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Where people share information

A SRC .COM

Feature story

Shareholder spotlight:

Jacob Adams of Utqiaġvik honored as “Alaskan of the Week.”

A LICE GLENN Turning the volume up on Alaska Native voices

Read more on page 9.

Read more on page 10.

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Table of contents President’s message..............................................................................................1 Environmental Quality Management joins ASRC.................................................3 ASRC ad campaign wins Emmy Award.................................................................4 Alaska Growth Capital named SBA Community Lender of the Year....................4 ASRC Federal advances health care for the military............................................ 5 AES-HCC a strategic partner in TAPS ................................................................... 6 Attorney General Bill Barr visits Alaska................................................................7 Moving aviation forward .......................................................................................8 Alaskan of the week...............................................................................................9 Shareholder spotlight......................................................................................... 10 Unalaska Marine Center completes $37 million dock expansion..................... 12 PSI testifies at ADEC hearing.............................................................................. 14 Brent Renfrew named new president & CEO of AIS........................................... 15 Iḷisaġvik College update..................................................................................... 16 Set Up Shop program......................................................................................... 18 ASRC Federal shareholder development programs.......................................... 20 Mavo Systems wins 3M Supplier of the Year Award........................................... 22 ASRC partners in dinosaur exploration............................................................. 23 ASRC sponsors 3-on-3 Unified Basketball Tournament.................................... 24 RSI achieves 10 years without lost time work injury at Portsmouth................ 25

Qaunaksriñiqput STEWARDSHIP We employ financial discipline when managing our land and assets to ensure that increases in business performance and shareholder returns are sustainable.

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President’s message RE X A . ROCK SR .

As ASRC celebrates its 47th year since incorporation, inching closer to our silver anniversary, it’s important to never lose sight of the Iñupiaq values and guiding principles that have allowed us to become not only a trusted leader in business both inside as well outside of the state – but also responsible stewards of our lands and resources. Our success has enabled the Corporation to create job opportunities for our people as well as strengthen the economic and cultural health of our North Slope communities. As we continue to expand our reach and aim for the aggressive targets established in our 2018-2023 Strategic Plan, we will not waver from allowing these values to direct our business decisions – continuing to learn from our rich past as we welcome the future. We saw additional growth in late June, as our subsidiary ASRC Industrial Services announced the acquisition of Environmental Quality Management, or EQM. The latest member of the ASRC family of companies is based in Cincinnati, Ohio and specializes in environmental remediation, emergency response, site restoration, environmental consulting and emission measurement services. You can read more about EQM later in this newsletter. You can also read about Alaska Growth Capital once again earning the SBA Alaska District’s 2018 Community Lender of the Year Award, which recognizes the SBA lender that offers services and engages in other activities that promote and support community development across the state. Congratulations to Logan Birch and the rest of the AGC team for the recognition and I look forward to the company’s continued success.

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Congratulations as well to the corporate external affairs department for once again being recognized by the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Even though there was stiff competition, I’m pleased to say the 2018 television commercial campaign featuring the communities of Anaktuvuk Pass, Kaktovik and Nuiqsut has won a prestigious Emmy Award. It’s the third Emmy for the Corporation since 2015 and I’d like to pass along my thanks to Fenton Rexford, Catherine Edwards and Archie Ahkiviana for their selfless involvement. In 2019, the advertising campaign will shift its focus to the Corporation’s business lines and I look forward to sharing the ads with our shareholders, employees and stakeholders – as well as with a statewide audience. In mid-June, my good friend, ASRC founder and current board member Jacob Adams Sr. Continued on page 2

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was honored by being named the “Alaskan of the Week” by Senator Dan Sullivan. From the floor of the U.S. Senate, Sullivan listed Jake’s many accomplishments and contributions to the people across our region. My thanks to our junior senator for the kind words and my congratulations to Jake for the well-deserved recognition. If you missed Sen. Sullivan’s “Alaskan of the Week” address, you can find a link to the video on page 3 of this newsletter. It was a pleasure to see so many familiar faces at the various Nalukataq celebrations across our region, and the Qagruq celebration in my hometown of Point Hope. The spring harvest was plentiful, with more than 20 bowhead whales safely and successfully landed in our region – seven in Tikiġaq, nine in Utqiaġvik, one in Point Lay and six in Wainwright. Congratulations to the team members who have helped to feed their communities throughout the summer months.

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Lastly, I’d like to thank those who took the time to attend the recent shareholder informational meetings across the North Slope as well as the Interior and in Anchorage. As we discussed, we are coming off a positive year for the Corporation and we are already making steady progress toward the goals established in our 2018-2023 Strategic Plan. I look forward to sharing additional progress in the future. Taikuu, and God’s blessings.

Rex A. Rock Sr. President and CEO


Environmental Quality Management joins ASRC On July 1, 2019, ASRC announced the acquisition of Environmental Quality Management (EQM) by our wholly-owned subsidiary ASRC Industrial Services, LLC. The company is headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio and provides environmental services in the Midwest, California and Pacific Northwest. EQM is a full-service environmental remediation company specializing in environmental remediation, emergency response, site restoration, environmental consulting and emission measurement services. The company serves both the public and private sectors, including the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, steel industry and large-scale manufacturers. Since the company was founded in 1990, it has differentiated itself from competitors through the quality of its services and ability to take on and master complex, large-scale projects. EQM will join AIS’s Environmental Engineering and Professional Services operating group. The company fills a gap in AIS’s existing portfolio and adds another skilled group of employees to the expanding enterprise.

provider,” said Greg Johnson, president and CEO of AIS. “The AIS management team appreciates ASRC’s support and looks forward to working with the team at EQM to build on the company’s well-earned reputation, and in the process, provide additional opportunities for their talented workforce, bring additional services to customers in new markets and ultimately deliver enduring benefits to ASRC’s shareholders.” “After getting to know the AIS team and learning about ASRC’s commitment to the industrial services market, I quickly recognized AIS was the right long-term home for EQM,” said Jack Greber, the company’s founder. “Selling a business is always a tough decision, but I’m excited by the new opportunities this next chapter brings to both our employees and our customers.”

“The AIS management team appreciates ASRC’s support and looks forward to working with the team at EQM to build on the company’s well-earned reputation, and in the process, provide additional opportunities for their talented workforce, bring additional services to customers in new markets and ultimately deliver enduring benefits...”

