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Uqalugaawich W H E R E

THIRD QUARTER, 2016

P E O P L E

VOLUME 38

S H A R E

I N F O R M A T I O N

ISSUE 3

Berries were plentiful in Atqasuk earlier this summer.

Atisioiabniq Resolution of Conflict – While respecting our differences, we deal with the inherent tension in our decision-making processes by strengthening our partnerships.

asrc.com


Contents T A B L E

O F

1 Management changes at several ASRC subsidiaries ................................................ 3 Builders Choice is now a member of the ASRC family of companies ........................ 4 Ad campaign pushes to keep Arctic in offshore leasing program ............................. 5 Shelley Cordova promoted to new role at ASRC Energy Services ............................. 8 Governor visits Petro Star Inc.’s North Pole refinery ............................................... 9 Shareholder success story: Alaska Fur Cache .......................................................10 Drug Prevention Coalition message ......................................................................11 ASRC board endorses Murkowski for re-election ...................................................12 Attention AEF students: submit your graduation photos .......................................12 Top of the World Arctic Broadband Summit wraps up in Barrow ...........................13 ASRC Feneral welcomes Vistronix to the family ....................................................14 New ASRC television ads hit the air ......................................................................15 North Slope Borough comprehensive plan underway ............................................16 ASRC announces the creation of new platform company .......................................18 Arctic Stars: highlighting Iñupiat youth ................................................................19 President’s message ...............................................................................................

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President’s message The summer in Alaska’s far north may be short, but it is always a season to remember. Our communities take advantage of this bountiful time of year to hunt the caribou as well as fish the waters north of the Brooks Range, making the nonstop journey to the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas – including the Kuparuk, Colville and Sagavanirktok rivers. Locals are also kept busy heading out to fill their buckets with ripe crowberries, raspberries and salmonberries. It certainly is a time in which resources are as plentiful as the daylight. As fall reinforces its grip, now the shift is toward what we hope and pray is a safe and successful autumn whaling season in five of our eight North Slope communities. It has been a busy and productive season for your Corporation as well. In mid-August, we made substantial changes to the management team at several of our subsidiaries. Doug Smith is now the president and CEO of ASRC Energy Services, or AES. As you know, Doug was the prior president and CEO of Little Red Services, or LRS, as well as ASRC Construction Holding Company, or ACHC. Joe Curgus, the long-time vice president of operations for LRS, has taken over as president and CEO of the company. Lastly, Brady Strahl is now serving as the president and CEO of ACHC. Brady was the prior president of ASRC SKW and has been with the ACHC family of companies since 2009. I congratulate each of them and wish them the best in their new roles. I’m also wishing our senior senator, Lisa Murkowski, the best when it comes to her re-election to the U.S. Senate. In mid-September, I joined the rest of the ASRC board in voting to endorse Murkowski because I believe she is the right choice when it comes to fighting for issues that create opportunity for our people and our “ ... now the shift is toward what shareholders. Throughout the next six years we hope and pray is a safe and beyond, we’ll need her assistance and leadership while serving in Washington. and successful autumn whaling

season in five of our eight North We are also making the decision to expand the footprint within our existing business Slope communities.” segments. In early July, we announced the acquisition of Builders Choice, Inc., or BCI, by our subsidiary ASRC Construction Holding Company. I’d like to once again welcome BCI and its employees inside the ASRC family of companies. You’ll read more about the acquisition a bit later in this newsletter. continued on page 2 THIRD QUARTER, 2016

