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INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

SMART IDEA: AN EFFICIENT MOUNTAIN CABIN SPECIAL: VENICE BIENNALE OF ARCHITECTURE 2010 TRÈS CHIC: FASHION’S INFLUENCE ON HOME

WINTER 2011 | CANADIAN EDITION

BIG IDEAS

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BIG SPACES: OUTSIZED SPLENDOUR IN QUEBEC, COLORADO, AND LIMA, PERU BIG PLANS: ‘WE’RE BUILDING OUR DREAM HOUSE’ [ PART 1 IN A SERIES ] BIG STYLE: CALVIN KLEIN DESIGNER’S NYC CONDO

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Inside Front Cover – Left Hand Page LOWE ROCHE

260 Queen Street West, suite 301, Toronto, Ontario M5V 1Z8 416 927 9794

Client: Audi

File Name: AUDI-1587-F-IFC-LHP_IAD

Business Manager: Janet W.

Creative Team: Sean/Rob

Page: 1

Production Contact: Beth Mackinnon, Ext. 254

Publication(s)/Description: International Architecture & Design – Inside Front Cover – Left Hand Page (DPS) Ad #: AUDI-1587-F-IFC-LHP

Final Trim/Ad Size: 18"W x 10.875"H

Visible Opening: N/A Colours:

Cyan

Magenta

File Scale: N/A Yellow

Black

Production Artist(s): DS

First Ins. Date: Dec. 6, 2010

Bleed: 18.25"W x 11.125"H Live/Safety: 8.5"W x 10.375"H Gutter: 0.25"


is for the world’s first*

LED Headlights An indisputable moment in history. An unmistakable presence on the road. The Audi A8’s full-LED headlights produce incredibly bright light with unmatched efficiency. In fact, each full unit draws only as much power as a standard 40-watt light bulb. What’s more, they produce a colour temperature that closely resembles daylight, making driving at night much easier on the eyes.

The all-new Audi A8

audi.ca ©2010 Audi Canada. *Audi A8 is the first vehicle to feature full-LED headlights. “Audi”, ”A8”, “Vorsprung durch Technik”, and the four rings emblem are registered trademarks of AUDI AG. To find out more about Audi, see your dealer, call us at 1-800-FOR-AUDI, or visit us at www.audi.ca.

Inside Front Cover – Right Hand Page LOWE ROCHE

260 Queen Street West, suite 301, Toronto, Ontario M5V 1Z8 416 927 9794

Client: Audi

File Name: AUDI-1587-F-IFC-RHP_IAD

Business Manager: Janet W.

Creative Team: Sean/Rob

Page: 1

Production Artist(s): DS

Production Contact: Beth Mackinnon, Ext. 254

Publication(s)/Description: International Architecture & Design – Inside Front Cover – Right Hand Page (DPS) First Ins. Date: Dec. 6, 2010 Ad #: AUDI-1587-F-IFC-RHP

Final Trim/Ad Size: 18"W x 10.875"H

Visible Opening: N/A Colours:

Cyan

Magenta

File Scale: N/A Yellow

Black

Bleed: 18.25"W x 11.125"H Live/Safety: 8.5"W x 10.375"H Gutter: 0.25"


1st Ad Spread – Left Hand Page LOWE ROCHE

260 Queen Street West, suite 301, Toronto, Ontario M5V 1Z8 416 927 9794

Client: Audi

File Name: AUDI-1579-D-01-LHP_IAD

Business Manager: Janet W.

Creative Team: Sean/Rob

Page: 1

Production Contact: Beth Mackinnon, Ext. 254

Publication(s)/Description: International Architecture & Design – 1st Ad Spread – Left Hand Page (DPS) Ad #: AUDI-1579-D-01-LHP

Final Trim/Ad Size: 18"W x 10.875"H

Visible Opening: N/A Colours:

Cyan

Magenta

File Scale: N/A Yellow

Black

Production Artist(s): DS

First Ins. Date: Dec. 6, 2010

Bleed: 18.25"W x 11.125"H Live/Safety: 8.5"W x 10.375"H Gutter: 0.25"


is for the world’s first*

Touchpad Control The sleek black touchpad with sophisticated character recognition automatically recognizes your handwriting based on millions of character samples from around the world. Enter a phone number by writing the numbers or search for a location by writing out the name of the destination. It’s a system so intuitive, it allows you to easily input data without even looking.

The all-new Audi A8

audi.ca ©2010 Audi Canada. *MMI Touch control is the first to be utilized in a vehicle. Do not operate the touchpad while driving. “Audi”, “A8”, “Vorsprung durch Technik”, and the four rings emblem are registered trademarks of AUDI AG. To find out more about Audi, see your dealer, call us at 1-800-FOR-AUDI, or visit us at www.audi.ca.

1st Ad Spread – Right Hand Page LOWE ROCHE

260 Queen Street West, suite 301, Toronto, Ontario M5V 1Z8 416 927 9794

Client: Audi

File Name: AUDI-1579-D-01-RHP_IAD

Business Manager: Janet W.

Creative Team: Sean/Rob

Page: 1

Production Contact: Beth Mackinnon, Ext. 254

Publication(s)/Description: International Architecture & Design (DPS) – 1st Ad Spread – Right Hand Page Ad #: AUDI-1579-D-01-RHP

Final Trim/Ad Size: 18"W x 10.875"H

Visible Opening: N/A Colours:

Cyan

Magenta

File Scale: N/A Yellow

Black

Production Artist(s): DS

First Ins. Date: Dec. 6, 2010)

Bleed: 18.25"W x 11.125"H Live/Safety: 8.5"W x 10.375"H Gutter: 0.25"


2nd Ad Spread – Left Hand Page LOWE ROCHE

260 Queen Street West, suite 301, Toronto, Ontario M5V 1Z8 416 927 9794

Client: Audi

File Name: AUDI-1581-D-02-LHP_IAD

Business Manager: Janet W.

Creative Team: Sean/Rob

Page: 1

Production Contact: Beth Mackinnon, Ext. 254

Publication(s)/Description: International Architecture & Design – 2nd Ad Spread – Left Hand Page (DPS) Ad #: AUDI-1581-D-02-LHP

Final Trim/Ad Size: 18"W x 10.875"H

Visible Opening: N/A Colours:

Cyan

Magenta

File Scale: N/A Yellow

Black

Production Artist(s): DS

First Ins. Date: Dec. 6, 2010

Bleed: 18.25"W x 11.125"H Live/Safety: 8.5"W x 10.375"H Gutter: 0.25"


is for the unique ultra-light

Aluminum Space Frame Beneath the sculpted exterior of the Audi A8 lies an incredibly advanced body structure: the Audi Space Frame. Made from high-strength aluminum, it is substantially lighter than steel, yet more rigid. Body panels welded onto the frame make it stronger still. As a result, fuel consumption, handling and performance are all drastically improved.

The all-new Audi A8

audi.ca ©2010 Audi Canada. “Audi”, “A8”, “Vorsprung durch Technik”, and the four rings emblem are registered trademarks of AUDI AG. To find out more about Audi, see your dealer, call us at 1-800-FOR-AUDI, or visit us at www.audi.ca.

2nd Ad Spread – Right Hand Page LOWE ROCHE

260 Queen Street West, suite 301, Toronto, Ontario M5V 1Z8 416 927 9794

Client: Audi

File Name: AUDI-1581-D-02-RHP_IAD

Business Manager: Janet W.

Creative Team: Sean/Rob

Page: 1

Production Contact: Beth Mackinnon, Ext. 254

Publication(s)/Description: International Architecture & Design – 2nd Ad Spread – Right Hand Page (DPS) Ad #: AUDI-1581-D-02-RHP

Final Trim/Ad Size: 18"W x 10.875"H

Visible Opening: N/A Colours:

Cyan

Magenta

File Scale: N/A Yellow

Black

Production Artist(s): DS

First Ins. Date: Dec. 6, 2010

Bleed: 18.25"W x 11.125"H Live/Safety: 8.5"W x 10.375"H Gutter: 0.25"




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CONTENTS

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN WINTER 2011 IN EVERY ISSUE 14 | F RO M TH E E D ITO R

A tale of two ideas 17 | D E S I G N P H I LE

What’s new: Books about art and architecture; this winter’s gallery exhibitions; two home collections from fashion designers; and three current looks in fabrics. Plus, a survey of the great designs of the past 150 years and an appreciation of artist Doris McCarthy at 100.

FEATURES 3 6 | F RO M TH E G RO U N D U P

58 52

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Dream Building Last spring, a couple in Saint John, N.B., purchased a rugged property with a view of the Bay of Fundy. Now, they’re building a house on it—and IA&D is reporting on their progress. Part 1: The Site By Suzanne Robicheau 4 0 | CO M M E N T

Imagine... An examination of the Big Issues was offered up in the 2010 Venice Biennale of Architecture. Ultimately, it was about what architects do best: the imagining of a better world. By John Bentley Mays

34 22

44 | ARCHITECTURE

Natural Wonder Minimalism, in all its quiet drama, is the perfect, harmonious response to the splendour of living in the foothills of Mont Saint-Hilaire. By Lisa Fitterman 52 | P H OTO E S SAY

All the Right Angles A modern jigsaw of glass and concrete, boxes and cut-outs forms a clifftop home from which to commune with the sea. By Dali Castro

COVER PHOTOGRAPH UNDINE PRÖHL 10

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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White high-tech ceramic watch. Self-winding mechanical movement. 42-hour power reserve. CHANEL BOUTIQUES AND FINE JEWELLERS • CHANEL.CA

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TITRE : MONTRE J-12 BLANCHE N° D’ANNONCE : CHS-VAR-M-13344-10-A PUBLICATION : INT ARCH. & DESIGN

FORMAT : 9” X 10.875” DATE D’INSERTION : NOVEMBRE

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CONTENTS

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN WINTER 2011 5 8 | I N TE R I O R D E S I G N

Master Class Calvin Klein designer Francisco Costa’s New York home is a heady lesson in marrying traditional and modern design. By Deborah Fulsang 70 | A R C H I T E C T U R E

Not Thinking Straight In 1963, architect Charles Deaton began his dream job building a spectacular modern family getaway. Now a design-architect team—his daughter and her husband—have completed the task. By Alex Bozikovic 80 | ARCHITECTURE

Take Shelter A unique mountain cabin packs plenty of living space into its small footprint and then packs up easily when its owner heads back to city life.

36 106

80 10 2 | F LOO R P L A N S

A closer look at the houses in this issue

44

10 4 | I N D E X

Where to find the architects, designers, products, and manufacturers in this issue 10 6 | G R AC E N OTE

Glass House on the Rocks

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12

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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FROM THE EDITOR

A tale of two big ideas

Robert Moore and Judith Mackin are standing on the site of the dream home they plan to build in downtown Saint John, N.B. The view from their future home: the Bay of Fundy.

14

The house remained semi-built, semi-used, for over 30 years. He died more than a decade ago, but his idea, it turns out, is alive and well. His daughter, Charlee Deaton, an interior designer, and her husband, Nicholas Antonopoulos, an architect, finished a few years ago what Deaton had started. You can see the breathtaking result in “Not Thinking Straight,” on page 70. The excitement of a new idea can also be contagious. That’s why, when International Architecture & Design writer Suzanne Robicheau told us about the new house that Saint John architects Monica Adair and Stephen Kopp were designing for their clients, we decided to show up with a camera. Not to photograph the house (it isn’t built yet), but to capture, essentially, the birth and then the growth, of an idea – from enthusiastic people talking around the table in an architect’s office, to the starry-eyed contemplation of the soggy ground (it was November) where the house was

to be built. Then there was the sobering scrutiny of dream-filled blueprints to be reorganized and redrawn after the always sobering review of the numbers on a budget printout. In this winter issue of IA&D, you’ll be privy to the game plan – the first steps on the path to building a dream house. We plan to keep you posted on the progress of the project over the months, to see where this Big Idea takes them, and to find out what insights can be gleaned from the inevitable bumps along the way. There are, after all, a lot of houses out there. It would have been easier for our friends in New Brunswick to just find themselves a good real estate agent. Too late, though; a potentially great idea seems to have them in its grip. Carolyn Kennedy Editor

BRUCE MACNEIL

T

he great thing about the Big Idea is that it could be a success even if it doesn’t work out the way you’d planned it. Given a little space and air, ideas— original, smart, even half-baked ones—tend to take on independent life. They may grow in ways unforeseen. They move off in unexpected directions. They sometimes beget other ideas. When an idea seems too out-there to be credible, some people tear ahead on it anyway. Maybe they can’t help themselves. Surely someone told architect Charles Deaton, back in the ’60s, that his dream house was, well, an unnecessary idea. It was large and expensive, and strange-looking, and it addressed issues that he saw but that most people had never even considered. Deaton forged ahead, though (it was the ’60s), took on what turned out to be more than he could handle – and never finished it.

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INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN WINTER 2011, NO. 10 EDITOR Carolyn Kennedy ART DIRECTION Jacques Pilon Design Communications EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kelvin Browne CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Dali Castro, Joy Ferguson, Deborah Aldcorn, Geri Savits-Fine CONTRIBUTORS Alex Bozikovic, Dali Castro, Shawna Cohen, Kathleen Dore, Lisa Fitterman, Deborah Fulsang, Colin Howes, Jean-Franรงois Jaussaud, Bruce MacNeil, John Bentley Mays, Steve Montpetit, Undine Prรถhl, Suzanne Robicheau, Leslie Young EDITORIAL INTERN Lili Milborne +D]HOWRQ/DQHV6KRSSLQJ&HQWUH $YHQXH5RDG 7RURQWR 

PUBLICATION DIRECTOR Geoffrey Dawe PUBLISHER Eithne McCredie ADVERTISING

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ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, ADVERTISING Donna Murphy donna@iadmagazine.com 647-519-8919 MONTREAL ACCOUNT MANAGER Danielle Adam 819-425-8859 U.S.A. ADVERTISING SALES Nicola Clayton nicola@luxurymediasales.com 212-619-6009 PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Maria Musikka DIGITAL PRE-PRESS Fiona Allison, Clarity Colour PRINTING Dollco Printing International Architecture & Design Magazine is published by GLP, 33 Euclid Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6J 2J7 Telephone 416-504-5282 Fax 416-361-9244 International Architecture & Design and International Architecture & Design Magazine are trademarks of GLP. All rights reserved. International Architecture & Design Magazine is published four times a year and is distributed via name and address and through select retail partners. No part of International Architecture & Design Magazine may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior written consent from GLP. For additional information, e-mail mail@iadmagazine.com, call 416-504-5282, or fax 416-361-9244. The views expressed by the contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher, editor, or staff. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to: mail@iadmagazine.com. GLP Inc. does not take responsibility for any unsolicited manuscripts or photography. Printed in Canada. Canada Post publications mail agreement number is 41637012. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: 33 Euclid Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6J 2J7

WINTER 2011 15

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DESIGNPHILE

NEWS GOODS GADGETS PEOPLE PLACES

MILESTONE

ART IN FASHION The 150-year history of a design house offers an illustrated tour of some of the enduring styles of the 19th and 20th centuries. By Leslie Young By the time you mark your 150th birthday, you’ve piled up a lot of memories. At Sanderson, the pioneer English purveyor of wall coverings and fabrics, in-house designers saluted their firm’s 15 decades in business by delving into the past—the company’s voluminous archive of historic textiles, embroideries, prints, and wallpapers. The archive yielded printing blocks with samples that date from the Renaissance and mid-19th-century French and Japanese

DE S IG N S OF TH E TI M E S styles to the Arts and Crafts movement, along with ’50s Festival and Pop prints. Using modern printing techniques to enhance Sanderson’s classic patterns, the designers then produced a celebratory collection—nine printed fabrics, two embroideries, and nine wallpapers. Innovation plays a major role in Sanderson’s success. As well, the longevity of the firm—which was granted the royal warrant in 1924 and continues to supply design services to the Queen and the British royal palaces—can be attributed to its ability to deliver products across the spectrum of the interior decor market. Through its Sanderson Options books, the design house was the first to introduce coordinated fabrics and wallpaper, presenting customers with colour and pattern schemes they might not have conceived of on their own. The books tripled its business in the 1980s, yet did not even dent the company’s solid relationship with its luxury-market clientele. Over the years, Sanderson has been able to keep production of all of its fabrics, wallpapers, and bed linens in the U.K., from the initial design concept to the manufacturing process—this through some challenging times that included several changes of ownership, expansions and acquisitions, and a fire that destroyed the firm’s premises and records. Much like its vintage anniversary collection, which offers a fresh take on beloved original patterns, the Sanderson studio proves that good design withstands the test of time.

1860

1879

1882

Arthur Sanderson starts his firm in London as an importer of French wallpaper. Later, he produces his own papers.