“On behalf of ASRC’s board of directors, I am pleased to welcome the management team and talented employees of Environmental Quality Management to the ASRC family of companies,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. “EQM is the most recent acquisition we have made in pursuit of the AIS strategy initiated in September 2016. I am happy with the progression of the strategy to date, and I am confident the AIS and EQM management teams will work collaboratively to sustain the positive momentum and ultimately create a scaled platform that delivers durable, enduring benefits to ASRC’s shareholders.” “Adding Environmental Quality Management to AIS’s RRS group is further evidence of ASRC’s commitment to pursuing the AIS vision to build an enduring, employeecentric, customer-focused and value-added service

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– Greg Johnson, AIS President and CEO

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ASRC ad campaign wins Emmy Award COMMERCIALS HIGHLIGHT RICH HISTORY AND CULTURE OF ALASKA’S NORTH SLOPE Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is honored to have won an Emmy Award from the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for its 2018 television commercial campaign featuring the communities of Anaktuvuk Pass, Kaktovik and Nuiqsut. The 56th annual award ceremony was held Saturday, June 8 in Seattle, Washington.

documentary “True North, the Story of ASRC”, which aired statewide in 2017. ASRC also won an Emmy for its commercial campaign in 2015.

“These beautiful commercials highlight the fact that while ASRC continues to diversify and expand its operations, our home is in Alaska and we continue to be guided by our Iñupiaq values and the lessons from our elders,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO. “I’d like to thank Fenton Rexford, Catherine Edwards and Archie Ahkiviana for their involvement and our external affairs team for putting the commercials together. I’m really pleased to see they’ve been so well-received.” This is the third Emmy for the corporation. Last year, the corporation won an Emmy for its long-format

You can view the 2018 commercial campaign on asrc.com.

Alaska Growth Capital named SBA Community Lender of the Year In mid-June, the Small Business Administration (Alaska District) announced several local awards, including its 2018 “Community Lender of the Year”, which went to Alaska Growth Capital BIDCO, Inc. The award recognizes the SBA lender that offers services and engages in other activities that promote and support community development in Alaska, and that achieves the highest number of SBA loan approvals to businesses located in Alaska during the fiscal year. AGC approved 13 loans totaling $13.5 million during FY 2018.

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“Alaska Growth Capital is proud to again be recognized as the SBA Alaska Community Lender of the Year. Our talented team underwrites, closes and services SBA loans right here in Alaska and is focused on working closely with our customers to get them the capital they need, often when other financial institutions aren’t willing to do so,” said Logan Birch, AGC president and CEO. “The SBA loan guarantee program allows Alaska Growth Capital to provide loans to small businesses across the state, and we are extremely proud of the job creation, community empowerment and economic impact our customers deliver.”


ASRC Federal advances health care for the military

Congratulations to the ASRC Federal team on winning the Defense Medical Information Exchange (DMIX) Sustainment & Systems Integration Support contract. This is a follow-on task order for the company that has a one-year base and four one-year options, and is valued at approximately $90 million. The ASRC Federal team will provide systems integration and sustainment for the DMIX products, including operations and sustainment for DMIX development, test, and production environments and clinical terminology mapping services. These services support the Defense Healthcare Management Systems interoperability mission, enabling secure health information exchange consistent with national standards among the Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Veterans Affairs and private sector partners. “We are honored to continue supporting the important missions of the Program Executive Office Defense Healthcare Management Systems (PEO DHMS) and the

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“This work is vital to making timely information available in the delivery of health care services to our military members and their families.” – Mark Gray, ASRC Federal President and CEO

Military Health System,” said Mark Gray, ASRC Federal president and CEO. “The DMIX products support implementation of DoD’s new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, providing access to comprehensive health record data. This work is vital to making timely information available in the delivery of health care services to our military members and their families.”

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AES-HCC a strategic partner in TAPS Alyeska Pipeline Service Company recently reached a significant strategy landmark when it completed a contract retaining ASRC Energy Services-Houston Contracting Company (AES-HCC) as its primary maintenance contractor for the next several years. “AES-HCC is a key partner to TAPS operation and our maintenance success, and this new agreement is an important milestone in Alyeska’s new maintenancefocused strategy,” explained Dan Flodin, Alyeska’s chief procurement officer. “Our shared culture of safety and protecting the environment is stronger than ever and this agreement allows us to continue the ‘Next 40’ journey with confidence and renewed focus.” The company has long been Alyeska’s biggest contractor in terms of spend, manhours (more than 1 million annually) and employees on TAPS. That partnership continued evolving in the past year to align with Alyeska’s strategic transition. “AES-HCC is proud of the longstanding partnership we have established with Alyeska,” said Wade Blasingame, president and general manager of AES-HCC. “Renewing and extending this contract represents an increase in planning collaboration and strengthens our ability to solve challenges together going forward with Alyeska’s new maintenance strategy.” AES-HCC is a partner that knows Alyeska and TAPS well. Its first contract with Alyeska was in the early 1990s for equipment fleet maintenance and warehouse support. It has held multiple maintenance contracts since, and today, as Alyeska’s primary maintenance contractor, performs a wide variety of work on TAPS, including some of the highest risk. “The company has a history of working with Alyeska to deliver excellence in the safe execution of pressure boundary work on the pipeline, at the pump stations and at the Terminal, and the structural remediation of the above-ground pipe system,” explained Dave Heimke, Alyeska’s director of engineering.

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As Alyeska’s primary oil spill response provider along the pipeline, AESHCC ensures compliance with regulatory oil spill contingency plans. Its crews also offer mechanical and piping work, minor modifications and major maintenance projects, right of way maintenance, maintenance services at the Valdez Marine Terminal, and surveillance line-wide – utilizing baseline crews and equipment at six maintenance centers: Prudhoe, Galbraith, Prospect, Yukon, Fairbanks and Delta. All locations are also required to respond to an emergency 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Another area of AES-HCC’s expertise is equipment/fleet maintenance and management. Alyeska has over 4,000 pieces of equipment, including vehicles that require maintenance. AES-HCC crews also provide material warehousing (receiving and shipping coordination), as well as snow removal, brushing, repairs to drainage systems, access gates, fences, bridges, and maintenance of Alyeska-operated airports at Galbraith and Prospect. “AES-HCC would like to thank our staff and skilled craft labor that do the hard work and heavy lifting day in and day out to make TAPS one of the safest places to work,” Blasingame said. “This is a very important contract to both AES-HCC and the labor affiliates that work with us hand-in-hand, and we appreciate all of the support we’ve received from Alyeska.” Alyeska and AES-HCC were recently recognized with the governor’s “Innovation in Safety Award” at the


governor’s Safety & Health Conference. The honor spotlighted the partnership’s efforts in Valdez, where crews increased safety and lowered cost in work performance by successfully utilizing new concrete drilling technology. AES-HCC crews have also contributed to numerous high visibility TAPS projects in recent years, including the flare tip repair and the fuel gas piping reroute at

Pump Station 1, mainline valve and fuel gas line valve replacements, crude pipe assessment and replacement, and industrial waste water repairs at the Terminal, and electrical projects line-wide. Alyeska maintenance director Melanie Myles said, “AESHCC has been a longtime partner of Alyeska Pipeline Service Company and we look forward to strengthening that relationship as we move into the next 40 years.”

