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FIRS T QUA R TER , 2020 VOLUME 51

Where people share information

A SRC .COM

Feature story

The life and legacy of Wesley Ugiaqtaq Aiken Story on page 3.

Iñupiaq Days 2020 Story on page 14.

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Table of contents President’s message ............................................................................................. 1 The life and legacy of Wesley Ugiaqtaq Aiken ..................................................... 3 ASRC subsidiaries participate in international conference ................................. 6 2020 Annual Meeting and village travel announcement...................................... 7 Another successful year at Alaska Growth Capital............................................ 10 International association forms to expand Inuit business opportunities........ 11 Remembering Rossman Eyak Peetook ............................................................. 12 Iñupiaq Days 2020............................................................................................... 14 A message to ASRC shareholders ...................................................................... 16 Environmental Quality Management awarded contract................................... 16 AIS Learning Center opening delayed due to COVID-19 concerns .................... 17 AEF fundraiser held in downtown Anchorage .................................................. 20 ACCL looking to complete Kivalina project in 2020 .......................................... 22

Iḷagiiŋñivut OUR R EL ATI O NSHIPS We develop and maintain relationships that focus on the creation of value for all participants.

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President’s message RE X A . ROCK SR .

This is an extraordinary time in ASRC’s history and I want to assure you the safety of our shareholders, employees and communities is our primary concern, as is the financial stability of the Corporation as we navigate what continues to be a rapidly-evolving health crisis. Our hearts go out to everyone around the world who has been impacted, either directly or indirectly, by Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Even though this hasn’t been the New Year we may have envisioned, we do have teams across the ASRC family of companies that are tirelessly doing everything they can to support the well-being of our employees and shareholders, and are actively monitoring the latest developments from federal, as well as their local and state authorities. There are a number of protective measures ASRC has been taking to mitigate the impacts of this health emergency on our shareholders and employees. In midMarch, workers were asked to start working remotely if possible (following state and municipal mandates) and we severely limited all non-essential travel companywide. We also put into place enhanced cleaning efforts and continue to encourage safe practices and hygiene to minimize person-to-person spread of the coronavirus. As the situation changes or is updated we will continue to keep you informed through an array of communication channels, including social media and other methods. In the meantime, we ask that everyone

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continue following the guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reduce the threat of this health emergency.

“to keep our communities safe, we have canceled all village travel and moved the location of the June 20 meeting...” The situation has also forced a dramatic change to our 2020 Annual Meeting schedule. In an effort to keep our communities safe, we have canceled all village travel and moved the location of the June 20 meeting to Utqiaġvik. Attendance will be strictly limited to directors, senior management, several shareholder representatives and other essential employees. As you may have seen, North Slope Borough Mayor Harry Brower Jr. issued an emergency Continued on page 2

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proclamation in late March, closing the region to travel. You’ll find additional information regarding the new annual meeting schedule a bit later in this newsletter. We are also undergoing serious cost-cutting measures to protect the future of the Corporation. As we mentioned in an earlier communication, if ASRC did not cut spending, we would put our entire business in jeopardy and be in danger of setting the company back by decades. The future of our company depends on our bold but necessary actions right now.

“I believe these difficult actions... will allow us to succeed and return to paying meaningful dividends far into the future.” These are not easy decisions, but longer-term, I believe these difficult actions, together with the fact we’ve expanded our company into the Lower 48 and prioritized the diversification of our business segments, will allow us to succeed and return to paying meaningful dividends far into the future. One of the cost-cutting changes we’re making is turning this shareholder newsletter, Uqalugaaŋich, into a digitalonly publication for the remainder of the year. Inside, you’ll still find the latest news on the Corporation and our subsidiaries, as well as information on the abbreviated

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Iñupiaq Days across the North Slope. The only difference is that you’ll find the publication online, and for the time-being, not in your mailbox.

“through the generations, and through our determination, commitment and resourcefulness, we have always come out stronger.” We greatly appreciate your patience and understanding as we recognize our employees, shareholders and communities continue to be negatively impacted by this challenging public health crisis. However, the Iñupiat people have faced many challenges through the generations, and through our determination, commitment and resourcefulness, we have always come out stronger. God’s Blessings and we are praying for everyone’s safety and health. Taikuu.

