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Where people share information

ASRC board chairman Crawford Patkotak attends an International Whaling Commission meeting in Florianopolis, Brazil.

A SRC .COM

Feature story

Shareholder spotlight:

Historic agreement reached at IWC

BR A NDON PILI

Read more on page 5.

Read more on page 8.


Table of contents President’s message..............................................................................................1 Unveiling the 2018-2023 Strategic Plan................................................................3 Glenn now Executive VP of External Affairs.......................................................... 3 Ceremonial swearing in for new Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs................4 Historic agreement reached at IWC......................................................................5 ASRC honored to lead Top 49ers list for 24th consecutive year..........................7 EFT-1 arrives at the White House..........................................................................7 Shareholder spotlight............................................................................................8 RSI EnTech hosts ASRC shareholder intern ..........................................................9 Summer 2018 Ilisaġvik College highlights ........................................................ 10 Iḷisaġvik College’s North Slope outreach........................................................... 11 Celebrating alignment in the Arctic................................................................... 12 ASRC Federal celebrates 10 years of shareholder development programs..... 13 Military spotlight................................................................................................. 15 Community and Economic Development team hosts digital arts camps........... 17

Qaunaksriñiqput STEWARDSHIP We employ financial discipline when managing our land and assets to ensure that increases in business performance and shareholder returns are sustainable.

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President’s message RE X A . ROCK SR .

As our glorious Alaska summer has come to an end, it is time to reacquaint ourselves with the return of shorter days across the state and the familiar conversion to autumn colors. From my home of Point Hope to the west, to Barter Island in the east – it is a time of transition across our region as well as the rest of Alaska. It is also a time of change and further diversification for your Corporation. In August, we released our new 2018-2023 Strategic Plan, which sets forth a new roadmap of checkpoints and aggressive guidelines for the Corporation to follow in order for ASRC to reach new levels of success in the areas of revenue, shareholder and employee development, as well as community economic development. Our ultimate goal through 2023 is to provide the greatest amount of benefit to the greatest number of shareholders. We recognize there will be headwinds along the way that may involve changing our processes and focus in order to successfully hit these targets, but I know we are ready for the challenge. By the end of the new Strategic Plan period, which will include the time period in which ASRC will celebrate its 50th anniversary, we are aiming to become one of the top 100 largest private companies in the nation, and I am excited to think about the upcoming growth of your Corporation. You can learn more about the 2018-2023 Strategic Plan in this newsletter. We’re also seeing a change within our Senior Leadership Team, as Richard Glenn is assuming a new role here at ASRC. Earlier this summer, he began serving the Corporation as the Executive Vice President of External

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Affairs, taking over a position held by Tara Sweeney, who is now the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior. In Glenn’s new role, he now oversees the departments of Government Affairs as well as Communications. I wish him the very best in this important position. In late July, ASRC held a village celebration in Kaktovik, celebrating our proud partnership with the community and the Kaktovikmiut. For nearly 40 years, the community has joined us in the battle to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to responsible oil and gas development, and the passage of ANWR legislation inside the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 is a testament to the strength of our collective voices and the steadfast conviction of the Iñupiat. I would like to thank local Elder Isaac Akootchook for his lifetime of service and look forward to our continued partnership with the community and its future leaders. In early September, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) met in Brazil and made a decision that will affect many of the communities in our region for generations. The IWC, originally set up in 1946 to monitor the conservation of whale populations across the globe, has given its full support behind the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission’s... Continued on page 2

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decision to allow for the local harvest of bowhead whales indefinitely. The IWC also supports giving a boost to the number of unused strikes from past years that can be used in a given year, which will increase the annual number of strikes available to our whaling teams across the Slope. As ASRC board chairman Crawford Patkotak said during the meeting in South America, this truly is a great achievement for the IĂąupiaq people and reestablishes hunting limits that allow our communities to meet their subsistence needs. The full press release from the IWC is included later in this newsletter. As the season of fall strengthens its grip across the state, and a new whaling season begins at home, we are reminded of the dangers of the sea and the sacrifices made by our whaling crews with the tragic passing of captain Roxy Oyagak Jr. and crew member Ron Ron

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Kanayurak while towing a whale back from a hunt. May they rest in peace, and God bless the families of the fallen crew members. Thank you to the fellow whaling crews who bravely and selflessly risked their own lives to save their IĂąupiat brethren. Our prayers will be with the families who lost loved ones, with all the crews taking part in the fall hunt and with the entire community of UtqiaÄĄvik as we mourn the passing of these great men. To others, I thank you for your continued involvement with the Corporation. Together, we make ASRC a stronger company. Taikuu.