Attorney General Bill Barr visits Alaska U.S. Attorney General William P. Barr visited Anchorage on May 29, 2019 to participate in the Alaska Native Tribal Justice roundtable at the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. Barr was joined by representatives of Alaska Native village corporations, public safety organizations, tribes and rural Alaska communities to discuss the lack of law enforcement and the high rates of violence against women and children in many communities throughout rural Alaska. “Victims of domestic violence and sexual assault cannot escape the cycle of abuse. Without a full-time or consistent prosecutor, rural Alaskan women often go back to the perpetrator just to ensure their children have a home,” said Heather Dingman with the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation Community & Economic Development (CED) team, who attended the roundtable on behalf of Arctic Slope Native Association. During his time in Alaska, Barr called the situation an emergency, pledging to do all he could to help. On June 28, 2019, Barr followed through with that promise and declared an emergency for public safety in rural Alaska. This declaration resulted in more than $10 million in emergency funds to support law enforcement in Alaska Native villages. More than half of that – $6 million – will go toward hiring, equipping and training Village Public Safety

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Heather Dingman with ASRC meets AG Barr in late May.

Officers, Village Police Officers and Tribal Police Officers, as well as for mobile detention facilities. The other $4.5 million in funding will go toward 20 officer positions, along with equipment and training, to Alaska Native grantees by the end of July. “It brings me, and many others in our state, great relief that U.S. Attorney General Barr has dedicated $10 million to rural communities. This investment will provide much needed improvements and bring positive impacts to our most vulnerable people,” Dingman said.

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Moving aviation forward ASRC FEDERAL TEAM SUPPORTS SAFE AIR SPACE Every day more than a million Americans travel by air for business, vacation, or to see family or friends. What travelers don’t see is the behind the scenes work that goes into making their journey safe, reliable and ontime. Over 192 ASRC Federal employees working at the FAA’s William J Hughes Technical Center (WJHTC) in Egg Harbor, New Jersey travel around the country to different airports, improving the National Airspace System (NAS) and ensuring the safe departures, flights and arrivals for travelers. Through the Terminal and Technical Operations (TnT) contract, ASRC Federal employees support the Federal Aviation Administration’s NAS mission, which serves as a tool for air traffic controllers and aids in the FAA’s mission to provide safe and efficient use of national

airspace. The NAS consists of surveillance targets, weather detection, flight plan data, communication, air traffic control and display systems, and supporting processing systems within the EnRoute, Oceanic, flight service and terminal air traffic control environments. The TnT contract provides second-level engineering and sustainment support for existing NAS equipment, systems and services used for air traffic control, and the implementation and deployment of new equipment and systems to move towards a satellite-based air traffic management system. As part of the modernization efforts approximately 300 employees nationwide, including those located at WJHTC, provide transition support activities for Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System (STARS), which are replacing the

Some of the ASRC Federal team members who support the FAA in Egg Harbor Township, new Jersey: Anthony Ragone (left), Stephen Groot, Jessica Salway, Hohn Waverka, Brian Conover, Diana Maslowski, Collin Surman, Mary Ellen James, Gederico Silie-Reyes, Jessica Ceresini.

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legacy air traffic control flight data systems used at over 500 airports. STARS is one of the cornerstones for the Next Generation Air Transportation System, and ASRC Federal employees are at the forefront of its testing and implementation. All of the FAA’s NextGen programs, such as System Wide Information Management (SWIM), Data Communications, and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADSB) depend on a successful STARS deployment. Additional enabling systems supported by the TnT contract include: Aeronautical Information Management Modernization (AIMM), the Terminal Flight Data Manager (TFDM), and the RMM Systems Engineering Team (RMSET), which monitors the systems and service of air traffic equipment. “The safety of air travelers is the utmost significance of our work,” says Ann Maguire, Egg Harbor office manager and program office lead. “When replacing the old

system, we aim not only to make sure the new system keeps up with the technology, but also to ensure that the transition does not interrupt air travel. The new system is running side by side with the old for at least a month and the switch-over almost always occurs around midnight,” adds Maguire. “The deployment team works through the night to ensure a smooth transition. Furthermore, a quadruple redundancy mechanism is in place so if anything in the new system does not work to the team’s satisfaction, the old system can still be brought back on-line.” “The most rewarding part of being on this team is hearing about the technical abilities of our employees and the importance of their role within the FAA and NAS,” concludes Maguire. “We are most proud of the relationship we have established with our employees and the FAA customer, and of course knowing that we are ensuring the safety of air travelers on a daily basis.”

Alaskan of the week

U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan honored Jacob Adams of Utqiaġvik as his “Alaskan of the Week” on the Senate floor in June: “Like so many Alaska Natives, as a boy, he was sent to Mt. Edgecumbe – a boarding school hundreds of miles away. He then went to the University of Alaska Fairbanks, until he got a job with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. All of this was at a time of great change for the whole state and, particularly, for the Alaska Native people. While Jake was still a young man, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) was

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being debated. It was one of the largest lands claims acts in history – and the story around its passage, after decades of struggle, is one for the ages. Jake Adams, among so many others, was highly involved in its passage, and he was even more involved in the implementation of ANCSA, which set up shareholder owned businesses – Alaska Native Corporations – in regions throughout the state. Stories abound of him and other Native leaders knocking on doors throughout the region, making sure that their people signed up to be shareholders. When he was only 21 years old, Jake was elected to the Barrow City Council, and served as the city’s mayor from 1971 through 1977. When the North Slope Borough was established, he became the borough mayor, following Eben Hopson – another great leader for the North Slope and our State.” Video of Senator Sullivan’s address can be found on sullivan.senate.gov.

