300 Years of Irish Timekeeping

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300 Years of Irish Timekeeping

Presented by Timepiece Antique Clocks 57-58 Patrick St., Dublin 8 - 01 4540774


300 Years of Irish Timekeeping Foreword We are delighted to announce that this exhibition, showcasing 300 years of Irish timekeeping has come to fruition. After many evenings spent with our friends and colleagues of the Antiquarian Horological Society (Irish Section) lamenting the lack of published material on the subject of Irish Horology, we realised that from our stock and that of our clients and friends, we have a comprehensive collection of Irish timepieces. The time was right. In celebrating the wealthy history of clock and watch making in Ireland, against the political and social history of the last three centuries, we have endeavoured to show how Irish clocks were indeed crafted in Ireland. Irish clock and watchmakers who served their apprenticeships both here and abroad, were known for their fine skills and their work was appreciated by commissions coming from our near neighbours in Great Britain.

Irish Timekeepers 1710 - 1730 The Walnut Period Queen Anne / George I

Collating the exhibits and their heritage has been a source of great satisfaction to us. We take pride in being a part of this rich art, science and craft and continue to mark time. Taking place during the Irish & International Antiques Fair, we hope you find the exhibition informative and enjoyable and that it might encourage an interest in this important area of Irish history and niche craft. Kevin & Carol Chellar, Timepiece Antique Clocks, 2010

We would like to sincerely thank everyone who helped to make this exhibition a reality, it would not have happened without their help and encouragement. David Boles, Colman Curran, Nicholas Davis, Donegan Family, Sophie Flynn-Rogers SFRPR, David Marshall, Gerard McBrierty, Albert McClure, Louis & Patrick O’Sullivan, Philip Stokes, Richard Symes, Antiquarian Horological Society (Irish Section) all our sponsors and for the trust placed in us by our private clients. Photography: Mike Bunn, Arrow Productions, Carrick-on-Shannon.Co.Leitrim Tel:071 9621088

In this period of time, Irish clocks would tend to be walnut veneered on a deal carcass, using yew wood and mulberry for decorative panels. Mouldings would be of cross-grained walnut. This surely applies to our earlier clocks, sadly we do not have any complete examples available to us at the moment.

Sources ‘Watch & Clockmakers In Ireland’, Wm.G.Stuart; ‘A List Of Irish Watch & Clockmakers’, Geraldine Fennell; ‘Watchmakers & Clockmakers Of The World. Vol 1’, G.H.Bailie; ‘Watch & Clockmakers Of The World. Vol.2, Brian Loomes. ‘Vulgar & Mechanick’, J.E. Burnett, A.D. Morrison-Low.

Copyright Timepiece Antique Clocks 2010

1


300 Years of Irish Timekeeping Foreword We are delighted to announce that this exhibition, showcasing 300 years of Irish timekeeping has come to fruition. After many evenings spent with our friends and colleagues of the Antiquarian Horological Society (Irish Section) lamenting the lack of published material on the subject of Irish Horology, we realised that from our stock and that of our clients and friends, we have a comprehensive collection of Irish timepieces. The time was right. In celebrating the wealthy history of clock and watch making in Ireland, against the political and social history of the last three centuries, we have endeavoured to show how Irish clocks were indeed crafted in Ireland. Irish clock and watchmakers who served their apprenticeships both here and abroad, were known for their fine skills and their work was appreciated by commissions coming from our near neighbours in Great Britain.

Irish Timekeepers 1710 - 1730 The Walnut Period Queen Anne / George I

Collating the exhibits and their heritage has been a source of great satisfaction to us. We take pride in being a part of this rich art, science and craft and continue to mark time. Taking place during the Irish & International Antiques Fair, we hope you find the exhibition informative and enjoyable and that it might encourage an interest in this important area of Irish history and niche craft. Kevin & Carol Chellar, Timepiece Antique Clocks, 2010

We would like to sincerely thank everyone who helped to make this exhibition a reality, it would not have happened without their help and encouragement. David Boles, Colman Curran, Nicholas Davis, Donegan Family, Sophie Flynn-Rogers SFRPR, David Marshall, Gerard McBrierty, Albert McClure, Louis & Patrick O’Sullivan, Philip Stokes, Richard Symes, Antiquarian Horological Society (Irish Section) all our sponsors and for the trust placed in us by our private clients. Photography: Mike Bunn, Arrow Productions, Carrick-on-Shannon.Co.Leitrim Tel:071 9621088

In this period of time, Irish clocks would tend to be walnut veneered on a deal carcass, using yew wood and mulberry for decorative panels. Mouldings would be of cross-grained walnut. This surely applies to our earlier clocks, sadly we do not have any complete examples available to us at the moment.

Sources ‘Watch & Clockmakers In Ireland’, Wm.G.Stuart; ‘A List Of Irish Watch & Clockmakers’, Geraldine Fennell; ‘Watchmakers & Clockmakers Of The World. Vol 1’, G.H.Bailie; ‘Watch & Clockmakers Of The World. Vol.2, Brian Loomes. ‘Vulgar & Mechanick’, J.E. Burnett, A.D. Morrison-Low.

Copyright Timepiece Antique Clocks 2010

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John Crampton, Dublin

circa 1710

William Marshall, Dublin

circa 1710

This wonderful and rare clock was created by Wm. Marshall on his premises at the sign of the Black Bull in Capel St., Dublin in the early years of the 18th century. The Walnut case is decorated with yew wood and mulberry panels and enriched by gilded Corinthian capitals and flambeau urns. Time Link - The Battle of the Boyne was but twenty years past and historical buildings such as The Mansion House and Tailors Hall were being constructed.

An ebonised bracket or table clock with twin fusee and verge escapement. The clock also has a pull repeat facility on three bells to record time to the nearest quarter. A very rare timepiece made from the finest materials and skilfully crafted.

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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John Crampton, Dublin

circa 1710

William Marshall, Dublin

circa 1710

This wonderful and rare clock was created by Wm. Marshall on his premises at the sign of the Black Bull in Capel St., Dublin in the early years of the 18th century. The Walnut case is decorated with yew wood and mulberry panels and enriched by gilded Corinthian capitals and flambeau urns. Time Link - The Battle of the Boyne was but twenty years past and historical buildings such as The Mansion House and Tailors Hall were being constructed.

An ebonised bracket or table clock with twin fusee and verge escapement. The clock also has a pull repeat facility on three bells to record time to the nearest quarter. A very rare timepiece made from the finest materials and skilfully crafted.

