learn about things like electrical theory. “It was a lot of learning, years and years of learning,” he says. “Even as a journeyman now, I’m still learning from other contractors. It never ends.” The long process didn’t come without its ups and downs. There were times that Ace wanted to take a break from his apprenticeship, but his parents


and Elders encouraged him to stick with it. Once he completed his apprenticeship, Ace decided he wanted to focus on other things.

“Whatever you want is what you can get. You’re the only one who can put a limit on yourself. There’s going to be a lot of trials, troubles and failures, but that happens to everyone. Keep going with it.”

“I’ve talked about opening a tour company for years,” he says. “I used to do it just for fun, but this was the first summer as an official business.” Starting a company from the ground up on his own came with new challenges, but Ace was ready for it. “Being an electrician gave me a lot of tools and knowledge about other trades, and I try to use that to my advantage,” he says. “I talked to a lot of guys that owned their own electrical business; they gave me some ideas of what works and what doesn’t.” He also received help and advice from his parents, who are entrepreneurs in their own right as the owners of God’s Country Cabin Rentals in Ninilchik.

– Ace Edwards

“I was nervous about leaving a steady job to try to do something that may or may not work. It was a drastic jump, but my parents were really supportive.” After sorting through all of the paperwork – business license application, land use permit, business insurance forms and others – Arctic Hummer Adventures was officially open for business in August. But Ace isn’t saying goodbye to electrical work forever. He plans to do it seasonally, to keep his skills sharp in between his other business ventures. Despite taking a non-traditional route, Ace doesn’t consider himself a risk-taker. “Whatever you want is what you can get. You’re the only one who can put a limit on yourself. There’s going to be a lot of trials, troubles and failures, but that happens to everyone. Keep going with it.”

Ace Carrington Edwards was born in Utqiaġvik. He has two Iñupiaq names, Ahmaogak and Ahsogeak. Ace was adopted and raised by Glenn and Carolyn Edwards; his biological parents are Daniel Edwards and Nora Jane Adams. His grandparents are Jim Edwards and Margaret Ahmaogak and Don Knighton and Carol Kious. Photos courtesy of Northerner Co. Graphic Design

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2019 National Flight Academy ASRC Industrial Services (AIS) would like to congratulate and recognize the eight students from across Alaska and the Lower 48 who were selected to attend the National Flight Academy in Pensacola, Florida from July 5th - 14th. The students were selected for academy participation through an essay contest where they wrote about an experience from their own life, relating to STEM, and how it has positively influenced them. critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, innovation, teamwork and information gathering as well as communication, technology literacy and adaptability.

The National Flight Academy (NFA) is an interactive, immersive learning adventure that focuses on inspiring youth to take a greater interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Since inception, nearly 16,000 students from all 50 states, 10 countries and four U.S. territories have experienced the unparalleled learning adventure aboard AMBITION, a state-of-the-art program housed onboard a 100,000+ square-foot virtual aircraft carrier. The National Flight Academy’s capstone program is a six-day learning “Deployment” where attendees – known as AMBITION eXperimental Pilots – plan humanitarian missions with ultramodern technology, learn to fly in 42 networked flight simulators, eat on a mess deck, sleep in staterooms and receive mission briefings in six fully electronic-ready rooms. The students learned aerodynamics, propulsion, navigation, aviation communication, flight physiology, and meteorology through simulators and virtual reality technology. In addition, students were exposed to trainings around

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The National Flight Academy has found that by placing students in real-world scenarios via immersion, simulation and virtual reality, they become far more skilled at scientific theorems, deciphering mathematical equations and discover self-confidence in their ability to problem-solve. Participants show a measurable increase in knowledge of STEM principals after completing the program. Being located on Naval Air Station Pensacola provided a unique opportunity to extend their learning into the real world. Students made “port calls” that included visiting the NAS Air Traffic Control tower and the National Naval Aviation Museum. They also had the opportunity to watch the Blue Angels practice from the Museum’s flight deck. The skills learned at NFA will be applicable to many facets of the student’s lives – both professionally and


personally – and it was clear that the opportunity to travel and learn about an incredibly scientific industry had boosted their confidence and problem solving abilities. AIS is excited to have fueled their interests in new and amazing career opportunities and empowered them to learn new leadership skills. After the six-day camp, students were able to enjoy Florida, relax by the hotel pool and beach, and enjoy a Southern Cajun dinner with some of the AIS Senior Leadership Team: Greg Johnson, Rob Pelham, Ted Mansfield and Chandi Prados.

Please join AIS in congratulating the 2019 National Flight Academy inaugural class! Charles “Moose” Brower Jr. Evelyn “Twirly” Pausanna Julien “Alaska” Robinson Leo “Spruce” Kinneeveauk Roman “Corsair” Lane Tatchya “Chain” Petrova Trustin “Meese” Tuttle

North Slope Marketplace Business Boot Camp Alaska Growth Capital’s (AGC) inaugural North Slope Marketplace (NSM) Business Boot Camp training for ASRC shareholder entrepreneurs was held August 8-11 in Utqiaġvik. The Boot Camp was a new component of AGC’s business plan competition this year, intended to build a cohort of North Slope entrepreneurs that support one another as they gain knowledge and build their businesses. In total, 20 applications were submitted to the NSM Business Concept competition. From there, 10 semifinalists were selected to attend with eight ultimately completing the Boot Camp. Semifinalists from the villages of Point Hope, Wainwright and Utqiaġvik showed focused dedication to the training, taking time away from children, families and work to attend the intensive all-day program. Business ideas ranged from selling beaded items or parkas to starting a falafel restaurant or a coffee shop. Ronette Panningona, a semifinalist proposing a beaded accessories business in Utqiaġvik, remarked that she applied for the NSM because – as a single mom – she is the provider for her family and she believes it is important to show her daughter that women can do anything.