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Shareholder spotlight A LICE GLENN Turning the volume up on Alaska Native voices

Storytelling has been an inherent part of Alaska Native culture for generations, but Iñuit voices are struggling to be heard at a national level. Enter Alice Qannik Glenn. Alice has always been curious – asking questions, challenging systems and striving to learn more about various topics. She is also passionate about accurate and authentic Alaska Native representation in the media. The culmination of all these things inspired her to create her own Podcast called Coffee & Quaq. “There were no other Alaska Native podcasts out there, that I knew of, so I asked myself, ‘If not me, who? And if not now, when?’” Alice is right – it’s rare to see Native representation in the media. According to the 2016 American Society of News Editors Diversity Survey, most newsrooms don’t employ any Native American or Alaska Native journalists or editors at all, with only 0.39% of U.S. newsroom workforces identifying as American Indian or Alaska Native. Further, the indigenous population is persistently underrepresented in the media. In a 2010 review of the top 20 internet news sites by traffic, only 0.6% of the people portrayed in the news coverage were Native American or Alaska Native. But the perspectives of Alaska Natives are often completely different than those of non-Natives. “Our experiences as Alaska Native people, in all our complexities and nuances, are valid. Our voices should be heard, and we should see and hear ourselves in the media we’re consuming,” says Alice. “So this [Coffee & Quaq] is my attempt to provide that for our community, and specifically the young Alaska Native community.”

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The idea for Coffee & Quaq came about after Alice moved back to Alaska from Florida, where she attended university. She would find herself having rich conversations with other Alaska Native people, discussing everything from current events to food recipes. She wanted a way to preserve these types of exchanges, and a podcast was the natural fit because, in many ways, a podcast aligns with the oral traditions of Iñuit people. Alice brings a critical indigenous lens to her conversational podcasts. Telling Native stories with Native voices, she only interviews fellow Alaska Natives (with the exception of one upcoming episode that focuses on the non-Native experience growing up in rural Alaska). Since Coffee & Quaq’s inception in June 2018, six episodes have been released on a range of topics including traditional Iñuit tattoos, Alaska Native foods, LGBTQ+ in the Native community, use of the word ‘Eskimo’, art and cultural appropriation, and decolonization. “I learn something new from every single discussion with a guest on my show. I received a formal education in aerospace, but I really feel like I’ve learned so much more in the short time I’ve been working on Coffee & Quaq.” Alice worries that some topics might be criticized by the community, but her hope is to spark discussions on topics of interest in a culturally relevant setting and challenge what people think.


“I hold my Iñupiaq values close to heart, and culture is a driving focus of this project.” It’s important to Alice that the interviews are never cold or transactional. She works to genuinely connect with her guests on a personal level so they are comfortable with what it is they are sharing. And while the podcast is conversational and sounds informal, this belies the care taken in the making of Coffee & Quaq. In addition to brainstorming topics, finding individuals to interview and creating questions to direct discussions, the interviews themselves typically last 2-3 hours. Alice then has to edit and cut the audio, then post the final product online. All of that on top of Alice’s full-time job has led to some inconsistency in the timing of her postings. “My listeners want more and more episodes, but I have a full-time job, so I don’t have a whole lot of time to dedicate to the podcast,” says Alice. “My goal to mitigate that is to find ways to work on my podcast full-time, and learn to monetize it somehow. That way, I’ll have the freedom and time to concentrate on the podcast and make a living.” Despite this, Coffee & Quaq has a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts. You can also find Coffee & Quaq on Google Play Podcasts, iHeartRadio Podcasts, YouTube, Patreon,

SoundCloud, Stitcher or at coffeeandquaq.com. Episodes also air on KRFF 89.1 Voice of Denali, KBRW 680 AM and KONR Out North Radio. Coffee & Quaq’s listeners aren’t just located in the U.S., with individuals from the U.K., Canada and even Finland downloading the podcast. Alice has also received help and support from various friends and family members to keep her grounded in Coffee & Quaq’s mission. “My Mom, Dad and my sisters helped me fine-tune my vision. My partner Amos helps me with every episode. Jenny Miller, Jacqui Igluguq Lambert and Howdice Brown III help me with brainstorming, networking and moral support.” Future topics that Alice will explore include missing and murdered indigenous women, climate change, social media in the village, the Alaska Native education system, language revitalization and more. “As long as there are current event topics, there will be an Alaska Native perspective to share.”

Alice Qannik Glenn was born and raised in Utqiaġvik. She currently resides in Anchorage with her longterm partner Amos Tumaitchaq Stankiewicz and his 5-year-old son Joseph Aviugan Stankiewicz. Her parents are Richard Savik Glenn and Arlene Iqilan Glenn. She is the granddaughter of Robert A. Glenn and Alice Kannik Glenn, and the late Frankie Mitchak Akpik, Sr. and Jeanette Patuk Akpik. She has three sisters – Patuk Glenn, Roberta Tuurraq Glenn and Joanne Mitchak Glenn. Alice received her bachelor of science in aerospace studies from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in 2014. She has six years of internship experience with various NASA contractors, as well as two years of experience as an environmental specialist for UIC Umiaq. She currently works at Rasmuson Foundation as a momentum program fellow – a leadership program done in partnership with Philanthropy Northwest to prepare professionals from underrepresented communities for careers in philanthropy.

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Unalaska Marine Center completes $37 million dock expansion

To the excitement of North Pacific Fuel employees and customers, the City of Unalaska unveiled its renovated dock facility in mid-January. After 20 months of work, the Marine Center added approximately 460 feet of operational dock space, expanding the dock’s back reach to 81,309 square feet, or nearly two acres. Instead of using traditional concrete for the back decking, the city contractor used heavy-duty pavers, much like those you would use for a residential project. “Using pavers saved approximately $2 million and significantly shortened the construction schedule,” said Scott Brown, deputy port director for the City of Unalaska. The Marine Center’s dock is adjacent to North Pacific’s Ballyhoo tank farm, which stores 5,400 barrels of unleaded gas, 4,700 barrels of jet fuel, and 45,500 barrels of ULS2, along with a load rack for all three products. In addition to more functional dock space, the project added three service fuel vaults to the five already in place, as well as three cargo line vaults for barge receipts of ULS2, jet and unleaded gas. North Pacific Fuel has long enjoyed a strong relationship with the Marine Center. “With the expansion, we won’t

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have to fight for dock space like we used to,” said Mark Hughes, North Pacific Fuel’s operations manager. “We’ll also be able to use it for overflow from our Captains Bay dock during the peak seasons.” The expansion brings improved access to the existing 3,000 square foot warehouse on the dock for vessels conducting offloads to sort their product. It also improves access to North Pacific Fuel’s adjacent Latitude 54 facility, with over 50,000 square feet of rentable warehouse space and almost 4,000 square feet of office space. Improved access for key North Pacific customers, such as Coastal Alaska Premier with its factory trawler and two longliner vessels, Fishermen’s Finest with three factory trawlers, and O’Hara Corp. with two factory trawlers is another valuable expansion benefit. When asked how the initial season has gone so far, Brown said, “Feedback from the users has been overwhelmingly positive. The port has been able to accommodate all schedule requests and positions since taking control of the dock in January.”