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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John Crampton, Dublin

circa 1715

John Crampton, Dublin

A walnut longcase clock decorated with mulberry panels, herringbone and arabesque inlays. The swinging pendulum revealed in front door lenticle. The magnificently engraved dial flanked by gilded Corinthian capitals, which are carved in limewood, these supported by ebonised columns. A uniquely Irish design, illustrated by unusual proportions, beginning with the 13� dial (proportionately larger than British clocks of the period) and following through to the long slender trunk and rectangular box base. Crampton, John - working in Dame St. from 1704. Still working 1732 when he married Mary Booth, 20th July in St. Catherine’s Church. We recently discovered a dial, signed J. Crampton, Damas St. Time Link - The Longitude Board was established by Queen Anne in 1714, awarding a substantial monetary prize to the inventor of a sea clock to calculate longitude. This illustrates the extreme importance of timekeepers of the day.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1715


John Crampton, Dublin

circa 1715

John Crampton, Dublin

A walnut longcase clock decorated with mulberry panels, herringbone and arabesque inlays. The swinging pendulum revealed in front door lenticle. The magnificently engraved dial flanked by gilded Corinthian capitals, which are carved in limewood, these supported by ebonised columns. A uniquely Irish design, illustrated by unusual proportions, beginning with the 13� dial (proportionately larger than British clocks of the period) and following through to the long slender trunk and rectangular box base. Crampton, John - working in Dame St. from 1704. Still working 1732 when he married Mary Booth, 20th July in St. Catherine’s Church. We recently discovered a dial, signed J. Crampton, Damas St. Time Link - The Longitude Board was established by Queen Anne in 1714, awarding a substantial monetary prize to the inventor of a sea clock to calculate longitude. This illustrates the extreme importance of timekeepers of the day.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1715


Patrick Smith, Dublin

circa 1710

The Arrival of Mahogany

Silver pair-case pocketwatch with verge escapement. The interesting feature of this watch is view of balance wheel through an aperture in the back-cock, which mimics a pendulum bob. Watch no. 367 by P. Smith, Quarter Brother of Dublin Goldsmiths Co. in 1698.

Thomas Crampton, Dublin A silver pair-case pocketwatch with verge escapement. Beautifully crafted movement with backplate revealing Crampton signature and number. Exquisitely executed wrought steel hands. Crampton, Thomas, brother of John. Made freeman by Dublin Goldsmiths Company in 1718. We believe working at Essex Gate. Died 1751.

George II

circa 1725

Up to the early part of the 18th century walnut had been the wood of choice amongst Britain and Ireland’s cabinet makers. But severe frosts in France during the winter of 1709 destroyed much of France’s walnut and the French added insult to injury by banning the export of their walnut in 1720. This catastrophe coupled with the Naval Stores Act of 1721 which reduced the taxes on the importation of exotic woods from the colonies, spelled the beginning of the end for walnut. Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) until recent times mistakenly known as Red Walnut and having a lot of the properties of mahogany and indeed often confused with it, was imported from Virginia for a time and was used quite extensively by Irish cabinet makers in particular. The complete overtaking of walnut by mahogany as the primary wood happened in 1733 when Sir Robert Walpole abolished all taxation on imported timber, that, along the normalisation of British, Spanish relations after the Spanish War of Succession and the realisation that mahogany was easier to carve, had an exquisite patina that improved with age, and was resistant to wood worm and rot put the final nail in the mahogany coffin of walnut! There were two types of mahogany imported. The first to appear, ‘Swietenia Mahogani’, was from San Domingo, Cuba and Jamaica. San Domingo sometimes known as Spanish mahogany was a dense, hard, plain, wood with a beautiful colour, that seems to have been more prized by the Irish cabinet makers than their British counterparts, who preferred the Jamaican and Cuban woods which were easier to work with and had better figuring for veneers. The second type of mahogany, ‘Swietenia Macrophylla’, came mainly from Honduras, was lighter than the West Indian variety and was mainly used after 1750 for carcass construction with Cuban mahogany veneers. Throughout the rest of the 18th century and well into the 19th mahogany was the overwhelmingly favourite wood for furniture construction, a fact borne out by the amount imported into Britain and Ireland in 1722 was £256 compared to £77,774 in 1800. Contributed by Paul Johnston, Johnston Antiques, Francids St. D8

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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Patrick Smith, Dublin

circa 1710

The Arrival of Mahogany

Silver pair-case pocketwatch with verge escapement. The interesting feature of this watch is view of balance wheel through an aperture in the back-cock, which mimics a pendulum bob. Watch no. 367 by P. Smith, Quarter Brother of Dublin Goldsmiths Co. in 1698.

Thomas Crampton, Dublin A silver pair-case pocketwatch with verge escapement. Beautifully crafted movement with backplate revealing Crampton signature and number. Exquisitely executed wrought steel hands. Crampton, Thomas, brother of John. Made freeman by Dublin Goldsmiths Company in 1718. We believe working at Essex Gate. Died 1751.

George II

circa 1725

Up to the early part of the 18th century walnut had been the wood of choice amongst Britain and Ireland’s cabinet makers. But severe frosts in France during the winter of 1709 destroyed much of France’s walnut and the French added insult to injury by banning the export of their walnut in 1720. This catastrophe coupled with the Naval Stores Act of 1721 which reduced the taxes on the importation of exotic woods from the colonies, spelled the beginning of the end for walnut. Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) until recent times mistakenly known as Red Walnut and having a lot of the properties of mahogany and indeed often confused with it, was imported from Virginia for a time and was used quite extensively by Irish cabinet makers in particular. The complete overtaking of walnut by mahogany as the primary wood happened in 1733 when Sir Robert Walpole abolished all taxation on imported timber, that, along the normalisation of British, Spanish relations after the Spanish War of Succession and the realisation that mahogany was easier to carve, had an exquisite patina that improved with age, and was resistant to wood worm and rot put the final nail in the mahogany coffin of walnut! There were two types of mahogany imported. The first to appear, ‘Swietenia Mahogani’, was from San Domingo, Cuba and Jamaica. San Domingo sometimes known as Spanish mahogany was a dense, hard, plain, wood with a beautiful colour, that seems to have been more prized by the Irish cabinet makers than their British counterparts, who preferred the Jamaican and Cuban woods which were easier to work with and had better figuring for veneers. The second type of mahogany, ‘Swietenia Macrophylla’, came mainly from Honduras, was lighter than the West Indian variety and was mainly used after 1750 for carcass construction with Cuban mahogany veneers. Throughout the rest of the 18th century and well into the 19th mahogany was the overwhelmingly favourite wood for furniture construction, a fact borne out by the amount imported into Britain and Ireland in 1722 was £256 compared to £77,774 in 1800. Contributed by Paul Johnston, Johnston Antiques, Francids St. D8

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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William Marshall, Dublin

circa 1730

JOHNSTON ANTIQUES 69/70 FRANCIS ST DUBLIN 8 Tel +353 - 1 - 473 2384 Fax +353 - 1 - 473 5020

A Pair of early 19th century Terrestrial and Celestial Globes on mahogany stands with turned legs. Circa 1820 Baring the trade label ‘Kirkwood sold by Rich Spear, College Green Dublin’.

Marshall’s bracket clock is of the earliest mahogany, of complex design and beautifully executed. Among it’s qualities one can find a verge escapement, pull repeat of hours and quarters, calendar and phases of the moon.

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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William Marshall, Dublin

circa 1730

JOHNSTON ANTIQUES 69/70 FRANCIS ST DUBLIN 8 Tel +353 - 1 - 473 2384 Fax +353 - 1 - 473 5020

A Pair of early 19th century Terrestrial and Celestial Globes on mahogany stands with turned legs. Circa 1820 Baring the trade label ‘Kirkwood sold by Rich Spear, College Green Dublin’.

