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Where people share information

Tennessee Judkins is joined by the Eskimo Ninja, Nick Hanson, to host the 5th annual Ivalu Gala.

A SRC .COM

North Slope leader inducted to Women’s Hall of Fame

Shareholder spotlight:

Read more on page 9.

KUNNI A K HOPSON Read more on page 12.


Table of contents President’s message .............................................................................................1 Iñupiaq leaders testify in Washington, D.C. .........................................................3 Utqiaġvik welcomes Al Roker from NBC’s “Today Show”....................................4 2019 Ivalu Gala ......................................................................................................6 ASRC Industrial Services’ cross-selling initiative pays off....................................8 ASRC to unveil new website..................................................................................8 North Slope leader inducted to Women’s Hall of Fame....................................... 9 ASRC Construction Holding Company awarded large contract .........................9 Shareholder spotlight ........................................................................................ 10 Supporting NASA’s Advanced Computing Services.......................................... 12 ASRC announces Industrial Services acquisition ............................................. 13 ANWR draft Environmental Impact Statement ................................................. 15 Join AES’ shareholder development program, Nutaaq! .................................. 16 Getting the facts on upstream carbon impact of ANWR development ........... 18 2019 ASAA State Basketball Tournament.......................................................... 20

Qaunaksriñiqput STEWARDSHIP We employ financial discipline when managing our land and assets to ensure that increases in business performance and shareholder returns are sustainable.

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President’s message RE X A . ROCK SR .

With the New Year taking shape and the blessed season of spring upon us, it is a good time to remember to give thanks for the many blessings both inside as well as outside of our region – and to prepare for what is expected to be a busy and demanding remainder of 2019. Based on a variety of factors, we are coming off an effective and profitable year for your Corporation – a period of continued growth and diversification that we identified as a key element of our 2018-2023 Strategic Plan. These efforts are producing positive results, bringing continued value to our shareholders and positioning the company for sustainability well into in the future. In 2019, we will celebrate our silver anniversary of being the largest locally-owned and operated company in the state, and for ASRC, we have not achieved nor maintained this level of success by accident. We credit our past leaders for their foresight, for using Iñupiaq values as their guide when making decisions that positively affected our region and the Corporation in the short-term as well as the long-term. This same determined, well-researched and thoughtful process continues to this day with the current board of directors. From what can best be described as humble beginnings, it is this leadership and vision which has molded ASRC into the company it is today – a wellrespected corporate partner and industry leader. I’d also like to thank the hard-working executive team and our wide-reaching family of employees who also play such a critical role in our continued success.

“we will celebrate our silver anniversary of being the largest locally-owned and operated company in the state...” subsidiary, ASRC Industrial Services, LLC, or AIS. K2 is headquartered in Houston, Texas and joins the AIS Remediation and Response Services operating group. In February of 2019, AIS acquired National Environmental Group as well as Niles Construction Services, both of which are based in Flint, Michigan. You can learn more about the latest acquisitions a bit later in this newsletter.

Already into the New Year, we have seen additions to our family of companies. In January, we announced the acquisition of K2 Industrial Systems by our

In early February, ASRC was pleased to assist Arctic Education Foundation (AEF) in holding its 5th annual Ivalu Gala fundraiser at the Captain Cook hotel. This gala has really turned into one of Continued on page 2

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the most talked about events across the state and only seems to get larger every year. Congratulations to Mae Ahgeak as the 2019 Flossie Hopson-Andersen Award recipient and to AEF for hosting another successful event. I’d also like to thank the generous sponsors that helped to open the door to educational opportunities for our shareholders – companies like ConocoPhillips Alaska, Chevron, Bank of America/Merrill Lynch, Alaska Airlines, GCI, KPMG and USI. I’m already looking forward to next year’s event.

“ASRC has joined the majority of Alaskans... in supporting the safe and responsible development of the Coastal Plain.” Speaking of opportunities, the Bureau of Land Management has closed the public comment period for the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) concerning the exploration and development inside the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve, or ANWR. ASRC provided comments at several of BLM’s public meetings – to include Utqiaġvik, Anchorage and Washington, D.C. ASRC has joined the majority of Alaskans, our Congressional Delegation and the Voice of the Arctic Iñupiat membership in supporting the safe and responsible development of the Coastal Plain. I look forward to BLM’s final EIS and to seeing successful oil and gas lease sales moving forward.