Saving for retirement may have a small impact on your paycheck… Consider the hypothetical examples opposite. In this scenario, an ASRC employee making $65,000 a year is not enrolled in the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation and Subsidiaries Employees Retirement Plan (the “Plan”). As you can see, their 401(k) deduction is $0 and their net takehome pay after taxes and other deductions is $2,000.

Emp ploy yee Name Period Start r

Social Security y#

Period End

Payyment Date

Federal Filing g Status EARNINGS Hours

Descrip ption ANNUAL LEAV A E BF Impu p ted Income HOLIDAY PAY REGULAR PAY

SUMMARIES: GROSS PAY PRE-TAX DEDUCTIONS TAX DEDUCTIONS OTHER DEDUCTIONS N NEET T PAY

Emp ploy yee No. Check No

Org ganization

Base Salary ry

Federal Allowance Amount

CURRENT $2,500 $0 $500 $0 $2,000

Year to Date

YEAR TO DATE

Sick Hours

Vac. Hours

State Filing g Status Descrip ption FIT Withheld Social Securityy Emp ployyee Wi Medicare Emp ployyee Withhel SUI Emp ployyee Withheld BF Vol Identityy Theft f BF Dental BF Medical BF Vision EE 401K EE 401K

SUMMARIES: GROSS PAY PRE-TAX DEDUCTIONS TAX DEDUCTIONS OTHER DEDUCTIONS NET PAY PAY A NET

State Allowance

DEDUCTIONS Amount

CURRENT $2,500 $0 $500 $0 $2,000

Year to Date

0.00

0.00

YEAR TO DATE

EE 401K EE 401K

0.00

3,927.28 0.00

In the scenario below, this same individual decides to enroll in the Plan and contribute 4% per pay period (biweekly), which is $100 per paycheck. As a result, they are contributing $100 per pay period to the Plan and their take-home pay is only reduced by $80. SUMMARIES: GROSS PAY PRE-TAX DEDUCTIONS TAX DEDUCTIONS OTHER DEDUCTIONS NET PAY PAY NET

CURRENT $2,500 $0 $500 $0 $1,920

YEAR TO DATE

EE 401K EE 401K

0.00 100.00

3,927.28 100.00

Images are for illustrative purposes only.

In the following illustration, you’ll see how potential compounding may work over the course of many years. For example: If you are making $65,000 per year and you save 4% annually ($2,600), ASRC will contribute an additional $2,600 per year to your Plan account.1 And thanks to the potential compounding of investment earnings in the Plan, after 30 years, your Plan account value could potentially be $383,101.*

1 Year

30 Years

$5,475 total potential value

$383,101 total potential value

$227,101

Potential growth over time

$2,600

$78,000

Company match

$2,600

$78,000

$275

Your contribution

Don’t leave additional savings behind—enroll now. Call Participant Services at 1-800-724-7526, from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday. *Hypothetical examples are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to represent the past or future performance of any specific investment. Investing involves risk, including loss of principal. The balances shown represent the amount contributed and the earnings compounded annually. The examples assume a hypothetical average rate of return of 5.3%, reinvestment of dividends and capital gains, and no current taxes paid on earnings in a retirement plan account. Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice.

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1 The employer contribution is paid on a pre-tax basis and may be taxable at withdrawal. Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. provides recordkeeping and related services with respect to the retirement plans and has provided this communication to you as a part of the recordkeeping services it provides to the Plan. CC2755057 (0719-93J5) MKT107036ASL-00 (06/19) 00230797

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PSI testifies at ADEC hearing In late June, Petro Star Inc. attended a public hearing, hosted by the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC), to share its concerns about the proposed control measure that will prohibit the sale of #2 Heating Oil within the Interior’s non-attainment area – covering Fairbanks and North Pole. ADEC has requested public feedback on the preliminary Serious State Implementation documents, which were produced this spring. PSI operates refineries in North Pole and Valdez, producing home heating oil and jet fuel as well as multiple grades of ultra-low sulfur diesel. Through its distribution arms – Sourdough Fuel and North Pacific Fuel – PSI delivers products such as heating oil and marine diesel directly to end users and operates a number of retail gas stations and convenience stores located in Kodiak, Unalaska Island and Fairbanks/ North Pole. PSI also produces specialty turbine fuels for two electric utilities – Golden Valley and Copper Valley Electric Associations – and is the main supplier of petroleum products to the Defense Logistics Agency/ Department of Defense within the state. The following is testimony provided by Petro Star Inc. Vice President and General Counsel, Angela Speight, at the hearing: As the only Alaska-owned refiner and sole producer of #2 Heating Oil in the Interior, Petro Star is deeply concerned about the Control Measure included in the Serious SIP that proposes to tell Interior residents what they can and can’t burn for home heating oil. Through the Sourdough Fuel heating oil division, this measure will impair Petro Star’s ability to serve its customers with locally produced #2 Heating Oil, a fuel that does not significantly contribute to the existing air quality issue. In fact, according to the State’s own Planning Inventory calculations, heating oil is the second smallest source of PM 2.5, contributing merely a fraction of the PM 2.5 emitted through solid fuel burning, despite being the most common means of heating Interior homes and businesses by a wide margin.