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There is also more information inside on the mid-August acquisition of Vistronix Intelligence & Technology Solutions by our subsidiary ASRC Federal Holding Company. The acquisition of Vistronix, headquartered in Reston, Virginia, further demonstrates the Corporation’s continued commitment to diversifying and growing our government services business segment. Vistronix is now a subsidiary of ASRC Federal. The Corporation teamed up with the Arctic Economic Council and Iñuit Arctic Business Alliance this summer to bring leaders in the tech industry as well as policy experts to Barrow – looking at ways of making high-speed internet, or broadband, a reality in the circumpolar Arctic. I had the privilege of attending the two-day Top of the World Arctic Broadband Summit and came away encouraged by the overwhelming interest and support across Arctic nations. As I found out – the logistical, financial and even political challenges of introducing broadband in remote regions are very similar, whether you live in Finland or the U.S. I look forward to the ideas and strategies discussed becoming the platform for future programs and courses of action, and congratulate the organizers on a successful conference. As a Corporation, we’ve also joined a coalition of groups supportive of responsible resource development in and off the coast of Alaska. In late summer, the coalition started running a new broadcast, print and digital advertising campaign calling on the Obama administration to keep intact the Arctic leasing areas currently contained in the Interior Department’s draft proposed plan. It’s an important topic to ASRC and to every Alaskan, and you can read more about it on page 5. As hectic as many of our schedules were this past season, I get the feeling the pace won’t slow down as we round the corner into fall and winter. Rest assured, even in the face of certain difficulties, we remain committed to enlarging and diversifying our core base of businesses while maintaining operational excellence. Taikuu.  Rex A. Rock Sr. President, CEO

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Management changes at several ASRC subsidiaries After five years as president and CEO of ASRC Energy Services (AES), Jeff Kinneeveauk has tendered his resignation. His last day with AES was August 19, 2016. Doug Smith, president and CEO of Little Red Services (LRS) and ASRC Construction Holding Company (ACHC), has assumed the role of president and CEO of AES. Prior to being the CEO of LRS and ACHC, Doug was a vice president and business unit manager of AES. Doug is active within the oil and gas industry, serving on the boards of the Alaska Support Industry Alliance and the Resource Development Council.

Joe Curgus, the long-time vice president of operations for LRS, has taken over as president and CEO of LRS concurrent with Doug’s transition to AES. Joe has been an essential member of the LRS team for more than 30 years and has played a critical role in the successful transition of the company into the ASRC family of companies. Joe is respected throughout the Alaska oil and gas industry as an engaged customerfocused executive. Brady Strahl, the current president of ASRC SKW, is now the president and CEO of ACHC. Brady has been with the ACHC family of companies since 2009. He has been a key member of the ACHC leadership and has been instrumental in improving ACHC’s financial and project performance over the past two years. Brady graduated from Gonzaga University in 2003 and was an Anchorage Journal of Commerce Top 40 under 40 award recipient in 2008. Despite the state’s challenging economic environment, ASRC’s board of directors and senior leadership team remains committed to Alaska, and believe Doug, Joe and Brady have the skills necessary to lead AES, LRS and ACHC as these companies confront the challenges posed by the Alaska economy in pursuit of the goals established by the ASRC 2012–2017 Strategic Plan.

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ASRC announces new acquisition Builders Choice is now a member of the ASRC family of companies ASRC is pleased to announce the acquisition of Builders Choice, Inc. by our whollyowned subsidiary ASRC Construction Holding Company, LLC, or ACHC. Headquartered in Anchorage, Alaska, BCI was founded 20 years ago and is now Alaska’s leading provider of customized modular solutions. The Company serves a diverse group of customers, including state, local and federal government agencies, oil and gas producers and service providers, mining companies and residential real estate developers. In addition to its facility in Anchorage, BCI operates a manufacturing plant in Vermillion, South Dakota. In 2013, the Company began selling building materials and engineered roof trusses from stores in Anchorage, Wasilla and Soldotna. “On behalf of ASRC’s board of directors, I am pleased to welcome BCI’s employees to the ASRC family of companies,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. “This

acquisition demonstrates ASRC’s continued commitment to the state of Alaska. Despite the challenges posed by the current economic environment, ASRC believes Alaska’s longterm future is bright.” “Over the past 20 years, BCI has built a reputation as a customer-focused, valueadded solutions provider,” said Doug Smith, former president and CEO of ACHC. “The acquisition of BCI fills a number of ACHC’s capability gaps and immediately increases alignment between our service offerings and the needs of our customers.” “Today is an exciting day for BCI and its employees,” said Mark Larson, BCI president and CEO. “I believe the combination of ASRC’s financial support and relationships across multiple industries will provide opportunities for growth and expansion of BCI’s products and services.” Members of the BCI management team, including Mark and Sandi Larson, will maintain their respective roles postacquisition. In his role as president and CEO of BCI, Mark will report to Brady Strahl, the new president and CEO of ACHC.