Adapting to changing tastes and the increasing demand for wallpaper, Sanderson sets up a factory in Chiswick. The company begins the shift from handprinting to the use of a surface printing machine.

Sanderson’s death leaves his young sons—John, Arthur, and Harold—in charge of the business, now named Arthur Sanderson & Sons, which continues to prosper.

SQUIRREL AND DOVE This elegant Arts and Crafts pattern dates back to the 1890s. Its modern version includes embroidered nesting birds and squirrels.

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DESIGNPHILE

MILESTONE

EARLY TULIPS Released in 1929, the original pattern showed vividly coloured tulip heads in a textural print. The update has toned-down hues with a soft watercolour ambience.

TREE POPPY The 1920s Tree Poppy design featured large poppies intertwined with branches—an Art Deco style considered avant-garde for the era. The pattern has been simplified for the Centenary Collection.

1899

1902–1903

The company joins Wall Paper Manufacturers Ltd., which soon controls 98 percent of wallpaper manufacturing in England.

An extension to the Chiswick factory is designed by C.F.A. Voysey, a renowned Arts and Crafts architect.

ROSLYN Created by famed artist William Turner in 1910, Roslyn is among Sanderson’s most enduring designs. Except for new colours, the original tree motif with tiny flowers on trellises has not been altered for the update.

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First quarter, 20th century Sanderson takes over several highly regarded wallpaper and paint businesses, such as Charles Knowles and Messrs. Casson & Co., and Jeffrey & Co., which printed patterns created by famous 19thcentury designers Walter Crane, Owen Jones, and William Morris. Sanderson continues to compile an archive collection of samples of every fabric it has printed from 1921 to the present time.

1928

1930

A fire at the Chiswick factory destroys part of the premises, including some equipment and records.

The Sanderson factory relocates to a custombuilt, state-of-the-art site in Perivale, U.K., touted in the press as “the finest wallpaper mill in the world.”

PRIMAVERA This striking pattern woven in metallic gold, fuchsia, orange, and cobalt features stylized leaves, fruit, and flowers.

INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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PALLADIO SUNFLOWER The sunflower motif in this circa-1961 design was created with the distinctive etched cross-hatching found in vintage botanical prints.

CONCORD Optical geometrics energizethis 1964 op art-inspired design, updated in current colours such as charcoal with silver.

EGLANTINE In 1957 Sanderson introduced Eglantine, and it captured the romance of roses in a loose painterly style typical of French florals. The original pink and taupe scheme has been reintroduced along with three new colour combinations.

Second World War Expansion is halted; Sanderson’s factories produce war works such as aircraft camouflage and provide silkscreening on Red Cross haversacks.

1960

2000

2003

2010

To celebrate its 100th anniversary, Sanderson expands the Uxbridge factory, rebuilds its contemporary showroom on Berners Street in London, and launches its wallpaper Centenary Collection.

Sanderson of Berners Street is now the Sanderson Hotel, classified as an English heritage building “of more than special interest.”

Three weeks after going into receivership, the company is purchased by Walker Greenbank PLC.

Sanderson—the oldest surviving English brand name in its field—marks its 150th anniversary. —Staff

WEYBRIDGE This linen floral pattern is typical of Sanderson’s 1970s prints, and its rose bouquet design was popular into the 1980s.

SWALLOWS Stylized elegance defined the patterns of the 1930s, and is conveyed in this serene print featuring swallows in flight.

SICILIAN LIONS The pattern of lions in the 1956 print is reminiscent of medieval heraldic motifs. For the update, the collection employs a loose contemporary style.

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A DAY IN THE LIFE

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a meeting time to go over the drawings for the reno. Once the call is over, I’m even able to rewind the last 5 minutes of music to catch the rest of that last song. I’m literally not missing a beat with this new system! The techno side of me appreciates MyLincoln Touch™ technology—but I don’t have to be a tech genius. MyLincoln Touch™ is intuitive, perfect for when I’ve got a lot on my mind.

3:00 p.m. My screen saver is a photo from our Spain trip. The clarity and colour of the shot are incredible on the MKX LCD screen. The blue of the water, the mountain backdrop—it’s like I’m right there. Can we rent the same villa again this year? I make a handsfree call to the agent.

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IF YOU’RE GOING TO BUY A NEW LUXURY CAR, THERE SHOULD BE SOMETHING NEW ABOUT IT.

Introducing the new 2011 Lincoln MKX with MyLincoln Touch™* powered by SYNC.®**If you’ve never seen this combination of technology and luxury before, it’s because it never existed before. Not at this price. Not at any price. Starting from $46,500 MSRP.‡ Learn more at lincolncanada.com

Vehicle may be shown with optional equipment. ‡2011 Lincoln MKX AWD starting from $46,500 MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price). Optional features, freight, AC tax, license, fuel fill charge, insurance, PDI, PPSA, administration fees, any environmental charges or fees and all applicable taxes are extra. Dealer may sell or lease for less. * Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control. Only use mobile phones and other devices, even with voice commands, when it is safe to do so. Certain functions require compatible mobile devices. ** Some mobile phones and some digital media players may not be fully compatible—check www.syncmyride.com for a listing of mobile phones, media players and features supported. Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control, accident and injury. Ford recommends that drivers use caution when using mobile phones, even with voice commands. Only use mobile phones and other devices, even with voice commands, not essential to driving when it is safe to do so. Sync is standard on select new Lincoln vehicles.

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rug; tted cashmere Feathers Top to bottom: Hand-kno bird ing mm Hu on cushion; Black Skulls wool Aubuss and silk). All by Alexander rug (shown in cashmere pany. McQueen for The Rug Com

OFF THE RUNWAY When fashion designers turn their eir energy and spontaneity to home furnishings, the results make a lasting impression. By Shawna Cohen

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN: BOY WONDER Men Mention the name Alexander McQueen to any fashion enth enthusiast and you’re likely to hear about his brilliant architectural designs, iconic skull patterns, towering high-heeled footwear, or provocative runway shows that fuse fashion with technology and theatrics—like the time he had model Shalom Harlow stand on a revolving platform while robots sprayed jets of paint onto her pure white dress. “An artist who happened to work in fashion” is how Christopher Sharp, co-founder and CEO of The Rug Company, describes him. Sharp would know. He collaborated with McQueen on one of the designer’s final projects before his untimely death in February: a six-piece collection of hand-knotted rugs with accompanying cushions designed exclusively for Sharp’s London-based company. Like his ready-to-wear creations that were embraced by trendsetters ranging from Lady Gaga to Kate Moss, McQueen’s home collection has an element of fantasy. His striking hummingbird rug, for instance—the image originated in his spring 2009 collection—appears three-dimensional, as if the jewel-toned birds are ready to fly off into the night sky. The detail, notes Sharp, is “almost photographic.” Another rug, woven from Tibetan wool and silk, incorporates the designer’s

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canon.ca/printinginnovations

Beautiful printers made for beautiful homes. The new Intelligent Touch System re-imagines the way a printer works. This revolutionary system features gorgeous backlit, touch sensitive buttons and light guided direction, which only illuminates the buttons you need to use. Printing, scanning and navigation through menus is easier than youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever imagined. Thanks to the Intelligent Touch System, PIXMA printers are simpler, more intuitive and absolutely stunning. Camera sold separately. Images are simulated. Canon and PIXMA are registered trademarks of Canon Inc.

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DESIGNPHILE

COLLECTIONS

trademark skull pattern—coveted by women around the world, his skull scarves have come to symbolize the McQueen brand—in silver grey juxtaposed against a striking white background. Two tapestry cushions depict the same skulls, one in simple but statement-making black and white, the other in gold metallic thread. It is McQueen’s attention to detail that partially accounts for the collection’s astonishing three-year design and production period. (Collections usually take around six months to turn around.) “McQueen really took his time,” recalls Sharp. “There were periods where he’d send us one design; then we wouldn’t hear from him for a couple of months; then something else would come through.” Even now, with the design process complete, each rug takes between six and eight months to produce—double the normal time—because of the fine knotting involved and, according to Sharp, the scarcity of weavers skilled in this type of intense work. And, much like most popular runway pieces, there’s a waiting list for the rugs. Sharp and his wife, Suzanne, who is co-founder and creative director of The Rug Company, approached McQueen first because they considered him to be “an extraordinary talent.” They had already collaborated with a range of highly regarded fashion designers, including Marni, Diane von Furstenberg, Paul Smith, and Vivienne Westwood. “The criteria is that they need to bring some value to a collection, something new,” explains Sharp. (High on his wish list of future collaborators is menswear designer Tom Ford.) “There are lots of big-name fashion designers who have approached us and we’ve said, ‘Great, show us your idea.’ And we end up telling them, ‘It’s wonderful, but we’ve already got that covered.’ ” In other instances, it can be a more natural—and surprising—match. There was the time, in 2007, that Sharp noticed a package on his desk that contained “absolutely fantastic” rug designs displayed on wooden boards. He assumed they had come from a student at the prestigious Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, until he spotted a note from Hungarian-born ceramic artist Eva Zeisel. “She was 102 years old when she sent them to us!” says Sharp. (Zeisel ultimately launched a collection for The Rug Company in 2009.) For McQueen, the process was long and intense, but the final product illustrates his rare ability to transform simple materials into breathtaking works of art. And, just like his graphic-print gowns and New Age–meets–Victorian accessories, the rugs are guaranteed to inject just the right amount of drama—and beauty—into a room. Designs by Alexander McQueen for The Rug Company are available in Canada exclusively at Avenue Road.

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VIRGINIA JOHNSON: RAW TALENT The merino wool shawls by Toronto textile designer Virginia Johnson are staples among the fashion set. Colourful and bold with nature-inspired prints, they’re equally as chic thrown over a holiday party dress as they are useful for cosying up on the couch with a good book. Her new collection of bedding—duvet covers, quilts, and pillowcases, plus crib sets—offers that same mix of style and comfort, and, with typical Johnson panache, the patterns are breezy and whimsical, featuring leaves, flowers, ducks, even Dalmatian spots. “I live in the city, so I love any bit of nature and greenery that I can have around my home,” says Johnson, who came up with the bedding idea while renovating a house. Johnson began her fashion career as an accessories designer for Helmut Lang—a label known for its stark minimalism—which is surprising, given the vibrant colour palettes in all of her creations, including the bedding collection in sunshine yellow, teal, and light blue. She also illustrated a series of books and stationery for fashion designer Kate Spade. But it’s her eponymous line of clothing and accessories, sold in more than 100 stores worldwide, that reflects her love of nature and the influence of her extensive travels. On a recent trip to Jaipur, for example, her interest was piqued by the ancient Indian technique of block printing, and she has since become an expert, using it to create her bedding line. Patterns are hand-carved into wood blocks, which are then pressed onto cloth laid out on large padded tables. “It gives a much more organic, irregular feel,” she explains. “There’s more texture, more character.” This natural “rawness” is perhaps what makes Johnson’s work, particularly her most recent collection, so appealing. Ironic how something so labour-intensive can look like it was thrown together on a whim. But then again, isn’t that what real style is all about? Virginia Johnson bedding is available at virginiajohnson.com.

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Toronto textile designer Virginia Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new bedding collection features bloc k-printed quilts, duvets, and pillowcases treated to her sign ature bold colours and nature-inspired patterns.

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There are a number of ways to build a performance luxury car. We would like to believe we avoided most of them. Status alone is not our goal. Nor is insulating you from the road. Or engineering bragging rights. At Infiniti, everything we do is built around creating a richer sensory experience. The shapes of our cars are designed to evoke both power and elegance simultaneously. We chose interior materials based on how natural they feel to your sense of touch. Even the distinctive Infiniti exhaust note is tuned to heighten the performance experience. We build our cars this way because our goal is not to just transport you physically, but to move you emotionally. Feel it in the newly redesigned G Sedan. This is inspired performance. This is the way of Infiniti.

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Visit infiniti.ca on your computer or smart phone. 速The INFINITI names, logos, product names, feature names, and slogans are trademarks owned by or licensed to Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., and/or its North American subsidiaries.

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DESIGNPHILE

NEW IN FABRICS

LIVING IN COLOUR It’s easier to add bright colour when you mix it with neutral accents. By Leslie Young Bright colours, which have been used for many seasons as mere accents to warm up neutral spaces, are claiming the limelight. Now it’s about pairing them with muted tones to create unexpected looks that are at once sophisticated and bold. Combinations such as fuchsia and beige or turquoise and grey make an eye-popping statement without overpowering a room. The key is to begin with a neutral base—creamy white walls, for instance, or a simple grey rug—and then introduce more vibrant pieces like floral curtains or a bright-hued sofa in a rich cut-velvet upholstery. Designers Guild Moyka in 01. Through Primavera.

Robert Allen at Home Sunscape in colour Tropic.

Designers Guild Morelli in 01. Through Primavera.

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Above and left: All fabrics from Designers Guild Zephirine Winter 2010 collection. Through Primavera.

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DESIGNPHILE

NEW IN FABRICS

DREAM WEAVES The irregular dyes and patterns in ikat fabrics add spontaneity to a decorating scheme. The distinctive look of ikat—which involves an ancient method of creating patterns by tie-dyeing the yarn before weaving—adds a welcome energy to our homes as well as on the fashion runways. Thanks to a resurgence of this weaving technique, we’re seeing more options than ever before, from dazzling colour combinations to intricate patterns that appear refreshingly raw. A stylish alternative to damask, ikat offers a touch of the exotic to any room, whether on a chair, rug, throw pillow, or lampshade. The multi-hued fabric has been around for centuries, but when viewed on a jewel-toned sofa, it can’t help but appear refreshingly modern and remarkably chic. —L.Y.

Oscar de la Renta Kublai Khan, in Blue/Red or Red/Gold (shown on cushion, left). Through Lee Jofa.

Bermingham Adras Silk ikat in B152. Through Lee Jofa.

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TAKE A SHINE TO IT Subtle sheens and shiny textures create glamour in the everyday.

Pollack Silk Grille in Ice. Through Primavera.

World-renowned artist Robert Kuo, whose work is on display at the National Museum of History in Taipei and at deluxe international hotels, has launched a fabric collection for S. Harris based on his metal and lacquer work. Kuo has managed to capture the shimmer and architectural feel of his art, applying it to a wide range of fabrics, from velvet to linen to silk. His nature-inspired patterns are simple and timeless, yet they add extraordinary interest and texture to any piece, be it drapery or a chair. The discreet lustre brings a touch of formality to an already sophisticated space. Sheen has the rare ability to turn plain fabric into something truly special. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;L.Y.

S. Harris/Robert Kuo fabrics, from left: Pleats I in Cream, Silk Clouds in Breeze, Dragon Swirl in Shale, Silk Clouds in Cream. Through Bilbrough.

Manuel Canovas Ronda in Aqua. Through Primavera. A

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DESIGNPHILE

EXHIBITIONS

THE MUNDANE AND THE MAGNIFICENT Current shows at the galleries offer investigations of life at every level, from the space claimed by the modern kitchen to the lavish lost world of India’s maharajas. Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen (to Mar. 14) Museum of Modern Art, New York

Since the beginning of the 20th century and the birth of the modern kitchen, opinions have differed widely on what a kitchen is. Whether a symbol of status or domestic servitude, a place for experimentation and creation, or a tool for efficiency and simplicity, the kitchen is arguably the most culturally significant area in the modern household. With the presentation of “Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen,” the Museum of Modern Art in New York has created a lively conversation about the evolution of the kitchen since the early 1900s, in the context of

Frankfurt Kitchen, the kitchen and kitchen appliances became a status symbol in the West following the Second World War. When developments in technology and plastic paved the way for more advanced appliances, Cold War America saw the new technology as a celebration of the wealth and plenty afforded by a capitalist society. Today, kitchen innovations tend to be celebrated for their ability to save time in a society in which both spouses work and mealtimes are more rushed. Although a lot of focus is put on the kitchen in a cultural context, the more human experience of the kitchen on everyday life is not ignored. The kitchen is the stage for plenty of family interaction and is associated with strong emotional experiences, both positive and negative. —Colin Howes

19th-Century French Photographs from the National Gallery of Canada (to Mar. 20) Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

This exhibition highlights approximately 80 works by major photographers in France from 1840 to 1900—Édouard Baldus, Maxime du Camp, J. B. Greene, Gustave Left: A reconstruction of the 1926 Frankfurt Kitchen, by Margarete Le Gray, and Nadar—as well as Schütte-Lihotzky, at the MoMa exhibition “Counter Space.” several examples of Eugène Atget’s Above, from top: French Military Manoeuvres, Camp de Châlons: work from the early 20th century. The Guard behind a Breastwork, 3 Oct. 1857, by Gustave Le Gray; Arles: Porte des Châtaignes, 1852, by Charles Nègre. The era’s various photographic National Gallery of Canada techniques and innovations are also featured, including daguerreosocial and political change throughout the 20th types, salted paper prints and albumen silver century. The 1926 Frankfurt Kitchen is showprints, and photogravures. —Lili Milborne cased as a socialist answer to the economic struggles in Germany after the First World War and Everything Everyday was designed by Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky (to Jan. 23) Vancouver Art Gallery with the intention of creating an affordable, effiOnly in the past 50 years—with the emergence cient work area. The design was based on a series of pop culture, found objects, autobiographical of time-motion studies and interviews conducted narrative, and blogs—has quotidian life become by Schütte-Lihotzky to maximize efficiency and a common subject in art. This exhibition is orgareduce the domestic workload on women. In nized around three themes: Everyday Actions, contrast to the socialist roots behind the

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focused on those simple, sometimes mindless tasks we perform regularly; Everyday Objects, which takes ordinary items as art subjects; and Everyday Encounters, which examines the common interactions that occur in daily life. Managing to avoid the banal, the artists offer provocative, poetic interpretations of the mundane—Arabella Campbell, Hadley+Maxwell, LAIWAN, Mona Hatoum, Gathie Falk, Ruth Scheuing, Khan Lee, Euan Macdonald, Aganetha Dyck, Diane Borsato, Gabriel Orozco, James Welling, and others. —Lili Milborne

IN BRIEF At Work: Hesse, Goodwin, Martin (to Jan. 2) Art Gallery of Ontario Three diverse artists are brought together through an exploration of their dedicated and powerful work ethic in studio.