Rex A. Rock Sr. President and CEO


The life and legacy of Wesley Ugiaqtaq Aiken On January 6, 2020, Wesley Ugiaqtaq Aiken passed away at age 93. Throughout his lifetime he was a hunter, reindeer herder, World War II veteran, an activist for Native rights and advocate for maintaining Iñupiaq culture. From being born and raised on a complete subsistence lifestyle to seeing technological advances through 2020, Wesley’s life and legacy span nearly an entire century.

From the time he was six years old, Wesley Aiken was a hunter in the truest sense of the word. Growing up at Isuk, near Cape Halkett on the coast of the Beaufort Sea with his Aapa Anabi and Aaka Iqalasuk, he developed a deep love and respect for the land, sea and animals of the region. Aiken first learned to hunt seals and caribou from his grandparents and Uncle Kiogak. It was the early 1930s on Alaska’s Arctic Slope, and there were no rifles, no four-wheelers or snow machines. Instead, they went hunting with a bow and arrow and a dog team. While out on seal hunting expeditions, Aiken learned how to inspect and safely traverse on the sea ice. He would help set nets over breathing holes on the ice and

then wait. Sometimes it would take days to catch one seal, and sometimes he and his family would catch as many as eight or nine seals in one day. On these days, they would take the sled back to the sod house to prepare the meat and store it for the long winter. These were some of Wesley Aiken’s favorite memories. He loved providing for his family, as well as nearby communities that were unable to provide for themselves. In 1938, Iqalasuk decided to move the family back to Utqiaġvik so Wesley and his siblings could attend school. Two years later, when he was 14 years old, Aiken began whaling under the guidance of Ned Nusunginya and James Qiugaq. He eventually became a whaling captain himself, once catching three whales in one week. Continued on page 4

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From 1947 to 1952, Aiken worked as a truck driver and heavy equipment operator for Arctic Contractors. During that time, despite having no carpentry experience, he decided to build a house for him and his wife. He ordered the materials from Seattle for $1,400 and had them sent to Utqiaġvik by barge. With the help of a friend from work, Miles Itta, he built the house entirely by hand – without the use of any electrical tools – in just three weeks. In 1953, ten years after joining the ATG, Aiken enlisted in the Alaska Army National Guard where he would continue to serve for the next 17 years.

Aiken began whaling when he was 14 years old and eventually became a whaling captain.

Aiken also entered the workforce when he was 14 years old. His first job was as a reindeer herder for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, where he tagged and counted reindeer for $11 a month. To earn extra money, he also worked as a trapper, where he could earn between $18 and $25 per skin. As a teenager in 1943, he joined the Alaska Territorial Guard (ATG) where he participated in activities such as drill and target practice and blackout drills. Wesley remained a member of the ATG throughout the end of World War II.

A steadfast believer in Native subsistence rights and traditions, in 1961 he participated in the Barrow Duck-In – a protest over Native hunting rights that contributed to the eventual settlement of aboriginal land claims in Alaska with the passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) ten years later. During the effort to pass ANCSA, Wesley Aiken joined Joseph Upicksoun, Warren Matumeak, Edward Hopson Sr. and Lester Suvlu as incorporators for Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. Aiken always admired late Mayor Eben Hopson Sr. and considered him to be an inspiration. He also assisted Hopson in the formations of the North Slope Borough, the region’s village corporations and the Inuit Circumpolar Conference.

Wesley Aiken played an important role in shaping the Arctic Slope region into what it is today. In 1945, Aiken met his future wife, Anna Attagnaq Kayutak, at the local hospital where she worked as a nurse’s assistant. They married in Utqiaġvik on April 8, 1947.

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In the 1980s, Aiken once again used his political activism to fight for the rights of Alaska Native people when the International Whaling Commission (IWC) implemented


a commercial whaling moratorium. Alongside Eben Hopson Sr., he worked tirelessly with the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission (AEWC) to pursue a just quota for Native subsistence whalers. When Ukpeaġvik Iñupiat Corporation (UIC) was formed, Wesley used his love and knowledge of the land to become the first land chief at UIC. Later he would go on to work for and oversee the ASRC lands department until his retirement in the early 1990s.

