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SECO ND QUA R TER , 2018 VOLUME 45

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A SRC .COM

Feature story

Shareholder spotlight:

ASRC congratulates Tara Sweeney on historic confirmation.

DONN A HILL Business Analyst Associate, AFHC Business Development

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Table of contents President’s message..............................................................................................1 ASRC congratulates Tara Sweeney on historic confirmation............................... 3 Documentary featuring history of ASRC wins Emmy Award................................ 4 RSI EnTech surpasses nine years without a lost time work injury.......................5 AES-HCC plays key role in oil and gas development expansions........................6 New round of ASRC television commercials in the works...................................8 AES awarded ASTAR project contract..................................................................9 2018 Unified Basketball Tournament.................................................................... 9 ASRC announces industrial services acquisition .............................................. 10 Shareholder spotlight......................................................................................... 11 2018 ASRC Annual Meeting................................................................................. 12

Our Military Spotlight and Arctic Stars features will return for the 3rd quarter edition of Uqalugaaŋich.

Iñuuniaġniqput Iñupiaguvluta O U R C U LT U R E A S I Ñ U P I AT Our culture is who we are and provides us with the guiding principles in our everyday business practices.

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President’s message RE X A . ROCK SR .

While it has been a relative slow start to summer on Alaska’s North Slope, with the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas still sporting a layer of ice and the mountains of Anaktuvuk Pass still blanketed in white well into July, the seasonal warmth in our region is gaining strength and is helping to renew plant and animal life in our communities, both on the land and in the sea. In short, this period of perpetual daylight is a time of growth and transformation in the Alaska Arctic. The same is true for your Corporation. In late June, we announced Hudspeth & Associates was now a member of the ASRC family of companies after being acquired by ASRC Industrial Services. This company is headquartered in Englewood, Colorado and provides environmental remediation, demolition, dismantlement and civil site services throughout the Rocky Mountain region. You can learn more about Hudspeth, a 20-year old company, a bit later in this newsletter. The summer of 2018 also means an end of an era for ASRC as we are proud to see one of our own appointed by the White House to lead the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as well as other offices. The confirmation, by unanimous consent, of Tara “Katuk” Mac Lean Sweeney to the position of Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior is truly groundbreaking. She now holds the first and only presidential nomination and U.S. Senate-confirmed position for any Alaska Native woman in state history. We have been watching this process unfold since the fall of 2017 and wish Tara nothing but the best as she transitions to her new role in Washington. With Tara in a leadership position there, all of us at ASRC know Indian Country will be in good hands. We go into more detail on Sweeney’s historic confirmation later in this edition of Uqalugaaŋich.

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“The confirmation, by unanimous consent, of Tara “Katuk” Mac Lean Sweeney to the position of Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior is truly groundbreaking.” We also congratulate Tara and her team in external affairs for winning an Emmy Award for the long-format documentary “True North, the Story of ASRC.” This hour-long video shares the story of ASRC’s early leaders – from their fight for land before statehood and the signing of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to the Corporation’s present-day strategic planning process of creating additional opportunities for our expanding pool of shareholder owners. The documentary aired statewide on July 1 on KTUU Channel 2. If you missed it, you can still watch “True North” on www.asrc.com or find a link on the ASRC or IAM Facebook page. I’d like to thank everyone who was involved in this exciting production, whether they were in front of or... Continued on page 2

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behind the camera. We were also nominated for another Emmy for last year’s television commercials. Since its start three years ago, this advertising campaign has focused on each community in ASRC’s region. In 2018, the commercials will highlight the villages of Kaktovik, Anaktuvuk Pass and Nuiqsut, the final three communities to be featured in this campaign. We’d like to thank Catherine Edwards, Fenton Rexford and Archie Ahkiviana for their generous involvement. You can look for these new commercials to begin airing across the state of Alaska later this summer and fall. I’d also like to thank our shareholders for their involvement in this year’s annual meeting – which had to be held six days late because of a late-spring storm in Kaktovik. The election results from that meeting

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have been made official and you can find those later in this newsletter. Lastly, congratulations to the various whaling crews across the North Slope, from Utqiaġvik to my hometown of Point Hope, which participate in the spring hunt. Ice conditions were tricky at times, but your hard work and dedication has helped to feed local communities throughout the summer months. For those communities which take part, I wish you success and safety in the fall. Taikuu, and God’s blessings.