Barb Hunt

Notebook 62, 1972–1976, by Betty Goodwin. Photo: Craig Boyko, Art Gallery of Ontario. © 2010 Gaétan Charbonneau

Arboretum

The Star of India: Rolls-Royce 40/50 HP Phantom II All-Weather Cabriolet Chassis 188PY Engine ZN15. Courtesy of RM Auctions. Photo: Tom Wood

Maharaja: The Splendour of India’s Royal Courts (to Apr. 3) Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto

If Star of India conjures for you visions of Bollywood or perhaps a priceless gemstone, think again. At the lavish spectacle that is the Maharaja exhibit at the AGO, Star of India refers to the legendary Rolls-Royce Phantom II custom-built in 1934 for His Highness Thakore Sahib Dharmendrasinhji Lakhajiraj of Rajkot. There are indeed extravagant jewellery pieces showcased, alongside finely crafted weaponry, among the more than 200 elaborate works that were commissioned for the maharajas of India between the 18th century and the mid-1900s. Of special note is a life-sized statue of a bejewelled elephant, the silver carriage of the Maharaj of Bhavnagar, and the spectacular 1,000-carat necklace of 2,930 diamonds for the Maharaja of Patiala. Also on display is a collection of magnificent paintings, thrones, and tapestries. —Colin Howes

20th-century American photography in this exhibition of 115 photographs compiled from the museum’s collection. It includes Alfred Stieglitz’s famous portraits of Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Steichen’s 1904 coloured photographs of the Flatiron building, and Paul Strand’s pioneering abstract images drawn from New York City street life.

(to Jan. 9) Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax With the loan of Arthur Lismer’s painting Sumach Pattern, Georgian Bay and a companion small study on board from the McMichael Collection, this exhibition allows visitors to further examine the subject for which the Group of Seven is so renowned —one that has come to symbolize what we perceive as the Canadian North.

(Dec. 10, 2010–Feb. 20, 2011) The Rooms, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador Through her textile-based installations, artist Barb Hunt immerses herself in themes of mourning, human conflict, and memory. She uses camouflage fabric in her work as she presents the consequences of war balanced by empathy for individuals, including soldiers.

Perceptions of Promise: Biotechnology, Society and Art (Jan. 4–Mar. 20) Glenbow Museum, Calgary This exhibition offers a fascinating glimpse into a unique collaboration. In response to a workshop that gathered a group of international biomedical scientists and scholars, a wide range of provocative sculptural works and drawings were created by artists who found inspiration in technology and science to further the discourse on complex issues such as stem cell research.

Ken Lum The Artistic Furniture of Charles Rohlfs (to Jan. 23) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Featuring 50 pieces of “artistic furniture” and various objects produced by the workshop of Arts and Crafts artist Charles Rohlfs in Buffalo, N.Y., this scholarly exhibit also reveals new research that shows his success in Europe as well as in America and chronicles his impact on other 20th-century furniture designers.

thelivingeffect (to Jan. 30) The Ottawa Art Gallery Pioneer robotic artist Norman White’s work serves as a point of departure for exploring the essence of life and the ability of robots to connect us to one other and to the carbon-based universe where we live.

Stieglitz, Steichen, Strand (to Apr. 10) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York View the work of three giants of

(Feb. 12–July 3) Vancouver Art Gallery The work of this celebrated Vancouver artist, including recent projects being exhibited for the first time in North America, is highlighted in a cohesive exhibition that encapsulates his career as a conceptual artist and portraitist.

theravenscall.ca Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver This comprehensive website dedicated to Canadian artist Bill Reid shares a visual feast of more than 200 of his Haida-influenced works—including bronze sculptures and gold, silver, and argillite jewellery—presented within the rich context of his personal and creative journey. —Lili Milborne Georgia O’Keeffe, 1918, platinum print, by Alfred Stieglitz. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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DESIGNPHILE

APPRECIATION

SOLO TRAVELLER A painter of evocative expressions of place, Doris McCarthy has also always been an explorer.

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t the Doris McCarthy Gallery, on the east campus of the University of Toronto, resides a collection of more than 1,500 works by contemporary artists—Ian Carr-Harris, Sandra Meigs, and many other familiar names in the Canadian art scene—alongside the paintings of McCarthy herself. The gallery also houses the artist’s personal archives—sketches, notebooks, and photographs of McCarthy camping, canoeing, and painting from the 1930s and ’40s onward; in one such she is perched near an iceberg, the better to appreciate her subject. Described by Erin Peck, the gallery’s exhibitions coordinator, as “a repository for all things Doris,” the gallery reflects a deep respect for this contemporary painter, now in her 101st year, who has worked for many decades in and around the neighbourhood, in between her extensive travels around the world. Born in 1910 in Calgary, Doris McCarthy moved with her family to Toronto, where she was taught by Group of Seven member Arthur Lismer and other artists at the epicentre of the movement that was shaking up the Canadian art world of the 1920s. She aspired to paint the spirituality in nature, not just scenery—an approach to art that put her in step with her contemporaries and informed her landscape painting for the next 80 years. McCarthy taught art at Toronto’s Central Technical School for 40 years—a job that allowed her to finance summer painting adventures. Mostly she travelled with other women artists, though she also took a year-long sabbatical, travelling solo through Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. It was a remarkable feat for a woman in the first half of the 20th century, yet none of her three published memoirs mention it as unusual. “McCarthy never identified as a feminist,” Peck says.

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Top: Lakescape Horizon (Winter Horizon), 1969, oil on canvas, 76 x 122 cm; courtesy of the artist. Centre: Rhythms of Georgian Bay (Georgian Bay Landscape in Reds), 1966, oil on canvas, 61 x 76 cm. Bottom: October Gold, 1969, oil on panel, 61 x 76 cm; courtesy of the artist. Paintings by Doris McCarthy (above); portrait by Ken Jones.

When she retired from teaching in 1972, McCarthy had her first taste of the Arctic. The “iceberg fantasies”—as she calls the largescale canvases—that emerged from her numerous northern excursions capture a palpable spirituality and garnered her a full membership at the prestigious Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. Characterized by confident lines and simplified shapes, those paintings are evocative, not

representational, expressions of the place, and were composed by McCarthy to give pleasure to the viewer. Over the next two decades she continued to travel—north, west, east, and even to the Antarctic—keeping a schedule and painting at a pace that was surprising for someone of her age. In 1986, she was honoured as a member of the Order of Canada. Recalls McCarthy in her first book, A Fool in Paradise: “We were following the example of Canada’s leading artists and discovering that while travel was good in itself, the best way to experience the places we went [to] was to paint them. “Painting demands a concentration and sensibility that grows into an intimacy with the country, greatly intensifying your awareness of it. You come to know it instead of just seeing it.” —Kathleen Dore

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BOOKS

DRAWING CONCLUSIONS Reading an architect through his sketches and delving into an overlooked season son in Canadian art history. Sketches: From Here and There by A.J. Diamond, Douglas & McIntyre 144 pages, 80 colour illustrations, $45

Jack Diamond is one of Canada’s most decorated d architects, and you would hardly know that from reading this new book. An unusual collection of reminiscences, Sketches gathers his recollections and visual renderings of some of the crucial places in his life. There’s Durban, South Africa, where he grew up feeling like an outsider—small, artistic, and Jewish, “a minority of one”—and the little town of Piet Retief, where he was born and spent memorable ates the book vacations with his grandparents. But what dominates are his drawings, which depict architecture and landscapes across the world. There’s rainy, stony London, where he arrived in 1956 to work on his master’s degree; and some of the places he’s been since then—rural England, Jerusalem, Venice, Provence, Laos, Mustique, Rhode Island. It’s a dizzying tour, the highlights of 60 years distilled on the page. The drawings are technically strong but unexceptional as artwork. What’s interesting is the way Diamond paints like an architect, his eye reducing buildings and landscapes to solids and voids, planes and volumes. A rural cottage in Dorset, England, and its shrubbery appear as solid and rectilinear as Diamond’s own modernist brick buildings. He paints the old city of Edinburgh and a row of arches at Durham Cathedral as equally massive and monumental. All this provides some implicit hints at his aesthetic. The great modernist architect Louis Kahn, Diamond’s teacher at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1960s, would have approved. Yet, Kahn and Philadelphia are never mentioned. Likewise, the city of Toronto, where Diamond moved 46 years ago, merits just a few pages. His own buildings are nearly absent, except Jerusalem’s city hall and the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs. True, the architecture has been well covered elsewhere. Still, the book is an odd gesture for an architect so deeply identified with his profession and with Toronto, where he’s made a major contribution to the design scene and its thinking about its historic buildings. Sketches leaves the impression that at age 78, Diamond feels the dry heat of the veld and the rich mists of London—in short, the places and experiences of his early years—more deeply than anything that came later. Which is the case for many of us. —Alex Bozikovic

Painters Eleven: Pain The Wild W Ones of Canadian Art by Iris Nowell, Douglas & McIntyre 364 pages, 297 colour illustrations, $85

In Painters Eleven: The Wild Ones of Canadian Art, author Iris Nowell brings to life the turbulent rise of an often overlooked period of Canadian art history – Abstract Expressionism. In an alliance reminiscent of the Group of Seven, 11 abstract expressionist artists—Jack Bush, Oscar Cahén, Hortense Gordon, Tom Hodgson, Alexandra Luke, Jock Macdonald, Ray Mead, Kazuo Nakamura, William Ronald, Harold Town, and Walter Yarwood—banded together in 1953 and launched their first group exhibition in 1954, which opened to harsh critical response. The Painters Eleven gradually garnered acclaim from both critics and collectors, and although they disbanded in 1960, several in the group became icons of contemporary Canadian art. Since then, their works have been displayed at major international art galleries and are avidly sought by public institutions as well as corporate and private collectors. Expertly researched by Nowell, an acclaimed biographer with extensive knowledge of the Canadian art world and personal ties with the group, Painters Eleven is an intimate look at a previously unexplored subject matter. The book features some 290 reproductions of their works, bringing readers and art lovers face to face with one of the most colourful periods of art history in Canada. “How they lived their lives, I discovered, was their art,” says Nowell, whose interviews with the artists’ spouses and lovers reveal new insights. Bush, the only member of the group with a notable international reputation, inspires Nowell’s best essay, enriched through excerpts from his personal diary. —Lili Milborne

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FROM THE GROUND UP

Dream Building Last spring, Judith Mackin and Robert Moore purchased a rugged property with a view of the Bay of Fundy in downtown Saint John. Now, they’re building a house on it—and IA&D is reporting on their progress, every step of the journey. By Suzanne Robicheau Photography by Bruce MacNeil

[ Part 1: THE SITE ]

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couple walk into a pub in downtown Saint John. It is a foggy afternoon—nothing new for this part of the world—and they are here to relax and raise a glass to the über-urban reno that won their 3,000-square-foot century house a segment in the HGTV show Original Home Tour. But for Robert Moore, a poet and professor of English at the University of New Brunswick, and his partner, Judith Mackin, owner and president of marketing company Punch Productions, this day of celebration takes an unexpected turn. They go for a stroll, climb a hill—and before they have descended, they decide to build a house on its peak.

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IA&D will follow Judith Mackin and Robert Moore as they go through the process of designing and building their house. In this issue, we’re exploring the genesis of their project. Next issue, we’ll peer over their shoulders as they dissect two sets of blueprints and decide which one will become their new home.

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Saint John, N.B.

Robert Moore and Judith Mackin (left) did not pick the easiest property (above) on which to build. Its steep pitch, rocky terrain, and access challenges will all have an effect on their home’s design possibilities—and the bottom line. But the beauty of the site and its views drew them in.

The hill is a steep, rock-strewn slope in the core of Saint John. Why the abandoned 2½-acre property has eluded development for decades remains a mystery. Not only is it the largest infill lot downtown, it has a 90-degree view of the city. Above it is the historic mansion of the founder of Red Rose Tea; to the west, cruise ships in the Bay of Fundy and the Carleton Martello Tower, a 30-foot-high fortress erected during the War of 1812; to the east, the towering stack of an oil refinery and other reminders of heavy industry; and to the south, an urban panorama that captures everything, from the tallest office tower to the cross atop the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. When Moore and Mackin reached the top of the hill, it was Moore who declared, “I want to build a house here.” True, the drywall dust had barely settled from the renovation of their current home. How then to explain this turnabout? It was the potential the couple immediately saw: to build something brand new from the ground up—without renovating. They had always lived in “old, cold houses,” Mackin says, and they’d always tried (successfully, it must be noted) to negotiate their admiration for clean modern lines and contemporary styles within a respectful treatment of traditional architecture. A typical example of their skill at marrying the two is the sleek moulded-plastic patio set by prolific designer Philippe Starck that now sits easily in their century-old home. But something about the “radical topography,” as Moore describes it, of this big green space in the heart of the city inspired them with the idea of creating a house that was bold, uncompromising, and new. They purchased the property. Next, they hired the Acre Collective, a Saint John–based

[ THE ARCHITECTS ] The Acre Collective is an art, design, and architecture practice based in Saint John. Co-founded by architects Monica Adair and Stephen Kopp (above), both graduates of the University of Toronto, the Acre was included in last year’s Twenty + Change, an exhibition program that showcases emerging Canadian architects and designers. Adair and Kopp were also the 2010 recipients of the Gerald Sheff Visiting Professorship in Architecture at McGill University in Montreal. The firm’s signature sense of playfulness is nowhere more apparent than in their awardwinning design for a public art installation at the new Saint John Transit Operations Centre. At 90 metres long, the sculpture is comprised of 85 aluminum panels that juxtapose the vivid colours of street signs to reinterpret the language of the road. The red and gold of stop signs and yield signs add an element of colour to the often-foggy city of Saint John. Better still, because the artwork is made of the same material as street signs, at night it reflects the light. —S.R.

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FROM THE GROUND UP

design practice led by architects Monica Adair and Stephen Kopp. “We didn’t interview any other architects,” notes Moore, since Mackin had worked with the Acre previously on two commercial projects—a patio wine bar attached to a heritage building and a public art installation—both award-winning efforts. “She knew their work and she trusted them.” The design process began last June at a meeting with Adair, Kopp, and Acre member John LeRoux, a Fredericton architect and author of Building New Brunswick, the seminal book on the province’s architecture. Sustained in equal parts by enthusiasm, Timbits, and sparkling water, the architects and their clients worked long hours to determine the requirements for the house. Then the team developed a program that includes bedrooms, bathrooms, living space, a home office for Mackin, and a 400-squarefoot garage/workshop and studio for Moore. A month later, at the first schematic design meeting, the clients revisited some of the room sizes, and proposed some new ideas for design and materials. But one thing remained constant: they wanted to build on the top of the hill. Faced with development costs as steep as that hill, however, the architects suggested pragmatism: step back and take another look at the site. Given the “intensity” of the landscape—the steep rock, access concerns, and service routes—Kopp suggested they explore all the options. “Now we have to consider the site as a whole and be open to the issues and opportunities inherent in a number of different designs.” Mackin and Moore left that meeting with two design concepts in hand: “The Belvedere,” a two-level house to be built exactly where they first envisioned it, at the top of the site; and “Into the Wild,” a novel approach that has a 1½-storey house built midway up the site and a separate cottage/studio perched on the peak. The next step will be their decision, after weighing the merits of each design scheme against the practicalities of building and the realities of a budget. It’s a decision that will have to be made soon: construction is slated to begin in the spring. The couple may be new to the house-building process, but they appreciate good design and have already decided that they want an award-winning house. “People don’t expect to be inspired by the location of a city house,” Mackin says. “We’re already inspired by this land, and we want to put a house on it that shows there’s more to urban design than gutting and renovating century homes. We can build.”