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The data used to determine that the Control Measure prohibiting #2 Heating Oil would provide a “definite improvement” to air quality is flawed, and Petro Star has shared with ADEC that it is inconsistent with empirical data gathered through decades of refinery operations and serving Interior customers. For example, the assumptions used to calculate a significant increase in jet fuel sulfur emissions are not just incorrect, they are higher by an order of magnitude. The faulty assumptions underpinning the SIP calculations should be verified against publicly available information on military jet fuel, or as Petro Star has previously offered, we stand ready to assist ADEC in obtaining accurate information. Correcting for the flawed data, Petro Star estimates that switching from #2 Heating Oil to #1 Heating Oil could result in a minor decrease in PM 2.5 overall, at considerable cost to residents and businesses. Despite this, the Serious SIP has failed to provide a precursor determination for sulfur emissions that meets the requirements of EPA – it includes mention of plans to do so in future SIP reviews, but future plans won’t help current customers. While home heating fuel is a very minor contributor to PM 2.5 emissions, this Control Measure imposes nearly all of the initial regulatory and financial burdens onto Interior consumers. This Control Measure is intended to “buy 3 years of improvement” to reach another 5-year review period for the SIP, all the while doing very little to actually address the PM 2.5 issue. Given the flawed data, this is unlikely – and while the improvement in air quality may not happen, the financial impact to the Interior residents most definitely will. Petro Star is also concerned that the economic analysis provided as part of the Serious SIP – and used to present the impact as “only $70 annually per household” – is fatally flawed. EPA’s feedback to the preliminary SIP documents stressed the importance of a supply side analysis. However, the proposed SIP does not appear to incorporate this in its economic analysis, but rather assumes an unlimited, local supply of #1 Heating Oil available at a static price point. Petro Star’s calculations show the impact of switching to #1 Heating Oil for Interior consumers now burning #2 Heating Oil to be roughly 10% above their current costs, and could


be much higher for all customers if local demand for #1 Heating Oil outpaces local production. Further, given jet fuel and #1 Heating Oil are essentially the same material, competition between Interior residents and military jet fuel requirements will grow substantially as the new F-35 squadron comes online. Nowhere can we find where this major change was taken into consideration when the economic analysis was performed and the $70 annual impact to households calculated. Petro Star strongly urges ADEC to delay the implementation of the proposed Control Measure prohibiting the sale of #2 Heating Oil until 2024, when more impactful control measures affecting solid fuel burning – the significant contributor of PM 2.5 – will also

take effect. This treats all Interior residents equitably, as well as grants ADEC additional time to conduct the necessary studies into sulfur emissions through a precursor determination and supply side impacts to the economic analysis. ADEC must have accurate information to provide Interior residents that will justify the significant economic burden on the community. Petro Star also plans to use this additional time to complete a debottlenecking project at its North Pole Refinery that will improve the available supply of #1 Heating Oil, reducing the need for additional transportation costs and improving the available capacity for this product. Thank you to ADEC for the opportunity to voice these concerns.

Brent Renfrew named new president & CEO of AIS In late July, Brent Renfrew will assume the role of president and CEO of ASRC Industrial Services, or AIS. He currently serves as AIS’s executive vice president and COO. In his new role, Renfrew will report to Butch Lincoln, ASRC’s executive vice president and COO. Concurrent with Renfrew’s transition to his new role, Greg Johnson will be stepping down as president and CEO of AIS to take a well-deserved break and spend more time with his family. Johnson joined the ASRC family in 2015 as the president of Petrochem. During his tenure, he has overseen the establishment of AIS and the execution of the AIS growth strategy we announced in September 2016. Specifically, Johnson spearheaded the successful acquisition of 13 companies, paving the way for significant expansion in support of our strategic plan and substantial growth of shareholder dividends. Renfrew is a familiar face to people across the ASRC family of companies. He joined ASRC in 2010 and has served in multiple roles across the enterprise. Prior to moving to AIS in May 2017, he served as ASRC’s vice

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president of corporate development where he helped develop ASRC’s acquisition strategy. Renfrew moved to AIS to serve as executive vice president of corporate development and CFO, and was promoted to his current role in May 2018. During his time with AIS, he has partnered with Johnson to pursue AIS’s vision to build something unique in the industrial services market and ultimately deliver meaningful benefits to ASRC shareholders. Brent Renfrew graduated from Wayne State University (WSU) in 2003 with a degree in accounting and is a certified public accountant. While at WSU, Brent was a four-year member of its Division I men’s hockey team. In 2016, he was a recipient of the Alaska Journal of Commerce’s Top Forty Under 40 award.

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Ilisaġvik College update Paġlagivsi partners, As we turn to our busy summer, we celebrate all the graduates who achieved their goals at our Spring 2019 Commencement. We continue to deliver a robust Workforce Development Program and are pleased to share a brief recap below of recent efforts, as well as exciting and innovative academic research by both students and staff. We thank you for all of your support in helping our students reach their occupational and educational goals. Quyanaqpak, Dr. Pearl Kiyawn Brower, President

Ilisaġvik Graduates

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Spring Commencement: former Lt. Governor Valerie Davidson speaks

rapidly warming Arctic climate is affecting microbial life in the region’s soil.

Iḷisaġvik College held its Spring 2019 Commencement ceremony at Ipalook Elementary School on Saturday, April 27. This year’s commencement included students earning 22 different associate degrees, 34 certificates and 30 endorsements in Accounting, Allied Health, Business and Management, CDL/Heavy Truck Operations, Heavy Equipment Operations, Construction Technology, Dental Health Therapy, Industrial Safety, Information Technology, Indigenous Education, Iñupiaq Studies, Liberal Arts, and Office Administration. There were 66 graduates in total.

Iḷisaġvik partners with University of Michigan developing land-based science curriculum

Commencement speaker, former Lt. Governor Valerie Davidson shared, “Change our institutions as we know them. Change your workplaces as you know them so it reflects who we really are as people, because you are different than everybody else and the strength of your ancestors that you bring to that work will change our world as we know it in a way that makes it easier and makes it more attainable to our children who come after us.”

Iḷisaġvik Student Study: Arctic Microbes “Arctic Microbes: Population Abundance and the Effects of a Warming Environment,” was one of three papers selected by Native Science Report for publication as part of its student research showcase. Reflecting the work Iḷisaġvik College students Ana Stringer, Jaime Patkotak and Olive Kanayurak, it examines how a

Iḷisaġvik faculty Linda Nicholas-Figueroa traveled to Ann Arbor, Michigan to work with collaborators at the University of Michigan to develop a culturally-grounded chemistry curriculum for Iḷisaġvik. The collaborative workshop will focus on chemical analysis methods used to study snow. In turn, she will share her experience of incorporating traditional knowledge into Iḷisaġvik College’s STEM curriculum. “This trip is part of an ongoing collaborative grant funded by the National Science Foundation that focuses on using traditional knowledge to guide Western science in the classroom. In particular, the science curriculum will focus on applying Iñupiat and local understanding of ice and snow to inform research projects that focus on the sampling and analysis of snow samples collected by the students.” Aarigaa for this important work!