Rex A. Rock Sr. President and CEO


ASRC congratulates Tara Sweeney on historic confirmation UNANIMOUS CONSENT VOTE IN U.S. SENATE IS FINAL HURDLE FOR SWEENEY

More than a month after facing tough questions from a U.S. Senate panel, Tara Mac Lean Sweeney’s nomination for Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs (AS-IA) moved out of committee in late June and onto the Senate floor. There, her confirmation passed by unanimous consent. Without objection from either party, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell confirmed Sweeney is now the next Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs. Sweeney had been with ASRC for nearly 15 years, most recently as the executive vice president of external affairs. She will transition into her new position as AS-IA in early August.

Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO. “We are all so proud of her, and look forward to her tenacity and fearless leadership while serving those in Indian Country.” Sweeney will oversee the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as well as the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), among other offices.

Sweeney now holds the first and only presidential nomination and U.S. Senate-confirmed position for any Alaska Native woman in state history. President Trump made the original nomination announcement in midOctober of last year. “This has been a long and exhaustive process, but we always knew Tara was up for the challenge,” said Rex A. Uqalugaaŋich

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ASRC documentary wins Emmy Award “TRUE NORTH” CHRONICLES HUMBLE BEGINNINGS AND DYNAMIC GROWTH OF THE CORPORATION”

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is pleased to have won an Emmy Award from the Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for its long-format documentary “True North, the Story of ASRC.” The 55th annual award ceremony was held June 9, 2018 in Seattle, Washington. The Corporation was also nominated for an Emmy for a series of television commercials, which aired throughout the state in 2017.

“In the fewer than 50 years since our incorporation, ASRC has grown into the largest locally-owned and operated business in Alaska, and that was no accident,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., ASRC president and CEO. “This production really highlights the decision-making process from our early leaders, based on their Iñupiaq values, that led to our success and I’m honored the documentary is being so well received. I’d also like to thank everyone who had a hand in putting this unique project together.” “True North, the Story of ASRC” shares the story of the company’s early leaders – the people of Alaska’s North Slope – from their fight for land before statehood and the signing of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to the present-day strategic planning process to create additional opportunities for the corporation’s expanding pool of shareholder owners.

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The documentary took more than two years to complete, utilizing archival video as well as new highresolution footage from every community on Alaska’s North Slope. It was re-shown statewide on KTUU Channel 2 as well as in the Interior on KTVF, KXDF and the Alaska Rural Communications Service (ARCS) on the evening of July 1. If you missed the broadcast, you can watch “True North” on www.asrc.com or find a link on the ASRC Facebook page.


RSI EnTech surpasses nine years without a lost time work injury

On May 6, RSI EnTech – the environmental technical services contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio – achieved a safety milestone, going nine years without a lost time work injury. The safe period encompassed 3,294 days and more than 1.1 million hours. “This kind of achievement does not happen by accident, it occurs only with a strong safety culture with employees who are cognizant of their environments,” said Greg Wilkett, RSI EnTech’s program director at the Portsmouth site. “Our work starts with safety and we

want to make sure people go home to their families the same way they came to work.” RSI EnTech President Paul Clay, Business Manager Barry Smith, and Operations Manager Steve Selecman were at the Portsmouth site on May 16 to commemorate the accomplishment with an employee appreciation event. “Safety is not just about looking out for yourself, but also about looking out for co-workers,” said Wilkett, who manages about 60 employees on the Portsmouth project. “This is a team focus and we are extraordinarily proud of this achievement.”

RSI EnTech employees recently celebrated a safety milestone, going nine years without a lost time work injury.

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AES-HCC plays key role in oil and gas development expansions ASRC Energy Services’ Houston Contracting Company (HCC) is playing a big role in two key projects to expand oil and gas production in Alaska. HCC is providing pipeline construction services to ConocoPhillips’ Greater Mooses Tooth 1 (GMT1) project. GMT1 is the phase Conoco is currently expanding and developing. HCC is also building the oil and gas pipelines in Cook Inlet between Granite Point Tank Farm to Kaloa and the Tyonek Platform to BPL Junction. Conoco Phillips GMT1 HCC began the pre-planning process for the GMT1 Pipe and Fiber Project in the fall of 2016. This project consisted of constructing four above ground pipelines of different sizes on vertical support members during winter construction, with hydro-testing in the summer. Twelve miles of 14-inch water injection and two miles of 20-inch produced oil line were constructed in 2017. In 2018, 8.6 miles each of 6-inch gas injection and 8-inch miscible injection, and 6.6 miles each of 14-inch water injection and 20-inch produced oil pipelines were constructed. This project also consisted of installing 8.9 miles of power, fiber and messenger cable from CD5 to GMT1.