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Ad campaign pushes to keep Arctic in offshore leasing program ASRC lends its support in sending message to Obama administration ASRC has joined a coalition of groups supportive of responsible resource development in and off the coast of Alaska. In mid-September, the coalition unveiled a new broadcast, print and digital advertising campaign calling on the Obama administration to keep intact the Arctic leasing areas currently contained in the Interior Department’s draft proposed plan.   The draft program, revealed in March, allows for the possibility of lease sales to be held for federally controlled tracts in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in 2020 and 2022 respectively. But activist groups continue to wage an aggressive campaign to have those areas removed from the final schedule.

The Arctic Coalition, a group of 20 organizations representing Alaska Native communities, labor unions, higher education programs, industry and others, is launching this new campaign in direct response to activists’ efforts, using the platform to articulate the essential role that oil and gas development plays in the Arctic and the importance of ensuring that it is included in the final leasing program. The television ad ran in the Washington D.C. media market beginning on September 12. You can watch the ad at: http://bit.ly/2cSØSCp. Rex Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO added his support, saying “Arctic OCS exploration

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and development would bring additional jobs, higher wages and increased tax revenues to both the North Slope region and the State of Alaska. Moreover, continued exploration and development of the Arctic OCS would serve the national interest by contributing to the United States’ long-term energy security.”

Today industry retains over 40 offshore leases in the Arctic and continues to invest millions of dollars into research into oil spill response and preparedness and other areas. This campaign is further proof that industry is fully committed to responsible offshore development in the region.”

Jeff Eshelman, senior vice president for operations and public affairs at the Independent Petroleum Association of America and a member of the Coalition, said, “Earlier this month the Wilderness Society became the latest to argue that industry’s ‘exit’ from the Arctic is proof that including the region in the offshore leasing program would be costly and unnecessary.

Kara Moriarty, president and CEO of the Alaska Oil and Gas Association, echoed Eshelman’s comments. “The breadth of Alaskan organizations that have come together, 16 in total, demonstrates the importance of this issue to our state. Despite repeated claims to the contrary by environmental groups, Alaskans overwhelmingly support oil and gas development in the Arctic offshore.”

“Quite aside from the skewed logic of arguing that companies will never again be interested in developing the Arctic based on today’s commodity price, the idea that we’re not interested in the Arctic simply isn’t true.

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“Without the lease sale option, there is simply no prospect of future investment in the infrastructure which we need. I can’t stress this enough; taking lease sales off the table now sends a clear message that the federal

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The Arctic Coalition, a group of 20 organizations representing Alaska Native communities, labor unions, higher education programs, industry and others, is launching this new campaign in direct response to activists’ efforts, using the platform to articulate the essential role that oil and gas development plays in the Arctic and the importance of ensuring that it is included in the final leasing program. government is hanging a ‘closed for business’ sign on our state, at a time when we are already facing huge budgetary challenges. The Administration must think about what impact this will have on Alaska.” Eshelman continued, “The oil and gas industry’s impact on the economy of the Alaska is well known. What is less well understood is the crucial role it plays in supporting homeland security in the Arctic, so this is a theme that the adverts really emphasize. As the comments by Secretary Cohen, General Ralston and others make clear, private sector enterprise, specifically oil and gas development, is a critical

prerequisite to our national defense. We really shouldn’t be needlessly throwing it away, especially at a time of increasing international tension in the region.” The imperative of America’s presence in and commitment to the Arctic has grown in prominence in recent weeks. In addition to the comments submitted to the Department of the Interior by former Defense Secretary William Cohen and others, a second group of foreign policy experts, led by a former National Security Advisor to President Barack Obama, General James L. Jones, issued a statement in July arguing that the United States “has not built the presence required to maintain regional security and stability” and “is at risk of being eclipsed by other Arctic states for access and influence.” Earlier in the summer, the Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), introduced a resolution that highlighted similar challenges and called on the Department of the Interior to include the Arctic leases in the leasing program as a means of enhancing America’s national security. And last month, the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Paul J. Selva, raised his own concerns, saying “The fact that we don’t have the capacity continued on page 8