The World War II veteran and former Alaska Army National Guard member had a deep love not only for his community and the region, but also for his country. He continued serving in whatever capacity he could, even late into his years. At age 90, he completed volunteer training as a tribal veteran’s representative near Utqiaġvik so he could assist fellow veterans in applying for state and federal benefits. Wesley was a World War II veteran and served in the Alaska National Guard from 1953-1970.

Aiken was a strong believer in God and a member of the Utqiaġvik Presbyterian Church. The very first Bible verse he learned as a boy was John 3:16, which remained his favorite verse. He was often called upon to give blessings in church and during Nalukataq whaling celebrations. In his later years, it was a tradition for family members – children, grandchildren, great grandchildren – to go to his house every Sunday after church. Aiken was also a strong believer in passing on cultural traditions to the youth. He was a member of the Iñupiat History, Language and Culture Commission and passionately advocated for a culture camp where only Iñupiaq would be spoken. He was always willing to share his knowledge of Iñupiaq culture and history, whaling and sea ice. He taught young family and community members to hunt and fish. When he could no longer hunt himself, the young hunters and fisherman shared their food with him.

Wesley Aiken always had a deep understanding of the past while also looking toward the future, and he was hopeful for many things – continued subsistence rights, cultural preservation and responsible land development, to name a few. He also never forgot to appreciate all that he had been blessed with in the present. We’ll leave you with these parting words from Wesley Aiken: “Live the right way, work hard, respect each other and help your community.”

Wesley Ugiaqtaq Aiken was born on January 25, 1926 in Utqiaġvik to Pamiilaq Lucy and Aviugana Johnny Aiken. Growing up, he lived in Cape Halkett and Qalugvik with his grandmother Iqalasuk and grandfather Ugiaqtaq. He was the beloved brother of Mary Lou and Herbert Leavitt; Rebecca and Baxter Adams; Robert and Martha Aiken; Jonathan and Mabel Aiken; James and Kate Aiken; Lewis and Marie Aiken; and Loretta and Sammy Kenton. Wesley married Anna Attagnaq Kayutak Aiken in 1947. His parents-in-law were Michael and Bertha Kayutak. He was the father of Martha and Michael Stackhouse; Larry Aiken; Ruth Marie Aiken; and John Michael Aiken. His grandchildren are Ernest and Marie Stackhouse; Lucinda Kunnaan and Anthony Kippi; and Wesley Wendell Aiken. His great grandchildren are Kacy Rice, Jennifer Angela Felder, Lauren Nicole Edwardsen, Jayna Moon Stackhouse, Starlet Athena Aiken, Angelica Dawn Telfair, Aaron Derek Stackhouse, Zan Michael Stackhouse, Anna Marie Edwardsen and Bella Marie Aiken.

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ASRC subsidiaries participate in international conference In early March, RSI EnTech, RSI Services and ASRC Industrial Services attended and exhibited at the 2020 Waste Management Symposia (WMS) in Phoenix, Arizona – widely regarded as the premier international conference for the management of radioactive material and related topics. RSI’s sister companies, Environmental Quality Management (EQM) and Northwest Demolition & Dismantling, also attended the Symposia. This was RSI’s eighth year as an exhibitor at the conference. With the growth of the ASRC Industrial Services family of companies, RSI is introducing its enhanced capabilities to the nuclear cleanup industry we serve and believe there are also market opportunities

for our sister companies – either individually or in collaboration with RSI. WMS is the perfect venue to make introductions and contacts, and to expand our message in 2020 and beyond. RSI’s Lesley Cusick presented a paper at the WMS conference titled "A citizen-centric approach to seeking a social license to operate". The purpose of Cusick's presentation was to assist the WMS audience in understanding how to work with and within communities to establish project credibility, gain acceptance and ideally build community support for projects so that they can obtain, and maintain, a social license.

RSI attendees of the conference included (from left to right): Steve Selecman, RSI EnTech president; Stephanie Windsor Slosser, HR & communications specialist;, Allison Getsi, business development manager; and Brad Spears, RSI Services president. Not pictured: Lesley Cusick, community and stakeholder engagement.