Marshall’s bracket clock is of the earliest mahogany, of complex design and beautifully executed. Among it’s qualities one can find a verge escapement, pull repeat of hours and quarters, calendar and phases of the moon.

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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Philip Glasco, Dublin

circa 1730

Philip Glasco, Dublin

This elegant and interesting clock is very much a transitional model, bridging the walnut and mahogany eras. The cabinet-maker constructed this piece using all of his prior knowledge of working with walnut, yew wood and mulberry. It is clear that he used the new exotic timber, employing the same techniques. Within a few years, new construction techniques altered conventional thinking. These observations can only highlight the importance of this rare clock. Glasco, Phil. – Quarter Brother of Dublin Goldsmiths Company 1729-1766 Time Link - Gullivers Travels written by Dean Swift, Dean of St.Patrick’s Cathedral, 1726.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1730


Philip Glasco, Dublin

circa 1730

Philip Glasco, Dublin

This elegant and interesting clock is very much a transitional model, bridging the walnut and mahogany eras. The cabinet-maker constructed this piece using all of his prior knowledge of working with walnut, yew wood and mulberry. It is clear that he used the new exotic timber, employing the same techniques. Within a few years, new construction techniques altered conventional thinking. These observations can only highlight the importance of this rare clock. Glasco, Phil. – Quarter Brother of Dublin Goldsmiths Company 1729-1766 Time Link - Gullivers Travels written by Dean Swift, Dean of St.Patrick’s Cathedral, 1726.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1730


James Whitthorne, Dublin

circa 1745

Whitthorne’s pair-case watch, no.532 with tortoiseshell outer case. Whitthorne operated his business as Watchmaker from Skinner Row, Dublin from 1725. He was made Master of Dublin Goldsmith Company 1744-45. Time Link - 1742 Handel’s Messiah premiered in Fishamble St., Dublin.

Thomas Blundell, Dublin

circa 1750

This mid-Georgian Dublin bracket/table clock in a mahogany case is a timepiece with quarter pull repeat facility, on two bells. Timepieces such as these are sometimes referred to as ‘bedroom’ clocks, as they only strike bells on demand. Unusually, this clock has wonderful provenance, having being owned by the O’Brien Family of Dromoland Castle and is featured in the book on the Family entitled ‘These Our Friends & Forebears’ by Grania O’Brien-Weir. Blundell, Thomas - Working at 3 Upr. Ormond Quay, Dublin in 1733. Becoming Master of Dublin Goldsmiths Company in 1747-48. Died 1774 at Ormond Quay address.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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James Whitthorne, Dublin

circa 1745

Whitthorne’s pair-case watch, no.532 with tortoiseshell outer case. Whitthorne operated his business as Watchmaker from Skinner Row, Dublin from 1725. He was made Master of Dublin Goldsmith Company 1744-45. Time Link - 1742 Handel’s Messiah premiered in Fishamble St., Dublin.

Thomas Blundell, Dublin

circa 1750

This mid-Georgian Dublin bracket/table clock in a mahogany case is a timepiece with quarter pull repeat facility, on two bells. Timepieces such as these are sometimes referred to as ‘bedroom’ clocks, as they only strike bells on demand. Unusually, this clock has wonderful provenance, having being owned by the O’Brien Family of Dromoland Castle and is featured in the book on the Family entitled ‘These Our Friends & Forebears’ by Grania O’Brien-Weir. Blundell, Thomas - Working at 3 Upr. Ormond Quay, Dublin in 1733. Becoming Master of Dublin Goldsmiths Company in 1747-48. Died 1774 at Ormond Quay address.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

Former Timepiece Stock - Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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13


2ESTORATION #ONSERVATION . /4 ( ). ' ! $ $ % $ " 5 4

1760 - 1810 Age of Industrial & Social Revolution George III Period

#ABINET -AKING #ARVING 7OOD 4URNING &RETWORK 0OLISHING 5PHOLSTERY ,EATHER 4OOLING 3UPPLIERS OF "RASS &ITTINGS ,EATHER 7AXES 0OLISHING -ATERIALS "Y APPOINTMENT 4EL &AX -OBILE WWW DALYANTIQUESERVICES COM INFO DALYANTIQUESERVICES COM

15


2ESTORATION #ONSERVATION . /4 ( ). ' ! $ $ % $ " 5 4

1760 - 1810 Age of Industrial & Social Revolution George III Period

#ABINET -AKING #ARVING 7OOD 4URNING &RETWORK 0OLISHING 5PHOLSTERY ,EATHER 4OOLING 3UPPLIERS OF "RASS &ITTINGS ,EATHER 7AXES 0OLISHING -ATERIALS "Y APPOINTMENT 4EL &AX -OBILE WWW DALYANTIQUESERVICES COM INFO DALYANTIQUESERVICES COM

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William Edwards, Dublin

circa 1760

Christopher Clarke, Dublin

circa 1770

Gold plate pocketwatch, verge escapement Watch no.852, Beautifully chased and engraved. Lacking it’s outer case. Clarke, Chris. - working at Crane Lane 1761 & Fownes St.

This clock style, known as Irish Chippendale, became popular from c.1735. It has become known as ‘the Irish clock’, primarily due to the great interest in Irish mahogany furniture, which featured carved reliefs. This was our wealthiest period and the great Georgian houses were decorated throughout with this finely crafted furniture. You should note how Wm. Edwards has employed swan-necked pediment, terminating in carved rosettes, carved cushion mould with lions masque, all visually supported by fluted pilasters and carved Corinthian capitals.

Shean Houston, Dublin

circa 1780

Gold cased, pair-case pocketwatch. No.316. Backplate beautifully chased and engraved. Case by Arthur O’Neill. Houston, Shean - Working at 12 Fishamble St. 1775 & 198 Abbey St. 1783-1803.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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William Edwards, Dublin

circa 1760

Christopher Clarke, Dublin

circa 1770

Gold plate pocketwatch, verge escapement Watch no.852, Beautifully chased and engraved. Lacking it’s outer case. Clarke, Chris. - working at Crane Lane 1761 & Fownes St.

This clock style, known as Irish Chippendale, became popular from c.1735. It has become known as ‘the Irish clock’, primarily due to the great interest in Irish mahogany furniture, which featured carved reliefs. This was our wealthiest period and the great Georgian houses were decorated throughout with this finely crafted furniture. You should note how Wm. Edwards has employed swan-necked pediment, terminating in carved rosettes, carved cushion mould with lions masque, all visually supported by fluted pilasters and carved Corinthian capitals.