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in any material way to have a surface presence in the Arctic is something that we ought to address.� The Arctic Coalition is made up of a group of 20 Alaskan and national organizations. They include: Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; the Alaska Chamber of Commerce; Alaska Laborers District Council (Alaska Laborers Union); Alaska Miners Association; Alaska Native

Regional Corporation CEOs; Alaska Oil and Gas Association; Alaska Petroleum Joint Crafts Council; Alaska Teamsters, Local 959; Alaska Support Industry Alliance (The Alliance; American Federation of Labor/ Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), Alaska; Americans for Prosperity Alaska; Anchorage Economic Development Corporation; Arctic Energy Center; Consumer Energy Alliance – Alaska; Council of Alaska Producers; International Association of Geophysical Contractors; Independent Petroleum Association of America IPAA; National Ocean Industries Association; and Resource Development Council, Alaska. For more information, check out the Arctic Energy Center website at www.arcticenergycenter.com.

Shelley Cordova promoted to new role at ASRC Energy Services Shelley Cordova has been promoted to senior vice president and general counsel of ASRC Energy Services (AES), as of September 12, 2016. In her new role, she will be responsible for AES legal direction and strategy and will report directly to Doug Smith, AES president and CEO. Shelley has served as senior corporate counsel for ASRC since July 2012, focusing on legal strategic planning, litigation, employment and process support for the Corporation. Before joining the ASRC team, Shelley spent four years at Kirkland & Ellis LLP and four years at Irell & Manella LLP. She litigated cases and offered advice and counsel on general business and employment matters. Shelley received her B.A. in English and political science from the University of California at Davis and her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

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Governor visits Petro Star Inc.’s North Pole refinery Petro Star Inc. (PSI) executives welcomed Governor Bill Walker to the company’s North Pole refinery in late August as construction on the new asphalt oil plant reached its final stages. The Governor toured the facility with PSI President and CEO, Doug Chapados and Senior Vice President of Engineering and Refining, Jim Boltz. During his brief visit, the Governor commended PSI for the work it’s doing throughout the state and discussed the benefits that will come from the soon-to-becompleted asphalt unit. “I like to see things being built and being made out of what we have here, creating value-added products,” said Governor Walker. “And I know ASRC and Petro Star are at the forefront of that.”

Governor Walker tours the asphalt oil plant in North Pole.

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Shareholder success story: Alaska Fur Cache In 2010, ASRC shareholder Bobby Itta started Hallelujah Designs (now Bobby Itta designs) to market her handmade and Iñupiaq-themed clothing designs. Her work has been featured in art and fashion shows and she has been awarded numerous grants and awards for her regalia designs over the years. Her largely made-to-order operation for kamipiat, atikjuit, parkas and other outerwear grew and, with that, grew her desire to open her own fur shop. It was a natural move for Itta, who has mastered the traditional art of skin sewing and has incorporated various types of fur into her designs.

Alaska Fur Cache has been in operation for over 30 years in Alaska and sells high-quality furs, handmade fur hats, headbands, ruffs, earmuffs and much more. Itta brings the ability to incorporate Alaska Native-sourced materials into their product lines, including sea mammal furs, and sells her designs at the weekend market in downtown Anchorage and online.

ability to incorporate Alaska Native-sourced materials into their product lines, including sea mammal furs, and sells her designs at the weekend market in downtown Anchorage and online. “It’s been a dream of mine to open my own business and I think this fur shop has the potential to connect Alaska Native artists and skin-sewers with products at better prices and also be a good resource for hunters and trappers to sell, trade and tan furs, ” Itta said. “AGC has been a great resource in making this business a reality and I am excited to see what other opportunities this business opens up.” The transaction was orchestrated and managed by Hilary Upicksoun, a commercial loan officer at Alaska Growth Capital. “What I love most about my job is helping fellow shareholders achieve their dreams of owning their own business. Bobby and Price were great to work with and I’m looking forward to watching their business succeed in the years to come.” To learn more about her business, visit AlaskaFurCache.com, or search Alaska Fur Cache on Facebook.