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Announcement: 2020 Annual Meeting and village travel several shareholder representatives and other essential employees in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines on limiting the size of gatherings.

ASRC leadership has worked to closely monitor and address the rapidly evolving coronavirus situation. With the health, safety and well-being of our shareholders, communities and employees as our top priority, we are changing this year’s annual meeting process to best serve these important interests.

• The only matter that will be addressed at the 2020 Annual Meeting will be the election of directors.

For 2020, the following changes will be implemented:

• There will be no in-person voting at the annual meeting. Instead, voting will be conducted through the proxy ballot process, allowing each shareholder to participate in the election via mail or online.

•A  ll village travel and informational meetings are canceled. •T  he June 20 annual meeting will now be held in Utqiaġvik, and will be called to order by the chairman, or another officer as allowed by the bylaws. •A  ttendance at the annual meeting will be strictly limited to directors, senior management,

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As this remains a rapidly changing and dynamic situation, we may have to make additional changes to this year’s processes. If you have any questions, please contact the ASRC Stock Department at stock@asrc.com or by phone at 800.770.2772.

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CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) Workplace Tips for ASRC Employees

What is coronavirus (COVID-19)? Various strains of coronavirus are common and are a frequent cause of upper respiratory infections. COVID-19 is a new strain of the coronavirus that was first detected in China in December 2019. It spreads from person-to-person and has the potential to cause severe illness.

How does the coronavirus spread? There are still many things that are unknown about the new virus strain. At this time, spread of the virus is believed to happen in the following ways: • When an infected person coughs or sneezes near others • Through close contact between individuals (hugging, kissing, shaking hands) • Possibly by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching the mouth, nose or eyes

USEFUL RESOURCES: What you need to know about the COVID-19 Alaska Dept. of Health & Social Services – COVID-19 Centers for Disease Control & Prevention – About Coronavirus Disease Municipality of Anchorage – COVID-19 Updates President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America

Minimizing the spread of COVID-19 Practice good hygiene • Wash your hands regularly • Avoid touching your face • Disinfect surfaces in your home and office space • Avoid handshaking and close personal contact

Limit meetings and travel • Consider postponing meetings or use telephone/video conferencing when possible

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Stay home • If you or a family member is sick, stay home to prevent spreading your illness • If telecommuting, make sure you have the required equipment to perform your work duties and know how to access ASRC’s virtual private network (VPN)


CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

Workplace Tips For ASRC Employees

Preparing for the coronavirus in Alaska USEFUL RESOURCES:

1) Stay up-to-date on the latest information from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.

Centers for Disease Control

2) Compile an emergency kit that includes supplies like soap,

& Prevention – How to

tissues and medications. For more information on emergency

protect yourself

kits, visit the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the Department of Homeland Security.

Centers for Disease

3) Do your part to fight fear, stigma and misinformation that can

Control & Prevention

surface when people are anxious about a new disease. Stay

– Nonpharmaceutical

calm and share accurate information.

Interventions (NPIs)

Find out more information on what Alaskans can do to prepare for the novel coronavirus here

Tips for working remotely Establishing good habits while working remotely is an important part of maintaining mental and emotional well-being as well as productivity. Adjusting to spending a large part of your day alone can be difficult. Here are some tips to assist in the transition.

1. M  aintain the same work-day routine

a. Keep the same sleep schedule

b. P  repare for the day as you normally would

c. Arrive at your workspace at the same time you would at your office

d. Take regular breaks and a lunch

e. Leave your workspace at the same time you typically leave the office

2. Establish a separate and distinct workspace

b. If you’re working from home, try to avoid your workspace during nonworking hours

c. If you have kids, be clear that your workspace is off limits

3. Communicate effectively a. M  onitor emails/correspondence and respond promptly like you would at the office

b. C  arve out time for phone or video conferencing to stay in active touch with co-workers

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a. C  reate a place to work that you can walk away from at the end of the day