Shean Houston, Dublin

circa 1780

Gold cased, pair-case pocketwatch. No.316. Backplate beautifully chased and engraved. Case by Arthur O’Neill. Houston, Shean - Working at 12 Fishamble St. 1775 & 198 Abbey St. 1783-1803.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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Charles Craig, Dublin

circa 1770

Charles Craig, Dublin

An extremely rare item in the Irish clock world. One need only consider that of the several bracket/table clocks on view during this exhibition, this is the only one that is actually for sale. It is a double fusee hour striking clock with verge escapement. The arch dial has a raised silvered chapter ring, applied gilded spandrels and aperture for mock pendulum. The arch contains a subsidiary raised dial, which offers a regulation facility. This is flanked by two decorative spandrels. The wonderful Spanish mahogany case, standing on bracket feet. Craig Charles - working 1761-76 at 43 Fishambles St. Dublin. At 84 College Grn. 1778. 18 Anglesea St. 1788. Time Link - Gullivers Travels written by Dean Swift, Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral, 1726.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1770


Charles Craig, Dublin

circa 1770

Charles Craig, Dublin

An extremely rare item in the Irish clock world. One need only consider that of the several bracket/table clocks on view during this exhibition, this is the only one that is actually for sale. It is a double fusee hour striking clock with verge escapement. The arch dial has a raised silvered chapter ring, applied gilded spandrels and aperture for mock pendulum. The arch contains a subsidiary raised dial, which offers a regulation facility. This is flanked by two decorative spandrels. The wonderful Spanish mahogany case, standing on bracket feet. Craig Charles - working 1761-76 at 43 Fishambles St. Dublin. At 84 College Grn. 1778. 18 Anglesea St. 1788. Time Link - Gullivers Travels written by Dean Swift, Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral, 1726.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1770


William McCabe, Newry

circa 1775

William McCabe & The McCabe Family

William McCabe (1740-1785) of the famous McCabe family of Lurgan. Brother

This red lacquered bracket/table clock is, to our mind wholly unique. Lacquering was not a decorative style used on Irish clocks. This is the first intact and genuine item in our experience.

to James, who founded the House of McCabe in London and Thomas who took a strong stand against the interests of ‘The West Indian Trade’. At a public meeting, held in Belfast in 1786, Waddell Cunningham promoted a prospectus for the ‘Slave Ship Trading Company’. McCabe denounced the move, citing “may God wither the hand and consign the name to eternal infamy of the man who will sign that document”. Source: David Bell, Antiquarian Horology, Vol 25

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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William McCabe, Newry

circa 1775

William McCabe & The McCabe Family

William McCabe (1740-1785) of the famous McCabe family of Lurgan. Brother

This red lacquered bracket/table clock is, to our mind wholly unique. Lacquering was not a decorative style used on Irish clocks. This is the first intact and genuine item in our experience.

to James, who founded the House of McCabe in London and Thomas who took a strong stand against the interests of ‘The West Indian Trade’. At a public meeting, held in Belfast in 1786, Waddell Cunningham promoted a prospectus for the ‘Slave Ship Trading Company’. McCabe denounced the move, citing “may God wither the hand and consign the name to eternal infamy of the man who will sign that document”. Source: David Bell, Antiquarian Horology, Vol 25

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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John Goodfellow, Dublin

circa 1780

John Goodfellow, Dublin

This Goodfellow longcase clock is unique and important on two counts. The first being the elaborate marquetry decorating the case, inlaid into solid mahogany, this is quite a feat of execution. We believe this to have been the work of a north German or Dutch immigrant. The case is unsigned, which is sadly the norm but relates very clearly to work which is on display in the Dansk Museuum. The second, and possibly the more interesting historically is the arch dial which displays a rocking ship feature. The artwork in this automatum is extremely intact. The insignia to the ships stern is French, this ‘subtle’ detail surely enlightens us as to the poltics and loyalties of the clockmaker.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1780


John Goodfellow, Dublin

circa 1780

John Goodfellow, Dublin

This Goodfellow longcase clock is unique and important on two counts. The first being the elaborate marquetry decorating the case, inlaid into solid mahogany, this is quite a feat of execution. We believe this to have been the work of a north German or Dutch immigrant. The case is unsigned, which is sadly the norm but relates very clearly to work which is on display in the Dansk Museuum. The second, and possibly the more interesting historically is the arch dial which displays a rocking ship feature. The artwork in this automatum is extremely intact. The insignia to the ships stern is French, this ‘subtle’ detail surely enlightens us as to the poltics and loyalties of the clockmaker.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1780


Archibald Buchanan, Dublin

circa 1790

19th Century - After the Act of Union

The significant thing about this bracket clock from the aspect of this exhibition, is the silvered dial. With the advent of the painted dial, the livelihood of engravers would have come under threat and so for a period of twenty years from 1780-1800, the engravers offered the alternative of a silvered dial to compete with the new painted style. Their efforts were however short-lived, as the cost of producing their silvered and engraved dials was still too high. Into the 19th century, only clocks of superior quality, such as regulators, would employ the silvered dial. The mahogany clock is a timepiece with verge escapement, pull repeat on three bells and a regulation facility in dial arch. Buchanan, Archibald - Working at 32 College Green 1781-1815. Buchanan regulator in Armagh Cathedral. Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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Archibald Buchanan, Dublin

circa 1790

19th Century - After the Act of Union

The significant thing about this bracket clock from the aspect of this exhibition, is the silvered dial. With the advent of the painted dial, the livelihood of engravers would have come under threat and so for a period of twenty years from 1780-1800, the engravers offered the alternative of a silvered dial to compete with the new painted style. Their efforts were however short-lived, as the cost of producing their silvered and engraved dials was still too high. Into the 19th century, only clocks of superior quality, such as regulators, would employ the silvered dial. The mahogany clock is a timepiece with verge escapement, pull repeat on three bells and a regulation facility in dial arch. Buchanan, Archibald - Working at 32 College Green 1781-1815. Buchanan regulator in Armagh Cathedral. Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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James Warren, Dublin

circa 1800

James Warren, Dublin

The design of this clock illustrates a significant departure from earlier thinking. Both the dial and case style have undergone a radical change. In Ireland circa 1780, brass dials on clocks began to give way to painted finishes. These dials were brighter and more easily read and importantly, less expensive to produce. One such dial has been found to bear it’s cost painted on the rear, £1.00 - Rowe, Maryborough. The cases of this period were of lighter material, more likely to be from British Honduras than the Spanish Islands. They were lighter and brighter in colour, very often bearing string and/or Georgian shell inlay, as in this case. The pediment of these clocks most often employed the architectural feature known as ‘broken arch’. Time Link - Custom House built by Gandon, 1791.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1800


James Warren, Dublin

circa 1800

James Warren, Dublin

The design of this clock illustrates a significant departure from earlier thinking. Both the dial and case style have undergone a radical change. In Ireland circa 1780, brass dials on clocks began to give way to painted finishes. These dials were brighter and more easily read and importantly, less expensive to produce. One such dial has been found to bear it’s cost painted on the rear, £1.00 - Rowe, Maryborough. The cases of this period were of lighter material, more likely to be from British Honduras than the Spanish Islands. They were lighter and brighter in colour, very often bearing string and/or Georgian shell inlay, as in this case. The pediment of these clocks most often employed the architectural feature known as ‘broken arch’. Time Link - Custom House built by Gandon, 1791.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1800


Clocks of Ulster Market Towns In a recent talk given by Mr. Gerard McBrierty to members of the A.H.S. Irish Section, he took the opportunity to note the large number of successful clock and watchmakers established in the market towns of Ulster during the 18th and 19th centuries. This as he points out, was in marked contrast to the rest of the island, where Dublin accounted for the large majority of makers with Cork, Waterford and Limerick offering a few notables. The answer to this he says, lies in economic and industrial history. Simply put, Ulster was a hive of activity, not least of these, being the linen industry. This required the growing of flax and the specialist weaving of linen. Economic strength of towns like Strabane, Downpatrick, Saintfield, Ballinahinch and Ballymoney ensured clients for makers such as Wilson, Knox, McCabe, Spratt, Scott, Kennedy and countless more. A weaver, he says, could afford a mahogany cased clock, if shorter than usual, due to the height of ceilings in his home. He could also afford a clock which ran for the week. Clocks that ran for thirty hours only, were not a tradition in Ireland and this he feels was due to a lack of customers in that economic stratum. In this section we have taken the opportunity to illustrate a bracket clock and longcase clock from the early 19th century to represent the work of so many fine Ulster craftsmen.