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[ THE NEIGHBOURHOOD ] Saint John is located on the north shore of Atlantic Canada’s Bay of Fundy. In the era of tall ships and trading known as the Golden Age of Sail, its location, at the mouth of the 700-kilometre Saint John River, made it one of the most affluent cities in North America. Thanks to the Great Fire of 1877—which consumed more than 1,600 buildings—by the late 1880s Saint John was also one of the most modern. Suddenly presented with a clean slate for urban design, the city witnessed a race among its wealthy merchants and shipowners to rebuild something bigger and better than what they had lost in the fire. It was “out with the old and in with the new” as they competed for the services of renowned builders, masons, craftsmen, and architects, as well as for prized materials like Honduran mahogany and Italian marble. As a result, Saint John now has more than 2,000 heritage buildings, of which 800 are concentrated in the 20-block Trinity Royal district, comprising one of the best collections of turn-of-the-20th-century architecture in Canada. Add to the mix some stalwart survivors of the Great Fire—what the locals call “pre-fire” buildings, such as Wellington Row’s Second Empire Jellybean row houses, Union Street’s 1810 Loyalist House, and the Greek Revival Gillis Residence—and Trinity Royal is just the ticket for architourists, those intrepid travellers who plan their itineraries around interesting architecture. For Judith Mackin and Robert Moore, long-time supporters of the careful preservation of the downtown core, building on a site that straddles the streets of the city’s struggling south end and the upscale enclave of Mount Pleasant reinforces their commitment to revitalize, rather than rip out, Saint John’s heritage area. —S.R.

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THEY LEFT THE MEETING WITH TWO DESIGN CONCEPTS IN HAND. THEY HAVE TO MAKE THEIR DECISION SOON.

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Imagine... The Big Issues—the environment, cities that work, public space— were reflected in 2010’s Venice Biennale of Architecture. Ultimately, it was about what architects do best: the imagining of a better world.

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n 1872, John Ruskin surveyed the Italianate suburban villas, factories, pubs, and other edifices built in London during the mid-Victorian craze for everything Venetian and was appalled. It was his majestic work The Stones of Venice (1851–1853) that had inadvertently helped set alight the city’s popular architectural passion. “Accursed Frankenstein monsters,” he described them, “of, indirectly, my own making.”

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Picking up on Ruskin’s mea culpa, the British pavilion’s artistic directors at the 2010 Venice Biennale of Architecture—the London-based firm of muf architecture/art—gave it a wry twist. They named the U.K.’s venerable little neoclassical temple Villa Frankenstein. The muf team then set about inserting into this building a collage-like installation that resembled, at least at first glance, the mad scientist’s stitched-together creature.

ISTOCKPHOTO.COM © DAMIR SPANIC

By John Bentley Mays

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The exhibition included an array of the art historian and social critic’s notebooks from around 1850, in which he meticulously sketched the medieval Venetian architectural details, façade treatments, and other discrete elements of the cityscape he loved and admired. Alongside Ruskin’s works were displayed arresting images by the amateur Venetian photographer Alvio Gavagnin. During a 30-year period in the latter half of the 20th century, Gavagnin made more than 10,000 pictures of the vernacular architecture in his city’s working-class neighbourhoods, places little frequented by cultural tourists. To all these, muf added, of all things, a fully operational reproduction of Venetian marshland, renewed with lagoon water and complete with tiny crabs. And squeezed into the palm court of the pavilion was a 1:10 scale wooden model of a section of London’s new Olympic Stadium. This ruggedly handsome artifact—called the Stadium of Close Looking—was used during the Biennale for children’s drawing classes, and for scholarly gatherings of researchers busy with the Venetian lagoon’s delicate endangered ecological systems, human and natural. If the content of Villa Frankenstein seemed at first to be a forced Frankenstein-ian assemblage of this and that—some art with an architectural slant, some things that weren’t art at all—the show gradually revealed to the patient visitor the thread of meaning that held everything together. That thread, or theme, was “close looking.” The Ruskin notations and Gavagnin photos were the wonderful outcomes of mindful observation. In the theatre-like stadium fragment, the kids who came to draw got valuable lessons in the careful scrutiny of objects. And the marsh vignette encouraged visitors to look beyond the obvious masterpieces of Venetian building design and art, and give fair, generous regard to the total environment, the subtle drowned landscape, from which the island city surfaced centuries ago. Then, the muf pavilion did commemorate an important architectural value: Ruskin’s belief that close looking, especially as embodied in drawing, was the key to good design. “The greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world,” he wrote, “is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way…. To see clearly is poetry, philosophy, and religion, all in one.” Ruskin’s enormous influence, along with long-standing tradition, guaranteed that drawing would enjoy a crucial place in architectural education and practice almost up to the present day, although computers have now displaced paper, pencil, and ink from many studios.

WILL THE NEW ARCHITECTURE OF PEACE, SO RICHLY EXAMPLED IN THE 2010 VENICE BIENNALE, PREVAIL AT LAST?

But did the multi-faceted show in Villa Frankenstein accurately mirror the situation in which contemporary architects find themselves working? The answer is yes. Here’s why. Architecture is certainly not now, if it ever was, a “pure” art merely concerned with form and shape, geometry, and structure. The environmental movement that sprang to life in the 1960s; new understandings of the city as a fluid, vastly complex organism; boundarysmashing experiments in the visual and literary arts; the rise and spread of the Internet; natural catastrophes—all these and other forces have combined in recent decades to teach architects, and the rest of us, that no man or woman, and no art, is an island. Advanced architects everywhere are now talking to and collaborating with climate scientists; filmmakers, painters, sculptors, and photographers; biologists and cybernetics engineers; economists and geographers; industrial and even fashion designers. Viewed from the high overlook demanded by the new ecological consciousness of our time, muf’s ambitious program of documentation, scientific congresses, and education in Venice was just one very good example of the “Frankenstein monster” (though not in Ruskin’s pejorative sense) that architecture is becoming. The entire 2010 Biennale, not just Villa Frankenstein, celebrated this avant-garde notion of the architect’s vocation by showcasing the new buildings, master plans, and speculative projects brought about by cross-fertilization. Festival director Kazuyo Sejima—who operates the distinguished Japanese firm SANAA with

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her business partner, Ryue Nishizawa—invited nations and the nearly 50 architects, artists, offices, and project teams in the centrepiece exhibition to respond to the overall title of the event, “People Meet in Architecture.” Behind this bland-sounding motto stood Sejima’s strong intention: to open up spaces in Venice for remarkable instances of contemporary placemaking and city-building for real people—not the genderless, neutral abstractions of statistics, polls, and too much modern town planning; but men and women with sexualities, histories, many levels of expertise, and myriad kinds of inheritance and memory. To this end, Sejima hoped, in her catalogue essay, that the central exhibition would be “an experience of architectural possibilities; about an architecture created by different approaches, expressing new ways of living.” And so it became such an experience. Take, for example, the sensitive scheme devised by the London collective Architecture Research Unit (ARU) for Saemangeum Island City in South Korea. Built on land reclaimed from the Yellow Sea, this huge new town is the work of many hands: architects, economists, environmentalists, specialists in renewable energy, among others. The goal is to “generate a poetic landscape” with “good public spaces” along the shoreline and the waterways that penetrate the city, while avoiding the traditional modernist concentrations of “single functional zones…such as bed-towns, business parks, or self-contained tourist resorts,” says ARU. “Dense urban districts where people live and work,” the collective contends, “will coexist with the beauty of the open landscape of farm fields, lakes, and mountains.” While most participants in Sejima’s curated show displayed fine artistic rigour, high imagination, and a holistic sensibility—and often an attractive sense of humour—few worked on canvases as spacious as Saemangeum. Some just showed excellent conceptual drawings for small projects, well-crafted models of houses or other minor structures, computer-generated documentation of imaginary worlds, spaces, cities, and buildings.

SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST VIVID, FERTILE ARCHITECTURAL MINDS ARE THINKING HARD ABOUT WHAT MATTERS—THE SPARING OF THE EARTH, THE CREATION OF LIVABLE CITIES, THE MAKING OF BUILDINGS THAT SHELTER BEAUTIFULLY OUR FRAGILE HUMANITY. A retrospective installation of the work of the noted Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi brought to Venice spontaneous, deft designs and descriptions for small places of temporary dwelling—a bar, a concrete staircase—and playful gear for popular Brazilian festivals. (Among Bardi’s acknow-ledged sources were Le Corbusier and the painter Yves Klein.) Other participants fabricated expansive site-specific installations—they would not look out of place in the Biennale of Art—that illustrated their comprehension of space and movement. Many other teams and individuals interrogated the topics that keenly interest architects nowadays. In haunting, very still images of modernist residential interiors, for instance, Italian photographer Luisa Lambri portrayed the floor-to-ceiling glass wall as a fraught zone of contest between culture and nature, the human will to dominate, and the natural environment around us—the ancient war that advanced contemporary architecture is at pains to end. Will the new architecture of peace, so richly exampled in the 2010 Venice Biennale, prevail at last? Or will the provocative ideas launched there run aground on the stony realities of the realestate market and the lagging world economy? I don’t have answers to these questions. Nobody does. But Kazuyo Sejima’s architecture exhibition—the world’s first big one since the financial crash of 2008—made one thing clear. In a time of widespread distress in the design business, of frightened clients and investors, of cash-strapped public agencies, some of the world’s most vivid, fertile architectural minds are thinking hard about what matters—the sparing of the earth, the creation of livable cities for the millions, the making of buildings that shelter beautifully our fragile humanity. Venice taught us that these minds, if they can survive the current downturn, will be ready with fresh visions when the economic prospects for architecture brighten once again.

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B:9.25” T:9” S:8.5”

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ARCHITECTURE

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The envelope of the house—walls, roof, windows, and floors—is at least 25 percent more efficient than required by the energy and building codes in the province of Quebec. The layout and dimensions of the windows maximize the use of passive solar energy, and heat is conserved naturally in the massive concrete foundation. Inside, concrete floors absorb heat and then release it throughout the house.

NATURAL WONDER

MINIMALISM, IN ALL ITS QUIET DRAMA, IS THE PERFECT, HARMONIOUS RESPONSE TO THE SPLENDOUR OF LIVING IN THE WOODED FOOTHILLS OF MONT SAINT-HILAIRE. BY LISA FITTERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE MONTPETIT

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“In winter, the sun provides passive solar heating, but as of June 21, no direct sunlight comes into the house,” says architect Alexandre Blouin. Motorized solar blinds are recessed in the ceiling; their fabric absorbs heat and helps keep the home cool. The concrete floor was designed to look like large slabs. Blinds, Altex. Sofa, William. Vases, Maison Corbeil.

‘OUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE WAS TO SET THE HOUSE SO THAT IT SEEMS ALONE, PRIVATE, AND PART OF THE LAND.’

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Right: The upper-level catwalk and wall of shelving are an intriguing update on the traditional bookshelf-lined study; the staircase’s open risers and glass panels contribute with a look reminiscent of a library ladder. Bottom: The windows in the tiny reading room frame the view of the mountains.

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nderstated and organic, the house on the hill stands apart from its more conventional neighbours. Sitting near the highest point of a road that arcs through a suburban development south of Montreal, the home offers a public face that seems closed and mysterious, with narrow windows, and an entrance hidden at the side. Enter and you are in another world—one with high ceilings and soaring windows that look out onto an ever-changing landscape as far as the eye can see. It is green and brown, deep red and fierce gold, charcoal and white. It can be cloudless and tranquil, or thunderously dark, at once a place to reflect, wonder, and entertain. Built on the lower slopes of Mont Saint-Hilaire, the 3,700-square-foot home is the full-time residence of a professional couple and their teenage daughter. Outdoor enthusiasts who work in the area, they fell in love with the vast half-acre tract of land—the last in the development that was zoned residential before the forest and trails begin in earnest. Two years after buying the land, the couple hired the Montreal firm of Blouin Tardif Architecture Environnement to help them build a house that, rather than attempt to tame nature, would work in perfect harmony with it. “They wanted a space that was contemporary, with forms that were very simple and pure to reflect the land, and they wanted a space where they could come home from work and host a large party or simply strap on their snowshoes and go tromping in

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At the end of the kitchen, a floor-to-ceiling window could be momentarily mistaken for a landscape wall mural. Two 12’ lengths of counters suggest this is a kitchen where real cooks work. A minimum of upper cabinetry contributes to the open feeling. Blouin used stained mirror, which is brighter than sanded glass, for the backsplash. Cabinetry designed by Blouin Tardif Architecture Environnement.

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Opposite: The dining room shares a fireplace with the living room. Here, a massive table and tall-back chairs dominate; a light fixture is the only decorative touch in this streamlined setting. Unusually, the concrete floors are left uncovered through most of the house; the radiant heating renders rugs unneeded.

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the woods,” says architect Alexandre Blouin. “In a sense, that was our biggest challenge: to set the house so that it seems alone, private, and part of the land; so that you come in and forget that you’re in a suburb. The mountain is the star here, with huge trees and boulders incorporated into the design.” To that end, Blouin and his team decided to site the house away from the road, partially hidden by maple, walnut, and birch trees. They anchored it on a concrete base that follows the slope of the land, and they drew up two plans for the exterior shell: the front (north) side, where privacy is paramount, and the south side, which is more open to take advantage of the landscape and light. This young firm considers the environmental aspect of all its projects, which range from private residences to a food-storage facility for Sobeys in Trois-Rivières and a luxurious spa in the Lanaudière region just north of Montreal. So it made sense to choose poplar that had been torrefied, or roasted, at a high temperature for the home’s exterior. Torrefaction turns standard woods such as pine and poplar into a product that is chemical-free, rich in tone, and resistant to rot, insects, and water absorption. In this case, the poplar was then treated with a stain that repels ultraviolet rays while giving it a subtle, slightly weathered reddish-brown tint that blends in with the trees and terrain. The façade of the house is a play of wood panels and windows, each fitting into the other like a jigsaw puzzle; seen from certain vantage points, it seems that the trees themselves are part of the structure. The roof hugs the house in the front, with a deep overhang only at the entry to protect a visitor from inclement weather. At the back, it offers more of a canopy, suspended over even the balconies and the patio, in order to protect the interior from direct sunlight when the trees are still bare of leaves.

INSIDE, THERE IS LITTLE TO DISTRACT FROM THE NATURAL SURROUNDINGS. EVERYTHING IS MINIMALIST.

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Inside, there is little to distract from the natural surroundings. Everything is minimalist, with clean, sharp lines, a Zen colour scheme of charcoal, white, and brown, and substantial custom-built furniture. A heavier hand might have made it seem cold or forbidding, but Blouin and his clients have managed to strike an aesthetic balance that calms instead. Follow the polished concrete floors through the short entry hall into the living room with its 20-foot-high poplar ceiling, a wall of windows, and a sleek white sectional sofa. The monumental dark-stained wood fireplace surround acts as a piece of sculpture and helps define this dramatic space from the kitchen, dining area, and a small office beyond. Throughout the rest of the house, the ceilings are lower, at nine feet, to lend a sense of intimacy in a setting that would otherwise be overwhelming in its grandeur. In the kitchen, a massive walnut butcher block, with bar stools along one side, distinguishes the space, while the appliances—refrigerator, oven, and microwave—are built in flush with the cabinetry. The stained-mirror backsplash is subtle, while a chalkboard, which camouflages the only upper cabinet, offers a sense of whimsy with grocery lists and messages. In the office, the outlines of a glass desk designed by Blouin’s firm disappear into the ether, and anything atop it appears to be hovering in mid-air. Stairs to the upper storey resemble a suspended ladder, albeit with a handrail and glass panels. The stair leads to a catwalk lined with shelves displaying small pieces of art, and books that can be carried around the corner to a spartan reading room. “This is where you sit and read or look at the mountain,” Blouin says. “This is where you pause.” The master bedroom, which faces south and opens onto a small balcony, continues the Zen scheme, for there is only a bed, flanked by tall bookshelves with niche lighting, and the flatscreen TV mounted on the opposite wall. The suite also contains a walk-in closet and a serene bathroom with a stall shower and deep bath. Outside the windows, the neighbour’s roof is barely visible. “That’s the benefit of building on a slope,” Blouin says. “It helps that the property is huge, but with carefully considered vantage points, you can feel like you’re alone in the woods.”

For floor plans, see page 102

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Blouin’s firm designed some of the furniture: the desk and chair in the office (opposite, top), the bookshelves, kitchen cabinetry, and the bathroom counter and vanity. “The idea was to work with a few materials—walnut, quartz, stained mirror,” he says. “This helped to achieve a simple, efficient design, and a sense that the furniture fits in the house.”