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Another successful year at Alaska Growth Capital Please join us in celebrating ASRC subsidiary Alaska Growth Capital (AGC) for their work across Alaska and beyond to grow economic opportunity that’s rooted in community. Here are just some of their 2019 highlights: • Received the 2018 Alaska Community Lender of the Year award from the Small Business Administration. Honored for the ninth time, AGC is widely recognized as one of the most innovative and communityfocused small business lenders in America. • Was awarded $650,000 through the Community Development Financial Institution Fund’s Native American CDFI Assistance Program, which supports loans in Alaska Native communities. • Submitted a competitive application to the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program to once again bring federal tax credits that benefit large infrastructure projects in rural communities. AGC also participated in important federal advocacy around the NMTC program to increase the tax credits allocated to Native organizations that do work in indigenous communities. • Said farewell to former President & CEO Logan Birch, who transferred to fellow subsidiary ASRC Energy Services. Taka Tsukada transitioned from his previous position as senior vice president of lending to president & CEO. • Welcomed new staff members, to include Julie Woodworth and Cody Beech. The business also welcomed intern Brendon Doyle, an ASRC shareholder pursuing an undergraduate economics and finance degree at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

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• AGC staff member Jennifer Snodgrass was named to the Alaska Journal of Commerce’s Top Forty Under 40 list. • AGC’s North Slope Marketplace Business Plan Competition for ASRC shareholders underwent significant changes, including revision of the application process, creation of a cohort model with a three-day intensive businesses training on the North Slope (rather than Anchorage), and incorporation of a mentor program. New partnerships with Arctic Education Foundation, three fellow ASRC subsidiaries and the Minority Business Development Association were initiated to further support the program.


International association forms to expand Inuit business opportunities In early February, representatives from Inuit businesses throughout Alaska, Canada and Greenland initiated the founding meeting of the International Inuit Business Association (IIBA). The group’s newly affirmed mission is to encourage sustainable and equitable expansion of the economy throughout the Arctic to promote greater self-sufficiency in Inuit “Nunaat” – Arctic and sub-Arctic areas where, presently or traditionally, Inuit have indigenous rights and interests or where Inuit culture is predominant.

“This is a transformative time for Inuit businesses in the international Arctic...” – Jim Stotts, president of ICC-Alaska “This is a transformative time for Inuit businesses in the international Arctic,” said Jim Stotts, president of ICCAlaska and convener of IIBA’s founding meeting. “The IIBA will be a resource for Inuit business leaders who have a collective interest in ensuring the success of our northern economies.” The IIBA was born out of the Inuit Circumpolar Council’s (ICC’s) 2018 Utqiaġvik Declaration, which urged sustainable development and collaboration among Inuit businesses as Arctic economies continue to rapidly change and interest in the Arctic grows. The ICC, in part,

advocates for policies that facilitate cross-boundary trade, employment and travel across the circumpolar Arctic. The IIBA will move forward independently and as an affiliate of ICC. “As Inuit business owners and partners, we’re seeing increased opportunities for collaboration across borders for pan-Arctic economic development,” said Liz Qaulluq Cravalho, IIBA provisional executive committee chair. “I am excited to be part of the founding of this association, open to all businesses interested in encouraging sustainable and equitable expansion of the economy of Inuit communities.” In addition to building Inuit business relationships and promoting business development opportunities among its members, the IIBA will undertake research in areas of economic priority to Inuit and participate in international organizations affecting Inuit economic and business interests. The IIBA is currently finalizing processes for membership and recruitment.

Executive committee members Liz Cravalho, provisional chair; Maggie Emudluk, secretary; and Jens K. Lyberth, vice-chair, met with other founding members to establish the International Inuit Business Association on Feb. 6 in Ottawa, Canada.

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Remembering Rossman Eyak Peetook Rossman Eyak Peetook was born in Wainwright in 1932 to Henry Peetook Tazruk and Annie Pausana Ahlook. He was raised on a subsistence culture, fishing with his grandparents on the lagoon side of the community from an early age. Later, he began hunting when he was about 12 years old.