Unveiling the 2018-2023 Strategic Plan After months of preparation and careful analysis, ASRC has rolled out its 2018-2023 Strategic Plan. This detailed and aggressive blueprint includes the guidelines, checkpoints and targets for the Corporation to follow in order to reach its next level of success, and will cover the time period in which ASRC will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Events were held both in Utqiaġvik as well as Anchorage in late August to announce the details of the plan. The Corporation’s ultimate goal through 2023 is to provide the greatest amount of benefit to the greatest number of shareholders. As the document highlights, what brought us success in the first 45-plus years will not necessarily get us to the next level today. Moving forward, we must benchmark ourselves against other world-class privately-held

companies, not just other Alaska Native Corporations. We will strive to earn a spot as one of the top 100 largest private companies in the nation by 2023 by growing our annual revenue to $5 billion. The 2018-2023 strategic plan provides a roadmap centered on building success through three pillar strategies. The pillars include Finance, Shareholder and Employee Development as well as Community Economic Development. The 2018-2023 Strategic Plan and accompanying video presentation are both currently posted on www.asrc. com, the ASRC employee portal (www.ear.asrc.com) and the ASRC shareholder website (www.iaminupiaq. com). Information regarding the current plan, as well as any updates, will be featured in subsequent newsletters and shareholder communication materials.

Glenn now Executive VP of External Affairs In early August, Richard Glenn began assuming a new role at ASRC, serving the Corporation as the Executive Vice President of External Affairs. In this new role, Glenn now oversees the departments of Government Affairs as well as Communications. Glenn is a former board member who has served the company since 2001, most recently as the EVP of Lands and Natural Resources, where he utilized his expertise in resource development in Arctic settings. He also has a long history of involvement with the Government Affairs team – helping to craft and shape policy favorable to ASRC shareholders and the Alaska Native

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community as well as testifying in front of legislative committees in Washington, D.C. Late last year, Glenn traveled to D.C. to help celebrate the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which included language to open the non-wilderness section of ANWR’s Coastal Plain to responsible natural resource development. Glenn has also served the people of our region in other ways, having twice been appointed by the President to the United States Arctic Research Commission. He has also been the board president of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium, and has served as board chairman of the board of trustees for Iḷisaġvik College. Richard received a Bachelor of Science degree in Geology from San Jose State University in 1985 and a Master of Science degree in Geology from the University of Alaska in 1991.

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Ceremonial swearing in for new Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs

In late September, a ceremonial swearing in ceremony was held for new Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs (AS-IA), Tara Katuk Mac Lean Sweeney. The ceremony was held in Washington, D.C., with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke administering the oath with the Iñupiat Bible of Sweeney’s Amau. Following the ceremony, a group of family and friends from Alaska joined in unison, dancing and singing to a celebratory and processional Iñupiaq song. “We are all so proud of her, and look forward to her tenacity and fearless leadership while serving those in Indian Country,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., ASRC President and CEO. Sweeney took over the position in August after being nominated to the post by President Trump in the fall of 2017. Sweeney, the former Executive Vice President of External Affairs for ASRC, is the first Alaska Native and only the second woman in history to hold the position.

Photos Credit: Mike Aamodt

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Historic agreement reached at IWC BOWHEAD WHALE HARVEST TO CONTINUE IN PERPETUITY George Noongwook, AEWC Secretary, spoke eloquently at the meeting and celebrated the vote. “Today we feel great joy and gratitude to see our people benefit from the AEWC’s and our excellent legal and science team’s many years of hard work.”

On September 12, 2018, at its 67th meeting held in Florianopolis, Brazil, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) – by an overwhelming 83 percent – agreed that the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission’s (AEWC) right to harvest the bowhead whale will continue in perpetuity. The IWC also agreed to increase the number of unused strikes from past years that can be used in a given year, effectively increasing the annual number of strikes available to subsistence hunters.