“best wishes to the various whaling crews who are taking part in the spring hunt across our region.” Our region’s favorite sport was on full display during the ASAA March Madness basketball tournament. It’s always enjoyable to see familiar faces – both in the stands and on the court – during this annual event and I’d like to thank the staff, coaches and players who were involved in the 2019 tournament for a job well done. Congratulations to my hometown Tikiġak Harpooners and Harpoonerettes for bringing home state titles. For Ramona and her team – it’s their second title in as many years – for the first time in state history. Congratulations as well to the other North Slope teams, including the Nunamiut boys who made it into the finals in the 1A division. You can read the full list of scores from the tournament a bit later in this newsletter. Lastly, I’d like to pass along my best wishes to the various whaling crews who are taking part in the spring hunt across our region. It is your hard work that will provide security to our communities throughout the summer and I pray for a safe as well as successful whaling season. Taikuu, and God Bless.

Rex A. Rock Sr. President and CEO

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Iñupiaq leaders testify in Washington, D.C. A hearing on H.R. 1146, a bill to repeal the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge oil and gas program, was held March 26 in Washington, D.C. by the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. ASRC Executive Vice President of External Affairs Richard Glenn testified in opposition to the bill, which was sponsored by Congressman Jared Huffman of California. Glenn was joined by Fenton Rexford with the North Slope Borough, and Matthew Rexford of the Native Village of Kaktovik and Voice of the Arctic Iñupiat, who also testified in front of the committee in opposition to the bill. “On the Arctic Slope, the facts of our life are that development and wildlife populations coexist; and development and our people also coexist. The survival of our region and the development of our communities today depend on continued development. Industry has explored in our region and we have been there at their side every step of the way. This is our freedom. This is what allows us to hunt and then have a warm house to come home to,” said Glenn. 

“I encourage you to work with and listen to the village of Kaktovik and the North Slope Borough. ANWR, especially the 1002 Area, is the ancestral and continuing homeland of the Iñupiat people. In trying to listen to the will of the American people regarding ANWR, extra attention should be given to Alaskans, especially those in Kaktovik and the North Slope Borough,” he added. Fenton Rexford, in part, offered the following: “Your legislation doesn’t mention the human rights of the Kaktovikmiut. Your legislation doesn’t mention the Kaktovikmiut at all. It doesn’t mention the Iñupiat people. What about our rights? What about our land, which has been our home since time immemorial? What about our resources?” For more information about H.R. 1146, including a list of the 124 cosponsors of the bill, visit: congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1146

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Utqiaġvik welcomes Al Roker from NBC’s “Today Show”

Early this spring, NBC’s Al Roker made a visit to the northern-most community in the United States to do a series of stories on how global warming is affecting the far north. The stories aired on “The Today Show” April 1st and 2nd, with Al joining his colleagues live from Utqiaġvik during the broadcast. During his visit, Roker and his NBC production crew stayed at the Top of the World Hotel, and were assisted by TOTW staff as well as ASRC to secure the necessary hi-speed internet to perform live shots during the early-morning hours. You can watch segments from “Al’s Arctic Adventure” here: today.com/news/al-roker-travels-arctic-firsthandlook-climate-change-t151303

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Did you know? Arctic Slope Regional Corporation and Subsidiaries (“ASRC”) will give you more money when you enroll and save in the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation and Subsidiaries Employees Retirement Plan (the “Plan”). ASRC will match 100% of your pre-tax contributions ($1 for every $1 you contribute) up to 4% of your eligible pay.1 If you’re contributing less than 4% to the 401(k) Plan, you’re leaving behind an important employer benefit—additional money toward your retirement savings. For example, if you are making $50,000 per year and you save 4% annually–$2,000–ASRC will contribute an additional $2,000 per year to your 401(k). That is additional money that could be yours for participating in the Plan.