New branding and website update Iḷisaġvik will soon release a new website and branding with student accessibility in mind. See the refreshed look of Iḷisaġvik this July!

Important Fall Semester dates! The Fall 2019 schedule has been released, and below are important dates to remember. You may also access the schedule online by visiting ilisagvik.edu.

July 8: August 1: August 2:

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Registration begins Deadline for most scholarships  eadline for applications for Fall D Semester

August 14: August 19: August 23:

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Registration (on campus) First day of instruction Last day to add semester-long classes

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Set Up Shop program The Set Up Shop program was initiated as a partnership between Alaska Community Land Trust (ACLT) and Alaska Growth Capital (AGC). In the past, AGC has focused their efforts on the North Slope region, but they have received several requests over the years to offer support to shareholders in Anchorage. When ACLT approached AGC about the Set Up Shop program, it was a natural fit. The program was created to provide business development training and capital access opportunities to new businesses in the communities of Mountain View, Fairview or Spenard, but ACLT felt that in order to best serve Alaska Natives, the class should be taught by someone in the Native community. Aurora Warrior, AGC’s Community & Economic Development consulting associate, took on the task of teaching the class. She was handed a textbook with materials to teach, but she immediately knew she had to make the class more culturally relevant and digestible for the participants. “They had curriculum, but I had to retrofit it to what I thought would be beneficial,” Aurora said. For example, the curriculum included tasks like breaking down the cost of a cheeseburger, but Aurora changed it to where students broke down the cost of a parka and a jar of salmon instead.

Throughout the 12-week course, participants met once a week to learn about business plans, basic marketing, accounting, taxes and legal aspects of a business. One of the main benefits of the class was connecting participants with a network to support their business endeavors. At the end of the program, seven students graduated – four of which were ASRC shareholders. “No one in the class thought of themselves as business owners when it started – even those with established businesses. The Set Up Shop class gave them the confidence to say that out loud,” Aurora added. *** Crystal Marie Naataq Nasagiluk Martin wanted a fun, simplistic way to teach her two daughters about their Iñupiaq culture. As an artist, she used visual references to connect Iñupiaq words with images for them. This sparked an idea for something bigger, something that

“No one in the class thought of themselves as business owners when it started – even those with established businesses. The Set Up Shop class gave them the confidence to say that out loud.” – Aurora Warrior, Community & Economic Development consulting associate, AGC

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Growing up in Utqiaġvik greatly influenced Crystal as an artist, but she initially wasn’t sure how she could turn her art hobby into a business. That’s why she decided to sign up for the Set Up Shop program. “Taking the Set-Up Shop program has allowed me to focus exactly how I want to utilize my talent in an effective way to give back to my community, and [the program] gave me the direction I needed to get started,” she added. “Now that I’ve completed the program, I can confidently make my dream into a reality, knowing that they can provide the resources and in-depth knowledge I need to succeed.” *** Jeannie Hall, originally from Utqiaġvik and now an employee for ASRC in Anchorage, was also part of this year’s Set Up Shop cohort. Her business idea is to open a shop in the Fairview or Mountain View area where elders can use their artistic talents to generate income for themselves. could reach beyond her own children. “Children are very visual learners, so I am self-learning how to develop apps in order to create a basic Iñupiaq interactive learning app, using my own artistic designs,” said Martin.

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“My goal is to help the elder people make their Native crafts and help them sell their products,” Hall said. The Set Up Shop program gave her the necessary tools to start turning this idea into reality. “What I learned from [Set Up Shop] was how to find a way to get help starting a business.”

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ASRC Federal shareholder development programs ASRC Federal would like to celebrate our 2019 Shareholder Development Program participants. ASRC Federal is committed to providing educational and professional development opportunities to the next generation of ASRC shareholder leaders. Internship Program ASRC Federal is excited to host eight shareholder students, and/or recent graduates, for the 2019 Shareholder Internship Program. Each of the following students are working directly for ASRC Federal and its subsidiaries supporting federal government customers across the country. In addition to gaining hands-on

professional experience during the workweek, interns can explore the nearby Washington DC area and National Mall. Please join us in congratulating the ASRC Federal Shareholder Intern Class of 2019!

Back row left to right: Jered Stewart, Josh Morgan, ASRC Federal President and CEO Mark Gray, David Elder-Waters, John Gregory. Front row left to right: Hannah Turner, Ruth “Maggie” Jackson, Sarah-Rose Neher, Tennessee Judkins

Shareholder Intern

Position & Location

Hometown

Josh Morgan

Financial Planning and Analysis - Beltsville, MD -

Anchorage, AK

Sarah-Rose Neher

Corporate Communications - Beltsville, MD -

Kenai, AK

John Gregory

Security and Facilities - Beltsville, MD -

Wasilla, AK

Hannah Turner

Continuous Improvement Analysis - Beltsville, MD -

Senoia, GA

David Elder-Waters

ASRC Federal Mission Solutions S Software Center of Excellence - Beltsville, MD/Moorestown, NJ -

Cottonwood, ID

Jered Stewart

Business Development - Beltsville, MD -

Portland, OR

Ruth “Maggie” Jackson

Tax and Compliance- Beltsville, MD -

Point Hope, AK

Tennessee Judkins

Inuteq Curriculum Development for NASA Space Communications and Navigation - Greenbelt, MD -

Barrow, AK

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Terp Young Scholars program This July, six shareholder high school students will live and attend class at the University of Maryland as recipients of ASRC Federal’s Terp Young Scholars Program (TYSP) scholarship. The TYSP is a threeweek program designed to give motivated high school students an opportunity to explore college by attending a college-level course of their choosing

while living on campus alongside students from across the country. Please join us in congratulating the 2019 TYSP Scholarship winners! Arissa Young, John Fritsch, Debra Lane, Leena Robinson, Alysa-Eileen Maclean, Evin Mongoyak

Space Camp Scholarship 11 shareholder student scholarships to attend the weeklong camp. During camp, students worked with their teams to build and launch rockets, train like astronauts and complete space missions. Following graduation, the space campers visited the ASRC Federal offices in Huntsville and toured the Select Laser Manufacturing lab, where advanced computer modeling and 3-D printing technologies are used to produce parts for customers such as NASA and the U.S. Air Force. Please join us in congratulating the 2019 Space Camp Scholarship winners! ASRC Federal would like to congratulate the following students on their completion of Space Academy and Advanced Space Academy held at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama on June 14-22, 2019. This year, ASRC Federal awarded