Ryan Wulff, U.S. Commissioner to the IWC added the following: “We are pleased the vast majority of the member countries voted in favor of renewing the aboriginal whale catch limits that are necessary to meet the subsistence needs of our indigenous communities. The four aboriginal subsistence whaling countries worked hard to develop this comprehensive proposal, which was based on robust science and endorsed by the IWC Scientific Committee. This important agreement gives our Native communities the much-needed flexibility to operate more safely in dangerous environmental conditions that vary from one year to the next.”

“This is a great achievement for our people,” stated Crawford Patkotak, Vice Chairman of the AEWC and a member of the U.S. Delegation at this meeting. “We praise God for making this possible and we thank the U.S. Delegation, Ryan Wulff, Dr. Mike Tillman, Dr. Greg Donovan of the IWC Secretariat, Mayor Brower and the many people who have supported us. I especially want to thank Jacob Adams of the Barrow Whaling Captains’ Association for his wisdom and years of persistence on our behalf.” The IWC began setting quotas for the bowhead whale subsistence harvest in 1977, under a regime of brief, automatically expiring quotas. Mayor Harry Brower of the North Slope Borough, also a member of the U.S. Delegation, spoke of the subsistence hunters’ many years at the IWC. “Forty-one years ago our Elder whaling captains founded the AEWC and started our work at the IWC. Our whaling captains and spouses have patiently worked to educate the world about our subsistence harvest and our cultural values.”

AEWC Treasurer, Julius Rexford, noted the invaluable support of Alaska’s Congressional Delegation to this positive outcome and expressed the AEWC’s deep gratitude to President Donald Trump for giving the full support of the United States to the AEWC and the rights of the AEWC’s bowhead whale subsistence hunters. Arnold Brower, AEWC Executive Director, memorialized the deeply emotional moment with a quote from Psalms 91:1, “He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most high shall abide in the shadow of the Almighty.”

Photos credit: IISD/ENB | Ángeles Estrada

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ATTENTION ASRC EMPLOYEES: ASRC offers a 401(k) plan, allowing employees to set aside contributions from their income on a pre-tax basis for retirement purposes. · Saving a little now makes a huge difference later. ASRC’s 401(k) program is for you. · You are eligible to contribute from 1% to 75% of your pre-tax income. · ASRC matches up to 4% of your eligible compensation in the form of an employer contribution. · Participation in the program is not automatic, employees must enroll first. To enroll or to make changes, please visit: www.workplace.schwab.com Schwab Participant Services: 1-800-724-7526 For additional ASRC assistance: Email: 401khelp@asrc.com | Phone: (907) 339-6837

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ASRC honored to lead Top 49ers list for 24th consecutive year Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is pleased to once again be recognized by the Alaska State Chamber of Commerce, Alaska Business magazine and local business leaders as the top Alaskan-owned and operated corporation. This is the 24th consecutive year that ASRC has ranked #1 on the “Top 49ers List” based on the prior year’s gross revenues. The list was released in late September during a luncheon in downtown Anchorage and can be seen in its entirety in the October 2018 edition of Alaska Business magazine. “2017 was another year of growth and expansion for ASRC,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO. “With the local and national economies continuing to pose challenges in many areas of our lines of business, diversification and teamwork have been keys to our success. To the other distinguished Alaskabased businesses on this list, my congratulations for a successful year.” In 2017, ASRC’s revenues came in at nearly $2.7 billion. ASRC has six major business segments, including government contract services, petroleum refining and marketing, energy support services, industrial services, construction and resource development.

EFT-1 arrives at the White House 1 on July 21 – the fifth rainiest day in D.C. history with over five inches of rain recorded. Through it all the team persevered and the “Made in America” event was a huge success, with the team commenting that this was one of the highlights of their careers on the Orion contract.

About the Orion contract and EFT-1

ASRC Federal and Lockheed Martin employees on the Orion contract at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida were requested to transport the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1) crew vehicle from KSC to Washington, D.C. to be displayed on the White House lawn for a “Made in America” event on July 23, 2018. The team traveled 1,250 miles over five days to arrive at the White House. They had to overcome many obstacles for the setup of EFTUqalugaaŋich

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The Orion contract is part of a partnership with Lockheed Martin, dating back to 2012, that provides technical services and operational support to human spacecraft assembly, testing, integration and production of a multipurpose crew vehicle. The vehicle’s first uncrewed flight, EFT-1, launched in December 2014 to test various Orion systems and recovery operations prior to its debut launch on the Space Launch System, which is scheduled for early 2020. Also uncrewed, this mission will venture Orion thousands of miles beyond the Moon over the course of about three weeks. The mission will pave the way for crewed missions beginning in the early 2020s that will take humans farther in space than ever before.