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Next, the eight semifinalists who completed the Boot Camp submitted a business plan that they created with the help of expert mentors. The NSM review committee judged the business plans based on feasibility and community impact, among other requirements. Up to three winnners received up to $25,000 each in grant funds from AGC to move their business idea forward, as well as $4,500 in continuing education funds through a partnership with Arctic Education Foundation. “Thank you for the opportunity,” says Dana Spicer, a semifinalist proposing an indigenous toy manufacturing company in Utqiaġvik. “We’ll remember this for the rest of our lives.”

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GeoFORCE graduates second cohort TARGETS SPRING 2020 RECRUITMENT FOR NEXT CLASS

Congratulations to our 14 North Slope high school students who graduated from the GeoFORCE Alaska Academy this year. Arigaa! GeoFORCE is a four-year, field-based, summer geosciences program put on by the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) for high school students in rural communities of Alaska. The program is modeled after the University of Texas at Austin program that targets disadvantaged rural communities in southwest Texas. Industry and UAF teamed together in 2011 to develop an Alaska-based GeoFORCE program because Alaska Natives are largely underrepresented in the University system, especially in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields. GeoFORCE Alaska is designed to remove the stigma of STEM challenges, raise high school graduation rates and encourage participants to attend college. ASRC has been a significant partner of GeoFORCE from the beginning, through financial support to student mentors like Veronica Jones, the geologist in the Land Department who traveled with students on three of four trips offered in the academy. It is important and valuable for high school students to mentor with another shareholder from the region like Veronica. This program has clearly demonstrated a positive impact on the North Slope. Since the beginning of the program, the first cohort saw a 94 percent graduation rate with 72 percent enrolling in college. Of the college enrollees, 61 percent are majors in the STEM fields with 28 percent in the geosciences. Marie Stackhouse, mother of first cohort graduate Angel “Alivrun” Telfair, looks back at her daughter’s experience with GeoFORCE. “Traveling to different states prepared her for college, it also broadened her understanding of the world and her place in it. The hands-on fieldwork made learning geology fun and prepared her for college level classes. Angel is currently a senior at Eastern Washington University studying social work,” says Stackhouse.

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Statistics are not yet available for the second cohort because many of the students are still finishing their final year of high school. However, of the students who have already graduated, all of them are attending college this year. One of those students, Yvonne Pigaaluk Sarren from Utqiaġvik, reflects on her experience, “This GeoFORCE program not only taught me more about geology, but has taught me to be more comfortable with working and communicating well with others. I had fun staying at the many campuses that allowed us to use their space for housing and important lectures. I would definitely recommend this to new students. For me, it made the transition from high school to college way easier.” The first cohort only included students from the North Slope villages of Utqiaġvik, Nuiqsut, Point Hope, Wainwright and Kaktovik. The second cohort also included North Slope students, but UAF brought in NANA as a sponsor and was able to recruit eight Northwest Arctic students from the villages of Noatak, Kivalina and Kotzebue. GeoFORCE Alaska will be recruiting its third cohort during spring 2020 and recruiters will be traveling to all ASRC communities across the Slope.

Year 4 of Cohort 2.


GeoFORCE Alaska is a four-year program. Students travel together all four years with trips taking place during the summer months and lasting approximately 7-10 days each. Students get to travel to amazing places each year, and are expected to maintain a B average in their STEM classes during each school year.

Year 1 of the academy starts in Alaska where students learn everything our great state has to offer. It builds a solid foundation in geologic concepts such as erosion, deposition, the rock cycle, subduction, faults, glacial deposits, permafrost, and plate tectonics to name a few. They walk on an active glacier, raft down the Chena River, observe permafrost from underground, and see where the Trans Alaskan Pipeline crosses the Denali Fault. Year 2 takes students to the much hotter southwest United States, where they can see the rocks! For some, this is the student’s first trip outside of their village! They hike Zion National Park, Arches National Park, Antelope Canyon, and raft the Grand Canyon! Places that most people dream to see in their lifetime.

Year 3 of the academy shifts gears and is focused on the northwest United States where they learn about volcanoes, igneous rocks, and coastal processes. They get to see and learn about the catastrophic event of the Mount Saint Helens eruption in 1980 and see Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States. Year 4 the academy travels to the Rocky Mountains where they can observe regional scale geologic events such as the basin and range province and map the multiple events of mountain building that form the backbone of the Rockies. Along the way they visit Dinosaur National Monument, watch Old Faithful erupt, visit petroglyphs and dig for fossils in the Green River Formation.

GeoFORCE will be recruiting in spring 2020 for 8th and 9th graders from all North Slope communities. If you or someone you know are interested, please contact Brian Regianni or Veronica Jones.

Brian Regianni UAF GeoFORCE Program Coordinator Office: (907) 474-5313 Email: uaf-geoforce@alaska.edu

Veronica Jones ASRC Geologist and Student Mentor Office: (907) 339-6004 Email: vijones@asrc.com

Learn more about GeoFORCE: geoforce.alaska.edu vimeo.com/129492268

Uqalugaaŋich

https://www.facebook.com/geoforceak/ https://www.instagram.com/geoforcealaska

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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

P.O. Box 129 Utqiaġvik, Alaska 99723 A S RC .CO M

ASRC Elder and shareholder rates FA LL R ATE S: SHAREHOLDER RATE: $197.64 + 5% tax | NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $263.21 + 5% tax

• Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability • Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked • Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate. The shareholder rate is intended for shareholder leisure stay only and cannot be used for medical, business, receptive, or international stays.

For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

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Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 3Q 2019 Newsletter  

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 3Q 2019 Newsletter  

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