Campbell, Strabane

circa 1820

This early 19th century bracket/table clock is housed in an ebonised mahogany case of breakarch design. Standing on brass ogee bracket feet with a convex white dial, bearing Campbell’s signature and porcelain alarm disc. The movement is single fusee with alarm facility housed in shaped brass plates. Campbell has also engraved his signature on the rear plate. This clock is of superior quality and construction. Time Link - Strabane’s earliest industries were in textiles and linen manufacture as well as milling and printing. The opening of the canal in 1793 gave Strabane a further economic boost, the canal connecting the town with the river Foyle and helping to facilitate trade. Strabane was one of the many thriving market towns, which by it’s financial success was in a position to support a superior clockmaker.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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Clocks of Ulster Market Towns In a recent talk given by Mr. Gerard McBrierty to members of the A.H.S. Irish Section, he took the opportunity to note the large number of successful clock and watchmakers established in the market towns of Ulster during the 18th and 19th centuries. This as he points out, was in marked contrast to the rest of the island, where Dublin accounted for the large majority of makers with Cork, Waterford and Limerick offering a few notables. The answer to this he says, lies in economic and industrial history. Simply put, Ulster was a hive of activity, not least of these, being the linen industry. This required the growing of flax and the specialist weaving of linen. Economic strength of towns like Strabane, Downpatrick, Saintfield, Ballinahinch and Ballymoney ensured clients for makers such as Wilson, Knox, McCabe, Spratt, Scott, Kennedy and countless more. A weaver, he says, could afford a mahogany cased clock, if shorter than usual, due to the height of ceilings in his home. He could also afford a clock which ran for the week. Clocks that ran for thirty hours only, were not a tradition in Ireland and this he feels was due to a lack of customers in that economic stratum. In this section we have taken the opportunity to illustrate a bracket clock and longcase clock from the early 19th century to represent the work of so many fine Ulster craftsmen.

Campbell, Strabane

circa 1820

This early 19th century bracket/table clock is housed in an ebonised mahogany case of breakarch design. Standing on brass ogee bracket feet with a convex white dial, bearing Campbell’s signature and porcelain alarm disc. The movement is single fusee with alarm facility housed in shaped brass plates. Campbell has also engraved his signature on the rear plate. This clock is of superior quality and construction. Time Link - Strabane’s earliest industries were in textiles and linen manufacture as well as milling and printing. The opening of the canal in 1793 gave Strabane a further economic boost, the canal connecting the town with the river Foyle and helping to facilitate trade. Strabane was one of the many thriving market towns, which by it’s financial success was in a position to support a superior clockmaker.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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Johnson, Down

circa 1825

A painted dial with rolling moon in a mahogany case of Belfast Chippendale influence. Overall style very prevalent in Co.Down. High sweeping swan-necks, carved rosettes, clock hood supported by four fluted columns. Quarter reeded columns flanking trunk and base. Johnson - a large family of clockmakers, Adam and Robert being just two, from Downpatrick.

McMaster, Dublin

This is a very rare Irish sedan chair clock. Sedan chairs were used by the well-to-do to carry them from place to place to prevent their long gowns trailing in the mud of the streets. The clock would have been hung inside the chair, hooked onto the wall, acting as the original car clock. It is one of only two that we know of. Mahogany cased, with large pocketwatch movement, specifically made for this clock. The movement was made larger in order to carry the extra long hands. McMasters - several members of the McMaster family of clock and watch makers, worked continuously at 97 Grafton St., Dublin from 1812-1880.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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Johnson, Down

circa 1825

A painted dial with rolling moon in a mahogany case of Belfast Chippendale influence. Overall style very prevalent in Co.Down. High sweeping swan-necks, carved rosettes, clock hood supported by four fluted columns. Quarter reeded columns flanking trunk and base. Johnson - a large family of clockmakers, Adam and Robert being just two, from Downpatrick.

McMaster, Dublin

This is a very rare Irish sedan chair clock. Sedan chairs were used by the well-to-do to carry them from place to place to prevent their long gowns trailing in the mud of the streets. The clock would have been hung inside the chair, hooked onto the wall, acting as the original car clock. It is one of only two that we know of. Mahogany cased, with large pocketwatch movement, specifically made for this clock. The movement was made larger in order to carry the extra long hands. McMasters - several members of the McMaster family of clock and watch makers, worked continuously at 97 Grafton St., Dublin from 1812-1880.

Clock currently available from Timepiece

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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McMaster, Dublin

circa 1830

Ralph Walsh, Dublin

circa 1830

A rare gilt and gesso framed Irish gallery clock with an 18” painted dial. The movement is a large fusee with A-shaped plates. These clocks are rare because they would tend to have been used in public places, such as courthouses and so naturally not many were produced. Examples still exist in places such as the vestibule of the Royal Irish Academy in Dawson St. Mahogany cased wall clock with brass inlay. Single fusee movement with flat painted dial and signature. Cast brass bezel. These are extremely rare items, it is very difficult to source a genuine Irish wall clock. Note the unusual proportions, the dial is quite small for the length and depth of the trunk body.

Ralph Walsh was born in Tarbert, Co.Kerry and moved to Dublin in 1831 following his apprenticeship. He opened a premises at No.7 Essex Quay, setting himself up as ‘Watchmaker, Clockmaker and Jeweller’. Married Mary Pierce, fathered William Walsh, only child, later Archbishop of Dublin. He died April 1867 - as listed in ‘Watch & Clockmakers in Ireland by William Galland Stuart.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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McMaster, Dublin

circa 1830

Ralph Walsh, Dublin

circa 1830

A rare gilt and gesso framed Irish gallery clock with an 18” painted dial. The movement is a large fusee with A-shaped plates. These clocks are rare because they would tend to have been used in public places, such as courthouses and so naturally not many were produced. Examples still exist in places such as the vestibule of the Royal Irish Academy in Dawson St. Mahogany cased wall clock with brass inlay. Single fusee movement with flat painted dial and signature. Cast brass bezel. These are extremely rare items, it is very difficult to source a genuine Irish wall clock. Note the unusual proportions, the dial is quite small for the length and depth of the trunk body.

Ralph Walsh was born in Tarbert, Co.Kerry and moved to Dublin in 1831 following his apprenticeship. He opened a premises at No.7 Essex Quay, setting himself up as ‘Watchmaker, Clockmaker and Jeweller’. Married Mary Pierce, fathered William Walsh, only child, later Archbishop of Dublin. He died April 1867 - as listed in ‘Watch & Clockmakers in Ireland by William Galland Stuart.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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Donegan Family

John Donegan, Dublin Silver cased pocketwatch of English lever type. Signed, John Donegan, No.15253. Dial signed, Donegan 32 Dame St. Case stamped with Donegan’s seal using the shamrock with J and D on left and right petals. The winding keyhole decorated with shamrocks and silver stamp bears the Spirit of Ireland harp. Donegan uses his beloved trefoil hands.