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Shareholder spotlight BR A NDON PILI

ASRC shareholder Brandon Pili has never been shy about his goals; playing in the NFL is something he’s aspired to since he was a kid. Currently in his second year as a defensive lineman for the University of Southern California (USC), Pili continues to put in the work to make his NFL dream a reality. Raised in Utqiaġvik and then Anchorage, Pili has been playing football since the third grade. He played for Dimond High School’s varsity football team before moving to Beaverton, OR to play for Westview High School his senior year. Pili understood that if he stayed in Alaska, he wouldn’t garner as much attention as other kids in the Lower 48. “My dad pushed me to make the move, because he knew I had the potential to make it to the next level,” says Pili. “I didn’t want to at first, but I finally agreed.”

“I get a lot of support from my family and friends in Barrow and all over Alaska, and it’s a privilege to represent my community and home state.” He received his first Division I college offer from Oregon State after his first game at Westview. When Pili ultimately committed to USC, he says it was like “a dream come true.” Playing at the Division I level in college has been an adjustment from Pili’s high school days. “Everyone I play against is either the same size or bigger than me, and in Alaska I was usually the biggest one.”

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That doesn’t intimidate Pili, though. “My parents have always pushed me and my siblings to do our best – their support and encouragement have been my backbone over the years.” Being away from his home in Alaska, Pili misses the outdoor activities and the long summer nights, when the sun doesn’t set until well after midnight. He also misses his family and friends, but he still gets plenty of love from his home state. “I get a lot of support from my family and friends in Barrow and all over Alaska, and it’s a privilege to represent my community and home state.” For now, Pili is undecided in his major at USC, but hopes to have a long and healthy career in the NFL after graduation. Pili comes from a diverse background. He is Iñupiat and Samoan, and is very proud of his heritage. To Pili, being Iñupiat is “very unique,” and he hopes to one day return to his former home of Utqiaġvik to learn more about the subsistence way of life and to give back to the community. His Iñupiat name is Nasuk, and his Samoan name is Matimatimaivasa. He is the son of Heather and Billy Pili and the grandson of Randy and Virgie Crosby, from Utqiaġvik. His siblings are Darren, Alissa, Trinity, Kayla, Cayden, Braden, Alyna and Billy, Jr.


Q&A Q: What does being an ASRC shareholder mean to you? A: I am very proud to be a shareholder of ASRC, and I hope that by being in the spotlight, it will encourage our younger shareholders to follow their dreams and work hard for what they want.

Q: To whom do you credit your success? A: First and foremost, I give all the honor and glory to God. Without Him, none of this would be possible. I also credit my parents, who have pushed me to get good grades and work hard on and off the field, to stay out of trouble, to stay away from drugs and alcohol and respect others. They have taught me many valuable life lessons.

Also my extended family – aunts, uncles, grandparents and cousins – for all of their love and support over the years, especially the ones who took me in, took me to camps and treated me like I was their own. And to everyone back home in Alaska, and family and friends all over the world, your encouragement and support means a lot to me.

Q: What are you most looking forward to throughout the 2018 football season? A: I’m looking forward to progressing as a player and learning the game better. I am also excited to try to win the PAC-12 title again this year.

RSI EnTech, hosts ASRC shareholder intern One of RSI’s tenets is “Work Hard, Play Hard,” and Hopson did just that. Not only did he obtain on-thejob training and knowledge, but he was also able to experience the vast array of activities that east Tennessee has to offer. Hopson was able to connect with many people including co-workers, members of employees’ churches and people in the community.

RSI EnTech, LLC (RSI) was enthusiastic to host an ASRC shareholder intern this summer at its corporate location in Oak Ridge, TN. In early June, RSI welcomed Billyjens Hopson for a six-week internship geared towards understanding the business functions and concentrating on information technology for RSI. Hopson was given many interesting and challenging assignments.

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“Hosting Hopson at our corporate office not only was a pleasure, but it was a learning experience for all,” said Paul Clay, RSI President. “It has advanced our understanding of the Iñupiat culture and what it means to be an ASRC shareholder. The time spent with him was invaluable to RSI.” Earlier this summer, Hopson accepted a job offer and now works in the IT department at ASRC.

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Summer 2018 Ilisaġvik College highlights

Summer camps In the summer, the focus at Iḷisaġvik College shifts to pre-college programming and the campus is inundated by middle school and high school summer-campers. This year students got a taste of college dorm life while they experienced intensive career exploration and academic study while perpetuating Iñupiaq values and traditions. Iḷisaġvik College hosted nine overnight camps, with over 100 students from the North Slope and other rural regions participating. The camps included: Allied Health High School and Middle School Camps, Iñupiaq Land Values & Resource Camp, Traditional Plants & Medicine Camp, Bridge Program: College Readiness Camp, Environmental Health in the Changing Arctic Camp, Exploration of Satellites & Weather Camp, Future Teacher of the Arctic Camp as well as a Type M Teacher Boot Camp held in Nuiqsut.

traditional healers MaryJane Litchard and Marie Tozier. Students started in Utqiaġvik where Patuk Glenn and Heather Dingman gave a presentation to them. Then, they traveled to Atqasuk to learn how to identify different types of edible and medicinal plants, such as ippiq (pink plumes), dwarf birch, sargiġruaq (stinkweed), quppiqutaq (young edible fireweed shoots), tilaaqiaq (Labrador tea), cordate-leaved saxifrage, sura (willow leaf), masu (Iñupiaq potato roots) and more. Overall, this was one of Iḷisaġvik’s most popular camps this summer and a great opportunity for our students to learn a healthy tradition that they can continue to practice for years to come.

Village outreach

In addition to the overnight camps, the College also hosted four day-camps that specifically focused on career exploration. These ranged from film making and aviation to engineering, and a hands-on construction camp that took place in Nuiqsut. Forty-nine students participated in these day-camp programs.

The Iḷisaġvik staff make a concerted effort to get out to the North Slope villages and provide programming for each community’s youth populations. This past summer, our Student Success Center staff travelled to seven of the eight North Slope villages to meet with prospective Iḷisaġvik students. Due to weather, Kaktovik was the only village they were unable to visit and will be visited in the fall.

A new camp introduced this year was the Traditional Plants & Medicine Camp. This camp was taught by

During the day, the staff made themselves available at the Liaison Offices for prospective students to come

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in to ask questions, register for classes and look at programs that Iḷisaġvik offers. Staff also conducted college readiness workshops for first year students. In the evenings, Iḷisaġvik staff led games and sports activities for local kids. Overall, 149 village residents participated in activities lead by Iḷisaġvik Student Success staff this summer.

We hope to see some ASRC folks who are interested in learning more about Computer Science to enroll. If you’d like more information, please contact Elizabeth Patience, Assistant Professor, Office Management and Technology at 907.852.1707 or elizabeth.patience@ilisagvik.edu.

Oracle Academy

The fall 2018 semester had the highest student enrollment and dorm occupancy since the College’s inception, and we are excited to see where this growth takes us in the coming year. Iḷisaġvik College, in partnership with other Alaska tribal education entities, submitted a resolution to the Alaska Federation of Natives titled, “Supporting Tribal Post-Secondary Education and the Establishment of Future Tribal Institutions of Higher Education.” Shareholders are welcome to contact Iḷisaġvik College if you have any questions.

Per ASRC’s recommendation Iḷisaġvik joined the Oracle Academy, which “advances computer science education globally to drive knowledge, innovation, skills development and diversity in technology fields.” Over the summer and throughout the fall the College’s Information Technology program has been participating in Oracle training. We plan to offer at least two new classes in the spring: Database Design and Introduction to Programming. We are also working on new certificates for Data Analytics. 

On the Horizon

Ilisaġvik College’s North Slope outreach Since inception, the goal of the College has been to provide quality academic and vocational post-secondary education to residents across the North Slope. Delivering course content to such a large area with a relatively small population means the College has to be on the cutting edge of technology to accommodate this effort. Here are some of the recent ways in which Iḷisaġvik has kept that promise to all villages on the North Slope:

Information technology Iḷisaġvik’s IT department is pleased to announce that the College now has high-speed internet available on the main campus and in the Browerville extension campus. The Learning Resource Centers have also been upgraded in Nuiqsut, Point Hope and Wainwright.

Vocational education and workforce development The Vocational Education and Workforce Development department taught its Industrial Safety series (40-Hr HAZWOPER, 8-Hr. HAZWOPER Refresher, NSTC, and Standard First Aid & CPR with AED) in Point Lay, Point Hope, Wainwright, Anaktuvuk Pass and Kaktovik. In cooperation with the North Slope Borough School District, Wilderness Survival/First Aid was taught in Nuiqsut. Additionally, Workforce Development business classes (MS Word, MS Excel, Conflict Resolution, and Communication Skills) were

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Celebrating alignment in the Arctic A RICH PARTNERSHIP IN THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE We thank local leaders for their service, including Elder Isaac Akootchook. Others who were also honored during the festivities include Fenton Rexford, Ida Angasan, Archie Brower, Matthew Rexford, Nolan Solomon, George Tagarook, Philip Tikluk and Edward Rexford.

In late July, ASRC held a village celebration in Kaktovik, celebrating the Corporation’s proud partnership with the community and the Kaktovikmiut. For more than 35 years, the community has joined ASRC in the battle to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to responsible oil and gas development, and the passage of ANWR legislation inside the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 is a testament to the strength of our collective voices and the steadfast conviction of the Iùupiat.

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During the ceremony, ASRC presented a $20,000 check to the Kaktovik Community Foundation, as well as another $10,000 check to the Kaktovik community.


ASRC Federal celebrates 10 years of shareholder development programs Over the past decade, more than 200 ASRC shareholders have participated in educational and professional development programs with ASRC Federal. Each of these young people took the opportunity to challenge themselves, explore new surroundings, gain valuable experience and carve a path for their future. ASRC Federal would like to congratulate each student for taking on the challenge and say thank you for helping to make our shareholder programs successful. ASRC Federal shareholder internship program

student attended the weeklong Space Academy and Advanced Space Academy training at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. Following graduation from the Academy, the space campers were invited to an ice cream social, hosted by ASRC Federal Huntsville employees, followed by a tour of our state-of-the-art selective laser manufacturing lab, which specializes in 3D printing and fabrication.

ASRC Federal’s Terp Young Scholars program scholarship This summer, we welcomed 12 shareholder interns working in entry-level technical or business positions, each with a dedicated mentor. These internships offered students an opportunity to learn and contribute to our business. This program focuses on developing critical workplace skills to prepare shareholders for long-term employment.

ASRC Federal Space Camp Scholarship This past July, seven shareholder students were awarded scholarships to attend the Terp Young Scholars program at the University of Maryland. In this rigorous and competitive three-week program, students enroll in one college course of their choosing, and participate in social and educational development activities held on the College Park, MD campus. Congratulations students! This past June, we awarded 12 shareholder students the 2018 ASRC Federal Space Camp Scholarship. Each

To learn more about ASRC Federal shareholder development programs, please visit: www.asrcfederal. com/shareholder-opportunities

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Credit counseling services As Iñupiat people, we realize the importance of maintaining our tools for survival. Over the last several generations the landscape we live in has changed, and so have the tools we use to survive – especially in today’s cash economy. One of these new tools is credit. Credit can be a used to improve one’s quality of life, both personally, such as for higher education loans, and professionally, such as for startup business loans. But bad credit can become a barrier to these endeavors. Checking your credit report once a year will help you make sure your credit is in good shape. Reasons to pull annual credit reports include:

1) You will better understand your credit score 2) You can monitor for identity theft 3) You can address wrongful charges

Alaska Growth Capital (AGC), a community development financial institution, realizes the importance of checking your personal credit score. This year, AGC began empowering shareholders by providing free credit counseling. This service to shareholders is provided on a one-on-one basis with an Iñupiat Certified Financial Credit Counselor.

Contact AGC today for a free and safe credit counseling session at 907.339.6760 or email info@AlaskaGrowth.com.

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Military spotlight JEREMI A H CRUZ IK AY UAQ SMITH

From a family of enlisted sailors, Jeremiah Cruz Ikayuaq Smith was destined for the Navy. Born in Anchorage and raised in Utqiaġvik, Smith has military ties with his father, grandfather and several uncles who have previously served. Smith’s father encouraged him to join the Navy soon after high school while he was still living with his parents. “My dad asked me to start paying rent,” Smith recalled. When Smith refused, his father ‘half-jokingly’ told him to go talk to the military recruiters. When I ended up going and talking to the recruiters, my dad was pretty excited about it,” Smith said. His father helped him navigate the enlistment process by providing information on what certain jobs were really like in the naval fleet. With a 14-year Navy career to date, including four years of active duty and 10 years in the Navy Reserve, Smith qualified as an Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist with the Fighting Marlins of VP 40, a maritime patrol squadron assigned to Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing TEN based ashore NAS Whidbey Island, WA. Smith’s father was assigned to this same squadron. Smith most recently returned from a tour of duty in Bahrain in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR). OIR’s mission is to defeat ISIS in designated areas of Iraq and Syria, and to increase regional stability. Smith received only 60 days notice before being deployed for 11 months. “The hardest part for me is definitely being away from my family,” Smith said. “With two young daughters, being away and missing time with the family was pretty tough.” This latest deployment was “particularly difficult towards the end” for Smith, as his father passed away in March 2018 while he was overseas.

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“My dad would always tell me that when times get tough to just keep doing my job to the best of my ability no matter what was going on,” said Smith. “It helped me get through some tough times.” While serving in active duty, Smith was a cryptologic technician, tracking worldwide threats and employed missile defense systems. Originally stationed at the USS Pinckney in San Diego, CA, Smith has traveled across the world through his service – Guam, Fiji, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, Australia and Panama. He has received several awards and decorations, including: the National Defense Medal, Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) and Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary (GWOTE) Medal, two Sea Service ribbons, the Armed Forces Reserve Medal, three Good Conduct Medals, and Expert Pistol and Rifle Medals. While deployed in Bahrain this past year, Smith was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal. Smith said he’s learned a lot from the 14 years he’s been enlisted. “I would have to say the most valuable part for me was gaining life experience,” said Smith. “Joining the Navy really put a steep learning curve for taking responsibility for myself and it really taught me how to be a more responsible person. I am very glad my father talked me into joining the Navy. I got to travel the world and do some really cool things that I wouldn’t have otherwise been able to do.” Smith is the son of Michael Cruz Smith and Marilyn Kuutuuq Smith. He is the grandson of Arnold Tigitqurak Brower Sr. and Emily Quamagun Hopson.

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iRecruitment is about to change! We are transforming our current online job application system to a newer and more modern cloud-based system effective January 1, 2019. This upgrade is one part of a larger overall effort to improve our Enterprise Resource Planning systems. In addition to a fresh look and enhanced candidate experience, moving to Cloud will help us ensure that we can continue to meet the needs of our customers, clients and communities for years to come. The larger overall effort has been named Project Akpak, inspired by the Iñupiat word that means to “reach the summit when climbing” or “to take a step up.” We chose “Akpak” as our project name because it embodies our desire to reach new heights by transforming our job application system.

What does this mean for you? iRecruitment will become Taleo (pronounced tuh-lay-oh), which is a cloud-based recruiting system. Action needed: If you have been using iRecruitment to store your resume, certifications or other documents, you may wish to download and store them between now and December. Watch for additional Project Akpak-related updates to follow soon on iamInupiaq.com and the ASRC Shareholder Facebook page. If you have questions, please contact your local ASRC office for more information.

The new system will go live on January 1, 2019.

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Community and Economic Development team hosts digital arts camps ASRC’s Community and Economic Development team hosted two digital arts camps this summer: one in Utqiaġvik and one in Wainwright. Both camps were offered to children 8-14 years old and included two separate classes: Minecraft Designers, and Lego Films and Stop Action. In Utqiaġvik, there were a total of 23 participants and a total of 17 in Wainwright. Students learned to design their own Minecraft game using a series of modules, taught by ASRC staff. Students also learned how to make their own short Lego film using stop action and webcams. The camp ran at the Tuzzy Library in Utqiaġvik from July 23-27, and at Aḷak School in Wainwright from July 30-August 3. Alaska Communication Systems provided lunch to all participants for both camps. The digital arts camps were a pilot program hosted by the CED team, which may be hosted in different locations on the North Slope next summer.

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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

P.O. Box 129 Utqiaġvik, Alaska 99723 A S RC .CO M

ASRC Elder and shareholder rates FA LL R ATE S: SHAREHOLDER RATE: $192.82 + 5% tax | NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $256.79 + 5% Tax

THIS RATE RUNS THROUGH May 14, 2019

• Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability • Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked • Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate.

For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

Profile for I am Iñupiaq

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 3Q 2018 Newsletter  

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation 3Q 2018 Newsletter  

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