In August 2016, Bobby and her husband Price acquired Alaska Fur Cache. The business acquisition was financed by Alaska Growth Capital, a subsidiary of ASRC. Alaska Fur Cache has been in operation for over 30 years in Alaska and sells high-quality furs, handmade fur hats, headbands, ruffs, earmuffs and much more. Itta brings the

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“Reported rates of smoking during pregnancy among North Slope Borough residents are nearly three times statewide rates.” – Data source: Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics Birth Profiles –

PERCENT OF MOTHERS WHO REPORTED SMOKING TOBACCO DURING PREGNANCY Alaska North Slope Burough 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

1997-1999

1998-2000

1999-2001

2000-2002

2001-2003

2002-2004

2003-2005

2004-2006

2005-2007

2006-2008

2007-2009

If you or a loved one is in need of help, do not hesitate to contact one of the following resources: • • •

Call the Alaska Suicide Prevention Careline at 1-877-266-HELP (4357) or Text “4HELP” to 839863 Call the North Slope Borough Hotline at 1-800-478-0267 Call the North Slope Borough Behavioral Health Center at 907-852-0366

PreventionCrew

THIS MESSAGE HAS BEEN PROVIDED BY THE NORTH SLOPE BOROUGH DRUG PREVENTION COALITION

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ASRC board endorses Murkowski for re-election The solution for Alaska: Senior senator is a fighter for business and Alaska Native community

At its regularly scheduled board meeting in Barrow in mid-September, the ASRC board of directors unanimously voted to endorse Senator Lisa Murkowski for reelection to the U.S. Senate and issued the following statement:

Continuing in the tradition of the late senator Ted Stevens, Lisa Murkowski has proven to be a tireless worker for the Alaska Native community, and is the right choice when it comes to fighting for issues that create opportunity for our people and our shareholders. We’ve been able to successfully work side-by-side with our senior senator on a wide variety of issues, from getting the Indian Health Service (IHS) and VA to allow veterans to receive care at IHS clinics, to working with other Alaska Native corporations on practical changes to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, or ANCSA. Her support has also been invaluable in other areas, to include federal revenue sharing, adopting changes to the SBA 8(a) Program, and even fighting federal agencies to allow for development in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska. We consider Senator Murkowski a partner when it comes to working with Washington, and look forward to her next six years in office. We invite others to join us in voting for Lisa Murkowski on November 8.

AEF students: submit your graduation photos WHO: all past and present AEF scholarship recipients WHAT: submit your graduation or school-related photos to be

displayed at the 2016 Ivalu Gala WHERE: email photos along with your name, school, graduation

year and degree title to aefgala@asrc.com

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Top of the World Arctic Broadband Summit wraps up in Barrow Large turnout as presenters explore critical need for high-speed internet across circumpolar north

Top of the World Arctic Broadband Summit # M A KI N G TH ECONNECTION

For two days in mid-August, policy leaders and tech industry experts met in Barrow, Alaska to discuss the essential need for broadband across the circumpolar Arctic, and how to best prepare for the many opportunities and the challenges the new technology will bring with it. Highlights of the Top of the World Arctic Broadband Summit included presentations ranging from what private investors are looking for when considering projects in the far north – to the very latest on the Quintillion Subsea Cable Project, in which ASRC is a minority partner. Other discussions touched on new satellite technology to compliment subsea fiber optic broadband, and what the government’s role should be in connecting the Arctic. In all, nearly 40 speakers participated in the conference, coming from as far away as Finland, Canada and the east coast.

“I’m incredibly grateful to the many experts and presenters who came all the way to Alaska to join us for the Summit,” said Tara Sweeney, who serves as chair of the Arctic Economic Council as well as executive vice president of external “ They’ve been able to see affairs for ASRC. “They’ve been able to see firsthand the many challenges we firsthand the many challenges experience in the Arctic and the importance we experience in the Arctic of using broadband as a tool to bring and the importance of using opportunities to the north – like educational, broadband as a tool to bring health and economic growth benefits. Improved connectivity and capacity is a opportunities to the north – problem all too common in many parts of the like educational, health and Arctic, and I’m pleased that industry leaders economic growth benefits. are committed to helping us find solutions.” The Summit, which was organized by the Arctic Economic Council and its telecommunications working group, was broadcast live on KBRW Radio and the program was simulcast worldwide on the internet. The event was also co-hosted by the Iñuit Arctic Business Alliance and Arctic Slope Regional Corporation.