1 Year Your 4% contribution: $2,000 Company match: $2,000

1 Year

35 Years

$4,000 total contributions

$140,000 total contributions

Total: $4,000 per year $70,000 company match

Graph is for illustrative purposes only and represents the dollar amount of 4% employee contributions with full company match over 35 years. Plan account balance is not guaranteed due to market fluctuations.

Enroll today

$2,000 company match

$70,000 your contribution

$2,000 your contribution

A Participant Services Representative can help you enroll if you call 1-800-724-7526 between 3 a.m. and 7 p.m. AKST, Monday through Friday or go to schwab.com/enroll to start the enrollment process.

Employer contributions are paid on a pre-tax basis and may be taxable at withdrawal.

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Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. provides recordkeeping and related services with respect to retirement plans and has provided this communication to you as part of the recordkeeping services it provides to the Plan. ©2019 Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. All rights reserved. CC2385187 0419-95F4 MKT105160ASL-00 (04/19) 00223442

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Ivalu Gala FEBRUARY 8, 2019 BENEFITING ARCTIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION

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ASRC Industrial Services’ cross-selling initiative pays off One of the expected benefits emerging from the rapid growth of AIS since its creation in 2016 is the leveraging of diverse expertise and capabilities from AIS’ family of companies to bring best value to our customers. In December 2017, AIS companies Petrochem Insulation, Inc. (Petrochem) and EnTech Advantage (a newlycreated subsidiary of RSI EnTech) collaborated on a bid to Bechtel Oil Gas and Chemicals, Inc. (Bechtel) for installing insulation and electrical heat tracing in a cogeneration (power) plant and other areas of a $6.5 billion ethylene plant owned by Shell Chemical Appalachia, LLC.

in November. The contract is currently expected to be completed in November 2020. This project is serving as a model for how the strengths of the AIS entities can be integrated for mutual benefits in opportunity pursuit and project execution.

Bechtel is serving as the construction manager on the project. With Petrochem’s experience and expertise in insulation and EnTech Advantage’s knowledge of project management and project controls, the team won a $48 million contract and mobilized to Monaca, Pennsylvania

ASRC to unveil new website After months of hard work and dedication, External Affairs is proud to announce the unveiling of a brand-new ASRC website. Our goal with this modern, interactive site is to provide our shareholders and visitors with an improved visual experience and updated, easily accessible information about the Corporation. Some of the new features the site contains include rotating introductory video reels, streamlined content, an imagecentric design, a new Issues page with regional-specific information, a Resources center to house our Emmy Awardwinning video and ad campaigns, and much more. We will be consistently updating our content with helpful information, articles, news, company announcements and subsidiary successes. We hope you find the new site as exciting and appealing as we do! Check it out today at asrc.com.

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North Slope leader inducted to Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame On April 30, Marie Qaquan Carroll will be inducted to the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame during a ceremony in downtown Anchorage. The Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame is dedicated to honoring women whose contributions have influenced the direction of Alaska in any field, including, but not limited to the arts, athletics, business, community service, conservation, education, government, health, the humanities, Native affairs, philanthropy, politics, theology and science – among others. The nonprofit organization got its start in 2008. Carroll is the current president and CEO of Arctic Slope Native Association (ASNA) and serves on the Voice of the Arctic Iñupiat board of directors. As the executive director of the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission in the late 1970s, she was instrumental in overturning the moratorium on bowhead whale hunting and has held various leadership positions at the North Slope Borough and the City of Utqiaġvik. Most recently, in her role as president and CEO of ASNA, Carroll worked to secure funding for a new hospital in Utqiaġvik that opened its doors in 2013.

Quyanaqpaq Marie for all you’ve done and continue to do for the people of the North Slope.

ASRC Construction Holding Company awarded large contract The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has awarded ASRC Construction a $128 million contract to build a 23-megawatt backup power plant at Clear Air Force Station near Fairbanks. The U.S. Air Force uses Clear as a radar station for detecting incoming ICBMs and submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

one of the most complex and technical facilities in the state. Work will begin this spring and is scheduled to wrap up in December of 2021.