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Richard Gordon, Danny Long, Ida Marie Rexford, Peter McDermott, Lucy Mae Napageak, Sarah Ahkiviana, Aaron Stackhouse, Anna Henry, Sam Mingo, Heather Napageak, Torrie Tracey

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Mavo Systems wins 3M Supplier of the Year Award In early June, Mavo Systems, an environmental and specialty contractor, was honored with the 2019 3M Supplier of the Year Award in recognition of the company’s contribution to improving 3M’s competitiveness. This year, 3M recognized 13 suppliers among thousands in its global supply base for world-class performance in providing products and/or services. These suppliers were identified and rated based on strategic spend, contract compliance, actions taken to improve 3M’s relevance and overall supplier performance (quality, delivery, responsiveness, cost and technology roadmaps). An awards ceremony was held in late June. “Mavo Systems AIS greatly values our relationship with 3M and strives daily to deliver world class, value added performance,” said Rich Forstner, Mavo Systems vice president of operations. “We are honored and humbled to receive this prestigious recognition from 3M, and look forward to continuing to do our part in helping 3M deliver on innovative solutions for their customers.” “Supplier collaboration is critical to supply chain

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success,” said Debora Fronczak, vice president, 3M Strategic Sourcing. “We are fortunate to work with great suppliers who are committed to fostering a relationship with 3M. It’s important that we recognize our most outstanding suppliers, and that’s what this award is all about.”

About Mavo Systems Mavo Systems AIS is a premier environmental/ specialty contractor specializing in asbestos/lead/ mold abatement, interior demolition, mechanical insulation, HVAC/duct cleaning, flooring services, specialty cleaning, water-fire-storm restoration and concrete sawing. Mavo Systems AIS has over 400 employees serving commercial and industrial markets in the upper Midwest – from small scale projects to large multi-phase projects. For more information on Mavo Systems visit mavo.com.


ASRC partners in dinosaur exploration For three years, the ASRC Lands Department has provided access and partnered with the Perot Museum of Nature & Science in Dallas, Texas in exploring for dinosaurs on the western North Slope. The Perot Museum opened its doors to a new museum facility in 2012 and sees approximately one million visitors a year. The museum is a global leader in exploring for dinosaurs of the ancient north through a decades-long history of field work in Alaska. It includes thousands of square feet of dinosaur exhibits, such as the only mounted skeleton of the pygmy tyrannosaur Nanuqsaurus from the Colville River. Dinosaurs have always held fascination for students of all ages, and these exhibits inform and educate the public about dinosaurs of the Arctic.

“These discoveries serve to illustrate the great potential of the western North Slope in producing valuable insights...” The work ASRC Lands has supported focuses on rocks that are approximately 100 million-years-old, roughly 30 million-years-older than the well-known dinosaur deposits along the Colville River and the rock unit that produced the first technical description of dinosaurs from all of Alaska. The rocks contain a complex record of deposits representing ancient shallow marine shelves, deltas, river channels and floodplain environments. It is within these riverine deposits that the Perot Museum has found success. This preliminary reconnaissance has discovered fossil trees that are preserved in place, with diameters ranging from one-to-two feet, with smaller trees interspersed between. Analysis of the fossilized plants tell us this part of the world was much warmer at that time period than it is today, and the fossil carbon

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Paleontologists examine rocks along the Kukpowruk River on the western North Slope.

preserved in these trees suggest the climate at this time was more like a temperate rain forest. The dinosaur record consists of footprints – with approximately 75 footprint sites now identified. More specifically, these footprints represent large (~20 feet long) and small (~3 feet long) predatory dinosaurs, birds, and twolegged and four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs. These discoveries serve to illustrate the great potential of the western North Slope in producing valuable insights into the structure, dynamics Continued on page 24

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and climate of an ancient Arctic ecosystem in a vastly different environmental setting. In addition to these intriguing paleontological successes the museum, along with ASRC Lands, plan to prepare dinosaur kits to take into the local schools to show students on the North Slope findings on their lands.

This project has also served to train students from the University of Alaska as well as international universities. This training helps to create the next generation of scientific explorers in Earth history as well as science communicators, and we hope to interest local students about Arctic dinosaurs in their own backyard.

Some 98 million years ago, the Kukpowruk River was a very different place. Two-legged and four-legged plant-eating dinosaurs roamed a coastal lowland landscape that had stands of tall trees growing along the rivers that fed the nearby ocean. Birds that ranged in size from sandpipers to cranes flew overhead, and hunting all of these animals were large and small predatory dinosaurs. Artwork by Karen Carr can be found at karencarr.com.

ASRC sponsors 3-on-3 Unified Basketball Tournament In mid-April, Special Olympics Alaska held its third annual Unified 3-on-3 Basketball Clinic & Tournament at the Jim Balamaci Training Center in Anchorage. ASRC is a major sponsor of the event. Participating schools included Barrow High School, Tikigaq School (Point Hope), Tukurngailngup School (Bering Strait), West Anchorage High School and Service High School.

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RSI achieves 10 years without lost time work injury at Portsmouth

RSI EnTech (RSI) achieved a safety milestone in May of 2019, reaching a 10-year stretch without an injury on the Environmental Technical Services contract at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Portsmouth, Ohio. RSI EnTech provides support to the Department of Energy at Portsmouth in regulatory strategy, safety and field operations oversight, project controls, technical services and other specialties. Headquartered in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, RSI is part of the ASRC Industrial Services (AIS) engineering and professional services operating group. RSI employs about 60 people at the Portsmouth site and the 10-year period covers more than 1.25 million work hours. “We do a lot of work to make sure our employees are conscious of safety, and we are proud of the safety culture we have created,” said RSI Program Director

“ We do a lot of work to make sure our employees are conscious of safety, and we are proud of the safety culture we have created” – Bob Winegar, RSI Program Director Bob Winegar. “To go 10 years without an injury is a remarkable accomplishment.”

RSI EnTech employees recently celebrated a safety milestone, going ten years without a lost time work injury.

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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

P.O. Box 129 Utqiaġvik, Alaska 99723 A S RC .CO M

ASRC Elder and shareholder rates SUMMER R ATE S: SHAREHOLDER RATE: $197.64 + 5% tax | NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $317.94 + 5% tax

• Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability • Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked • Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate.

For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

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Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 2Q 2019 Newsletter  

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 2Q 2019 Newsletter  

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