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ASRC Federal welcomes Vistronix to the family Vistronix Intelligence & Technology Solutions is now a member of the ASRC family of companies In mid-August Arctic Slope Regional Corporation announced the acquisition of Vistronix Intelligence & Technology Solutions by our wholly-owned subsidiary, ASRC Federal. Headquartered in Reston, Virginia, Vistronix has over 700 employees and has been providing a broad range of enterprise solutions to federal agencies across the mission assurance and national security markets for over 25 years. With core capabilities in advanced analytics, signals processing, cloud computing and largescale data management, Vistronix adds new capabilities and new customers to ASRC Federal’s portfolio. Vistronix is known for its mission focus and customer responsiveness. “This acquisition demonstrates ASRC’s continued commitment to diversifying and growing our government services portfolio,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. Through a series of employee welcome events, Mark Gray, ASRC Federal president and CEO continually highlighted the importance of cultural fit and stressing the imperative to maintain a mission and customer-focused organization. According to Gray, “The acquisition of Vistronix meets

important objectives necessary for ASRC Federal to fulfill its role in ASRC’s strategic plan. Specifically, this acquisition expands our customer footprint in the intelligence community, and in key, select civilian and DoD markets.” Going forward, Vistronix will be a subsidiary of ASRC Federal. John Hassoun, ASRC Federal Vistronix president, will continue to lead the Vistronix organization. The majority of Vistronix’s employees are located throughout northern Virginia, Colorado, New Jersey and Maryland. An integration team which includes employees from ASRC Federal and Vistronix has been formed to facilitate systems integration and identify best practices that can be adopted across the ASRC Federal subsidiaries.

Top, left to right: Butch Lincoln, Mark Gray and John Hassoun. Above: ASRC Federal Vistronix employees in Fort Collins, CO.

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New ASRC television ads hit the air

A pair of new ASRC television commercials has begun airing across Alaska, featuring local residents in the communities of Wainwright and Atqasuk. The latest footage was recorded on-site in mid-August. “These latest commercials continue the theme of highlighting each community on the North Slope,” said Tara Sweeney, ASRC executive vice president of external affairs. “The visuals are absolutely stunning, and are already

some of my favorites. My thanks to Edna Ahmaogak and Elizabeth Hollingsworth for their involvement and their hospitality.” You can check out the commercials for yourself at: https://vimeo.com/187215092.

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North Slope Borough comprehensive plan underway The North Slope Borough (NSB) Department of Planning & Community Services is conducting a thorough review and revision of all community comprehensive plans in preparation for updating the North Slope Borough Area Wide Comprehensive Plan. The NSB contracted ASRC Energy Services (AES) and UMIAQ Design and Municipal Services (UMIAQ) to help with these efforts. Together, these entities formed a planning team focused on working with the communities to develop their comprehensive plans.

The plan is a road map for the future and is designed to guide the physical, social and economic development of the community. The new comprehensive plans will be used to guide future development, growth and decision making over the next 20 years. The plan is a road map for the future and is designed to guide the physical, social and economic development of the community. It contains a vision of how the residents want their community to accommodate change over a 20-year period. The vision is developed by community residents – goals, objectives and strategies are developed to implement the vision. A comprehensive plan provides direction on many physical and social issues, including land use, transportation and housing. It is framed in broad terms and guides future implementation.

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Comprehensive plans provide information and guidance in the following ways: • Support the preservation of Iñupiat values and traditions • Provide a clear direction for managing the Borough’s future in the face of new development and declining revenues • Guide land use within the Borough and revisions of land use regulations • Provide guidance for sound resource and village development • Help to manage Borough funds, employees and facilities more efficiently • Assist in obtaining grants for the Borough and villages • Aid villages in developing comprehensive plans • Help to identify and set priorities for actions by the Borough and its villages • Incorporate values of our Elders and visions of our youth

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Comprehensive plans will be reviewed two years after they are adopted and will be modified as needed. This will allow the plans to meet the changing needs and goals of their communities.

The Plan development process

The planning team’s comprehensive plan development process includes five visits to each community. This starts with an introductory community meeting, followed by a “Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT)” exercise with the community, which is the baseline for the comprehensive plan. The planning team will then organize a meeting with the city office, the Tribal office and village corporation to review the administrative draft comprehensive plan. This is followed by a public draft comprehensive plan meeting with the community. Once the plan is finalized and resolutions of support are received, it will go before the planning commission in the community. Once adopted by the planning commission, the plan will go before the assembly to be finalized upon adoption.

INTRODUCTION MEETING

VISIONING (SWOT EXERCISE)

RESEARCH (ONGOING)

DRAFT PLAN

PUBLIC REVIEW AND REVISIONS

The most recent plan adopted by the assembly on September 13 was the Anaktuvuk Pass Comprehensive Plan. The NSB, AES and UMIAQ would like to thank Anaktuvuk Pass residents for their participation in the community meetings and their support to adopt the plan. The planning team is in the process of developing the Point Hope, Point Lay, Atqasuk and Nuiqsut comprehensive plans. Once these community plans are finalized, they will become components of the revised Area Wide Comprehensive Plan for the NSB. The team plans to complete the revision by the end of 2017.

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RESOLUTIONS OF SUPPORT

ADOPTION

IMPLEMENT (ONGOING)

Symbol indicates public participation

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ASRC announces the creation of new platform company ASRC Industrial Services, LLC is ASRC’s newest platform company team and workforce at Petrochem to expand our industrial services offerings into attractive new markets for the benefit of our shareholders.” In late September, ASRC announced the establishment of a new platform holding company, ASRC Industrial Services, LLC, or AIS, which will be headquartered in Concord, California. Greg Johnson, the president and chief executive officer of ASRC’s wholly-owned subsidiary, Petrochem Insulation, Inc. will take over as president and CEO of AIS. Petrochem will become a subsidiary of AIS.

“I am excited about the future of AIS,” said Greg Johnson, president and CEO of AIS. “I look forward to building on the momentum we have created over the last 15 months at Petrochem to expand our service offerings to existing and new customers, provide additional opportunities for our employees and ultimately increased benefits to ASRC’s shareholders.”

“On behalf of ASRC’s board of directors, I am proud to announce the creation of ASRC Industrial Services,” said Crawford Patkotak, ASRC board chairman. Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC, added, “I believe the establishment of AIS positions ASRC to leverage the talented leadership

“ I believe the establishment of AIS positions ASRC to leverage the talented leadership team and workforce at Petrochem to expand our industrial services offerings into attractive new markets for the benefit of our shareholders.”

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Arctic Stars: highlighting Iñupiat youth Miss Alaska brings home confidence from national pageant By Shady Grove Oliver Reprinted from the Arctic Sounder; September 9, 2016 “It was so much fun. I learned a lot about myself,” she said. “I feel like I was able to learn how to appreciate myself and love myself more. I oftentimes don’t see the accomplishments that I’ve done and this pageant was kind of a way for me to get a perspective change on myself and be like, ‘Look at where you are.’” Seemingly ever the optimist, she even took the challenges in stride and picked them apart to discover what she learned from them, looking back. Berg is no stranger to challenges.

It’s a whole lot different from Miss World Eskimo Indian Olympics. That was one of the takeaways for Rosemary Berg, Miss Alaska 2016, from the Miss United States Pageant. From the evening gowns to the in-person interviews to the bikinis to simply standing among dozens of other young women from around the country and its territories, this pageant gave her opportunities and hurdles she hadn’t always expected.

Originally from Tikigaq, she was adopted at an early age and raised in Anchorage. She often struggled with self-confidence as a young woman which came to a head after she was sexually assaulted as a student in college. She fell into a deep depression, gained a lot of weight, and at her lowest point, made a plan for taking her own life. The way she tells it, she went to church and heard the right words at the right moment, which set her on a new path. Over the last five years, she’s tried to get healthy, find ways of thinking more positively about herself, worked hard to inspire and help others along the way. continued on page 20

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Since she made the decision to enter the pageant, she pushed herself to her limits, committing to handfuls of volunteer activities and setting herself on a furious fitness routine. Body image aside, Berg said, the most important thing is that she now feels better about herself on the inside. “I think it’s just become a lifestyle for me of being healthy,” she said. She’s run a spirited social media campaign, as well, posting photos and videos of her progress.