Additionally, 7.7 miles of gravel road and more than 11 acres of gravel pad and two bridges were built by others in support of the GMT1 infrastructure. Pipeline construction will be complete in August, with first oil planned for late 2018. At its peak, GMT1 is expected to produce 30,000 barrels of oil per day. ConocoPhillips estimates the total development cost for GMT1 will be approximately $900 million. GMT1 is located in the National Petroleum ReserveAlaska (NPR-A) and will be an Alpine satellite connected by road to the CD5 development. GMT1 will initially be a nine well pad with capacity for up to 33 wells, and the oil will be processed through the existing Alpine facilities.

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Harvest Alaska Cross-Inlet Expansion Harvest Alaska (Harvest) is currently working on its Cross-Inlet Expansion Project, a $75 million project that will allow producers to ship oil via pipeline across Cook Inlet. Harvest, Hilcorp Alaska’s midstream


subsidiary, is expanding the inlet’s pipeline network and ultimately piping oil from their west inlet facilities to the Andeavor refinery in Nikiski. The project includes constructing new subsea and onshore pipelines as well as repurposing a cross-inlet gas pipeline into an oil line to feed the refinery at Nikiski.

Expansion Project will bring a higher level of safety and reliability for shipping oil across Cook Inlet. We think it’s the right thing to do,” Harvest President Sean Kolassa said in a company release.

HCC is constructing the new 10-inch oil pipeline from Granite Point Tank Farm to Kaloa, which is 3.3 miles. Construction includes trenching and burial of the new pipeline four feet below grade to/from above ground terminus flanges. HCC is also constructing the new 10-inch gas pipeline from the Tyonek Platform to BPL Junction, which is 1.4 miles onshore and 5.5 miles offshore. Construction began in the fall of 2017 and should be completed in August of this year. “The Cross-Inlet

How Common is Smoking?

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Smoking among Alaska Native adults hasn’t changed much over the years

%

of Alaska native adults are smokers according to the 2010 North Slope Census.

1in 3 Almost half of the Alaska Native mothers report smoking during pregnancy

Alaska Native teens in the North Slope Region are smokers

If you or someone you know is in need of support, do not hesitate to contact one of the following resources:

PreventionCrew

North Slope Borough Hotline: 1-800-478-0267 North Slope Borough Behavioral Health Center: 907-852-0366 North Slope Borough Prevention Program: 907-855-8501

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New round of ASRC television commercials in the works for 2018 CAMPAIGN CONTINUES TO HIGHLIGHT EACH NORTH SLOPE COMMUNITY In late-June, ASRC’s external affairs team visited three more communities along the North Slope – and taped footage for the next round of the Corporation’s television commercials. They also captured still images to be used in various print advertisements and other materials. This campaign won an Emmy in 2015 and was nominated for another two years later. Since its start, the advertising campaign has focused on each community in ASRC’s region, to include Point Hope, Point Lay, Wainwright, Atqasuk and Utqiaġvik. In 2018, the campaign will highlight Casey (Catherine) Edwards and the community of Anaktuvuk Pass, Fenton Rexford and his hometown of Kaktovik, as well as Archie Ahkiviana and the community of Nuiqsut. External affairs would like to thank each of the individuals who are featured in the new commercials for their generous time and involvement.

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Look for the ads to be broadcast statewide later this summer and fall, as well as posted to ASRC’s various social media sites.