© Bill Hess

Some of Peetook’s earliest memories are of loading boats with freshly-caught seals to pull back home by ropes. If there were too many seals, they would bury some of the seals in the sand. It was cold enough back then that the seals would stay fresh without ice cellars until the families were able to return for them. The juices from these stored seals were his favorite; to him, it tasted better than soda pop. Shortly after he began hunting, Peetook went whaling for the first time and went again every year after that he was able. He would later become a whaling captain and a commissioner for the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission. In 1951, at just 19 years old, he enlisted in the Army National Guard Reserve. He was never deployed, and

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instead ended up stationed in his home village. His battalion was ultimately instrumental in the search and rescue effort resulting from the 1964 earthquake in Anchorage. For his service, Peetook received the Alaska National Guard Sergeant Major’s Award and the Department of the Army’s Army Achievement Medal. In 1984, he retired from the National Guard as a first sergeant. Jobs were scarce in the late 1960s, and he worried about being able to financially support himself and a family in his elder years, which is what partly motivated him to pursue a career in acting. In 1969, when Walt Disney Pictures traveled to the North Slope to search for actors, a community member pointed to Peetook as someone they may be interested


© Patrick J. Endres/AlaskaPhotographics.com

in casting. And with that, he would go on to star in three Hollywood films – Snow Bear (1970), Two Against the Arctic (1974) and On Deadly Ground (1994). While on set for his first film, Snow Bear, he began to notice environmental changes. It was July, and suddenly the weather turned from being the warmest month of the year to one of the coldest. Birds were dying due to the cold weather, there was frost in the morning, ice started piling up on the shoreline and there were no mosquitoes in sight. From that summer onward, Peetook observed many changes on the North Slope. Grass growing longer than it ever had before, he felt the tundra soften beneath his feet, and he ate wild cloudberries that had never before sprouted in his community. He became a passionate activist and often encouraged Native people to come together to discuss the changes he was witnessing.

City of Wainwright councilman, Wainwright Search and Rescue coordinator, captain of Wainwright Volunteer Fire Department, and North Slope Borough mayoral appointee. He was elected to Olgoonik Corporation’s board of directors in its early years. He also served his community as an assemblyman on the North Slope Borough Assembly, traveling back and forth between Wainwright and Utqiaġvik for meetings. He did all of these things because he believed in building a better future for the next generation. He worked to preserve cultural traditions and to provide opportunities that were not available for him. Rossman Peetook played many parts in his lifetime – hunter, whaling captain, assemblyman, big screen actor, veteran. But his most important role was being a leader for his community. Rossman Eyak Peetook passed away on January 14, 2020. He was the son of *Henry Peetook Tazruk and *Annie Pausinna Ahlook. His grandparents were *Thomas Tazruk and *Alice A. Ogaloak Waalook. His siblings were *Thomas Solomon Peetook and *Agnes Peetook Walters. He was married to Helen James. His children are Marilyn Oktollik, Marlene Okakok, Ryan Peetook, Leonard Peetook and Oliver Peetook. He also had many grandchildren.

Peetook loved his community and culture. He was the leader of the Wainwright Dance Group and later the Utuqqaqmiut dance group, performing in the Presidential Inaugural Parade for the Obama administration in 2008. He was also a composer of music and songs for use in church and cultural performances. A strong and beloved member of the community of Wainwright, Peetook served in many roles on behalf of his community throughout his lifetime, including

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Iñupiaq Days 2020 Inupiaq Days events kicked off in December, with the last event held in early March. A team, organized by ASRC’s community economic development department, consisted of staff from the North Slope Borough Mayor's Office, Alaska EXCEL, ASRC and its family of companies. The team went into schools across the Slope, working with kids on team building/strategy activities, giving lectures on Iñupiaq values and handing out free t-shirts to the students. Presentations were also given to older students on career and training opportunities.

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Iñupiaq Days were held at the following schools: Ipalook Elementary, Hopson Middle School, Barrow High School, Alak School and Tikigaq School. Events had been planned for additional North Slope schools but have been postponed until school is back in session.


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A message to ASRC shareholders In light of the recent news regarding several lending institutions, such as Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and others announcing they are no longer financing new Arctic oil and gas projects, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation would like to pass along the following message to its shareholders: Arctic Slope Regional Corporation values the strong relationships it has with its banking partners and is actively engaged to monitor any further developments. While the recent announcements have very little impact on ASRC, the dialogue with our partners is ongoing and we will continue to educate them on the importance of a safe, robust and responsible oil and gas industry in the state of Alaska.