Over the last five years, she’s tried to get healthy, find ways of thinking more positively about herself and worked hard to inspire and help others along the way. With her past in mind, one of the most daunting moments of the Miss United States pageant for Berg was right before she went onstage for the infamous swimsuit competition. “I almost had a breakdown right before,” she said. “Everybody was like, ‘Don’t forget, it’s just going to be for 30 seconds and when you’re done you’re going to be so glad it’s over.’ I almost had a mini anxiety attack and cried off my makeup. But then, I went out and I did it and when it was done I just thought, ‘Why was I so afraid?’” As a pageant newcomer, she credits many of her fellow Misses as helping her through Miss United States 2016, from giving tips on wardrobe to whispering encouraging words backstage.

“The two girls I was standing next to, Alabama and American Samoa, when I was about to go onto the stage and I felt like I couldn’t do this, they both said, ‘Remember where you were before. It’s not about having the perfect body, it’s really about how you are confident about yourself. That shines through more than a six-pack,’” she remembered. When it came time for the finals, Berg didn’t make it into the top 15, but made sure to point out that three of the friends she made at the pageant did and that she was proud of them. That camaraderie and the joy of women supporting other women was something Berg lauded in videos throughout the pageant and will continue to focus on in the future. With more time on her hands since the pageant has ended, Berg hopes to put more energy into her Dare to be Darling project, continued on page 21

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WHERE PEOPLE SHARE INFORMATION


which she started to “encourage, inspire, and empower women to discover their personal beauty, identity, and purpose.” Over the next few weeks, she hopes to get a 21-day positivity challenge off the ground in which she’ll prompt participants to choose something they want to do and stick with it for 21 days to create new and positive routines. At the core of her message, though, and something she said she both learned and took to heart during the pageant was that above all, it’s important to stay true to who you are and give yourself a break.

OUR PEOPLE. OUR REGION. OUR DECISION. “WE NEED JOBS”

“I saw myself for who I was and I saw how other people saw me for who I am,” she said. “I think my whole perspective of myself has changed in such a positive way.” That’s why, with her characteristic humor and ebullient smile, before we ended our interview, she made sure to add: “You didn’t ask this question but I think it might be good to include. The first thing that I ate after the pageant was over was a strawberry topping Oreo McFlurry and then macaroni and cheese.” More information about Dare to be Darling can be found on the project’s Facebook page. You can find out more about Berg herself at www.rosejanae.com or the Miss Alaska United States 2016 Facebook page. Rosemary Berg is an ASRC shareholder and serves as an intern for the Corporation.

“NO ARCTIC DEVELOPMENT”

“HANDS OFF THE ARCTIC”

Decisions affecting Arctic Alaska must remain in the hands of those who call it home.

OUR VOICE. OUR VISION.

ARCTIC SLOPE NATIVE ASSOCIATION ARCTIC SLOPE REGIONAL CORPORATION ATQASUK CORPORATION CITY OF ANAKTUVUK PASS CITY OF ATQASUK CITY OF BARROW CITY OF KAKTOVIK CITY OF POINT HOPE CITY OF WAINWRIGHT ILISAGVIK COLLEGE

THIRD QUARTER, 2016

VOLUME 38

KAKTOVIK IÑUPIAT CORPORATION NATIVE VILLAGE OF ATQASUK NATIVE VILLAGE OF POINT HOPE NATIVE VILLAGE OF POINT LAY NORTH SLOPE BOROUGH NUNAMIUT CORPORATION OLGOONIK CORPORATION TIKIGAQ CORPORATION UKPEAGVIK IÑUPIAT CORPORATION WAINWRIGHT TRIBAL COUNCIL

ISSUE 3

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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

P.O. Box 129 Barrow, Alaska 99723 asrc.com

ASRC Elder and shareholder rates Winter rates now in effect SHAREHOLDER RATE: $ 184.00 + 5% tax NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $ 237.00 + 5% tax

· Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability · Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked · Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate

All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate. For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

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3rd Quarter of 2016 ASRC Newsletter  

3rd Quarter of 2016 ASRC Newsletter  

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