According to ACHC president and CEO, Brady Strahl, this is one of the largest single-project contracts ever awarded to ACHC and it is currently the largest U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project in Alaska. It will also be

ACHC is currently building the Mission Control Facility & Electrical Substation at Clear – a project valued at $115 million. Combined with other recent projects at the Air Force station (Temporary Workforce Camp, Heat Plant & Substation, and other projects), the ACHC team has secured nearly $300 million in work at the Interior military installation.

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Shareholder spotlight KUNNI A K HOPSON

Maktak unites Iñupiat families of the North Slope where whales feed the entire community. When Kunniak Hopson decided to build a business around this tradition, it’s no surprise that her product quickly became a success. When Kunniak was growing up, her grandmother used McCormick’s Salt and Spice blend to season the maktak. But when McCormick’s stopped making the blend in 2007, Kunniak was determined to continue the tradition she had with her grandmother. She found a recipe online to replicate the spice blend, and decided to make her own concoction inspired by the McCormick’s version.

business hasn’t changed home life for her family, but she’s grateful to be home more often. “It’s really just something normal that we do now.” Kunniak hopes to one day take her spices company back home to Utqiaġvik. She’s also working to get the product onto store shelves. “It feels really good,” she says of having so many people who want her spices. “It’s expensive, and I thought people probably wouldn’t buy it, but people do. It’s a wonderful feeling.”

“I altered it just a little bit – but it started from there,” says Kunniak. After perfecting the blend for herself, she sent some to her sisters in Wainwright. And when her sisters in Wainwright began sharing it with their friends, word of mouth took hold and Kunniak began to receive requests for more. Now, nearly three years later, Kunniak’s Spices is not only a popular spice company with 20 different blends, it also serves as an incubator for people to share recipes with one another on a public Facebook group, which now has more than 1,800 followers. The business eventually became successful enough for Kunniak to quit her day job and work on the spices fulltime. She learned how to do her own bookwork, got her food handlers card and started increasing the amount of orders she could fill. “When I first started, I’d make a small little batch and it would just be monthly,” she said. “But now, it’s constantly, every week, that I have to fill orders.” The North Slope isn’t the only region ordering, either. Orders have gone out to Norway, Canada and the Lower 48. Kunniak has some help in the kitchen, though. Her four daughters and her husband pitch in, helping her blend or come up with new flavor ideas. The family

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Kunniak was born and raised in Utqiaġvik but currently resides in Chugiak. She and her husband Baxter Kayuttaq Hopson have four daughters: Judy Mae Hopson, Courtney Sierra Hopson, Deanna Emma Hopson and Kallista Hopson. Kunniak also has a daughter who was adopted out, Evelina Ahmaogak. Kunniak grew up with her grandparents Norman and Martha Leavitt; her parents are Judy Segevan and Jimmy Nayakik; her other grandparents are Walter Nayakik, Della Nayakik and Susie Nayakik. She has nine siblings: Linda Lee Agnasagga, Betty Ann Bodfish, Fred Segevan, Maggie Faye Sarren, Hal Wallace Segevan, Tara Shephard, Michelle Nayakik, Walter Nayakik and Adam Nayakik.


2019

NORTH SLOPE MARKETPLACE FOR ASRC SHAREHOLDERS:

BUSINESS CONCEPT APPLICATIONS DUE:

Compete for the chance to win a $25,000 business grant!

June 24 Apply Today!

REVAMPED 2019 PROGRAM!

Semi-Finalists will be  selected  to  attend  a  Business  Boot  Camp  training August  9-11  in  Utqiaġvik,  Grant  winners  announced  during AFN.  Network  in a cohort and  learn  the  key  elements  of  developing  a  successful  business  plan! Learn more about how we work and our   NorthSlopeMarketplace.com  past projects by visiting our portfolio page (907) 339-6788 at www.reallygreatsite.com.  aurwarrior@alaskagrowth.com

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Supporting NASA’s Advanced Computing Services

Advanced computing, or high-performance computing, generally refers to the practice of aggregating computing power in a way that delivers much higher performance than one could get out of a typical desktop computer or workstation in order to solve large data problems in science, engineering or business. Through data, groundbreaking scientific discoveries are made and game-changing innovations are fueled. Working together with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), ASRC Federal employees use advanced, high-end computing technologies, and modeling and simulation methods, to tackle some of the toughest science and engineering challenges.