Opposite, bottom: In the master bedroom, tall wall niches stand in for bedside tables—and continue the seamless look—providing generous amounts of storage and display space. Even the lighting is recessed, leaving all surfaces uninterrupted. Bed, Flou.

This page: Despite their oversized dimensions, a double-sink walnut vanity on a quartz base, a large mirrored square cabinet, and a deep square-edged tub don’t interfere with the focal point in the master ensuite: the view from joined corner windows. The absence of nearby neighbours obviates the need for window coverings.

‘THE MOUNTAIN IS THE STAR HERE, WITH HUGE TREES AND BOULDERS INCORPORATED INTO THE DESIGN.’

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ALL THE RIGHT ANGLES A MODERN JIGSAW OF GLASS AND CONCRETE, BOXES AND CUT-OUTS FORMS A CLIFFTOP HOME FROM WHICH TO COMMUNE WITH THE SEA. TEXT BY DALI CASTRO

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Right: Glass boxes, steel framing, and white concrete create a startlingly graphic cohesion of textures. The central box shown here houses one of the three master bedrooms. Pumaquiro slats were used for the balcony floors as well as under the roof overhangs, acting as adjustable blinds to provide shade and ventilation. Left: Green slate, brought down from the Andes, offers contrast to the stark white of the exterior concrete walls and the rock mosaic.

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cean and desert dominate in Punta Misterio, south of Lima, but here, atop an imposing rock-and-sand bluff, the vacation home for an extended family of 42 built by architect Luis Longhi holds its own—a bold, confident design response to the stark environment. Sculpted into the craggy cliff, the house stacks sharply angled boxes on three levels, its exterior clad in concrete, natural rock, and green slate. Longhi’s architectural “intervention in nature”—as he describes his design—orients all the rooms westward,

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toward the Pacific, affording panoramic vistas of the water and the neighbouring rocky outcrops and lowland plains. It takes its cues from the surroundings, proffering glass-enclosed living spaces, skylights, slivers of window, and balconies that mitigate the boundaries between indoors and out. A recreational infinity pool overlooks the narrow L-shaped lap pool below it and, further down, a sheer drop to the sea. At the carport, in the rear, sand-garden roofs that mimic the desert are stepped to emulate the mountains. The pièce de résistance is the living-dining room—a “floating” glass box cantilevered off the cliff and open to the ocean on three sides. Steel and glass comprise the structural elements, and local stone, crafted into mosaics for the flooring and cut-out walls, was used liberally on the terrace, where it delineates the deck along the lap pool and carries through to the steps leading

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‘FOR ARCHITECTURE TO BE SUCCESSFUL, IT IS FUNDAMENTAL TO LISTEN TO THE ENVIRONMENT AND TO ESTABLISH A RELATIONSHIP WITH IT.’ —Luis Longhi, architect

Opposite, left: On the staircase, treads made of richly coloured pumaquiro, a Peruvian hardwood known to withstand the elements, are a warm complement to the sheen of stainless steel risers, banisters, and cable rails. The walls alongside are clad in a mosaic of natural rock, the same as that used on the terrace—part of the harmonious blending of indoors and out. Opposite, right: The cantilevered glass box, one of Longhi’s favourite features, gives family members in the dining room and sitting area a three-sided westward view and the impression that they are floating above the sea. It also creates an intimate, sheltered zone in which to congregate on the patio beneath it. Left: The recreational infinity pool, which is popular with the younger children, overlooks the lap pool, where the grown-ups like to swim. Below: The rock mosaic on the terrace walls and floor carries through to the steps leading down to the beach below—a mere five-minute stroll.

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Left: The magnificent views were what prompted the clients’ purchase of the property—as well as the architect’s vision and design. Bottom left and below: In the wine cellar, pumaquiro and concrete built-in shelves end at a rock wall, which is actually the side of the bluff. Opposite, left: Near the lap pool, carved right into the cliff, is a powder room with contemporary bathroom fixtures and cavern-like walls. The sink sits on a pedestal of solid concrete.

Opposite, right: At the carport, in the rear, sand-garden roofs mimic the desert, for now—the plan is to eventually use drought-resistant plantings to help cool the house. The stepped design, inspired by the mountainous landscape, allows more natural light into the house.

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‘THE DESIGN TAKES ADVANTAGE OF EVERY SINGLE MOMENT IN THE LANDSCAPE.’ —Homeowner to the beach below. Inside, cantilevered to a wall comprised of the same naturalrock mosaic, is a wood and stainless steel staircase that visually integrates the three storeys of the home. Cast concrete finished in polished cement—used for the floors as well as the built-in shelving and furniture typical of beach houses in the area—links the interiors texturally to the austere landscape. Front and foremost, naturally, are the views, maximized by windows in diverse sizes, shapes, and patterns. From the outside, they look randomly scattered on the north and west sides of the house; each and every aperture, however, was meticulously positioned to direct the eye toward a specific, carefully selected view—perhaps an islet, a mountaintop, or a sandy stretch of beach. For floor plans, see page 103

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A graphic black and ochre folding screen, purchased by Francisco Costa (below) at a Christie’s auction, stands in a corner of the living room. The screen is from the estate of the iconic 20th-century photographer Horst P. Horst. Significantly, its primitively patterned painted fabric was a gift to Horst from Coco Chanel. The screen’s bold lines and rich fabric add depth and drama to the apartment, which is a den of greys in myriad textures and quiet patterns. “The auction find became the inspiration for the space,” says interior designer Leslie Steven, “the touchstone for the design.”

CALVIN KLEIN DESIGNER FRANCISCO COSTA’S NEW YORK HOME HAS THE WARMTH AND LUXURY OF A TRADITIONAL SPACE DESPITE ITS CLEAN LINES AND A PALETTE OF MODERN NEUTRALS. IT’S A HEADY DESIGN LESSON IN HAVING THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS. BY DEBORAH FULSANG PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEAN-FRANÇOIS JAUSSAUD

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illowy models breezed down Francisco Costa’s runway for Calvin Klein’s spring 2011 show; their clothes, minimal creations in white or black with the occasional shot of coral or blue, were sculptural but seemingly weightless, of-the-moment but timeless too. Those women would look right at home in Costa’s New York City apartment. The 11th-floor space, which the Brazilian-born designer shares with partner John DeStefano, a horse trainer and manager, is in a handsome 1940s brick building in the city’s Murray Hill neighbourhood. Like those elegant dresses, the home personifies discipline and grace, and a style obsessive’s eye for detail. Costa has been twice honoured by the Council of Fashion Designers of America as womenswear designer of the year. His fashion curriculum vitae is long and deep: Bill Blass, Gucci, Balmain. He was at Oscar de la Renta when plucked to join Calvin Klein, where he then assumed the role of creative director of womenswear in 2003. “He’s such an artist,” frontrow guest Katie Holmes noted with admiration after the spring catwalk presentation. “[The collection] was so simple, and it’s not easy to do things that are simple.” Architectural simplicity is Costa’s signature, and it inspired Alexander Poma and Leslie Steven of Manhattan-based PomaSteven, the architecture and design firm responsible for the 2006 renovation of Costa’s home. The casting was perfect: Poma was a project architect at Ralph Lauren before joining forces with his wife, Steven, whose own resumé includes designing furniture and interiors for Donna Karan. Mirrored walls, glossy marble floors, and lacquered kitchen cabinets—Costa’s home was previously more Wall Street glam, circa 1987, than au courant 2010. “We did a major renovation,” the partners explain, “revising the layout, enlarging the kitchen, removing extraneous walls, adding moulding and lighting, creating new closets, new plumbing, and electrical throughout.” “They wanted a combination of modern and traditional with clean lines and a sense of lightness,” says Poma of their clients. Some would call the resulting look “transitional.” Poma and Steven’s term? “Modern classic.”

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THE APARTMENT IS A DEN OF GREYS IN MYRIAD TEXTURES AND QUIET PATTERNS. ITS TAILORED MOULDINGS ADD STATELINESS. ‹

By increasing the depth of walls and pass-throughs, the design firm achieved a sense of grandeur in the space, despite the fact that the apartment is a modest 1,375 square feet. The dove grey walls are the ideal backdrop to Costa and DeStefano’s considerable art collection, which includes many striking photographic, representational, and abstract contemporary works. Shown here is a piece by Brooklyn-based, Turkish-born Pinar Yolaçan, who is perhaps best known for her portraits of subjects clad in garments of raw meat.

For his spring collection, Costa was inspired by the blues and how the easy, good-in-your-skin attitude of the music can be expressed in clothing. He could just as easily have been referencing these handsome herringbone armchairs by New York’s Roman Thomas. Refined, yet with plush curves, they invite nesting. The chairs flank a glossy art deco table and a print by Argentinian Guillermo Kuitca; it’s a favourite piece of the homeowners, who gravitate to the work of emerging artists. The tailored scene is softened by two layers of area rugs and luxurious sheer cashmere roman shades; the cashmere ranks as Poma and Steven’s favourite fabric in the apartment.

Art deco, mid-century modern, Arts and Crafts, present-day industrial: the apartment references many pivotal design eras. In fact, if one were to sink into the living room’s sumptuous linen-velvet sofa and survey the surroundings, one could imagine that the room had been time-warped into any number of high-style moments from the past 60 or 70 years.

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In reconfiguring the space of the apartment, Poma and Steven aligned the doorways of the library and bedroom, enclosed the foyer, and removed a wall between a former dining alcove and the living room to create better flow and a more open atmosphere. The addition of tailored panelling, mouldings, and ceiling beams, generated a sense of stateliness that is further enhanced by the restrained palette. To add warmth, the architect and designer chose rich golden hues: a herringbone-pattern oak floor with a dry-look Danish oil finish, a sisal carpet, and vintage Italian wooden chairs.

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Like the colour that punctuates many a Calvin Klein collection—the recent resort-wear show featured an acid-yellow sheath in a sea of barely there tints—yellow metals are the accessories sparking this home’s interior design. In the study, brass lamps and a brass-topped side table detail the art-filled room.

A gallery wall en route to the study exemplifies PomaSteven’s space-smart, clutter-free approach. Its door, detailed with vintage-brass Belgian hardware and an easy-to-open panel, makes updating the collection on view a cinch. “It was designed as a space for personal photos,” says Steven. “It features John and Francisco’s family as well as renowned individuals from both worlds, of horse racing—John’s profession—and fashion.”

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The apartment’s clean-lined masculine aesthetic serves as a foil to the dramatic art and decorative objets within. It is in the study where this tension plays most obviously. Polished brass-trimmed bookshelves and a boldly patterned Arts and Crafts rug contrast with an antique American leather horn chair and coordinating bench. Upper East Side meets the Wild West: the pairing is both unexpected and beautiful.

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Beige, grey, black and white: these are standards on the Calvin Klein runway and they play beautifully in the bedroom too. As on the catwalk—where basic turns to breathtaking in Costa’s little black dresses and coats in shimmering silks and taffetas—it is the mix of finishes and textures that enriches the decor experience. Smoke grey grasscloth wallpaper teams with lustrous charcoal-hued bed linens and a satiny leathertopped table to define the chic yet comfortable decor. On the bedside table sits a drawing by Diego Rivera; close by is a vintage wooden barbell stool by American artist John Derian.

Leather chairs by Austrian designer Paul Frankl flank the bedroom’s writing table; above it swings an articulating French vintage wall sconce alongside two stacked canvases by Italian painter Enrico Castellani.

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ART DECO, MID-CENTURY MODERN, ARTS AND CRAFTS, PRESENT-DAY INDUSTRIAL: THE HOME REFERENCES MANY PIVOTAL DESIGN ERAS.

Heavily veined white Carrara marble combines with historically inspired fittings and fixtures from New York’s Urban Archaeology and a vintage cast-glass wall sconce to create the look of a classic European hotel bath.

Who knew a galley kitchen could be so glamorous? In keeping with the disciplined luxury executed in the rest of the apartment, Poma and Steven elected glossy grey back-painted glass for the backsplash and grey honed granite for the countertop, which offers long runs of prep space. The smart design suits the homeowners well. “They frequently entertain,” notes Steven. “Francisco is a fantastic cook.” And in keeping with the kitchen’s high style and highly functional floor plan, the firm placed both a utility closet and a bar behind pocket doors in the hallway leading into the space.

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THINKING NOT STRAIGHT

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IN 1963 ARCHITECT CHARLES DEATON BEGAN HIS DREAM JOB BUILDING THE FAMILY GETAWAY HE HAD BEEN ENVISIONING ALL HIS LIFE – A SPECTACULAR MODERN HOME THAT WOULD EMBRACE ITS INHABITANTS WITHIN ITS BOLD CURVED SPACES. BUT HE NEVER FINISHED HIS PROJECT. NOW, A DESIGN-ARCHITECT TEAM—HIS DAUGHTER AND HER HUSBAND—HAVE COMPLETED THE CIRCLE. BY ALEX BOZIKOVIC PHOTOGRAPHY BY UNDINE PRÖHL

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ver nearly 50 years, residents of Denver have grown used to a strange sight as they drive west into the mountains – a swoosh of arcing concrete perched on the edge of Genesee Mountain, high above the interstate. “There was a whole mythology that grew up around the house,” says local architect Nicholas Antonopoulos, “that it was owned by Hugh Hefner or Elvis. There were all kinds of stories.” In fact, the home never housed any celebrities, although Woody Allen did stop by in the early 1970s with a film crew. The house was an empty shell – the unfinished masterwork of its architect, Charles Deaton, who conceived the dramatic structure as a getaway for his family and started building it in 1963. But the interior was never finished and the building lay vacant for decades. Only recently was it completed, in a way that united the building’s history and its myths. A new owner had the structure expanded and renovated, transforming it into a grand bachelor pad, and the design was shaped by Charles Deaton’s daughter, Charlee, and his son-in-law, Nicholas Antonopoulos. The couple added a new wing to the house, tripling its size to 7,500 square feet. They completed the interior in line with the original aesthetic, and the new layout opened up the space, which Charlee, an interior designer, filled with period furnishings. “It’s a wonderful story for us,” says Antonopoulos, who had worked in the elder Deaton’s office. It was a long and circuitous road to a happy ending. But then Charles Deaton rarely did anything in a straight line. Born in New Mexico in 1921, Deaton spent his early childhood living rough. His family migrated to Oklahoma on a horse-drawn wagon and lived in a tent for two years before building their own home. Yet, he started his career in the late 1930s not as a builder but as a commercial artist. During the Second World War, he worked in a military plant and picked up the rudiments of aeronautics and industrial design – while designing board Above: The 5,000-sq.-ft. addition is built into the slope of the natural rock shelf and attached to the stem of Charles Deaton’s original house (see previous page). The roof of the addition serves as a large terrace connected to the home’s entry. Opposite: Classic modernist furniture in the stepped white-on-white mod lounge and office area do not detract from the panoramic vistas afforded by wraparound floor-to-ceiling glass walls. Womb chair and ottoman, Eero Saarinen. Vintage Arco floor lamp by Achille Castiglioni. Custom office table, design by Charles Deaton.

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‘HE WAS TRYING TO CREATE AN ARCHITECTURE THAT EMBRACED PEOPLE,’ SAYS THE DAUGHTER OF CHARLES DEATON, ‘AN ARCHITECTURE THAT CURVED LIKE THE HUMAN BODY.’ Left: A cosy nook issues an invitation to relax amid rich colours and textures contr the stark white of an arcing wall and ceiling. Sofa and throw pillows, Charlee Deaton, Watermark Interiors. George Nelson coffee table. Below: The spiral staircase—enclosed within an undulating elliptical half-wall and contoured steel banister railing—features concave treads that suggest a sensation of one’s feet being cradled every step of the way up.

games. But building was his passion, and by the 1950s Deaton was an architect and engineer: his company, based in Denver, would design buildings across North America. Sculptured House, as Deaton came to call it, was his labour of love. “He was sketching it out from the time I was a baby,” Charlee recalls. “He made drawings, then plaster models – and he created the architectural drawings from there.” What Deaton came up with was an elliptical form – essentially a clamshell perched on a pedestal, its concrete shell cradling an irregular twostorey volume wrapped in glass. Positioned on the edge of a mesa 8,000 feet above sea level, it would have remarkable views of the Rockies; the surrounding area had already become part of a massive park. The building reflected two of Deaton’s passions: an architecture of curves and structural experimentation. Its two levels were wrapped in intricately arranged planes of concrete. On one side of the house, a wall curves simultaneously on the horizontal and vertical planes. This is the sort of structural gymnastics that architects and computer-controlled milling machines can pull off easily today, but Deaton did all the figuring himself, sculpting the forms and designing them out of concrete on a steel structure. “He had an incredible grasp of non-Euclidean geometries, for someone who didn’t have access to a computer,” says Antonopoulos. This was the work that was central to Deaton’s career, what he called “organic” architecture. “He was trying to create an architecture that embraced people,” says Charlee, “an architecture that curved like the human body, not

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Opposite: The wool carpet’s pattern was inspired by Charles Deaton’s squiggle design for an integral lighting system in the ceiling. Suspended above the open-pit fireplace is a copper-rimmed hood of curved glass panels. Blue Egg chair, teal and magenta Swan chairs, all Arne Jacobsen. Eero Saarinen marble-top dining table; Bunny Chairs, design by Charles Deaton.