AES awarded ASTAR project contract AES Alaska has been selected by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR) as prime contractor for the Arctic Strategic Transportation and Resources project (ASTAR). The purpose of ASTAR is to identify, evaluate and advance opportunities to enhance the quality of life and economic opportunities in North Slope communities through responsible infrastructure development. In partnership with the North Slope Borough and in collaboration with area communities and other key stakeholders, ASTAR seeks to advance community infrastructure and regional connectivity projects that offer the greatest benefits to the region. These benefits could include lower cost of energy, basic goods, utilities and other services; improved infrastructure to support community stability and improve public safety; and enhanced access to create opportunities to strengthen cultural exchange and community connectivity. Among the 23 proposals submitted, AES was ranked first in each of the four categories that encompass the scope

of work: (1) Overall Project Management, (2) GIS Data Integration and Analysis, (3) Stakeholder Outreach and Coordination, and (4) Economic/Socioeconomic Analysis. AES’s contract has a base term of 1 ½ years with a 1-year renewal option. The work effort will be led by AES’s Regulatory and Technical Services division with support from a team of selected subcontractors. The State of Alaska has appropriated $7.3 Million to DNR to fund this important work. One interesting component of the work involves developing detailed terrain unit maps of the National Petroleum Reserve – Alaska. This geologic mapping is being performed by AES and subcontractor 3rd Rock Consulting, and represents a significant increase in the level of detail available in prior public maps of the area. The maps delineate and characterize surficial soil units, identify potential geohazards, and also identify potential areas that could provide sand and gravel resources for infrastructure development.

2018 Unified Basketball Tournament In late-April, Special Olympics Alaska hosted the second Unified 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament and clinic in Anchorage. ASRC was a sponsor of the events. In total, six high schools competed – Barrow, Bethel, East, Service, Point Hope and West. Attending from Barrow High School were students Calvin Miller, Rebecca Gerke, Jordan Piti, James Tuckfield, Dalton Kippi, Kyle Tefft, Keora Wilkie and Sophia Enlow. The coach for the team was athletic director, Jeremy Goodwin. Attending from Point Hope were students Shaylinda Hunnicutt, Brianna Nashookpuk and Molly Oktollik. The coach for the team was athletic director, Ramona Rock. The championship game was a hard fought battle between Service High School and Barrow High School, with Barrow pulling out the win. Point Hope took home third place.

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Point Hope and Barrow High School with UAA Women’s Basketball team.

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ASRC announces new acquisition HUDSPETH & ASSOCIATES IS THE NEWEST ASRC INDUSTRIAL SERVICES COMPANY

Arctic Slope Regional Corporation is pleased to announce the acquisition of Hudspeth & Associates (Hudspeth) by our wholly-owned subsidiary ASRC Industrial Services, LLC (AIS). Headquartered in Englewood, Colorado, with a satellite office in Rifle, Colorado, Hudspeth provides environmental remediation, demolition, dismantlement and civil site services throughout the Rocky Mountain region. Hudspeth serves a diverse customer portfolio made up of industrial and commercial enterprises, state and local governments, as well as federal agencies. Since the company’s founding in 1998, Hudspeth has differentiated itself from competitors via its relentless focus on safety, and willingness to partner with customers to overcome complex challenges with unique, innovative solutions. Hudspeth becomes the second member of AIS’s Remediation and Response Services (RRS) operating group, following the February 2018 acquisition of Mavo Systems.

“The late-June announcement of the acquisition of Hudspeth is another exciting day in the pursuit of the AIS strategy that ASRC initiated in September 2016,” said Rex A. Rock Sr., president and CEO of ASRC. “On behalf of ASRC’s board of directors, I am pleased to welcome the management team and talented employees of Hudspeth to the ASRC family of companies. I am confident the addition of Hudspeth to the AIS platform will contribute to delivering durable, enduring benefits to ASRC shareholders.” “The addition of Hudspeth to AIS’s RRS operating group is a reflection of ASRC’s relentless pursuit of the AIS vision to build an enduring, customer-centric, valueadded service provider focused on the industrial market complex,” said Greg Johnson, president and CEO of AIS. “I look forward to working with the team at Hudspeth to build on the company’s well-earned reputation as a value-added service provider, and in the process, bring additional services to existing and new customers while also providing additional development opportunities for the talented workforce of the company.” “When I decided it was time to turn Hudspeth over to a new owner, my biggest concerns were the impact on Hudspeth’s employees and customers,” added Rob Levitt, president of Hudspeth. “After getting to know the AIS team and learning about ASRC’s commitment to the industrial services market, I quickly recognized AIS was the right long-term home for Hudspeth.”

