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THE HIM


CONTENTS 1. The Education 2. Shadowplay 3. The White Shirt 4. Aerial Horizon 5. Beneath The Bridge 6. Interview: Michael Vo 7. Abstraction 8. Vivienne Sun Collection 9. Interview: Paul Carrigan 10. Concrete Son 11. White Space 12. Vehement Silhouettes 13. Interview: Chapter


THE WHITE SHIRT THE GRANDAD COLLAR


THE COLLAR PIN


THE WING COLLAR


THE CLASSIC COLLAR


MICHAEL VO

An illustrator from California, United States of America.

Tell us what prompted you to begin illustrating? I was 12 years old when I watched Yves Saint Laurent A/W 2008 RTW. Immediately I was captivated by the silhouettes Stefano Pilati created. The show was so futuristic, the construction and proportions were astounding. I began sketching looks I adored from the show and that’s when I immersed myself into fashion sketching, which then lead to illustrating. I wanted to recreate the same thing on paper with my own aesthetic; though the illustrations weren’t as marvelous as they are today.

-How parallel do you find the architecture and fashion industry? It seems like architecture lays the foundation for the construction of the fashion industry. It is forced within the design process in order for the garment to hold its position and not fall apart during presentation. Construction is always the key for an appealing garment and show.

-Is there ever a Brutalist influence in your work? -What designers illustrating?

do

you

gravitate

toward

I’m always drawn towards designers that display garments with different shapes; a collection that creates a reaction. It certainly makes it more alluring and breaks the boundaries of typical silhouettes.

-Would you say architecture influences the silhouette of your work? Architecture builds the foundation for my other work. I always found these man-made lines of buildings captivating - the way they interact with one another and the environment.

Brutalism has always influenced my work. There’s something so ugly and fascinating about these blocky geometric structures stuck onto a free-flowing, natural landscape; almost like a cyborg. I imagine extraterrestrials assembled these strange, futuristic formations and as a sci-fi fanatic, I’m constantly incorporating it into my work.

-Aesthetically, what is most important for you to achieve? I want to achieve something that you can question and formulate a story, using clues within the illustration. I think it’s important to explore, before making a swift conclusion, with the stories you formulated to generate a finalized conclusion.


-What aspirations do you have for your illustrations? My illustrations are for my own enjoyment and others to enjoy. I hope I inspire others to illustrate because I love seeing different things from different people and how they develop a signature within their style, which is always inspiring.

“Brutalism has always influenced my work. There’s something so ugly and fascinating about these blocky geometric structures stuck onto a free-flowing, natural landscape; almost like a cyborg”


PAUL CARRIGAN A model from Glasgow, Scotland.

-Who has been your favourite designer to walk for?

- What do you consider your niche in the industry?

KTZ, not only are they a massive designer, but the buzz back stage was incredible. The group of designers are all really down to earth and I enjoyed spending time with them, even though before show-time they were very stressed.

That would have to be high fashion. After signing with Storm, we had a meeting about what is expected from me and what I should expect from them. In this discussion, brands like Dior and Prada were used to focus our efforts on growing me into the best male model I can be.

-Tell us how you felt the moment you were announced the new face of Stone Island? The new face of Stone Island! It’s pretty massive for me, considering my career 5 months ago. It’s an international campaign so the billboards will be everywhere and I will be on posters in most department stores. It is still quite surreal.

-Did you find the jump from modeling in Scotland to signing with Storm in London a challenge? It is a big step. I am now signed with the biggest agency in London, in one of the biggest fashion capitals in the world, alongside Paris, Milan, and New York. It’s a challenge everyday. I know this though. I had to sacrifice a lot coming down here, however the depth of this is now being mirrored in my successes.

-Which designer is your ultimate goal to work for? Since shooting an exclusive editorial for them Dior would be my dream designer to work for. Dior Homme would the icing on the cake for me. Having massive British names as previous campaign stars, Jude Law and Robert Patterson, I don’t see why not me.

-Would you say the industry lives up to typical stereotypes? No. The industry doesn’t play up to the stereotypes set upon it by journalists and wanabees.


Photograph by George Naylor


CONCRETE SON


WHITE SPACE


CHAPTER Devin Carlson - Creative Director of Chapter, California.

-Where does the Concept for Chapter originate from? Chapter is symbolic of the individual man’s personal progression, broken down into chapters that evolve in aesthetic, personality and voice.

The AW14 look book is fantastic, can you explain the message behind the title “Moral Form”? The message comes from the architectural movement of Brutalism and Metabolism, the idea that we appreciate most about these disciplines is the concept of honest design “Moral Form”. This inspired the collection by having the functional details in the garments stand out and occasionally be the main focus of the garment.

- What draws you to using landscape backgrounds for the Join Chapter lookbooks? The vast, sheer proportion of landscape and the interaction of man-made objects with nature.

- There is a lot of references to concrete within the lookbooks and associated imagery, what about concrete do you find inspirational? I really like the porous texture and the way in which concrete ages - it is extremely functional. This was an inspiration in selecting fabrics for AW14.

- Stereotypical California contrasts a lot with the dark Chapter image, do you think California influences the aesthetic of the brand at all? I love Los Angeles, but I don’t think it particularly influences me in one way or another. I do a lot of traveling so I am always taking in everything I see.


“The message comes form the architectural movement of Brutalism and Metabolism, the idea that we appreciate most about these disciplines is the concept of honest design “Moral Form.”

DEVIN CARLSON



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