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architecture that was all rectangular walls and rectangular ceilings.” In the case of Sculptured House, that meant a spectacular embrace as soon as you walk inside. Through the curved white door with a porthole, you climb up three levels alongside spiralling walls of concrete, look up through a circular railing that opens like a blossoming flower, and then step out onto the splayed oval of the clamshell, the Rockies marching to the horizon on all sides. It was a grand vision that Deaton never fulfilled. Though the house measured a fairly unremarkable 2,500 square feet, with three Opposite: Curvilinear kitchen bedrooms upstairs and modestly scaled rooms, Deaton never found cabinets are finished in a shimmering light-toned the resources to complete it. It lay empty. “My dad put a drafting Japanese ash with a swirly grain. table in there and used it as a studio for a while,” Charlee says. The black granite countertop The house had its moment of greatest fame during this period, extends to a stainless steel when Woody Allen and a film crew landed to make it a location, as conical base with a suspended glass top. The backsplash and the home of a 22nd-century socialite, for the 1973 comedy Sleeper. walls feature neutral-hued glass “The crew had to mock up a temporary interior to do the shooting, tiles accented with cobalt and and they had to negotiate with my dad,” Charlee recalls. “I think he charcoal metallics. A stainless wound up playing poker with Woody Allen for hours.” steel door leads to the pantry. The force of character that shaped the house also, in a sense, led Cabinetry designed by Charlee Deaton in tamo ash wood by to its long fallow period. By Charlee’s account, her father’s archiSteve Rheinhart Studios. tecture practice largely stopped growing after the 1960s, when his work on a two-stadium sports complex in Kansas City left him squeezed out of the final project, denied credit, and feeling wronged. “He spent many years of his life chasing stadiums,” she says. And yet, he continued to build. After an internship with the great severe modernist I. M. Pei, Antonopoulos landed in Deacon’s office and found a mentor in him, as well as a partner and collaborator in Charlee. The couple were the perfect people to carry on his work. Both their firms—Antonopoulos’s praXarc and Charlee’s Watermark Interiors—have been involved on a broad range of projects, including the renovation of numerous historic buildings and projects focused on the forms and concepts of high modernism. When a local software entrepreneur, Charles Huggins, bought the house, he sought out the couple with a plan: Huggins wanted to turn the house into a venue for entertaining that could be rented out for charitable and commercial events, taking full advantage of its voluptuous forms and its remarkable vantage point. As the architect, Antonopoulos followed a scheme that Deaton had mapped out to enlarge Sculptured House. He

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‘A MYTHOLOGY GREW UP AROUND THE HOUSE THAT IT WAS OWNED BY HUGH HEFNER OR ELVIS. THERE WERE ALL KINDS OF STORIES.’

Left and below: The elliptical tub and shower stall feature glass tiles in graduated tones of plum, turquoise, and chartreuse. For the curved corrugated glass-tile walls, a soft palette of muted lavender, pink, lichen gold-green accented with gold and silver offers a striking contrast to the white fine plaster finish that prevails throughout the home’s interiors.

added a 5,000-square-foot wing—in the form of a rounded berm— underground, below the clamshell, along with a small two-storey cylindrical tower spoked with concrete and steel mullions. The addition houses a new garage, a grand guest suite, and public rooms; on top, at ground level, is a large terrace. The new layout presented a fresh canvas for Antonopoulos and Charlee, and the removal of some of the clamshell’s original rooms and functions allowed them to open up the home into the poetic form set in motion by Charles Deaton. “Essentially, we divided it into a public zone, below ground, and a private zone, which is the original house,” Antonopoulos says. The base of the original house—two levels—became more guest rooms. The original three bedrooms were turned into one master suite, and the original main floor became a white-on-white mod lounge behind a veil of glass. That lounge was furnished with an array of classic modernist furniture – sympathetic sculptural work by Eero Saarinen and Arne Jacobsen. Throughout the house, Charlee added new finishes that are in keeping with the bold colours and bulging forms of the early 1960s. “I was really driven to honour what he had done,” she says, “and also to add my own layer of design on top of it.” It was her idea to create transom windows all the way along the interior walls in the original space, making the whole arc of the shell visible from within. And in the living room, she stacked luxurious

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Opposite: The house gives the sense of emerging out of the sloping terrain to proffer expansive views of the city of Denver and the Continental Divide. The lively colour palette in the elaborate master suite (right) and guest bedroom (below) suggest a fun take on mid-’60s modern. Watermelon Seed Beds, custom-built by Feelini, based on Charles Deaton’s design.

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Bisazza mosaic tile, adding a wash of colour that lightens gradually up to the top of the room as the concrete turns into a curve. It’s a departure from but also a complement to Charles Deaton’s original work, full of verve and craft. Charlee believes that her father would be proud of the finished product, which has brought the house back to life, now geared to enjoyment and entertainment. And still there are very few rectangles to be seen. Says Charlee, “He used to say, ‘People aren’t made of straight lines. Why should buildings be?’ ”

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The cabin is clad in hot-rolled steel, which, when left untreated, will rust and age naturally.

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TAKE SHELTER A UNIQUE MOUNTAIN CABIN PACKS PLENTY OF SMARTS INTO ITS SMALL FOOTPRINT, AND THEN PACKS UP EASILY WHEN ITS OWNER HEADS BACK TO CITY LIFE. BY MARGARET GLASS PHOTOGRAPHY BY UNDINE PRÖHL

There’s a small but unavoidable downside to owning a vacation home: It is … a second home. This means all the issues and responsibilities that come with home ownership—maintenance, security, stewardship—present themselves, again. It’s double the workload, and the necessary tasks come at a remove, sometimes considerable, from the owner’s home base. Throw in a minor crisis, and all of the perceived benefits of a hideaway—remote location, openness to the natural world, even simplicity of lifestyle—can become serious drawbacks to keeping the house safe and sound.

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Above: The cabin’s owner, an outdoors enthusiast, doesn’t need luxury here. Plywood gives the interior a rustic warmth. Right: The 10’ by 18’ steel shutters can be closed all at once with a hand crank.

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For this highly efficient weekend cabin, located on the flood plain of a river near the British Columbia border with Washington state, the owner and the architect collaborated on a scheme—if not to tame the wild landscape, to at least be prepared and tucked in tightly when the outdoors makes its presence known. It’s a four-hour drive from the city residence of the owner, a sportsman and outdoors enthusiast who doesn’t need or want luxury at his mountain getaway. Still, for every concession to climate and setting, the architect of the cabin made a point of using his design solutions to tease out an additional benefit. Of first concern was the flood plain. The regular seasonal flooding in the area demanded a pre-emptive strike to avoid the inevitable soggy basement. Instead of a more typical low, squat cabin, Tom Kundig, a principal of Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig Architects, who likes to experiment, placed 20-foot-square living spaces on two levels and perched the structure on steel stilts to keep the river out; a car park and storage space are tucked below. Kundig also inverted the traditional hierarchy of living spaces, placing two tiny bedrooms and two baths on the middle floor and saving the upper floor for the open-plan kitchen, living room, and dining area. Thus the common areas, at three storeys off the ground, command dazzling views with a 360-degree vista of the forested valley, the river, and the surrounding snow-topped Cascades. The mandate to keep the weather out also inspired the cabin’s most unique design element: huge double-height shutters that slide over the windows on each of the four sides of the house. Suitably, for this retreat from the world, the shutters function on an extremely low-tech operating mechanism: a giant wheel that can be used to crank them all open on a bright morning and then close them tight before a gathering storm. No electronics here to create headaches on the weekend, either: Powering up the wheel calls for only a good dose of elbow grease. On a crisp cold day, when the leaves were still on the trees, photographer Undine Pröhl arrived at the cabin to record it against its backdrop of bright fall colour. It was critical, she felt, to photograph this “fun piece of architecture” just then, before winter settles in. “The light goes right through the building at this time of year, when the sun is low and all the shutters are opened up.” From a distance, the cabin’s façade offers an organized patchwork of rusted metal cladding alternating with large expanses of glass. Inside, “it’s like you’re in a tree house,” Pröhl says, “sitting up high, open on all sides to the outdoors.” Turn the wheel and the building becomes a fully unified structure—mysterious, sleek, and ruggedly individual. And when closed and shuttered, this cabin is as warm and dry and safe from intrusion as any bunker. Its owner can rest easy, whether safely in residence or far away and merely plotting his next escape to a mountain snug.

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BRITISH COLUMBIA LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

SUN PEAKS COLLECTION Located in British Columbia’s interior region, Sun Peaks is an easy 4.5 hour drive from Vancouver and one of the fastest growing four-season resorts in the province. Renowned for its light, dry powder snow and 2,000 hours of sunshine annually, Sun Peaks is one of Canada’s largest resorts with over 3,678 acres of skiable terrain spanning three mountains. In addition to skiing, experience golfing on the Graham Cooke designed 18 hole course, lift accessed mountain biking, hiking, plus nearby lakes, all enjoyable during the spring, summer and fall. The charming ski-through village has accommodations, shops, restaurants, spa and more. In 2010, Sun Peaks became BC’s first Mountain Resort Municipality and home to the ‘Centre for Balanced Education’ for resident children. For more information on this four-season award winning resort, visit www.sunpeaksresort.com LIZ FORSTER , JENNIFER LITTLECHILD, DARLA MILLER & LISA VILLAMO

1.877.578.5774 | sunpeaks@sothebysrealty.ca | sunpeakscollection.com

Photos Dom Koric & Adam Stein

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA sot he bysre a l t y.c a

PRESTIGIOUS TIMBER FRAME RETREAT

SLOPESIDE FOUR-SEASON RESORT HOME

4137 Douglas Court, Sun Peaks, BC | $4,295,000

4117 Sundance Dr., Sun Peaks, BC | $2,499,000 | #89303

Premier location, ultra convenient ski-in/ski-out access to chair lifts, endless mountain views and the distinct feeling of privacy and privilege. This timber frame masterpiece with outdoor fireplace, library, theatre and wine rooms, featuring reclaimed wood and rock finishes, radiant heat with snow melt and superb attention to detail throughout, is fully furnished including grand piano.

Grand fully furnished slope-side home in a premier ski-in/ski-out location in award winning Sun Peaks Resort. Just steps from Village amenities, featuring impressive arched timber frame great room with massive rock-faced fireplace and floor-to-ceiling windows, gourmet kitchen, private top floor master suite and copper clad windows and doors.

SKI-IN | SKI-OUT GREEN HOME

LUXURIOUS LOG HOME

4206 Bella Vista Dr., Sun Peaks, BC | $1,790,000 | #87658

2461 Fairways Dr., Sun Peaks, BC | $999,900

This EnerGuide rated â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Green Homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; boasts awesome mountain and valley views and backs onto a main ski run. Featuring exposed timber construction, 4 bedrooms with ensuite baths, gourmet kitchen and expansive great room with vaulted ceiling, soaring windows and grand floor-to-ceiling rock fireplace. Comfortable radiant in-floor heat throughout.

Handcrafted log home located in four-season Sun Peaks Resort. Within walking distance to chair lifts and village amenities, adjacent to the golf course and backing onto forested ski terrain, this home is just steps from the planned West Morrisey chair lift. Spacious open floor plan, huge deck with hot tub, games room, gourmet kitchen and spectacular master suite.

LIZ FORSTER

1.250.682.2289 | lforster@sothebysrealty.ca | sunpeakscollection.com

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

ELK RIVER LODGE

BRIDGE CREEK ESTATE

Sparwood, BC | $1,780,000 | #K187217

100 Mile House, BC | $8,850,000 | #V4023709

This 92 acre property on Elk River, in the East Kootenays of BC, Canada, offers world-class fly fishing & hunting. Only 25 miles north of Fernie BC, Sparwood is 3½ hours southwest of Calgary. Fenced for horses, 6 bedroom restored 1910 home, barns and outbuildings, opportunity to develop for high use. Long inclusion list of chattels. landucci.ca/9

Founded in 1912, Bridge Creek Estate currently operates on over 2,400 acres of deeded land and 2,700 acres of grazing & woodlot licenses, making it one of the largest ranches in the South Cariboo of BC. This historic family ranch is a unique operation combining environmentally sensitive practices, modern infrastructure, beautiful buildings and a stunning land-base. landucci.ca/35

ALI LANDUCCI

1.877.816.8163 | alanducci@sothebysrealty.ca | landucci.ca

AT YOUR LEISURE - TOTAL PRIVACY 5437 Clearwater Valley Rd., Clearwater, BC | $1,100,000 | #90888 This 1997 spacious 2,700 sq.ft., custom designed home sits on 65 acres in Wells Gray Park, offers two storeys of bright open spaces for living and dining with an open kitchen concept on the second floor, 16 ft. vaulted ceilings and large floor-to-ceiling south exposure windows. Two covered decks up to 120 sq.ft. to enjoy the spectacular views of mountains, the creek and forest. There are 4 bedrooms with the master bedroom, bathroom and laundry room upstairs and 3 bedrooms, bathroom, cold room and recreation room on the lower level. Efficient in-floor heating on both floors, steel roof, satellite dish for media programming, security and audio system roughed-in. Two car attached garage. The heritage log cabin on the property is excellent for guest house usage. STAN VAN WOERKENS

1.604.306.2550 | svanwoerkens@sothebysrealty.ca | sothebysrealty.ca

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA sot he bysre a l t y.c a

EDMONTON CONTEMPORARY 13619 Buena Vista Rd., Edmonton, AB | $1,500,000 | #E3210735 Designed by Edmonton architect Wayne H. Wright, this multi-level West Coast contemporary styled home near the University of Alberta is set on a large secluded, naturally forested property. The River Valley Park System is a short walk away as are local and major shops with quick access to downtown, major arts centers, major hospitals and International Airports. The interior finishing of this solid, soundproof, 4 bedroom home includes lighting and hardware of commercial standard, extensive use of mahogany, 12 ft. high cedar ceiling and open brick fireplace. All rooms, including living room, have floor-to-ceiling windows with casement openings. The living room and solarium open onto secluded cedar decking and two heated garages give direct access to the house. NANCY- JEAN O’CARROLL

1.604.805.7053 | nocarroll@sothebysrealty.ca | nancyjean.ca

THACKER MOUNTAIN HOME 21377 Thacker Mountain Rd., Hope, BC | $1,350,000 | #H1001737 This spectacular West Coast styled home is located in Hope, BC, a 90 minute drive east of Vancouver. Built of cedar, rock and glass, the 9 year old custom-built 3,400 sq.ft. luxury home is one of Hope’s premier residences. It is perfectly positioned overlooking the Fraser and Coquihalla Rivers and the town of Hope, with commanding views of mountain, river and valley. Designed to accommodate a casual lifestyle that emphasizes the relationship between indoors and outdoors, a 22 ft. vaulted cedar ceilings, timber beams and walls of glass that reflect the glowing interiors while multi-level decks open interior spaces to countless perfect moment experiences. Design wise and meticulously presented, this robust home offers enduring natural beauty. NANCY- JEAN O’CARROLL

1.604.805.7053 | nocarroll@sothebysrealty.ca | nancyjean.ca

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

CONTEMPORARY MASTERPIECE

SPECTACULAR YALETOWN PENTHOUSE

3265 Dickinson Cres., West Vancouver, BC | $4,580,000 | #V855201

1199 Marinaside Cres., Vancouver, BC | $10,000,000 | #V806717

Custom-designed, one year old home featuring 5 ensuite bedrooms up, plus nanny ensuite down. All principal rooms enjoy spectacular views and exposures. Great outdoor areas and decks with amazing infinity pool off the family room. Truly a piece of contemporary art in a sought after family location close to all the best schools. Virtual tour at carros.ca

Completely rebuilt to world-class standards with every conceivable extra for an exciting lifestyle. 5,000 sq.ft. of sophisticated modern design with an open floor plan. Fully furnished and equipped to exacting standards. The private roof top deck also has spectacular 360 degree allencompassing views. Virtual tour at carros.ca

GREG CARROS

1.604.603.5730 | gcarros@sothebysrealty.ca | carros.ca

THE ALEXIS

CLASSIC TUDOR STYLE HOME

708 – 27 Alexander St., Vancouver, BC | $1,025,000 | #V815671

6570 Marine Cres., Vancouver, BC | $4,300,000 | #V847931

This suite flows seamlessly, which is a credit to designer Patricia Gray’s professional training in Feng Shui design. One-of-a-kind loft space is in the heart of Vancouver’s historic Gastown District & located in “The Alexis” one of the area’s first & most popular heritage conversions. Virtual tour at andrewcarros.com

Classic Tudor style home in a prime Kerrisdale location. Perched high on Marine Crescent with unparalleled views, many of this home’s original features have been kept intact. A grandiose property offering spacious bedrooms and classic living areas, there is also ample opportunity to develop into your dream home. Virtual tour at andrewcarros.com

ANDREW CARROS

1.604.787.2882 | acarros@sothebysrealty.ca | andrewcarros.com

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA sot he bysre a l t y.c a

PROVENCE INSPIRED 2242 Inglewood Ave., West Vancouver, BC | $2,996,000 | #V845578 Provence inspired mexi-terranean home in the Dundarave area. Walk to shops, restaurants & Seawall. This 6 bedroom family home reflects uncompromising standards & features the best in design, quality and finishes. Open kitchen with hand forged solid copper counter & sinks, 13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; great room ceilings, South American wood planking & gorgeous master suite with ocean views. Gated with separate Casita.