ASRC shareholders and employees receive discounts at ASRC subsidiary Builders Choice (BCI). BCI has in-stock availability on lumber, sheetrock and hundreds of other building materials. For more information, visit builders www.builderschoice.us.com or call 907.522.3214.

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Shareholder spotlight DONN A HILL Business Analyst Associate, AFHC Business Development

During the month of March, in celebration of National Women’s History Month, ASRC Federal met with female leaders from around the organization to learn from their experience working with the company. One of those leaders was ASRC shareholder employee Donna Hill, who works as a business analyst associate for ASRC Federal’s business development team. For two summers and a school year while attending college, Donna participated in the ASRC Federal Shareholder Internship Program. After graduating in 2016 from the University of Alaska Fairbanks with a bachelor of business administration degree with a concentration in finance, she was offered a full-time position with the business development team. She is originally from Trapper Creek, Alaska but now lives and works in Colorado Springs, Colorado. We sat down with her to talk about her experience working with ASRC Federal.

I also ensure the data that I am pulling is correct, and that requires a bit of data entry. My role also includes aiding in looking at our financials and seeing how those correlate to our strategic plan.  With the growth of ASRC Federal my role within the company has grown as well, with more responsibilities and tasks. 

How long have you worked for ASRC Federal?

In what ways do you think ASRC Federal is succeeding at being a place for young women to progress their careers?

I’ve worked for ASRC Federal, in the Colorado Springs, CO office for the past two years. I started interning about four years ago, then when I graduated from college I became a full-time employee.

How did you hear of career opportunities at ASRC Federal? I first learned of ASRC Federal and its career opportunities through emails and participation in the Shareholder Internship Program. The internship program is an amazing opportunity for young shareholders in college that should not be passed up.

What is your role at ASRC Federal? As a business analyst for the business development team my day-to-day can vary. The regular tasks include keeping track of the budget for my operating group, as well as building and running reports for various uses. 

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What is your favorite thing about working at ASRC Federal? My favorite thing is the employees. They are all welcoming and nice and I can turn to anyone for help.

How do you see ASRC Federal including women in the workplace? The majority of our employees, at least here in the Colorado Springs office, are women. We have women in higher positions and in all positions.

What I really like is that this company doesn’t really look at your gender, but at your qualifications and how well you perform at your job. If you do well you will move up. No matter your gender you can succeed in this company.

What is one piece of advice you would give your younger self? I would have to say, to not to be afraid of asking questions. When I first started, I was very shy and a little afraid to talk to people. Soon I realized that when I was able to get answers to my questions I could move on to my next task and became much more efficient. As I’ve moved through the company I’ve come to notice and appreciate how nice and helpful everyone really is.

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2018 ASRC Annual Meeting After a delay of nearly a week due to unstable weather on the North Slope, ASRC’s annual meeting of shareholders was held at the Harold Kaveolook School in Kaktovik on June 14.

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The following individuals were elected to the ASRC board of directors seats, as indicated: Avaiyak Burnell

Lillian Stone

Julius M. Rexford

Utqiaġvik (Barrow) Seat 1, three-year term: 493,846 votes

Anaktuvuk Pass Seat 2, three-year term: 189,648 votes

Point Lay Seat 3, three-year term: 175,146 votes

Paul S. Bodfish, Sr

Patsy Ann Aamodt

Atqasuk Seat 4, three-year term: 189,648 votes

At-Large Seat 5, three-year term:   607,180 votes

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PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Anchorage, AK Permit #537

P.O. Box 129 Utqiaġvik, Alaska 99723 A S RC .CO M

ASRC Elder and shareholder rates SUMMER R ATE S: SHAREHOLDER RATE: $192.82 + 5% tax | NON-SHAREHOLDER RATE: $310.19 + 5% tax

• Upgrade to deluxe room is possible based on availability • Rate may be discounted depending on number of nights booked • Must present shareholder card and ID to receive discounted rate All rates and upgrades are based on availability at the time of booking.

ASRC shareholders must show their shareholder ID card on their first visit and stay at the Top of the World Hotel. The shareholder’s ID card will be entered into the hotel database, and the next time the shareholder stays at the hotel, the front desk clerks will be notified that they are ASRC shareholders and will qualify for the lower hotel rate.

For more information please contact the hotel at 907.852.3900 or by email at twh@tundratoursinc.com.

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