Environmental Quality Management awarded contract COMPANY TO WORK ON U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEER REMEDIATION EFFORT Congratulations to Environmental Quality Management (EQM) for being awarded a large, environmental rapid response contract with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. EQM will partner with IO Environmental & Infrastructure to provide emergency environmental remediation services to contaminated sites across the United States. EQM was awarded the $35 million, single-award contract in January. “This is an excellent opportunity for EQM to implement our nearly 30 years of experience performing these exact types of services, not only safely, but efficiently,” said EQM Federal Program Development Director Glen Sherrier. “The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been a

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strategic target client for EQM and winning this contract is a great way to start the New Year.” EQM specializes in environmental remediation, emergency response, site restoration and environmental consulting services for both the public and private sectors, including the Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, steel industry and large-scale manufacturers. Congratulations EQM on this exciting contract award!


AIS Learning Center opening delayed due to COVID-19 concerns North Slope Communities

The new Tempe office and Learning and Development Center are almost complete. However, at this time, we are delaying the opening due to COVID-19 impacts. ASRC Industrial Services is still committed to learning and development for its employees, but in the nearterm, learning will be provided on an online basis. When open, it will offer world-class learning opportunities to its team from the Tempe office location.

THINKING OF A WAY YOU CAN HELP?

About the Learning and Development Center

TURN IT INTO A BUSINESS IDEA WITH OUR HELP!

The state-of-the-art facility brings together the latest in audio/visual technology and content to provide on-site and virtual learning opportunities for all of our employees across the United States.

BUSINESSES BUILD STRONGER COMMUNITIES YOUR IDEA CAN MAKE A CHANGE

BUILD YOUR BUSINESS & YOUR COMMUNITY WITH ALASKA GROWTH CAPITAL APPLY TODAY!

NorthSlopeMarketplace.com

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Arctic Slope Regional Corporation and Subsidiaries Employees Retirement Plan

SPRING SPRING HAS SPRUNG! It's a great time to plan for your future.

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IS RETIREMENT ON YOUR HORIZON? If you’re planning on retiring in the next 10 years, it’s time to check-in. Check your progress and catch up if you need to. Plan ahead for things like Social Security, health care costs and how to go from saving to spending.

1. Assess your needs. How much will you need in retirement? How will Social Security fit in? Will your loved ones be taken care of? 2. Make sure you’re on track. Once you’ve got an idea of how much income you may need in retirement, take a good look at where your retirement savings are now. If there’s a gap, you may need to adjust some of your goals. 3. Boost your retirement savings. Could you save a little more? If you’re 50 or older, the IRS allows you to contribute an extra $6,500 a year beyond the standard IRS limit of $19,500. You may also want to explore whether you should adjust the investments you have in your Plan so that they’re in line with your retirement goals and risk tolerance.

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GET HELP. Through your Arctic Slope Regional Corporation and Subsidiaries Employees Retirement Plan, you can get personalized advice that helps you know how much to save and how to invest your retirement plan account.2 Because you are 50 or older, you can receive a spending strategy that outlines how to optimize your income sources in retirement. The advice service is provided by Morningstar Investment Management LLC, an independent registered investment adviser. To access advice, log in to workplace.schwab.com > Advice.

QUESTIONS? Call Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. at 1-800-724-7526 from 3 a.m. to 7 p.m. AKST, Monday through Friday.

The employer contribution is paid on a pretax basis and may be taxable at withdrawal. At the direction of the Plan Sponsor or Plan Administrator, Participants may have access to advice services that can provide Participants with a retirement savings and investment strategy for their Plan account, furnished by Morningstar Investment Management LLC, an independent registered investment adviser and subsidiary of Morningstar, Inc. Recommendations are formulated and provided by Morningstar Investment Management through Morningstar® Retirement ManagerSM, an advice (non-discretionary investment advice) and managed accounts (discretionary investment advice and asset management) program which is intended for citizens or legal residents of the United States and its territories, and can be accessed through workplace.schwab.com. Morningstar Investment Management will select investment options appropriate for each Participant’s strategy from the investment options available under the Plan as selected by the Plan Sponsor, Plan Administrator or other Plan fiduciary. There is no guarantee a Participant’s savings and investment strategy will provide adequate income at or through their retirement. Morningstar Investment Management is not affiliated with or an agent of Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. (SRPS); Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (CS&Co.), a federally registered investment advisor; or their affiliates. Neither SRPS, CS&Co., nor their affiliates supervise, make recommendations with respect to, or take responsibility for monitoring the advice services provided to the Participants by Morningstar Investment Management. The Morningstar name and logo are registered marks of Morningstar, Inc.

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The term "personalized advice" refers to personal participant data such as age, salary, and Plan account balance, which will form the basis by which Morningstar Investment Management will establish the Participant’s savings and investment recommendations. Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. provides recordkeeping and related services with respect to retirement plans and has provided this communication to you as part of the recordkeeping services it provides to the Plan. ©2020 Schwab Retirement Plan Services, Inc. All rights reserved. CC3866532 (0320-0WBC) MKT110169ASL-00 (03/20) 00241958

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AEF fundraiser held in downtown Anchorage In late February, organizers held the 6th annual Ivalu Gala at the Captain Cook Hotel – the largest fundraising event of the year for Arctic Education Foundation, or AEF. From funding vocational or training programs that bring our young people back to the North Slope - to pursuing college and graduate degrees that lead them across the world – for more than 40 years, AEF has been impacting the lives of Iñupiaq students by opening the doors of educational opportunity. This year’s emcees included Alice Glenn and Nick

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Hanson, with the juggling duo “The Passing Zone” serving as the headline entertainment of the evening. Congratulations to George Sielak, former ASRC as well as AEF board member for winning the Flossie HopsonAnderson Award. Also, congratulations to Oil Search for being awarded this year’s “Umialik Award” for its lasting commitment to the foundation and its mission. AEF would like to thank everyone who attended the event, as well as those who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to make the night such a success.


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ACCL looking to complete Kivalina project in 2020 For decades, the community of Kivalina has been faced with threats of coastal erosion and flooding. In order to avoid entirely relocating the community from Barrier Island, a plan to create a safe and reliable means of evacuation was put into place. ASRC Civil Construction, LLC, (ACCL) has been working on the Kivalina Evacuation and School Site Access Road project since late 2018. The project included developing a working quarry to supply more than 500,000 cubic yards of material to construct nearly 8 miles of road. A 188foot single span steel bridge also needed to be built to connect the island to the road. By winter of 2020, 90% of the bridge abutments had been

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completed, and ACCL plans to have the bridge completed by fall of this year. Several culverts also need to be placed, including 1,578 lineal feet of various culvert sizes throughout. Along with the bridge completion occurring in the summer of 2020, an additional 70,000 cubic yards of gravel will be placed on the road prior to the final 30,000 cubic yards of 1-inch surfacing material.


Throughout the course the project, ACCL has:

• Installed 220 lineal feet of 12’ diameter structural plate pipe (aluminum culvert)

•S  et up and maintained a 52-person man camp •D  eveloped a working hard rock quarry •C  onstructed eight miles of ice road in winter of 2019 for access to the quarry site •P  laced 400,000 cubic yards of shot rock material •P  rocessed and installed 18,000 cubic yards of Rip Rap

Local employment was an important aspect of this project. Nearly 33% of the workforce were local hires, putting in more than 31,000 man hours in total. Developing a strong relationship with the community has been key to the success of this project to date. ACCL has hosted community feeds and donated food to the community school. Despite setbacks from weather, the project remains on schedule to be completed later this year.

• I nstalled bridge substructure pilings and abutments

Employment Breakdown: TOTAL EMPLOYMENT: 97,186 man hours • LOCAL EMPLOYMENT: 31,967 man hours (32.9% of the workforce) • NANA: 24,730 man hours (25.4% of the workforce) • ASRC: 7,621 man hours (7.8% of the workforce) • ALASKA NATIVE EMPLOYMENT: 38,531 man hours (39.6% of the workforce)

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In an effort to prevent the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), the Top of the World Hotel in UtqiaÄĄvik is closed and not accepting reservations until June 1, 2020. We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your patience during this time.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate.

Profile for I am Iñupiaq

ASRC Newsletter, First Quarter of 2020  

ASRC Newsletter, First Quarter of 2020  

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