CALVIN LINDBERG

1.604.351.3000 | clindberg@sothebysrealty.ca | calvinlindberg.com

&

POLLY B . REITZE

1.604.671.7076 | preitze@sothebysrealty.ca

SPECTACULAR WATERFRONT 2 Strachan Point Rd., West Vancouver, BC | $2,890,000 | #V830957 Private oceanfront home with 100 ft. of low bank waterfront. Completely rebuilt approximately 10 years ago, this home was the winner of numerous Gold Georgie Awards. Featuring an open floor plan, floor-to-ceiling windows opening to an entertainment-size oceanside patio with sunken hot tub & a place to moor your boat. Separate 301 sq.ft. unit/studio attached to the house by a covered walkway.

CALVIN LINDBERG

1.604.351.3000 | clindberg@sothebysrealty.ca | calvinlindberg.com

&

POLLY B . REITZE

1.604.671.7076 | preitze@sothebysrealty.ca

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

CLASSICO PENTHOUSE

SPECTACULAR PRIVATE WATERFRONT

3801-1328 West Pender St., Vancouver, BC | $3,499,000 | #V832163

5290 Gulf Place, West Vancouver, BC | $3,388,000 | #V847719

This penthouse feels like a house perched on top of the city. Over 1,500 sq.ft. of outdoor living space on 3 decks offers sweeping panoramic views. With over 2,250 sq.ft., including 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms on two levels, there is plenty of space to spread out and relax. The flow of the rooms offers a large gathering area around the open kitchen, dining and living rooms with immediate access to the main deck that overlooks Coal Harbour.

A spectacular private waterfront lifestyle! This contemporary home enjoys some of the finest West Vancouver views. Fantastic detail and finishing throughout the 3,135 sq.ft. of living space with sliding glass doors opening to a further 2,800 sq.ft. of outdoor patio and decks.

A STORYBOOK HOUSE

FALSE CREEK WATERFRONT VIEWS

1849 Esquimalt Ave., West Vancouver, BC | $2,388,000 | #V849210

2601-638 Beach Ave., Vancouver, BC | $1,238,000 | #V855699

This one of a kind home is located on one of the quietest streets in West Vancouver. Completely remodeled home with a gourmet kitchen and a living area that is designed for entertaining. Terracotta stone and hardwood floors are throughout the 2-storey vaulted beam ceiling home.

False Creek waterfront views from the Icon building. 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom & office suite with over-height ceilings. Includes gas fireplace, central air conditioning, high-end kitchen appliances and resort-style amenities at Club Oasis. 24 hour concierge, pets and rentals allowed.

JAMIE MACDOUGALL & GRANT CONNELL

1.604.992.2282 | jmacdougall@sothebysrealty.ca & gconnell@sothebysrealty.ca | grantandjamie.com

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA sot he bysre a l t y.c a

CANADIAN COUNTRY CASTLE 29488 58th Ave., Abbotsford, BC | $6,900,000 | #F1025353 One of Canada’s largest estates of unmatched quality and design settled on a private and rural 20 acres, just one hour outside of Vancouver. This home features every amenity possible and offers an unrivalled lifestyle. Indestructibly built of steel and concrete and exceptional quality of all equipment and appliances throughout. Two independent heating systems: Geo Thermal and 2 Natural Gas furnaces as backup. This home has its own water treatment system amongst its numerous sophisticated features including tunnel to spa and pool. Please call for a more detailed report of this mansion.

LAURIS TALMEY

1.604.734.1874 | ltalmey@sothebysrealty.ca

&

JAMIE MACDOUGALL

1.604.992.2282 | jmacdougall@sothebysrealty.ca | grantandjamie.com

THE FALLS – VICTORIA’S CLASSIC LANDMARK

EXQUISITE PEAK DRIVE CHALET

905, 708 Burdett Ave., Victoria, BC | $1,095,000 | #276646

Whistler, BC | $4,500,000 | #V839225

This furnished 2 bedroom plus den luxury suite is the ultimate for home or destination living. With its walls of glass this home offers towering southwest views of the harbour, Parliament buildings and the museum. Located steps from the historical Empress Hotel, downtown and waterfront. Boasts a gym, outdoor pool plus towering cascading waterfalls. Simply deluxe.

This exquisite 4 bedroom Whistler home offers stunning views of Blackcomb and Whistler Mountain. Expert craftsmanship and extraordinary architectural design combine to produce this masterpiece located in an exclusive enclave of residences on the peak of Blueberry Hill. Very impressive lifestyle with all the features that you demand.

PAULETTE M. MARSOLLIER

JUDY SHAW

1.250.888.3297 | pmarsollier@sothebysrealty.ca

1.604.902.0357 | jshaw@sothebysrealty.ca

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


BRITISH COLUMBIA LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

CAIRN GARROCH

ARCHITECTURAL OCEANFRONT

160 Wilkie Way, Salt Spring Island, BC | $1,698,000 | #284940

228 Arbutus Rd., Salt Spring Island, BC | $2,195,000 | #259781

Prominently positioned above the seaside town of Ganges, Cairn Garroch thrills from the moment you catch its site on the way up the mountainside. The house only excites more when you open the door, its lines and environments are in a word - sexy. Architecturally, the house is more of an atmosphere than a shelter in a way that only enhances mood as it seductively reveals its views, room by room. The technical details factor every high end modern amenity. This is powerful design and once smitten, there may be no going back.

An extraordinary waterfront property designed to accommodate a casual lifestyle, this home is perhaps one of the most stunning and expressive in use of site and outlook. The house rides its topography and keys on the water, with views maintained throughout the residence. Doors spill on to oceanside sundecks and garden terraces, allowing “open house” to become a way of life. Stone interior elements and hefty timber beams lend permanence and natural beauty, while the open concept layout is timeless and so functional for modern living.

SIGNATURE STYLE ON THE SHORE

ARBUTUS HOUSE

170 Rourke Rd., Salt Spring Island, BC | $1,645,000 | #281059

225 Arbutus Rd., Salt Spring Island, BC | $1,750,000 | #266479

A porte-cochère entry is a welcoming beginning to this 3,500 sq.ft. West Coast showpiece with an abundance of that light dances throughout with banks of oversize windows and skylights. Set on a private 2 acres with steps down to the near 200 feet of shoreline, it beckons the beachcomber to discover the hidden treasures of the sea.

This significant walk-on beachfront home enjoys sunsets and open ocean views that can hardly be put into words. Vaulted open spaces and windows instead of walls welcome the waterfront to nearly every room in the house. Intricate beam work and ridge line roof windows shower the house in luster and light. Superb location with a brilliant design.

CHRIS & DARLENE HOBBS

1.888.697.1550 | chobbs@sothebysrealty.ca & dhobbs@sothebysrealty.ca | thehobbs.ca

E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated.


ONTARIO / BRITISH COLUMBIA sot he bysre a l t y.c a

OLD WORLD STYLE IN LYTTON PARK

SECLUDED 6 ACRE LAKEFRONT ESTATE

Toronto, ON | $2,895,000 | #C1937360

83 Lele Ln., South Frontenac Township, ON | $2,500,000 | #X1929316

Old world style in Lytton Park one of Toronto’s finest neighbourhoods. Designed and built to meet the standards of discerning owners who know quality when they see it. The classic brick and limestone architecture blends gracefully into one of the finest established neighbourhoods. Nestled in a parklike setting, this home offers a quiet, calming respite just minutes from Toronto’s downtown core.

Labelle Lake Resort is a magnificent 7,500 sq.ft. custom-built home situated on a secluded 6 acre point of land on Labelle Lake, ½ hour north of Kingston. This luxurious home offers 270 degree views of the water and is the only home on the lake. Exceptional millwork, features and finishes compliment the natural and rugged landscape.

DAVID DUNKELMAN*

1.416.960.9995 | ddunkelman@sothebysrealty.ca

LISA CLARK*

1.416.258.6053 | lclark@sothebysrealty.ca

PRESTIGIOUS & DESIRABLE LOCATION

MAGNIFICENT OCEAN FRONT LOTS

1267 Oceanwood Lane, Victoria, BC | $1,329,000 | #283201

Channel View Way, Mayne Island, BC | From $429,000

A virtually new, custom-built, 5 bedroom, 6 bathroom luxury 4,367 sq.ft. home. Protected woodlands surround this private enclave of premium homes. Features carriage house, chic marble & mahogany kitchen, decadent master suite, outdoor patio & courtyard with kitchen & gas fireplace, media room, bar & wine cellar, top appliances, state-of-the-art wiring & more.

Five 5 acre waterfront lots to choose from with 72 acres of Common Property. Stunning treed property with deluxe building sites. Bare Land Strata with with boat launch, many trails to ocean and viewpoint access, some moorage potential. Serviced, Perc tested, drilled wells, minutes from BC Ferry terminal with easy access from Vancouver, Seattle and Victoria.

JAMES LEBLANC SCOTT PIERCY

1.250.812.7212 | jleblanc@sothebysrealty.ca 1.866.599.3933 | spiercy@sothebysrealty.ca

GREG ROWLAND

1.250.665.6868 | growland@sothebysrealty.ca

**Broker *Sales Representative. Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Brokerage. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal.


ONTARIO LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

STYLISH ELEGANCE WITH A VIEW

LIVE IN LUXURY

1503 - 155 St. Clair Ave. West, Toronto, ON | $2,940,000

305 - 155 St. Clair Ave. West, Toronto, ON | $1,040,000

With direct elevator access and only 3 suites per floor this 2 bedroom, 2½ bathroom unit with library offers full-service concierge and 24 hr. valet. North, West, South views of Forest Hill, Lake Ontario and Casa Loma. Fireplace, balcony, terrace for BBQ. Choose your dream kitchen, bathroom and flooring. Brian Gluckstein designed spa and entertainment facilities.

Award-winning boutique building. Glamorous porte-cochère with cobblestone driveway, garden and fountain. Full-service concierge and 24 hr valet. Elegant open concept, 1 bedroom plus den with fireplace. Spacious kitchen with marble dining bar. Wolfe Gas cooktop, SubZero, Miele DW. Master with 2 walk-in closets and 18 ft. balcony.

LISA- MARIE DOOREY *

1.416.960.9995 | ldoorey@sothebysrealty.ca

MUSKOKA FOUR-SEASON COTTAGE

GRAND HARBOUR CONTEMPORARY

Muskoka, ON | $1,999,000 | #X1977183

2285 Lake Shore Blvd. West, Toronto, ON | $959,000 | #W1980694

Four acres of serene forest in private bay with 285 feet of lake front only 90 minutes from Toronto. 5,800 sq.ft. 7 bedroom, 4 bathroom home with modern conveniences, country warmth, charm and sophistication. Muskoka room, fitness, library, stone fireplace, dock, boats, furnished turnkey paradise.

European-chic designed condo. This stunning 2 bedroom (or 1 bedroom plus den) 1,200 sq.ft. suite has been completely rebuilt with impeccable taste using the highest quality European fixtures, finishes & craftsmanship. Spectacular views over the lake and city skyline with abundant terrace & balcony. Yacht club at your doorstep. Waterfront living on a luxurious scale.

LISA- MARIE DOOREY *

JAMES BURTNICK**

1.416.960.9995 | ldoorey@sothebysrealty.ca

1.416.450 1942 | jburtnick@sothebysrealty.ca

**Broker *Sales Representative. Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Brokerage. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal.


ONTARIO sot he bysre a l t y.c a

EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOM BUILT FAMILY HOME

STYLISH ELEGANCE, SOUTH EAST OAKVILLE

201 Dianne Ave., Oakville, ON | $3,395,000 | #2021098

222 Morrison Rd., Oakville, ON | $2,689,000 | #2022047

Exceptional custom home on mature ravine property. Outdoor oasis with Gunite pool & waterfall, hot tub, cabana and kitchen all perfect for entertaining. Elegant home with formal dining room, gourmet kitchen, sunroom with gas fireplace, great room, 4 bedrooms, home theatre, wine storage, exercise room & walk-out to backyard. Exceptional attention to detail throughout.

This classic tudor revival, circa 1912 heritage home boasts a refined elegance. Over 5,000 sq.ft. of finished space on ½ acre lot amidst century old hardwoods and extensive perennial gardens. Highest quality of materials and attention to detail. Geo-thermal HVAC system. The Carriage house has a 400 sq.ft. loft for studio/office or guest suite & oversized two car garage.

ELEGANT HOME WITH MULTI FAMILY OPTION

UNIQUE & EXQUISITE CONTEMPORARY HOME

370 Poplar Dr., Oakville, ON | $2,895,000 | #2021582

335 Maple Grove Dr., Oakville,ON | $2,649,000 | #2023499

Exceptional executive family home sits on a 1.1 acre private property on a quiet cul de sac in South East Oakville. Unique potential for a combined family offering an exceptional 2 storey in-law or nanny suite, easily retrofited to a future main floor master suite. Stunning gardens, paths and patio area, all surrounded by mature trees and plantings.

Minimalist architecture at its finest! Exceptional open concept plan with 5 bedrooms, stunning baths, designer lower level with home theatre and 1,200 bottle wine cellar. Outdoor living space showcases an outdoor heated dining pavilion, a 60 ft. concrete pool, a 17 ft. waterfall and numerous other state of the art features.

THE RUTH ANNE WINTER TEAM

1.905.845.8908 | ruthannewinter.com

**Broker *Sales Representative. Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty Canada, Brokerage. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal.


ONTARIO LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

PRIVATE WATERFRONT ESTATE

ROCKSDRIFT HILL

1400 Sandy Bay Rd., Georgian Bay, ON | $4,988,000 | #X1984804

4998 Tenth Line, Erin, ON | $5,900,000 | #X1974157

Located on 24+ acres, this 8 bedroom residence boasts approximately 600 ft. of waterfront with white, sandy beaches! Designed to appreciate spectacular views over Georgian Bay, this 9,000+ sq.ft. residence boasts a four-season sunroom and indoor pool. The acreage also includes a boathouse with living quarters and a 1 bedroom guest cabin.

Enter past the 4 bedroom gatehouse and follow the winding driveway alongside the stocked pond to this stunning residence resting on over 165 acres of rolling countryside. Stroll down the flagstone path to the 5 stall barn and adjacent drive shed, or meander across the grounds to the inground pool and patio.

CONTEMPORARY COUNTRY DESIGN

CUSTOM WOODLAND ESTATE

2862 St. John’s Sideroad, Stouffville, ON | $1,880,000 | #N1914261

65 Offord Cres., Aurora, ON | $4,498,000 | #N1952919

Enjoy the privacy of country living only minutes from the city with this unique 10,000+ sq.ft. custombuilt home on almost 10 acres. The contemporary open-concept design provides many layout options and with multiple kitchens, this home provides the perfect opportunity for intergenerational or multiple-family living.

This remarkable residence is located on 2 acres of private, wooded terrain offers 15,000+ sq.ft. of living space. A separate apartment makes the West wing ideal for intergenerational living. Entertain guests in the great room, complete with a wine cellar, cigar room/study, media area, billiards room, and 17’x10’ bar area.

ALLISON PARENT

1.416.910.4507 | aparent@sothebysrealty.ca | allisonparent.com

**Broker *Sales Representative. Sotheby’s International Realty Canada, Brokerage. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal.


QUÉBEC sot he bysre a l t y.c a

THE ULTIMATE DOWNTOWN VIEW

DOMAINES DE LA RIVE SUD

1200 Ouest de Maisonneuve, Montréal, QC | $2,100,000 | #8324227

Brossard, QC | $1,499,000 | #8339095

Custom high-end designed apartment with exceptional layout and finishes offering spectacular unobstructed panoramic views of Mount-Royal and the downtown core. Located in a prestigious building, this sunny 2,170 sq.ft. corner unit includes 3 bedrooms, private terrace, 2 garages, 24/7 security and is surrounded by Montréal’s finest dining, cafés and shopping.