As part of ASRC Federal’s NASA Advanced Computing Services (NACS) contract, ASRC Federal employees provide a wide-range of high-performance computing services in support of NASA’s mission, which is to “drive advances in science, technology, aeronautics, and space exploration to enhance knowledge, education, innovation, economic vitality and stewardship of Earth.” Specifically, ASRC Federal employees on the NACS contract support high-fidelity modeling and simulation, data analysis and visualization, network operations and emerging computing technologies evaluation. Modeling and simulation is used as a substitute for physical experimentation whereby computers calculate the results of some physical phenomenon. Scientific visualization provides a window into reams of observational and simulation data by creating graphical representations that communicate to researchers and the public. Just as a picture is worth a thousand words, visualizations are worth billions of bytes. Work for the NACS contract is performed at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division at the Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California and the NASA Center for Climate Simulation at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

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ASRC announces Industrial Services acquisition NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP AND NILES CONSTRUCTION SERVICES JOIN ASRC INDUSTRIAL SERVICES In early February, ASRC announced the acquisitions of National Environmental Group (NEG) and Niles Construction Services (NCS) by our wholly-owned subsidiary ASRC Industrial Services, LLC, or AIS. Both companies are headquartered in Flint, Michigan, and provide services throughout the Great Lakes region. NEG is a full service environmental remediation company specializing in asbestos/lead abatement, waste disposal and site decontamination services. NCS is a painting and coatings contractor. The companies serve a diverse customer portfolio made up of industrial, automotive and commercial customers. Since founding in the early 2000s, NEG and NCS have differentiated themselves from competitors via the quality of services and ability to take on and master complex, challenging projects. NEG will join AIS’s Remediation and Response Services (RRS) operating group and NCS will join AIS’s Construction, Maintenance and Repair (CMR) operating group. Each company fills a gap in AIS’s existing portfolio and adds another skilled group of employees to the expanding enterprise. “Today is another exiciting day in the pursuit of the AIS strategy that was initiated in September 2016,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. “On behalf of ASRC’s board of directors, it’s my privilege to welcome the management team and talented employees of National Environmental and Niles Construction to the ASRC family of companies. I am confident they will work closely with the AIS team to achieve AIS’s vision of building something unique in the industrials service market, thereby providing additional opportunities for employees and enduring benefits for ASRC’s shareholders.” “The additions of NEG and NCS to AIS’s RRS and CMR groups, respectively, on the heals of Wednesday’s announcement of the addition of K2 Industrial Services, demonstrates ASRC’s commitment to the AIS vision,”

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said Greg Johnson, president and CEO of AIS. “The AIS management team appreciates ASRC’s contined support and looks forward to working with the teams at NEG and NCS to build on the companies’ well-earned reputations and in the process, provide additional opportunities for their talented workforces, bring additional services to customers and ultimately deliver meaniningful benefits to ASRC’s shareholders.” “Selling a business is always a tough decision, particularly when the impacts on employees and customers are taken into account,” added Tom Niles, founder and president of Niles Construction Services. “After getting to know the AIS team and learning about ASRC’s commitment to the industrial services market, I quickly recognized AIS was the right long-term home for Niles Construction Services.”

“After getting to know the AIS team and learning about ASRC’s commitment to the industrial services market, I quickly recognized AIS was the right long-term home for Niles Construction Services.” – Tim Niles “When we began thinking about NEG’s future, we were looking for another family company to call home,” said Tim Niles, president of National Environmental Group. “ASRC and AIS give us that family culture while providing new opportunities to our most valuable asset, our employees.”

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2019

summer camps

application deadline: May 10th!

~

: Middle School or younger

Inupiaq language revitalization

Students will attend the Iñupiaq History, Language, and Culture (IHLC) Conference, which this year’s focus is on the Iñupiaq Language.

6/2 - 6/8 Drivers ed intensive

One week rotations for village students to complete their unrestricted drivers license. AGES 16+

6/2 - 6/22 Behavioral health

Learn about key topics in behavioral health including abuse, neglect, addiction, grief, stress and mental health while discovering career paths within the field. Students will explore careers including social workers, counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, behavioral health aides, and other positions within the field of behavioral health and human services

6/9 - 6/15 young engineers DAY camp

Create working models of everyday machines and use these models to complete challenges. Engage in daily hands-on engineering challenges and bridge building.

6/16 - 6/22

~

: High School

Inupiaq Art and culture

Combines classwork and the chance to study the challenges and opportunities that local cultures face in regards to land rights, preservation of local culture (Iñupiat community in Utqiagvik), and climate change. Students will assist and participate in the Nalukataq festival

6/23 - 6/29 explore your culture through writing & performance

Utqiaġvik is home to people from many different cultures. During the course of the week, students will learn more about who they are, engage in meaningful cultural research, and write and perform new creative work about who they are culturally.

Arctic perspectives on climate change & sustainability

This camp is designed to employ scientific approaches to studying environmental and cultural issues related to climate change and sustainability in the Arctic. In a combination of lecture, field trips, and hands-on laboratory and experiential activities, students will be provided an introduction to sustainability and environmental sciences. Activities will be led by scientists, researchers and Elders.

7/14 - 7/27 INTRO TO TRADITIONAL PLANTS Students will learn about the traditional edible and medicinal plants in the North Slope of Alaska. Students will also travel to one of the North Slope villages to see the difference in variety of plants from Utqiaġvik! 11th & 12th grade + Adults

7/7 - 7/13

7/23-7/29

allied health

PLAY, FLOW, GROW a MINDFUL MOVEMENT

Interested in health-related careers including Behavioral Health, Public Health, and Nursing? Get hands-on training to earn First Responder, First-Aid, and CPR certificates. Students will also take part in strength challenges to promote a healthy lifestyle!

7/14 - 7/20 7/21 - 8/3 ~

ICAMP day camp

Inupiaq land use, values, and resources

6/16 - 6/22

7/10 - 7/20

Students will create one or two short films as they practice filming, editing, and acting. They will show off their films to the community on the evening of the last day.

Students will go camping in tents in one of the North Slope villages and will gain insights on subsistence hunting, wildlife patterns, historical features and more! 11th & 12th grade + Adults

Acting/Yoga/Mindfulness camp for those interested in exploring the balance between fun and functionality, play and practical application, art and zen! By combining Acting exercises, Yoga techniques, and Mindfulness tricks that encourage teamwork, attention building skills, creativity, insight, physical stamina, and mental wellbeing, students will expand their knowledge of self and health, and build the confidence to “show up” to their lives fully, joyfully, and with purpose. LOCATED IN VILLAGES AGES 8 - 12

DATES TO BE DETERMINED

Questions? Contact: SUMMERCAMPS@ILISAGVIK.EDU

apply online: https://bit.ly/2u66iUt 14

: Adult


ANWR draft Environmental Impact Statement ASRC weighed in on the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) leasing program for the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), saying it welcomes a robust and thorough review of the agency’s draft Environmental Impact Statement, or DEIS. Before the BLM creates its final environmental impact statement and releases its record of decision on how to conduct the leasing program, the public had a chance to weigh in, with the comment period closing March 13. ASRC strongly believes all voices should be heard throughout the process, but also believes there must be a balance between preservation and responsible development. Public meetings on the DEIS were held in various locations, including Fairbanks, Kaktovik, Utqiaġvik and Washington D.C. The Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was specifically identified by Congress – pursuant to

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Section 1002 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980 – for its potential for oil and natural gas resources. In 2017, Voice of the Arctic Iñupiat (VOICE), which represents seven of the eight communities across Alaska’s North Slope, passed a resolution in support of opening less than eight percent of the Refuge to oil and gas exploration. VOICE, in which ASRC is a member, approved the resolution because it believes that safe and responsible development there is not only possible, but necessary for the economic well-being of the region. More information regarding the BLM’s oil and gas leasing program within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain can be found at: blm.gov/programs/planning-and-nepa/plans-indevelopment/alaska/coastal-plain-eis

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Join AES’ shareholder development program, Nutaaq! SHAREHOLDERS – DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS AND GET PAID! In Iñupiaq, nutaaq means ‘new learner,’ but any shareholder can be a nutaaq regardless of skill level. Upon acceptance to the ASRC Energy Services’ (AES) Nutaaq program, you will be placed in a paid position where you can develop your skills to qualify for fulltime employment opportunities within AES. The Nutaaq program consists of three phases, each lasting three months. The program provides specific training and work opportunities. The journey typically begins on the North Slope where you are paired with a mentor and then job shadowing and on-the-job

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training. In addition to tactical skills, you’ll learn soft skills like ethics and values, attitude and behavior, study skills and much more. During your journey, you’ll gain exposure to camp life, safety training, hazard awareness and craft specific skills. At the end of the Nutaaq program, AES offers additional Shareholder development. For more information or to apply to the program please email shareholder@asrcenergy.com or call 907.334.1557.


2nd annual

ASRC Presents

CULINARY &

HOSPITALITY CAMP June 25th – 28th

Caitlin Sweeney, Cornell University graduate, leads this hands-on camp focused on aspects of the hospitality industry like cooking, restaurants, and hotel operations. The activities will give campers job skills and a headstart in the industry.

APPLICATIONS OPEN APRIL ST https://bit.ly/2T9yDD4

Open to all ASRC shareholders aged 13-18 For more information, please email ces357@cornell.edu

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Getting the facts on upstream carbon impact of ANWR development NORTH SLOPE HAS LEGACY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY THAT SHINES AMONG THE OILFIELDS IN THE WORLD The following opinion piece originally ran in several statewide newspapers in mid-February: On Monday, Feb. 11, I had the privilege of watching democracy in action, right here in Anchorage. The draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) was released, and public comments were taken at the Dena’ina Center in Anchorage. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) furnished us with maps of the different development scenarios, impacts on the indigenous people and animal species, and a strong education on the process. Hats off to the agency for sitting through six straight hours of public comment by stakeholders from both inside as well as outside of the protected region, with a wide spectrum of coherence. Many of the comments were spot on, but many others diverged widely from the scope of the report. I was struck by a conspicuous lack of discourse on the specific threats that development poses to the Porcupine Caribou Herd, which is central to the controversy surrounding the development of ANWR. Despite its minimal appearance in the public comment period, the actual DEIS addressed this issue very well. However, opponents of the leasing program did not allow a lack of education on the issue to stand in the way of holding the microphone hostage. They used the airwaves to discuss many issues, one common thread being the potential greenhouse gas emissions. One activist was bold enough to implore the BLM to consider the carbon created during the end use of the hydrocarbons. Of course, had this activist read the DEIS, they would find that use-phase CO2 impacts were actually addressed very well. I thought it would be interesting to provide a bit of color and more technical detail around this hot subject. The draft report recognizes (correctly) that additional upstream hydrocarbon development does not

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have a one-for-one impact on oil and gas demand. Developing ANWR to its full potential will not actually add 390 thousand barrels per day to the world’s oil consumption. It will almost displace that much oil already on the market, and then add a fraction of that as a result of bringing the price down. Between the direct emissions generated by the development itself and the indirect emissions generated by the modest increase in global demand, the report ultimately arrives at the conclusion that ANWR development would increase global emissions by between 0.76 and 5.38 million metric tons of CO2 over the field life. This is 11 to 77 thousand metric tons per year, or about 0.5 kilograms per barrel produced. It’s hard to picture what this means in real life, so in context – the average barrel of North Slope crude oil produces 564 kilograms of CO2 throughout its life. Augmenting this by 0.5 kilograms for the barrels produced by the ANWR development is a 0.1 percent increase. If anything, the report was too fair. Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude is typically refined in California, meaning that ANWR development is likely to offset declining California barrels as a refinery feedstock. California, despite its green image, produces the dirtiest crude in the nation at 725 kilograms of CO2 per barrel. With this in mind, we are likely offsetting dirtier crude with cleaner crude, should we develop ANWR. The reality is that the North Slope has a legacy of environmental responsibility that shines among the prolific oilfields in the world. This great corporate citizenship is not being left behind in the age of climate change. BP recently announced the purchase of 9.3 million metric tons of carbon offsets from Ahtna. My employer, ASRC Energy Services, has seen a strong trend of clients asking for greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction solutions. It’s an exciting time to be a part of a changing industry.


The GHG impact of ANWR development pales in comparison with the potential in demand reduction. People who care about climate change should work to change their habits. Boeing 737s make an astonishing 11 metric tons of CO2 for a short 575-mile flight [European CORINAIR manual (2001)]. An electric vehicle can take 4.5 metric tons of CO2 per year out of the atmosphere. Tesla therefore sold enough cars in 2018 to solve the worst-case ANWR carbon emissions scenario eleven times over. People can truly impact GHG emissions on the demand side, by changes in their everyday life. To conclude – carbon emissions may be the defining issue of the decade, but they are far from the most important issue related to ANWR development. We will continue to develop and produce oil on the North Slope with world-class corporate responsibility, and drive hard toward a low-carbon future. Proponents of ANWR leasing are open to constructive input on responsible development scenarios. This

should be seen as an unprecedented opportunity to collaborate between industry, regional stakeholders, and concerned Americans to reach a plan that benefits everyone. People engaging in the process would be advised to learn more about the issues, the proposal and the process itself. In this way, the discussion can be elevated and constructive outcomes achieved. I want to again thank the BLM for a great presentation, an excellent report (which was delivered through a government shutdown) and for great patience shown throughout these hearings. I hope the conversation in the future can remain focused on the relevant elements, such as the impact on coastal plain wildlife. Finally, I hope that the needs and wishes of the regional stakeholders are met, especially the Iñupiat people of the village of Kaktovik, as they have the greatest at stake. Liam Zsolt is the Director of Technology at ASRC Energy Services.

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT FOR STUDENTS OPEN POSITIONS Interested students can apply online at https://careers.asrc.com/

ASRC Work Study Employee — Anchorage/Fairbanks (College) Requisition: 19000245

ASRC Work Study Employee — North Slope (High School & College) Requisition: 19000245

REQUIREMENTS Applicants must provide the following documentation and meet the criteria below to be eligible for the internship program: Proof of Enrollment – Student must provide a letter of acceptance, certificate of admission, and/or class schedule for the upcoming semester/quarter from the educational institution or vocational training program the applicant will be attending; Credit Minimum – Student must provide proof of registry for a minimum of nine credits; and GPA Minimum – Student must provide proof of 2.0 GPA or higher. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable. Contact studentprograms@asrc.com for more information and/or to submit required documentation.

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2019 ASAA State Basketball Tournament HELD AT ALASKA AIRLINES CENTER, UAA

1A Girls

2A Girls

3A Girls

OPENING ROUND Anaktuvuk Pass 29 Noorvik 46

QUARTERFINALS Tikiġaq 57 Scammon Bay 34

QUARTERFINALS Barrow 46 Galena 35

CONSOLATION GAME Anaktuvuk Pass 32 Shishmaref 55

SEMIFINALS Tikiġaq 51 Craig 31

SEMIFINALS Barrow 54 Nikiski 62

1A Boys

STATE FINALS Tikiġaq 49 Nenana 39

3RD/5TH PLACE GAME Barrow 42 Kenai Central 50

OPENING ROUND Nunamiut 84 Kotlik 29

2A Boys

3A Boys

QUARTERFINALS Tikiġaq 81 Cordova 73

QUARTERFINALS Barrow 50 Grace Christian 55

SEMIFINALS Tikiġaq 76 Glennallen 60

CONSOLATION GAME Barrow 51 Monroe Catholic 65

QUARTERFINALS Nunamiut 83 Thorne Bay 49 SEMIFINALS Nunamiut 88 Tanana 77 STATE FINALS Nunamiut King Cove

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54 59

STATE FINALS Tikiġaq 53 Metlakatla 47


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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

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ASRC Elder and shareholder rates SUMMER R ATE S: SHAREHOLDER RATE: $192.82 + 5% tax | NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $310.19 + 5% tax

• Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability • Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked • Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate.

For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

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Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 1Q 2019 Newsletter  

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 1Q 2019 Newsletter  

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