Many consider John Donegan (1794-1862) to have been Ireland’s primary 19th century manufacturer of Irish watches. He was born in Co.Fermanagh and educated in hedge schools throughout the area. John Donegan first appeared in 1834 in Thoms Directory as a dealer in watches and jewellery. It was not until 1840 that Patrick Donegan, his brother, arrived on the Dublin scene at 9 Essex Quay where Patrick lived for many years with his family. Both brothers conducted their own businesses until 1848 when Patrick, now 60 years old, joined forces with his younger brother John (1794). John Donegan’s legacy in those short twenty-eight years in Dublin, before his death on November 18th, 1862, was legendary. Time stood still for his funeral when over 4000 people followed his cortege to Glasnevin Cemetery, O’Connell Circle.

Donegan Wright Donegan & Wright shared a brief partnership in the 1840’s This gold watch is signed D & W No.1368. The case bears Spirit of Ireland harp and the same number as on the watch movement. Gold dial is inscribed with the pattern of a cathedral.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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circa 1840


Donegan Family

John Donegan, Dublin Silver cased pocketwatch of English lever type. Signed, John Donegan, No.15253. Dial signed, Donegan 32 Dame St. Case stamped with Donegan’s seal using the shamrock with J and D on left and right petals. The winding keyhole decorated with shamrocks and silver stamp bears the Spirit of Ireland harp. Donegan uses his beloved trefoil hands.

Many consider John Donegan (1794-1862) to have been Ireland’s primary 19th century manufacturer of Irish watches. He was born in Co.Fermanagh and educated in hedge schools throughout the area. John Donegan first appeared in 1834 in Thoms Directory as a dealer in watches and jewellery. It was not until 1840 that Patrick Donegan, his brother, arrived on the Dublin scene at 9 Essex Quay where Patrick lived for many years with his family. Both brothers conducted their own businesses until 1848 when Patrick, now 60 years old, joined forces with his younger brother John (1794). John Donegan’s legacy in those short twenty-eight years in Dublin, before his death on November 18th, 1862, was legendary. Time stood still for his funeral when over 4000 people followed his cortege to Glasnevin Cemetery, O’Connell Circle.

Donegan Wright Donegan & Wright shared a brief partnership in the 1840’s This gold watch is signed D & W No.1368. The case bears Spirit of Ireland harp and the same number as on the watch movement. Gold dial is inscribed with the pattern of a cathedral.

Exhibited by kind permission of collector

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circa 1840


Francis M. Moore, Dublin & Belfast

circa 1870

A quintessential mahogany clock case design for the mid-Victorian period, employing sharp, cleancut lines and a simple white dial with elegant graphics. Striking hours on a sonorous gong. Mahogany case. Moore F.M. - Watch, Clockmaker & Chronometer Maker at 23 Eden Quay, Dublin 1868-1880. This profession could be considered a rare skill in Ireland at that time. This probably accounts for the high quality of the movement in this clock which employs a deadbeat escapement, maintaining power and ebonised timber shaft for the pendulum, which are all signs of superior timekeeping. His son, James Moore, Belfast working at 114 High St. 1854-1898.

John Jameson, Dublin

This is an example of a domestic regulator clock, usually housed in a superior quality case, with a glazed trunk door to reveal polished brass cased weights, suspended by beautiful spoked pulleys and brass pendulum. Regulators are clock works constructed to very high standards, invariably using dead-beat escapement and maintaining power. Jameson, John - Working 1853-1880 at 87 Grafton St., Dublin

Clock currently available from Timepiece

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1870


Francis M. Moore, Dublin & Belfast

circa 1870

A quintessential mahogany clock case design for the mid-Victorian period, employing sharp, cleancut lines and a simple white dial with elegant graphics. Striking hours on a sonorous gong. Mahogany case. Moore F.M. - Watch, Clockmaker & Chronometer Maker at 23 Eden Quay, Dublin 1868-1880. This profession could be considered a rare skill in Ireland at that time. This probably accounts for the high quality of the movement in this clock which employs a deadbeat escapement, maintaining power and ebonised timber shaft for the pendulum, which are all signs of superior timekeeping. His son, James Moore, Belfast working at 114 High St. 1854-1898.

John Jameson, Dublin

This is an example of a domestic regulator clock, usually housed in a superior quality case, with a glazed trunk door to reveal polished brass cased weights, suspended by beautiful spoked pulleys and brass pendulum. Regulators are clock works constructed to very high standards, invariably using dead-beat escapement and maintaining power. Jameson, John - Working 1853-1880 at 87 Grafton St., Dublin

Clock currently available from Timepiece

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1870


Racine, Dublin

circa 1870

This regulator by Racine is a design used in Irish buildings such as the Chamber of Commerce, the Royal Dublin Society and Heuston Station where near perfect timekeeping was required. These wall mounted regulators were the more favoured although some floor standing examples may be found. The case is simple but robust and this particular clock is made of ebonised mahogany. The movement is constructed of thick plates and pillars, has a jewelled dead-beat escapement with jewelled end-stops for the wheels. It drives a mercury filled pendulum, the glass jar containing the mercury being octagonal in shape. The silvered dial is engraved with name and numerals in the astronomical regulator style. This is the first Irish regulator to come to us at Timepiece in six years. We found this clock in Houston, Texas.

ClimateUnderPressure 19th Century - Irish Barometers & Barographs

Racine - Working at 33 Nassau St., Dublin 1858-1898

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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Racine, Dublin

circa 1870

This regulator by Racine is a design used in Irish buildings such as the Chamber of Commerce, the Royal Dublin Society and Heuston Station where near perfect timekeeping was required. These wall mounted regulators were the more favoured although some floor standing examples may be found. The case is simple but robust and this particular clock is made of ebonised mahogany. The movement is constructed of thick plates and pillars, has a jewelled dead-beat escapement with jewelled end-stops for the wheels. It drives a mercury filled pendulum, the glass jar containing the mercury being octagonal in shape. The silvered dial is engraved with name and numerals in the astronomical regulator style. This is the first Irish regulator to come to us at Timepiece in six years. We found this clock in Houston, Texas.

ClimateUnderPressure 19th Century - Irish Barometers & Barographs

Racine - Working at 33 Nassau St., Dublin 1858-1898

Clock currently available from Timepiece

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Yeates & Son, Dublin

circa 1900

Yeates & Son, Dublin A barograph is an instrument which gives a graph printout of atmospheric changes over the course of a week. The chart papers envelope a drum which in turn houses a carriage-clock mechanism, which revolves on a carousel. Ink is applied to the chart by means of a nib, whose arm is connected to an aneroid barometer and so the nib rises and falls with atmospheric changes. Very popular in gentlemens’ clubs, sailing clubs and among the general public who had an interest in weather prediction.

The Leinster Regiment Samuel Yeates, 1790 as optician at Upr. Ormond Quay was the first of the Yeates dynasty. Several members of the family traded in their own right at several locations in Dublin, but primary family business was located at No.2 Grafton St., where Yeates & Son describe themselves as ‘Optician & Mathematical Makers to the University & Port & Docks Board’. They made and sold a great range of scientific instrumentation. Their goods included apparatus for telegraphy, surveying instruments such as theodolites, instruments for meterology and even medical diagnostic instruments.

Regiment raised in 1857 by Officers of the Canadian Volunteers to serve in India. In 1881 was retitled 1st Battalion the Prince of Wales’s Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians). The Regiment left India in 1895 when it returned to Ireland. In 1898 was despatched to Halifax, Nova Scotia and from there to South Africa in 1900. This barograph possibly presented to retiring officer.

Other notable family businesses in the 18th and 19th century were Masons, Spears and Lynch. Barographs currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1900


Yeates & Son, Dublin

circa 1900

Yeates & Son, Dublin A barograph is an instrument which gives a graph printout of atmospheric changes over the course of a week. The chart papers envelope a drum which in turn houses a carriage-clock mechanism, which revolves on a carousel. Ink is applied to the chart by means of a nib, whose arm is connected to an aneroid barometer and so the nib rises and falls with atmospheric changes. Very popular in gentlemens’ clubs, sailing clubs and among the general public who had an interest in weather prediction.

The Leinster Regiment Samuel Yeates, 1790 as optician at Upr. Ormond Quay was the first of the Yeates dynasty. Several members of the family traded in their own right at several locations in Dublin, but primary family business was located at No.2 Grafton St., where Yeates & Son describe themselves as ‘Optician & Mathematical Makers to the University & Port & Docks Board’. They made and sold a great range of scientific instrumentation. Their goods included apparatus for telegraphy, surveying instruments such as theodolites, instruments for meterology and even medical diagnostic instruments.

Regiment raised in 1857 by Officers of the Canadian Volunteers to serve in India. In 1881 was retitled 1st Battalion the Prince of Wales’s Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians). The Regiment left India in 1895 when it returned to Ireland. In 1898 was despatched to Halifax, Nova Scotia and from there to South Africa in 1900. This barograph possibly presented to retiring officer.

Other notable family businesses in the 18th and 19th century were Masons, Spears and Lynch. Barographs currently available from Timepiece

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circa 1900


Yeates Family

Barometers

Grafton St. & Capel St.

Popular pocket aneroid barometer. Very accurate and skilfully crafted.circa 1890

Single Vernier, open fronted stick barometer on oak back. circa 1875

Sundial by Wm.Yeates, 18 Capel St. circa 1830

Double geared vernier in oak case. circa 1875

V.Bianchi, Belfast

Lowry, Belfast

Robert Spears, Dublin

Late Georgian wheel barometer of Sheraton style, having inlaid shell work and satinwood edging. Broken arch pediment and full length boxed thermometer.circa 1825

Oak cased stick barometer with single vernier scale. circa 1875. Working at 66, High St. Belfast between 1850-1890.

A mahogany wheel of superior quality having a swan-necked pediment, full length boxed thermometer with subsidiary dials for hygrometer and spirit level. Barometer dial is nicely etched with world atlas. circa 1835.

Barometers currently available from Timepiece

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Yeates Family

Barometers

Grafton St. & Capel St.

Popular pocket aneroid barometer. Very accurate and skilfully crafted.circa 1890

Single Vernier, open fronted stick barometer on oak back. circa 1875

Sundial by Wm.Yeates, 18 Capel St. circa 1830

Double geared vernier in oak case. circa 1875

V.Bianchi, Belfast

Lowry, Belfast

Robert Spears, Dublin

Late Georgian wheel barometer of Sheraton style, having inlaid shell work and satinwood edging. Broken arch pediment and full length boxed thermometer.circa 1825

Oak cased stick barometer with single vernier scale. circa 1875. Working at 66, High St. Belfast between 1850-1890.

A mahogany wheel of superior quality having a swan-necked pediment, full length boxed thermometer with subsidiary dials for hygrometer and spirit level. Barometer dial is nicely etched with world atlas. circa 1835.

Barometers currently available from Timepiece

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Conservation & Restoration A view by David Marshall. Conservator.

Mealy’s, an IAVI member firm based in Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny, are renowned both nationally and internationally for the valuation and sale of Fine & Decorative Art and Antiques. Mealy's are the Irish experts in Country House Contents Auctions, having conducted more sales on the premises of country house estates than any other Irish firm. Our quarterly Fine & Decorative Art Sales, held at spacious auction gallery in Castlecomer, comprise all manner of personal property from Period Furniture and Paintings to silver, porcelain and timepieces, while specialised sales of Rare Books, Irish history Memorabilia and Collectibles are held annually in Dublin. We also host regular sales of 19th & 20th century interiors.

Having specialised in 18th and 19th century Irish furniture for 25 years, I have developed a particular fondness for the longcase and bracket clocks of Ireland. Since meeting Kevin more than 20 years ago and having put so many of his clocks through my hands, I have developed a system and thinking which I call my ‘holistic’ methodology. When approaching a conservation project, I must always have sympathy towards the construction methods and materials used by the original maker, indefinite repairability being central to this. So many wonderful pieces have suffered grievously from ham-fisted repairs down through the years and the level of sensitivity brought to the work has been sadly wanting. This is true, not only of cabinet work, but also true of the finish and I always heave a sigh of relief when I complete work on a project. To French polish or not? Well, this depends on the period of the item and the quality of the timbers used. Where an 18th century piece has been refinished with French polish during its life, I will remove this polish and recreate an original type finish, using raw pigments, oils and waxes. This gives the timber a depth as opposed to a glaze, which inevitably deteriorates. Some modern products and equipment facilitate me in my work but machines are only good for roughing out. Everything has to be shaped, fitted and finished by hand, in the time honoured tradition. It is that quality which separates period cabinet work from almost everything else available today and I like to think that the fruits of my work will continue to enrich peoples’ lives for generations to come.

Further Information can be found at www.mealys.com Mealy's Ltd., Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland. Tel: +353 (0)56 4441229. Fax: +353 (0)564441627. Email: info@mealys.com

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Conservation & Restoration A view by David Marshall. Conservator.

Mealy’s, an IAVI member firm based in Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny, are renowned both nationally and internationally for the valuation and sale of Fine & Decorative Art and Antiques. Mealy's are the Irish experts in Country House Contents Auctions, having conducted more sales on the premises of country house estates than any other Irish firm. Our quarterly Fine & Decorative Art Sales, held at spacious auction gallery in Castlecomer, comprise all manner of personal property from Period Furniture and Paintings to silver, porcelain and timepieces, while specialised sales of Rare Books, Irish history Memorabilia and Collectibles are held annually in Dublin. We also host regular sales of 19th & 20th century interiors.

Having specialised in 18th and 19th century Irish furniture for 25 years, I have developed a particular fondness for the longcase and bracket clocks of Ireland. Since meeting Kevin more than 20 years ago and having put so many of his clocks through my hands, I have developed a system and thinking which I call my ‘holistic’ methodology. When approaching a conservation project, I must always have sympathy towards the construction methods and materials used by the original maker, indefinite repairability being central to this. So many wonderful pieces have suffered grievously from ham-fisted repairs down through the years and the level of sensitivity brought to the work has been sadly wanting. This is true, not only of cabinet work, but also true of the finish and I always heave a sigh of relief when I complete work on a project. To French polish or not? Well, this depends on the period of the item and the quality of the timbers used. Where an 18th century piece has been refinished with French polish during its life, I will remove this polish and recreate an original type finish, using raw pigments, oils and waxes. This gives the timber a depth as opposed to a glaze, which inevitably deteriorates. Some modern products and equipment facilitate me in my work but machines are only good for roughing out. Everything has to be shaped, fitted and finished by hand, in the time honoured tradition. It is that quality which separates period cabinet work from almost everything else available today and I like to think that the fruits of my work will continue to enrich peoples’ lives for generations to come.

Further Information can be found at www.mealys.com Mealy's Ltd., Castlecomer, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland. Tel: +353 (0)56 4441229. Fax: +353 (0)564441627. Email: info@mealys.com

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Making Time in 2010 The Irish Swiss Institute of Horology has produced a number of fine horological engineers since the three year course was established some fifty years ago. Kevin Chellar of Timpiece graduated in 1981 and some years later, two brothers, John and Stephen McGonigle also qualified. In 2006, having established workshops in both Ireland and Switzerland, the brothers created their own brand, McGonigle Watches. The watch is a manual wind Tourbillon wristwatch available in Platinum or Gold. Each watch can be personalised to such a degree that every one is virtually a unique piece. There are no serial numbers, instead, each timepiece is dated and signed by it’s maker, either John or Stephen. We are delighted to report that horology, as an art, is alive and well in Ireland in 2010. All enquiries directed through Timepiece Antique Clocks.

Noonan Antiques Dealers in Antique & Later Jewellery, Diamond Engagement, Dress Rings, Collectibles including Antique Pocket Watches. 16 Ellen Street, Limerick 061 413861

We have pleasure in Supporting this Horological Exhibition

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Making Time in 2010 The Irish Swiss Institute of Horology has produced a number of fine horological engineers since the three year course was established some fifty years ago. Kevin Chellar of Timpiece graduated in 1981 and some years later, two brothers, John and Stephen McGonigle also qualified. In 2006, having established workshops in both Ireland and Switzerland, the brothers created their own brand, McGonigle Watches. The watch is a manual wind Tourbillon wristwatch available in Platinum or Gold. Each watch can be personalised to such a degree that every one is virtually a unique piece. There are no serial numbers, instead, each timepiece is dated and signed by it’s maker, either John or Stephen. We are delighted to report that horology, as an art, is alive and well in Ireland in 2010. All enquiries directed through Timepiece Antique Clocks.

Noonan Antiques Dealers in Antique & Later Jewellery, Diamond Engagement, Dress Rings, Collectibles including Antique Pocket Watches. 16 Ellen Street, Limerick 061 413861

We have pleasure in Supporting this Horological Exhibition

46


Glossary Automatum

A moving mechanical device - in this case a ship moved by pendulum swing.

Barograph

A barometer that records atmosphere changes on a moving chart.

Barometer

An instrument measuring atmospheric pressure, weather forecasting.

Bracket Clock

Clock designed to stand on a bracket, shelf or table.

Broken-Arch

Architectural design to clock hood top - Arch with broken centre.

Chapter Ring

Part of clock dial on which the hours are marked.

Corinthian Capital

An architectural feature terminating a column.

Ebonised

The black polishing of timbers.

Escapement

The organ of the clock which allows for the regulated release of power. This creates the ticking sound.

Freeman

An apprentice who had obtained his freedom after serving his apprenticeship of approx. 7 years.

Fusee

A mechanical system incorporated into the spring winding which allows for even distrubution of spring power over the week.

Horology

The study and measurement of time/art of making of clocks and watches.

Longcase

A full sized clock - sometimes called tall case or grandfather clock.

Master

Referred to a title of office held in the Goldsmiths Co., also maker who took an apprentice.

Maintaining Power

A device which ensures wheel rotation for a period after the mechanism has run out of its natural power, be that by spring or weight.

Movement

Commonly called the ‘works’.

Pair-Case

Glass-less outer case designed to contain a pocketwatch.

Pull Repeat

A facility on a clock to strike last hour and quarter by means of a pull cord or button.

Quarter Brother

Immigrant goldsmiths/time-expired apprentices paying quarterly payments to Goldsmith Co.

Regulator

A pendulum clock designed for very accurate timekeeping.

Spandrel

An applied casting to the four corners of a brass dial or artistic decoration on a painted dial.

Sedan Clock

A clock in the form of a watch within a wooden frame, carried in sedan chairs.

Timepiece

Any clock which does not strike or chime.

Timepiece Antique Clocks Specialist in FineClocks since 1983

57-58 Patrick St., Dublin 8

Tel: 01.4540774

Mobile: 087 2260212

www.timepiece.ie 48

Kevin Chellar F.I.S.I.H. Carol Chellar


Glossary Automatum

A moving mechanical device - in this case a ship moved by pendulum swing.

Barograph

A barometer that records atmosphere changes on a moving chart.

Barometer

An instrument measuring atmospheric pressure, weather forecasting.

Bracket Clock

Clock designed to stand on a bracket, shelf or table.

Broken-Arch

Architectural design to clock hood top - Arch with broken centre.

Chapter Ring

Part of clock dial on which the hours are marked.

Corinthian Capital

An architectural feature terminating a column.

Ebonised

The black polishing of timbers.

Escapement

The organ of the clock which allows for the regulated release of power. This creates the ticking sound.

Freeman

An apprentice who had obtained his freedom after serving his apprenticeship of approx. 7 years.

Fusee

A mechanical system incorporated into the spring winding which allows for even distrubution of spring power over the week.

Horology

The study and measurement of time/art of making of clocks and watches.

Longcase

A full sized clock - sometimes called tall case or grandfather clock.

Master

Referred to a title of office held in the Goldsmiths Co., also maker who took an apprentice.

Maintaining Power

A device which ensures wheel rotation for a period after the mechanism has run out of its natural power, be that by spring or weight.

Movement

Commonly called the ‘works’.

Pair-Case

Glass-less outer case designed to contain a pocketwatch.

Pull Repeat

A facility on a clock to strike last hour and quarter by means of a pull cord or button.

Quarter Brother

Immigrant goldsmiths/time-expired apprentices paying quarterly payments to Goldsmith Co.

Regulator

A pendulum clock designed for very accurate timekeeping.

Spandrel

An applied casting to the four corners of a brass dial or artistic decoration on a painted dial.

Sedan Clock

A clock in the form of a watch within a wooden frame, carried in sedan chairs.

Timepiece

Any clock which does not strike or chime.

Timepiece Antique Clocks Specialist in FineClocks since 1983

57-58 Patrick St., Dublin 8

Tel: 01.4540774

Mobile: 087 2260212

www.timepiece.ie 48

Kevin Chellar F.I.S.I.H. Carol Chellar


Presented by Timepiece Antique Clocks 57-58 Patrick St., Dublin 8 - 01 4540774