This magnificent home in Brossard’s prestigious “Domaines de la Rive Sud” sits on an immaculately landscaped corner lot of over 21,000 sq.ft. neighbouring the Quartier Dix30, this home boasts 4 plus 2 bedrooms, 4 plus 1 baths, 3 gas fireplaces, sauna, saltwater pool and much more. Attention to detail makes this residence ideal for sumptuous living and effortless entertaining.

ANNE - MARIE TURCOTTE *

COLIN WORRELL*

1.514.591.9712 | amturcotte@sothebysrealty.ca

1.514.889.4838 | cworrell@sothebysrealty.ca

333 SHERBROOKE

WHERE WINTER DOES NOT EXIST

333 Sherbrooke St. E., Montréal, QC | From $399,000+ taxes

Tropiques Nord | Montréal, QC | $1,495,000 | #8392253

Your home in the Plateau. There is a prestigious address on Montréal’s most elegant thoroughfare: an internationally renowned residential project with exceptional sights, in the heart of one of the most cosmopolitan cities. Just steps from the city centre and its buzzing business district, the 333 Sherbrooke is also on the edge of the legendary Plateau Mont-Royal quarter.

Unique waterfront location, yet only 5 minutes to downtown by private hourly shuttle bus. Luxurious 3,500 sq.ft., corner condo offering 2 plus 1 bedrooms & huge terrace overlooking a lush tropical garden, waterfall and indoor lagoon shaped salt water pool. Over-size master suite with fireplace, huge living room ideally suited for entertaining with sweeping views.

CYRILLE GIRARD*

1.514.582.2810 | cgirard@sothebysrealty.ca

DAVID WILKES*

1.514.947.5152 | dwilkes@sothebysrealty.ca

*Real Estate Broker. **Certified Real Estate Broker. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated. Real estate agency.


QUÉBEC LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

BALMORAL GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB

LES COURS MT-ROYAL

Morin Heights, QC | $1,349,000 | #8303087

Downtown, Montréal, QC | $2,050,000 | #8387341

Executive home on the most prestigious street in this golf community, offering stunning views of the Laurentian mountains. Enjoy this open concept home complete with 2 plus 1 bedrooms, recently designed pool and terrace. Only minutes to premier ski centers and 40 minutes from Montréal, this is the best of all worlds.

Exquisitely renovated, this 2,000 sq.ft. condo is available to you for a luxurious zen life in the heart of downtown Montréal. Completely unique! Exotic high-quality materials and all furnishings all included. Ambiance entirely controlled by domotic system. Direct access to underground city and high-end shopping. Reputed 24 hr. security and doorman services.

1.514.963.6311 | krossy@sothebysrealty.ca

KAREN ROSSY **

ISABELLE PERREAULT *

1.514.266.2949 | iperreault@sothebysrealty.ca

LAKEVIEW HILLSIDE CASTLE

AUTHENTIC CANADIAN LOG CABIN

Mont-Tremblant, QC | $3,950,000 | #8392860

Labelle, QC | $529,000 | #8387491

This 10,000 sq.ft. architectural beauty offers breathtaking views of Lac Tremblant. Features of this elegant multiple-storey home, whose details echo its European influences, include home automation, a 100% stone exterior construction, abundant windows, wrought-iron work, four handcrafted circular staircases and two massive stone fireplaces. Luxury of the highest standards.

This house was built with love by its owner, every detail in its construction was tended to with care and practicality. Traditional board and batten wood finish on the outside and pine tongue-and-groove finishing in the interior. Just 20 minutes from Mont-Tremblant Resort and seconds from crosscountry skiing, cycling, hiking just about any outdoor sport. Come see a home built by a craftsmen.

1.819.429.9019 | hratsch@sothebysrealty.ca

HERBERT RATSCH†

ROBERT C . OUIMET *

1.514.212.0533 | rouimet@sothebysrealty.ca

*Real Estate Broker. **Certified Real Estate Broker. Sotheby's International Realty Québec HR . E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated. Real estate agency. †


QUÉBEC sot he bysre a l t y.c a

LE CAVERHILL Old Montréal, QC | $2,495,000 | #8419229 Glorious, completely renovated two-storey, 3 bedroom condo situated in Old Montréal in the historic Caverhill building (1865). Featured on HGTV’s “House & Home” as well as numerous upscale magazines. This brilliant architectural masterpiece with enormous terrace has been completely renovated. The luxurious finishings and exquisite details are the hallmarks of this over 2,800 sq.ft. apartment. This sophisticated residence, entirely transformed by architect Paul Grenier is the epitome of style.

LIZA KAUFMAN†

1.514.232.5932 | lkaufman@sothebysrealty.ca

EXCEPTIONAL LAND OPPORTUNITY

IMPECCABLE WATERFRONT

Brownsburg-Chatham, QC | $2,300,000 | #8433468

Memphremagog Lake, QC | $1,749,000 | #8400876

Located in the heart of the Québec Laurentians, this expansive 347 acres of pristine forest is situated within minutes of the Carling Lake Golf Resort, only 45 minutes from the MontTremblant ski resort and one hour from the city of Montréal. This property’s abundance of natural attractions, is a paradise for sportsmen, fishermen and outdoor adventure lovers.

An inspiring home that has views as expansive as your vision. Architectural and contemporary residence with 120 feet directly on Memphremagog Lake. Maximum light and lots of windows. This California styled retreat boasts a sandy beach and flat land access. Divided in two separate sections, perfect for guests and/or family retreats.

1.514.803.1375 | llipari@sothebysrealty.ca

LISA LIPARI*

LOUISE LATREILLE *

1.514.577.2009 | llatreille@sothebysrealty.ca

*Real Estate Broker. **Certified Real Estate Broker. Sotheby's International Realty Québec LK . E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated. Real estate agency. †


QUÉBEC LOCAL EXPERTISE , GLOBAL CONNECTIONS .

A FAMILY HOME

1200 OUEST DE MAISONNEUVE

Montréal, QC | $1,750,000 | #8421193

Montréal, QC | $1,875,000 | #8345472

Unique craftsmanship defines this 4 plus 1 bedroom, 3 bathroom, custom built residence. The hand-carved stone facade and its copper roof tower set the standard of quality found throughout. A classy home offering a large backyard with in-ground pool and facing a beautiful park with pond on Jean-Gascon.

Meeting your highest expectations, this magnificent penthouse with mezzanine offers breathtaking views, open space, two large terraces and two indoor parking spaces all in the very heart of downtown! Prestigious address, sumptuous lobby, 24 hr security, heated pool on magnificently landscaped terrace, fully equipped gym with sauna and steam room.

LYDIA ABOULIAN*

1.514.463.6333 | laboulian@sothebysrealty.ca

PHYLLIS A . TELLIER**

1.514.924.4062 | ptellier@sothebysrealty.ca

WATER & CITY VIEWS IN MONTRÉAL

FOREST BROOK MANOR

Montréal, QC | $1,295,000 | #8432331

Lake Placid, New York | $2,995,000 | #8412120

Cosmopolitan urban living with expansive city and water views. Exquisite modern design, this 2,300+ sq.ft. condo is adorned by three outdoor terraces. Double grand foyer leads to open and sun-filled entertainment and living spaces where the most accomplished chef would feel right at home in this gourmet kitchen. Prestigious full-service building with shuttle service to downtown Montréal.

Situated within the Whiteface Club & Resort, this mansion has been restored to the splendour of its time with modern amenities. The 8,000 sq.ft. home is positioned on a hill which provides panoramic views of the Adirondacks. The five acres of wooded land ensure privacy year round. Club membership provides access to golf, tennis, beach and marina.

ROGER QUIRION*

1.514.246.2017 | rquirion@sothebysrealty.ca

LILLIAN LEONARD**

1. 514.949.5211 | lleonard@sothebysrealty.ca

*Real Estate Broker. **Certified Real Estate Broker. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated. Real estate agency.


QUÉBEC sot he bysre a l t y.c a

UNRIVALLED ELEGANCE

UNIQUE WATERFRONT

Nun’s Island, QC | $1,075,000 | #8435786

Saint-Anicet, QC | $1,350,000 | #8407204

Emerging from the most prestigious tip of Nun’s Island, a haven of water and greenery perfectly blending with the landscape! Offering a breathtaking view of the St. Lawrence River, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 garages, indoor & outdoor pools, spa, fitness center, terrace, easy access to golf course and bicycle paths. The perfect sanctuary just minutes from downtown Montréal.

Magnificent 200,000 sq.ft. estate featuring a spacious 3 bedroom bungalow with solarium, 1 bedroom guest house, 3 bedroom cottage, pottery shed, detached garage, peacock aviary and boat house (which is an acquired right). Fabulous sunsets and amazing views. Exceptional gardens with cascading ponds. Entertainer’s delight with over 300 feet of shoreline on Lake St. François!

1. 514.923.9280 | frassi@sothebysrealty.ca

FADIA RASSI*

PENELOPE VILAGOS*

1.514.779.5122 | pvilagos@sothebysrealty.ca

THE ULTIMATE RETREAT

LA MAISON MARGUERITE HAY

Ile d’Orléans, Ste. Pétronille, QC | $1,895,000 | #8347100

Montréal, QC | $1,495,000 | #8328750

Extraordinary estate of grand luxury and impeccable quality. Breathtaking vistas on the St. Lawrence River and Québec City. Features 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3 living rooms, 4 fireplaces, 3 terraces of which one is interior, 2 level garage, wine cellar, home theatre, gym, sauna, central air conditioning, indoor training lap pool and electric gate. A must see!

Classified as a Historical Monument, the Marguerite Hay residence is an urban home of neoclassic inspiration, whose original construction dates back to the 1,800’s. One of the oldest in the Saint Jacques neighbourhood, the residence has been completely restored and is sited on a private landscaped lot. A comfortable home and unique heritage treasure.

STEEVE GILBERT *, PIERRE BLONDEAU*

CATHERINE DAVIS*

1.418.951.0770 | pblondeau@sothebysrealty.ca

1.514.966.2397 | cdavis@sothebysrealty.ca

*Real Estate Broker. **Certified Real Estate Broker. E&O.E: This information is from sources which we deem reliable, but must be verified by prospective purchasers and may be subject to change or withdrawal. Independently owned and operated. Real estate agency.


th

FLOOR PLANS

Natural Wonder THE LAYOUT AND DIMENSIONS OF THE WINDOWS IN THIS 3,700-SQ.-FT. HOUSE MAXIMIZE THE USE OF PASSIVE SOLAR ENERGY. (SEE STORY, P. 44)

First

Architecture: Blouin Tardif Location: Montreal, Que.

Second

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three-

All the Right Angles EVERY DESIGN FEATURE IN THIS VACATION HOME IS A RESPONSE TO ITS SETTING AT THE MEETING POINT OF OCEAN AND DESERT. (SEE STORY, P. 52)

First

Architecture: Longhi Architects Location: Lima, Peru

Second

Third

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WINTER 2 011

Where to find the architects, designers, products, and manufacturers in this issue DESIGNPHILE Milestone: Art in Fashion pp.17–19 Sanderson, sanderson-uk.com Collections: Off the Runway pp. 22–25 Alexander McQueen designs for The Rug Company. rugs, from $15,145; cushions, from $675. Available in Canada exclusively at Avenue Road. Avenue Road, avenue-road.com The Rug Company, therugcompany.info Virginia Johnson bedding: pillowcases, from $78; duvets, $195; quilts, $325. Available at virginiajohnson.com. New in Fabrics pp. 28–31 Living in Colour Designers Guild Morelli in 01, Designers Guild Moyka in 01, Designers Guild Zephirine Winter 2010 collection; primavera.ca Robert Allen at Home Sunscape in colour Tropic; robertallendesign.com

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Dream Weaves Bermingham Adras silk ikat in B152, Oscar de la Renta Kublai Khan in Blue/Red, Oscar de la Renta Kublai Khan in Red/Gold; leejofa.com Take a Shine to It Pollack Silk Grille in Ice, Manuel Canovas Ronda in Aqua; primavera.ca S. Harris/Robert Kuo fabrics: Pleats I in Cream, Silk Clouds in Breeze, Dragon Swirl in Shale, Silk Clouds in Cream; bilbroughs.com Exhibitions: The Mundane and the Magnificent pp. 32–33 Everything Everyday, Vancouver Art Gallery, vanartgallery.bc.ca Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen, Museum of Modern Art, moma.org 19th-Century French Photographs from the National Gallery of Canada, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, mbam.qc.ca Maharaja: The Splendour of India’s Royal Courts, Art Gallery of Ontario, ago.net At Work: Hesse, Goodwin, Martin, Art Gallery of Ontario, ago.net Arboretum, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, artgalleryofnovascotia.ca

The Artistic Furniture of Charles Rohlfs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, metmuseum.org thelivingeffect, The Ottawa Art Gallery, ottawaartgallery.ca Stieglitz, Steichen, Strand, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, metmuseum.org Barb Hunt, The Rooms, therooms.ca Perceptions of Promise: Biotechnology, Society and Art, Glenbow Museum, glenbow.org Ken Lum, Vancouver Art Gallery, vanartgallery.bc.ca theravenscall.ca, Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, billreidgallery.ca Appreciation: Solo Traveller p. 34 Doris McCarthy Gallery, utsc.utoronto.ca/~dmg/ Books: Drawing Conclusions p. 35 D&M Publishers, douglas-mcintyre.com

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FROM THE GROUND UP Dream Building pp. 36–39 Acre Collective, theacre.ca COMMENT Imagine… pp. 40–42 muf, muf.co.uk Architecture Research Unit (ARU), aru.londonmet.ac.uk Lina Bo and P.M. Bardi Institute, institutobardi.com.br Sanaa, sanaa.co.jp ARCHITECTURE Natural Wonder pp. 44–50 Architecture by Blouin Tardif Architecture Environnement, btae.ca Bathroom counter/furniture, bookshelves, glass desk, kitchen cabinetry, designed by Blouin Tardif Architecture Environnement, btae.ca Bathroom counter/furniture, bookshelves, glass desk, kitchen cabinetry, manufactured

and installed by Ébénisterie Louiseville, ebenisterielouiseville.com Black vases, white chaises longues, maisoncorbeil.com/index.php/en Builder, Patrick St-Onge Renouveau Domiciliaire, patrickst-onge.com Lighting consultant, QUARTZ, quartz.com Motorized blind, Altex, altex.ca/index=eng.htm Motorized blind installation, Stores J Fauteux, 450-430-1820 Sofa, gwwilliam.com

ARCHITECTURE Not Thinking Straight pp. 70–79 Architecture by praXarc, praxarc.com Interior design by Watermark Interiors, charlee@watermark-interiors.com Terrazzo bathroom flooring and glass tile, store.bisazzausa.com Custom cabinetry manufacture, Steve Rheinhart Studios, reinhardtstudios.com Design of cabinetry, sofa, throw pillows, Charlee Deaton, Watermark Interiors, as above

ARCHITECTURE All the Right Angles pp. 51–57 Architecture by Longhi Architects, longhiarchitect.com

ARCHITECTURE Take Shelter pp. 80–83 Architecture by Olson Kundig Architects, olsonkundigarchitects.com

INTERIOR DESIGN Master Class pp. 58–69 Interior design by PomaSteven Design & Architecture, pomasteven.com

GRACE NOTE p. 106 Architecture by gh3, gh3.ca Governor General’s Medals in Architecture, Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, raic.org

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Stoney Lake, Ont.

GRACE NOTE

Barely There

R

einterpreting the traditional boathouse, the Toronto architectural firm of gh3 built a contemporary all-glass live/work photographer’s studio on a granite foundation on Stoney Lake, in southern Ontario. The compact, transparent structure highlights its setting, serving as both backdrop to and centre of the 360-degree vistas of water, rock, and forest. With its austere white palette

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and steel frame, the glass house virtually blends into the site, taking on the ephemeral qualities of the mist and the lake year-round. As one of 12 projects that garnered Governor General’s Medals in Architecture in 2010, gh3’s glass house exemplified the criteria set out by the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts in selecting the award recipients—“originality, daring,

vision, and sensibility…in [blending] the conceptual and the technical to bring together truly inspired contemporary Canadian architecture.” Interior details are “impeccable,” noted the jury—“the depth of floor slabs, the relationship between glazing and railing, and the evidence of program, essentially ‘erasing’ as much as possible to bring emphasis to the site itself.” –Dali Castro

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PuraVida

©2010 Hansgrohe, Inc.

Discover pure life for the bathroom

PuraVida. Poetic purity and clarity of form defines the latest Hansgrohe collection. PuraVida, which translates to “pure life”, is the design i nspiration from Phoenix Design that reflects harmony, balance and emotion. Experience PuraVida and discover pure life for the bathroom.  Please visit www.hansgrohe.ca to view the entire collection.


INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN