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Comprehensive Plan O u r c i t y. O u r f u t u r e .

Final Plan May 2019


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Acknowledgments A special thank you to everyone who has participated in the planning process. Ballwin is fortunate to have elected officials, committee members, residents, and staff who are passionate about their community.

City Council

Mayor Tim Pogue Mike Utt, Ward 1 Alderman Michael Finley, Ward 1 Alderman Mark Stallmann, Ward 2 Alderman Kevin M. Roach, Ward 2 Alderman Frank Fleming, Ward 3 Alderman Jim Leahy, Ward 3 Alderman Ross Bullington, Ward 4 Alderman Ray Kerlagon, Ward 4 Alderman

City Staff

Bob Kuntz, Interim City Administrator Andy Hixson, Director of Development / Assistant City Administrator James Link, Director of Public Works Kirsten Hochstetler, Director of Marketing and Communication

Planning and Zoning Commission Mark Weaver, Chairman Grant Alexander Tracy Bolte Olivia Pieknik Chad Silker Victoria Winfrey Lisa Zimmerman Michael Finley, Alderman Tim Pogue, Mayor

Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee Mike Anselmo Greg Beasley Jana Jones Wes Kuhn Craig McAleavey Anne Miller Ron Moore Mike Pettit Pam Zayas

Planning Team The i5Group

Stephen Ibendahl, ASLA, AICP Sean Thomas Roger Grow Laura Linn Christy Cunningham

i 5TThe he i5 Group Urban & Community Planning

Public Affairs Landscape Architecture

Community and Economic Development Solutions Jacqueline Davis-Wellington Elizabeth A. Noonan

T² Traffic & Transportation

Carrie Falkenrath, PE, PTOE, PTP

iii | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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Content 7

Chapter 1: Introduction

85

Need for a Comprehensive Plan Schedule and Planning Process History of Ballwin

13

67

Principle #1 - Strong Neighborhoods Principle #2 - A Modern Transportation Network Principle #3 - A Resilient Local Economy and City Revenues Principle #4 - A Strong Sense of Place Principle #5 - Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living Principle #6 - A Distinctive Image for Ballwin Principle #7 - Outstanding Community Services

Chapter 2: Discovery Demographics Existing Land Use Existing Economy and Jobs Existing Housing Existing Community Assets and Institutions Existing Transportation Existing Parks and Recreation Existing Natural Resources Annexation History

Chapter 3: Community Engagement What We Have Heard Stakeholder and Focus Group Meetings Open House #1 Open House #2 Open House #3 Homeowner Association Leaders - Focus Group Highlights of Community Surveys

Chapter 4: Plan Principles, Goals, and Recommendations

145

Chapter 5: Future Land Use Plan Future Land Use Plan Land Use Category Descriptions

161

Chapter 6: Scenario Planning Typical Existing Manchester Road Development Intermediate Scenario for Manchester Road Long-Term Scenario #1 for Manchester Road Long-Term Scenario #2 for Manchester Road

171

Chapter 7: Growth and Annexation Analysis Growth Analysis Analysis of Possible Annexation

193

Appendix A. Citywide Survey Results B. Visual Preference Survey Results v | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Chapter 8: Implementation Detailed Action Plan - Top Priorities Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

MAY 2019


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1 Introduction


NEED FOR A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Overview

Benefits of a Plan

Ballwin is a great place to live, work, and raise a family. A testament to this high quality of life is Ballwin being named multiple times as “One of America’s Best Places to Live” by Money Magazine. The City has also been named as one of the safest cities in America.

The Plan Manages Future Change

The City’s comprehensive plan will be an opportunity to create a shared community vision for the next twenty years that will keep and enhance the quality of life while attracting continued economic investment in the City.

While the future cannot be predicted, the City can plan and manage for change. The planning team examines trends in demographics, workforce, mobility, housing, and economic development to best position the City to be resilient in adapting to future changes.

The Plan Creates a Shared Community Vision

Comprehensive plans are an opportunity to develop consensus on a community vision and community priorities that will help shape growth in the community for the next 20 years. The planning team utilizes traditional and online engagement techniques to engage the community in creating a shared vision for Ballwin. The planning team engages residents in multiple ways to ensure that they are included in the planning process.

Municipalities should update their comprehensive plans every 10 - 15 years, with a thorough review every five years.

Our City. Our Future. 8 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

O u r c i t y. O u r f u t u rMAY e2019 .


The planning process began in Spring 2018 and lasted until Spring 2019. Key milestones of the process included:

1

Discovery and Awareness

2

Community Vision and Goals

3

Draft Plan Recommendations

4

Plan Refinement and Adoption

April - May 2018: Focus Group Meetings

■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Mar - July 2018

SCHEDULE

Project kickoff Existing conditions analysis Stakeholder and focus group meetings Community survey Open House #1

May 15, 2018: Open House #1

August 2018: Discovery Report September 13, 2018: Open House #2 October 2018: Visual Pref Survey Results

■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

July - Sept 2018

May 1 - June 19th: Community-wide Survey

Visioning and goal development Growth analysis Visual preference survey Open House #2

November 29, 2018: Open House #3 February 2019: Release of Draft Plan

April 1, 2019: Planning and Zoning Commission Hearing May 2019: Release of Final Plan

■■ Draft plan components and recommendations ■■ Follow-up stakeholder meetings ■■ Open House #3

June 2019: Adoption of Comprehensive Plan Updates during the planning process were available at a dedicated website for the plan (www. BallwinsBlueprint.com).

MAY 2019

Jan - May 2019

9 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

■■ Draft comprehensive plan for city and steering committee review ■■ Draft comprehensive plan for public review ■■ Planning & Zoning Commission Hearing ■■ Adoption by Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Aldermen

Sept - Dec 2018

March 1 - April 10, 2019: Public Comment Period


PLANNING PROCESS The planning process began in Spring 2018 and lasted until Spring 2019. A resident steering committee helped guide the process. There were numerous opportunities for resident input including three open houses, surveys, small group meetings, a website, and social media.

Steering Committee meeting #2 on May 1, 2018.

The planning process included an assessment of existing resources and issues, projections of future conditions and needs, and consideration of collective goals and objectives. The plan covers topics such as economy and jobs, housing, demographics, transportation, land use, utilities, and community facilities and services. In addition to extensive community engagement, the final comprehensive plan went through a formal adoption process including a public review period, approval by the City’s Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Aldermen.

Community open house #1 on May 15, 2018.

Steering Committee meeting #1 on April 16, 2018.

Community open house #2 on September 13, 2018.

Focus group with home owner association leadership on April 17, 2018.

Community open house #3 on November 29, 2018.

10 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Using the Comprehensive Plan The comprehensive plan is a strategic document. A comprehensive plan is not a zoning ordinance, subdivision regulation, a budget, or other regulatory document. It is meant to be the basis for the preparation of those documents. It lays out a vision for the future growth and development of the community: what the community will be like and look like in the future. At the vision and policy level, it will serve as a blueprint for community decision making. It addresses how the City will grow.

Municipal Authority for Comprehensive Planning Municipalities in Missouri are authorized by state statute to develop and carry out city plans. These are reflected in Sections 89.300 through 89.491 of the Missouri Revised Statutes, and deal with the authority of the planning commission and the contents of the city plan. RSMo 89.310: Any municipality in this state may make, adopt, amend, and carry out a city plan and appoint a planning commission with the powers and duties herein set forth. RSMo 89.340: The commission shall make and adopt a city plan for the physical development of the municipality. The city plan, with the accompanying maps, plats, charts and descriptive and explanatory matter, shall show the commission’s recommendations for the physical development and uses of land, and may include, among other things, the general location, character and extent of streets and other public ways, grounds, places and spaces; the general location and extent of public utilities and terminals, whether publicly or privately owned, the acceptance, widening, removal, extension, relocation, narrowing, vacation, abandonment or change of use of any of the foregoing; the general character, extent and layout of the replanning of blighted districts and slum areas. The commission may also prepare a zoning plan for the regulation of the height, area, bulk, location and use of private, nonprofit and public structures and premises, and of population density, but the adoption, enforcement and administration of the zoning

11 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

plan shall conform to the provisions of sections 89.010 to 89.250. RSMo 89.350: In the preparation of the city plan, the commission shall make careful and comprehensive surveys and studies of the existing conditions and probable future growth of the municipality. The plan shall be made with the general purpose of guiding and accomplishing a coordinated development of the municipality which will, in accordance with existing and future needs, best promote the general welfare, as well as efficiency and economy in the process of development.

MAY 2019


HISTORY OF BALLWIN The City was founded by John Ball, son of James Ball and Mary Bray Ball of Virginia and Kentucky. His father, James, who came to America from Dublin, Ireland, served in the 4th and 8th Virginia Regiments during the Revolutionary War. Because of his military service, he was given a military land warrant and moved to new land in Kentucky after the war. Reportedly, James was a friend of Daniel Boone. Around 1797 or 1798 John Ball moved to the West St. Louis County area, possibly at the same time as the Daniel Boone party moved to and settled in the St. Charles and Warren County areas. Records now preserved in Jefferson City show the transfer of title of about 400 acres of land along Grande Glaize Creek to John Ball in February, 1800. This is the first official record of John Ball in the West County area. Since John Ball’s property claim was derived originally from a Spanish land grant, and was land that was at the time under Spanish rule, the Louisiana Purchase raised doubts about

12 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

property ownership. It took several hearings and appeals and ten years for John Ball to clear his claim to the land that would eventually become the town of Ballwin.

neighbor, two miles to the east. Hence the “win” was incorporated into the name. Ballwin is a unique name for a City. In fact, it is the only City in the United States with its spelling.

In 1826, Missouri moved its capital to Jefferson City. Soon there was a need for an overland mail route between St. Louis and the new capital. As luck would have it, this new road was established along a route that passed by John Ball’s property. After the road, known at times as Jefferson Road, Market Road and Manchester Road, became established, John Ball decided to capitalize on the accessibility it provided for his property, and laid out a town.

In the years that followed, Ballwin has grown from the town Ball knew, with only a few homes and businesses, to a small village of 750 people when it was incorporated on December 29, 1950, to a thriving City of 32,000 today. (Source: City of Ballwin)

The town was originally recorded as “Ballshow”, but two days later, on February 9, 1837, Ball amended the recorded plat to Ballwin. No one knows for sure why the name was changed, but one of John Ball’s great-grandsons says it was the result of a rivalry with neighboring Manchester. Ball saw great things ahead for his new town and was confident that it would “win out” in reputation and growth over its older and more prominent

MAY 2019


2 Discovery


REGIONAL CONTEXT Ballwin is located in St. Louis County. The City is centrally located in the greater St. Louis region. Ballwin is located near major transportation networks including Interstate 64, Interstate 44, and Interstate 270. Major state routes include Highway 141, Highway 370 (Clarkson Road), and Route 100 (Manchester Road).

Location of Ballwin in St. Louis County

Ballwin’s central location makes the community easily accessible to major regional destinations such as downtown St. Louis (30 minute drive), St. Louis Lambert International Airport (25 minute drive) and Castlewood State Park (5 minute drive).

Regional context

14 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


DEMOGRAPHICS Population Since its incorporation in 1850, the City of Ballwin experienced a steady increase in its population from 84 residents in 1850 to 31,283 residents in 2000, primarily due to the annexation of land surrounding the City. The 2010 census, however, documented a slight 2.8% decrease in the population from 31,283 in 2000 to 30,404 in 2010. The July 2016 American Community Survey (ACS) estimates that Ballwin’s population has continued to decline nominally by approximately 0.3% to 30,313 residents. In contrast to Ballwin’s population growth in previous decades, the population fluctuation is typical for older, stable, second and third tier suburbs without land available for new development.

Ellisville at 4.40 square miles and a density of 2,078 residents/square mile; Manchester at 5.08 square miles aity density 1,494 residents/ square mile.

Population of Ballwin by Age (2016)

Source: American Community Survey

The surrounding communities also saw slight changes in their populations since the 2010 census. The population in Manchester only increased by 0.3%; Chesterfield 0.4%; Ellisville 1.2%; and Clarkson Valley saw a slight -0.2% population decline. It should be noted that the total population in St. Louis County also showed a slight -0.2% decline. The total area of the City of Ballwin is 8.99 square miles resulting in a population density of 3,372 residents per square mile based on the 2016 ACS population. The surrounding communities vary greatly in size and density from Clarkson Valley at 2.75 square miles with a density of 960 residents/square mile;

15 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Population of Ballwin and Nearby Communities from 2000 - 2016 MAY 2019


Population by Age

Educational Attainment

The population in Ballwin is aging. The city’s median age was 37.6 years in 2010 and is estimated to have increased to 42.2 years in the 2016 ACS. Similarly, the 2016 estimated median age in Chesterfield is 46.5 years; Clarkson Valley 49.4 years, Ellisville 44.8 years with Manchester having the youngest median age at 38.9 years. The population in Ballwin (42.2) is older on average than in St. Louis County (40.3) and the State of Missouri (38.3).

The residents in Ballwin are more educated than residents in St. Louis County overall. Approximately 54.7% of Ballwin residents hold a bachelor’s degree or higher compared to 42.4% in St. Louis County, with 96.4% having a high school degree or higher compared to 93% in St. Louis County.

Reflecting the increase in median age, age groups 55 and above saw an increase from 2010 to 2016. Interestingly, there was a decline in the population aged 45-55 from 16.6% in 2010 to 14.2% in 2016. When considered in light of the increases in groups 55 and older, it appears that many Ballwin residents are electing to remain in the community as they age. The composition of Ballwin’s population for groups 44 and younger remained essentially stable between 2010 and 2016.

The communities surrounding Ballwin also have populations that are more educated than the population in St. Louis County as a whole. In Chesterfield, 97.9% of residents hold a high school degree or higher and 66% have a bachelor’s degree or higher; in Manchester, 96.6%of residents have a high school degree or higher and 54.6 % have a bachelor’s degree or higher; in Clarkson Valley 98.7% of residents have a high school degree or higher and 77.5% have a bachelor’s degree or higher; and in Ellisville, 94.8% of residents hold a high school degree or higher and 40.6% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Source: American Community Survey

Source: American Community Survey

Median Age in Ballwin and Nearby Communities from 2000 - 2016 16 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Educational Attainment in Ballwin and Nearby Communities MAY 2019


Race & Ethnicity Ballwin’s racial composition is largely consistent with the surrounding communities. Ballwin and these communities are predominantly white, although showing a slight increase in diversity since the 2010 Census, with Manchester having the most diversity. The 2010 Census data for Ballwin identified 89.3% of the residents as white, 2.5% as African American and the remaining 8.2% as Asian, American Indian, Hispanic or a combination of races. Chesterfield is 84.2% white, 3.3% African American, and 12.5% other races; Clarkson Valley is 92.9% White, 1.5% African American and 5.6% other races; Ellisville is 92.7% white, 1.3% African American and 6% other races and Manchester is 83.1% white, 3.7% African American and 13.2% other races. Overall, St. Louis County is more diverse: 70.3% of the population is white, 23.3% African American; 3.5% Asian; and 2.5% Hispanic; and all other races representing less than 1%, based on the 2010 census. According to the 2016 ACS estimates, Ballwin’s population has continued to diversify with 88% of the population being white, 2.3% African American and 9.7% Asian, American Indian or Hispanic.

17 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Over the course of the past five years there has been an increased awareness of the economic impact that foreign-born residents have on the regional economy. Immigrants are 60% more likely to start a business; 130% more likely to have an advanced degree; 44% more likely to be college educated; and on average earn 25% more than the American born population. Immigration increases regional productive capacity by stimulating investment and specialization that leads to greater efficiency, profits and higher wages. The ACS data for 2016 indicates the foreignborn population in Ballwin and the surrounding communities to be as follows: Ballwin 8.4%; Chesterfield 12%; Manchester 12.6% and Ellisville 4%. Because the ACS does not tabulate this data for communities with populations of less than 5,000, the population of foreign-born residents in Clarkson Valley was not available. Data for Clarkson Valley is included in the calculations for St. Louis County which has a foreign-born population of 6.9%, compared to 3.9% for the State of Missouri.

Source: American Community Survey

Racial Composition in Ballwin (2016)

MAY 2019


Household Income The benefit of a more highly educated population is reflected in higher median household income. The ACS estimates that Ballwin residents had a median household income of $86,494 compared to $61,103 in St. Louis County in 2016. The surrounding communities have median household incomes that range from $74,074 in Ellisville to $164,286 in Clarkson Valley. Chesterfield ($97,090) and Manchester ($77,978) have median household incomes within this range.

Source: American Community Survey

Household Income in Ballwin and Nearby Communities (2016) 18 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


EXISTING LAND USE Overview The land use plan is advisory in nature, but provides guidelines for City staff, the Planning and Zoning Board and the City Council in considering and approving development proposals, as well as changes to the City’s infrastructure and facilities. A land use plan is a long-range map of what is intended in the future. A zoning map is what is allowed now. A zoning map and designations regulate what can be legally done with a parcel such as setbacks, minimum lot sizes, buildings heights, buffering, landscape requirements, etc.

The primary existing land use in Ballwin is single family residential. Commercial land use is primarily along Manchester Road with pockets of commercial along Clayton Road. Multi-family residential is spread throughout the City, but with many areas of multi-family residential between the commercial areas of Manchester Road and single family residential. Institutional land use is primarily schools and religious institutions. Adjacent communities to Ballwin have similar land uses of primarily single family residential with commercial grouped along major transportation corridors of Manchester Road, Clarkson Road, and Highway 141. South of Ballwin is a large expanse of unincorporated St. Louis County. This area is similar in land use to Ballwin with primarily single family residential and pockets of multifamily, institutional, and commercial.

19 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Existing Land Use 20 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Existing Zoning The purpose of zoning, as defined in the City ordinance, is as follows: “to classify, regulate and restrict the locations of trades, industries, and the location of buildings designed for specific uses; to regulate and limit the height and bulk of buildings; to regulate and limit the intensity of use of lots; and to regulate and determine the area of yards, courts and other open spaces within the surrounding buildings.” A summary of the zoning districts follow after the description of overlay districts. Existing Zoning Districts: ■■ R-1A single-family dwelling district ■■ R-1 single-family dwelling district ■■ R-2 single-family dwelling district ■■ R-2A single-family dwelling district ■■ R-3 single-family dwelling district ■■ R-4 planned multiple dwelling district ■■ R-5 multiple dwelling district ■■ PSD planned single-family development district ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

C-1 commercial district C-2 regional shopping district C-3 planned limited commercial district S-1 service district

■■ PA public activity district

21 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Several existing overlay districts were established for the purpose of promoting and implementing the goal of the city’s previous comprehensive plans, which is to be a familyoriented community of predominantly singlefamily neighborhoods supported by a unique, well planned commercial-retail business sector. The overlay districts provide a process for permitting and regulating uses located in the areas designated as “overlay” on the future land use map. These districts are the Manchester Road Revitalization Overlay District (MRD), the Conservation Subdivision Overlay District (CSD), the Neighborhood Residential Overlay District (NRD) and the Neighborhood Commercial Overlay District (NCD). Manchester Road Revitalization Overlay District (MRD) The purpose of the MRD is to promote the local economy and mixed-use development within the Manchester Road corridor while simultaneously maintaining the functional capacity of the highway. The MRD encourages a wide range of well-planned, market sensitive commercial and mixed-use development scenarios. The preferred land development pattern in the area will offer a pedestrian oriented development with a mix of residential and/or commercial uses that provide high quality services and amenities that prolong and enhance the shopping, working and living experience. Special effort should be given to tenant mixes and the configuration of tenant

spaces to maximize convenience, visibility and aesthetics. Development within the MRD shall fulfill the following objectives: ■■ Define a consistent scale and character for the streetscape. ■■ Accommodate a mixed variety of retail, commercial, business and residential uses that will attract residents and customers from a larger market area. ■■ Introduce commercial and/or mixed-use development that is pedestrian oriented, connects with the adjoining neighborhoods physically and visually, is compact, energy efficient and representative of the latest retail and commercial development trends. Conservation Subdivision Overlay District (CSD) The purpose of the conservation subdivision overlay district (CSD) is to preserve undisturbed natural areas within the city’s expected annexation limits by allowing higher density residential development on portions of development sites via relief from the area, density and building bulk limitations of the conventional residential districts. The CSD allows the set aside of undisturbed natural areas through the site design flexibility allowed by modifications to the standards for setbacks, lot dimensions and building bulk; however, the maximum overall density(s) for the entire site allowed in the underlying zoning district(s) shall be maintained. This allows the clustering of residential lots and units on portions of sites MAY 2019


and thus creates the option of leaving portions of sites undisturbed in their natural state. These undisturbed natural areas provide community benefits including: Aesthetics, privacy, flood control, water quality preservation, cleaner air, noise mitigation, reduced erosion and undisturbed natural wildlife habitat. The intention of the CSD is to establish a mechanism to provide the flexibility needed to respond to conditions and constraints that may be unique to specific sites and the characteristics and constraints that are inherent to residential development in general. Neighborhood Residential Overlay District (NRD) The purpose of the neighborhood residential overlay district (NRD) is to allow the creation of rental and owner-occupied residential neighborhoods of mixed densities and dwelling types. Such neighborhoods are to be transitional between existing low intensity developments and higher intensity land uses within the geographic limits for which the overlay district is recommended. The NRD offers the possibility of relief from the development standards of underlying residential zoning districts and associated development regulations to incentivize the creation of new housing or the redevelopment of existing residential areas.

dwelling types and provides the high quality amenities that prolong and enhance the living experience. Special effort shall be given to architecture, building configuration, geography, topography and the mixture of residential uses and densities of dwelling types to maximize and preserve the convenience, quality of life and aesthetics in the NRD development and the surrounding neighborhoods. Neighborhood Commercial Overlay District (NCD) The purpose of the neighborhood commercial district (NCD) is to enhance the continuity of economic success of designated commercial nodes that are outside of the Manchester Rd corridor by encouraging and promoting well-planned, neighborhood-oriented, market-sensitive commercial and mixed-use development scenarios. All development shall be compatible with the character of the surrounding neighborhood and adjoining land uses and consistent with the general goals and recommendations of the city’s comprehensive community plan.

Development in the NCD shall complement the adjoining land uses and promote the following objectives: ■■ The scale of buildings, intensity and congestion of the district shall reflect, blend or coordinate with neighboring residential areas. ■■ Encourage commercial land uses that attract users from surrounding neighborhoods and reinforce the local and family oriented focus of these locations. ■■ Emphasize small, low-impact, local oriented development that respects human scale and the proximity of such locations to residential land uses. ■■ Strengthen the ability of neighborhoodserving businesses to compete in a changing economic environment.

The NCD regulations and procedures are intended to encourage revitalization and infill development that improves the visual character of these areas while simultaneously maximizing the utilization of these commercial nodes.

The preferred land development pattern in the NRD is a pedestrian-oriented residential neighborhood that offers a mixture of different 22 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Lot Width at Street Line / Building Line (Min) ¹

Front Yard Dimension (Min)

Front Yard Dimension Adjacent to Manchester Rd / Major Rds (Min)

Side Yard Dimension (Min)

Rear Yard Dimension (Min)

Max Height

Dwelling Area - Single Story (Min)

Dwelling Area - MultiStory (Min ground floor / total)

50 feet

60 feet

15 feet

35 feet

3 stories or 35 feet

2,200 sf

1,600 sf / 2,600 sf

R-1 SINGLE-FAMILY

20,000 sf

100 feet 100 feet

40 feet

60 feet

10 feet

25 feet

3 stories or 35 feet

1,150 sf

850 sf / 1,700 sf

R-2 SINGLE-FAMILY

20,000 sf

12,500 sf

45 feet / 85 feet

40 feet

60 feet

10 feet

25 feet

3 stories or 35 feet

1,150 sf

850 sf / 1,700 sf

R-2A SINGLE-FAMILY

20,000 sf

15,000 sf

45 feet / 70 feet

25 feet

60 feet / 40 feet

10 feet

15 feet

3 stories or 35 feet

1,150 sf

850 sf / 1,700 sf

R-3 SINGLE-FAMILY

20,000 sf

10,000 sf

45 feet / 70 feet

20 feet

60 feet / 40 feet

8 feet

15 feet

3 stories or 35 feet

900 sf

700 sf / 1,500 sf

R-4 PLANNED MULTIPLE DWELLING

R-5 PLANNED INFILL MULTIPLE (PIM) FAMILY DWELLING

Open Space

150 feet / 150 feet

Lot Area - Exception for Public Sewer (Min)

40,000 sf

Lot Area (Min) R-1A SINGLE-FAMILY

2,000 sf per unit

40%

2,750 sf per unit

35% (10% recreation / 25% open space)

Summary - Residential Zoning Districts

23 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

60 feet

10 feet / 60 feet adjacent 2 stories or to residential 35 feet²

40 feet

10 feet or 25 feet or same as same as Mean of adjacent adjacent adjoining Residential Residential districts, 900 sf min / 1,000 sf District District max 45’ feet avg

60 feet

900 sf min / 1,200 sf avg

Notes: The above chart is a simplified summary of zoning districts in Ballwin and is not intended to provide a complete listing of zoning requirements. Refer to zoning ordinances for all requirements. (1) Requirements for lot widths vary for streets that are curved or arc or if lots have sewer access. (2) Additional height allowed based on setback requirements.

MAY 2019


C-2 REGIONAL SHOPPING DISTRICT C-3 PLANNED LIMITED COMMERCIAL DISTRICT S-1 SERVICE DISTRICT

Summary - Commercial Zoning Districts

24 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Max Height

Rear Yard Dimension (Min)

Side Yard Dimension (Min)

Landscaping

40 feet

Front Yard Dimension Adjacent to Manchester Rd / Major Rds (Min)

Front Yard Dimension (Min)

Open Space

Lot Area C-1 COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

0 feet / 25 feet adjacent to residential and public 60 feet activity 25’ feet

10’ along road, rear yard

45 feet

135 feet setback from boundary / 60 feet setback of not more than ten percent of the buffering of perimeter residential districts

40 feet

60 feet

10 feet

45 feet / increased height allowed with setback requirements

20 feet

100 feet setback from boundary

45 feet / up to 90 feet with certain criteria

buffering of adjacent districts

45 feet

Notes: The above chart is a simplified summary of zoning districts in Ballwin and is not intended to provide a complete listing of zoning requirements. Refer to zoning ordinances for all requirements.

MAY 2019


B

C

E

D 398

A

F

H

G

I

102

103

396

392

388

384

376

374

380

372

368 366

101 104

364

105

360

100

356 350

99

106

348 344 340

98

108

107

336 332

102

34

38

732

479

ING

501

905

909

928

868

909

911

915

913

908

830

834

831

832

831

828

902

829 921

920

816

922

924

814 812 810

651

846

835

810

806

813

809

T C EY

915

746

848

850

849

845

841

826

10

6

710

KN O R

911

740 731

711

AGEAN WAY 804

808

806

475

DR TO NE

NS

831

702

12 515

512

514

495

497

492

494 496

637

493

491

MEA DOW

S DR

469

471

SPR

473

SU 459

456

458

460

454

801

417

423

425

499

429

427

422

420

497

508

510

493 489

491

493

476

478

803

E CT 416

419

421

423

418

416

420

TREEWOOD CT

414

503

11 10

482

467

472 471

469

812

707

600

601

RA NN

418

424

SU

10

426

YB

428

434

432

439

435

431

429

437

427

433

425

STONEBRIAR CT 409

421

423

415

417

419

413

411

425

504

504

502

420

500

418

415

398

404

402

400

485

18

17

467

418

412

MAYMONT DR

439

465

462

10

498

16 608

407 406

404

609

28

30 35

441

426 431 429

116

503 132 108

14646 46

50

42

78

82

86

TORINO DR

100

104

106

108

54

30 263

261

259

257

270

253

268

251

249 290

DR

618

209

219

R JACK

AMBE

TOWE

RCLIF FE DR

103 317

105

107

109

110

112

496

499

133

135

131

129

137

128

130

113

114

111

112

MAPLE LN

110

109

LOCK DR

107

3 1464

14701

14653

14637

14649

14703

22

26 265

272

278

276

POR TWIN D PL

289

111

113

115

452

628

103

109

112

108

103

113

111

107

109

116

112

110

108

114

143

139

135

131

127 132

140

128 120

112

157

141

142

134

138

133

158

133

132 210

18

14

125

CT

297

BARKE R

133 127

121 112

118

510

600 110

277

278

276

279 115 113

113

111 114 115

120

118

147

151

152

148

161

210

206 207

175

211 212

208

159

210

202

105

108

201 138

118

119 133

141

139

138

132 115

113

114 117

119

125

115

110

109

27 29

102

108

110

112

106

105

107

109 326 324 322

317

315

302

307 305 269 270

272 632

611

283

FOREST LEAF DR

273

275

271

274

276

608

284

282

280

303

301

119

117

116

114 115

S DR

196 204

200

209

205

213

187

208

212

HICKORY TREE CT

157

107

109

SUM MER SWE ET LN

414

417

319 322

293

289

117 120

WS DR

MEADOW

HIGH

MEADO

122

BRIGHT

300

209

155

201

205

206

202

160

156

144

603

GARDENLEA F CT

DR

Y MED OWS 294

290

286

SHAD

324

309

307

305

129

125

123

121

119

316

124

121

120

122

123

118

325

129

DR 204

213 210

251

303

212

210

208

312

305

201

OWS

Y MEAD

SHAD 255

117 14772

14762

HIL L LN

BIN

140

138 151

149

145

152 148

260

264 272

125

123

121

117

119

300

116

120

126

192

124

168

164

265

433

14650

597

595

14640 108

LN 492

490

430

426

424

428

425

423

421

330

328 323

211

205

207

302

203

206

204

121

102

104

106 155

206 204

202 200 209

205

203

203

153

201

208 219

217

213

211

209

199

197

127

215

302

216

303

214

269

191

SURF CT 403

122

124

196

270

266

194

223

221

220

303 274

278

WESTSIDE DR

230 300

207

205

203

205

CT

OWS

MEAD

COOL

10

267

263

259

283

111

FIEL DST ONE

587

102 101

585

575 429

427

173

104

105

472

432

419

480

478

476

474

472

577

470

DR OD

IVY WO 456

152

231

229

209

445

HILL TRAIL DR

169

215

213

211

217

220

218

216

214

237

271

275

279

280

268

272

276

271

267

263

266

262 139

123

125

124

103

100

104

CIR 101

IS 105

HR 117

115

100

LO RC

116

114

112

110

108 14795

14780

151

RO

227

215

218

207

323

324 332

306

300

283

D

291

287

282

286

401

CT

EN

RD

LL Y GA

155

424

430

150

HO

402

153

149

R

299

HOLLYGREEN CT

148

437

111

107

115

213

205

130

217

221

126

118

110

114

122

225

229

233

241

237

7

216

232

161

143

157

236

240 916

918

920

922 919

921

202

135

DR D

127

124

162

158

150

154

146

130

122

126

142

1 100

126

250

LL YB

8

133

131 135

915

917

911 910

914

918 1017

EN

LL YB

120

HO

8

100

70

EN

D CT

137

DR

141

134

130

126

129

125

1039

113

114

118

122

102

156

D 402

BE N

IS RE HOLLY HAVEN DR

102

244

248

252

910

912

914

256

260 906

904

908

907

913

917

911

110

106

231

351 383 381

202

204

206

211

213

209

215

206

208

202

204

211

209

207

LN 12

206

SWEET MEADOWS

219 216

UT

121

118

149 307

307

305

303

306

304

220 317

311

305

312

318 405

417

447

451

6

501

445

453

LARKHILL LN

N ELM ST

LN

311

308

211

311 224

284 285

359

330 410

132

136

108

112

249

253

106

401

413

405

409

417

108

113

117

109

101

105

403

407

415

411

406

402

100

410

104

257

459

261

RIES RD 403

264

268

902

404

900

901 521

492

415

433

427

403

421

420

414

402

426

432

438

HOLLYLEA F CT

551

559

555

563

202

305

HOLLOWAY RD

219

301

224

222 287

296 292

CT

279

CARDEL DR

KN

210

OA

274

DR M ID

TR

AI

L

LOG TRAIL DR

ROCK TRAIL DR

H CT

AULD SPANIS RK PA 14835

14841

WOER THER

DR IER

219

TH ME

RE

438

275

273

271

269

267

265

249

440

234

DR

WA HO 301

305

429

313

409

405

401

329 320

419

422

406

410

414

418

427

421

417

415

411

407

403

423

426

418

422

414

412

408

404

449

421

400

455

425

104

100

400

404

408

412

416

420

428

424

479

473

467

444

165

168 237

238

236 234

239

232

237 235

234

232 230 228

13

12

359

324

316

217

305

301

304

300

210

325

FAWN MEADOWS DR

309 308

DR

BRITE STAR CT

EE GR

DR

147

L

148

TR LL 144

323

437

439

441

443

435

433

438

434 436

441

443

439

437

440

442

232

RD

436 264

262

260

252

254

258

256

282

228 452

420 401

405

407

409

250 455

451

447

443

437

433

468 534

558

564

439

445

451

463

457

469

712 454

233

502

CT

308

306

NY AR D

GE

214

212

210

RIE S RD

18

0

149

214

450

442

451

261

257

259

263

261

437

441

445

449

453

457

433

432

436

448

444

452

440

435

447

443

451

439 434

438

446

442

450

430

490

373

369

377

365

381

368

11

CT REMINGTON PLACE 361

433

431

437

441

443

449

447

454 450

448

430

432

436

438

442

444

GOVERNOR DR461

456

444

440

460

464

452

461

467

457

350

CT D

OO

383

387

RY W

MA

378

382

372

R D

IL L H

409

COUNTRY DOWNS DR

FAR

475

479

463

471

483

467 RED PINE CT

474

482

478

229

244

242

303 302

243

241

300

242

240 238

236

401

388

309

305

302

300

415

307

309

313

311 308

310

307

305 306

500

BLU 225

221

217

213

270

327

325

321

319

313

315

309

301

326

324

SA BL UE

E DR E SAG

568

140 233

136

173

DR

229

LL OW AY 126

HO

509

118

BE 151 ND 148 DR

133

507

LL 132

505

S MI

133

S MI

KE HR 410

408

14924

DR BALL PARK

15004

15000

1494

CT

IDE YS NN

112

SU 210

212

HILL

525

521 541

529

706

480

727

506

504

502

509

507

508

506

531

525

527

529

532

530

526

524

536

528

532

539

511

525

517

533

536

530

520

512

518

524

537

514

527

519

531

540

496

492

510

516

528

534

522

400

DR

419

501

HO

EC 526

530

534

553

537

536

525

604

600

569

563

564

568

572

560

640

636

628

615

510

S DR MON

432

577 507

511

513

512

510

508 513

517

516

511

510

512

514

541

535

533 534

536

538

557

551

545

548

542

546

554

506 508

641

637

633

645

619

611

627 626

520

524 622

618

656 622

618

614

COM 550

462

493

497

503

230

579

581

583 582

580

578

CT4

D

521

523

590

436

233

238 235

240 237

COACHGATE CT

COACHGATE LN

COACHGATE CT 589 587

222

O O

W BL518 AZ ED 516

514

519

521

522

520

518

549

551

546

552

545 540

542

544

575

569

563

554

560

566

583

579

575

576

420

424

518

514

510

619

623

627

509 508

468

540

536

544

542

R CI ON S MM

CO 595

591

593

594

592

215

217

214

212

527

523

525

524

522

520

533 531

529 525

530 528

524

526 557

555

553

548

550

607

589

581

572

578

584

595

591

587

580

586

412

416

421

415

523 530

634

626

630

641 638

634 411 420

634

630

658

656

207 209 211

213

216

216

230 229

232

227

SOLON DR

236

231

234

138

134

122

130

126

123

127

545

235

549

547

548

546

538

DENNISON DR

550

BA LL W

IN

OAK

511

615

619

617

255

597

599

614

612

618

622

616

620

547

545

304

207

211

543

R

311

D

306

D

204

206

546

539

208

210

537

535

533

531

529

ST AT 544 EW 542 O O

540

538

536

534

532

530

528

577

526

575 573

574

569

673

535

556 554

631

623

615

628 622

633

616

608

625

602

619

636

615

609

630

603

624

618

614

666

610

606

660

598

658

630

634

644

648

594

654 650

653

651

671

669

545

674

671

CT 400

669

674

672

646

RUSTIC 638 VALLEY

661

655

649

645

643

659

670

657

652

648

646

642

654

650

441

619

611

615

550

554

555

540

561

605

609

601

629

630

OAK LEAF MANOR CT525

626

247

316

311 503

509

515 252

ESSEX MILL DR 523

589

415

K DR

411

1491

9

14925

14931

14935

14943

9 1494

BALL PAR

15101

122 128

134

NEWTON PL

140

114

110

118

115

119

231

602

551

622

641

639

635

631

629

633

625

409

686

661

547

657

649

662

658

654

641

638

642

637

650

646

15046

15204

15210

15208

603

619

605

607

621

623

625

NANCY PL

626

628 625

623

621

627 339

695

693

697

691

383

701

634

245

321

319 317

318

314

427

ELMCREST DR

328

316

422

245

573

565

567

569

557

539

543

559

551

555

556

554

552

560

541

537

533

529

542

579

249

577

581

585

586

582

578

578

510

558

582

590

521 519

515

517

GL EN N 511

107

KE HR

124

SHIRLEY LN

STEAMBOAT LN

119 107

OLD BALLWIN RD

15212

15270

120

646

634

638

642

354

342

336

348

695

693

320

691

689

687

685

683

681

679 680

682

337

341 345 671 664

657

670

661

674

665

669

668

328

336

675

662

656

667

652

665 663

659 655

647

643

354

691 692

690

688

695

685

687

690

688

692

389

695

693

689

687

691

685

416 498 499

698

696

694

692

690

688

684

686

682

680

S NE

466

731

723

717

702

727

730

726

718

722

495

713

709

705

717

508

748

717

721

725

729

756

OAK BRIDGE DR

718 710

714

706

718

725

711

709

721

717

705

706

714

718

710

608

729

861

843

845

839

837

849

851

863 868 866

862

860

856

854

844

838

842

848

836

850

106

VICTOR CT

223

702 732

705

702 700 713

CT

744

740

478

732

736

470

474

482

PI

486

ST LE

CA

465

473

469

477

483

494

454

462

458 457

461

735

739 759 760

602

778

873 877

497

WILDFLOWER CT

BIG BEND RD

T C LS AI TR D

G E

D

RI O AK

811

RC O

R A

722

ILS614 CT

829

WO OD

958

SID E TR

110

AIL 844 S DR

865

1

877

5

1100

819

811

4

803

827

1108

744

858

955

622

851

954

951

110

732

736

740

5

256

840

737

4

244

604

GE TRA

812

741

4F 4F 4F 5D 6G 3B 5C 7C 3I 7G 1H 2H 8E 8E 8D 3I 1H 5E 5F 5C 8C 4G 8F 6G 4E 5E 8D 2H 4D 4D 6E 7F 4E 4F 4G 3H 5G 4G 2H 3F 6E 6E 7D 5E 1G 8B 4E 2H 1B 6D 4E 1F 6G 4D 7D 3D 2G 3F 2H 5E 3E 7F 4C H1 3H 6F 4F 5E 3G 7F 6F 2F 3I 7F 5F 8C 7A 5G 8C 7G 6G 7D 7D 2F 2G 2B 6G 2G 7D 3E 7E 3C 5E 7E 4F 8E 5D 6D 7C 6D 7D 7C 7C 7D 5D 8D 8D 5G 6E 3C 4F 1G 3E 5C 8D 2B 7C 5G 3D 2B 8C 8D 8D 8D 4E 4E 4E 2G 3G 8E 3G 2G 3E 6F 2I 4E 6D 5F 4F 7A 7B 3F 3D 7D 7D 1I 9D 8D

238

615

950

947

752

RID

607

946

943

745

668

684

ROCK RD ROCK TRAIL CT ROCK TRAIL DR ROJEAN DR ROLAND AVE ROLLING GLEN LN ROMINE CIR ROSEWELL CT ROTHERHAM DR ROYAL OAKS DR RUE DE GASCONY CT RUE MONTAND DR RUNNING CREEK DR RUSTIC VALLEY CT RUSTIC VALLEY DR RUTHWOOD DR SCHOETTLER RD SEAWIND DR SEVEN TRAILS DR SHADALANE WALK SHADY CASTLE CT SHADY MEADOWS DR SHANDRA DR SHARON PL SHEFFIELD CT SHIRLEY LN SHOWPLACE CT SILVERCREEK LN SKYLINE DR SMITH DR SOLON DR SORRENTO DR SPOONERS MILL DR SPRAGUES MILL CT SPRING LEIGH CT SPRING MEADOWS DR SPRING OAKS CT SPRING OAKS DR SPRINGLAKE CT ST ANDREWS CT ST JOSEPHS DR ST MARYS DR STATEWOOD DR STEAMBOAT LN STEEPLE HILL LN STEEPLETON CT STODDARDS MILL DR STONEBRIAR CT STONEBRIAR RIDGE DR STONEY CREEK LN STORS MILL CT STRAUB RD STREIFF CT STREIFF LN STRYKER CT SUDBURY LN SUMMERSWEET LN SUNFIELD PL SUNNYBRAE CT SUNNYSIDE CT SUNNYSLOPE DR SUNRISE BLVD SUNSET DR SUNSET FOREST CT SUNSTONE DR SURF CT SWEET MEADOWS LN SWEETCREEK DR SWEETWOOD CT TALBERT CT TALL TIMBERS MEADOWS DR TAMARACK DR TANGLEWILDE DR TARA RIDGE CT TEMPLE AVE TERRINGTON DR THORNRIDGE CT TIMKA DR TONI MARIE CT TORINO DR TOWERCLIFFE DR TOWERWOOD DR TRAGO CREEK DR TRAILGROVE CT TRAILWOOD DR TRAVELLA CT TREASURE COVE TREEWOOD CT TURFWOOD DR TURNBURY CIR TWIGWOOD DR TWOSOME CT VAIL CT VALLEY MANOR DR VALLEY TRAIL DR VERNAL HILL CT VICTOR CT VICTORIA POINTE CT VILLAGE BROOK CT VILLAGE CREEK CT VILLAGE CREEK DR VILLAGE MEAD DR VILLAGE MEADOW DR VILLAGE WOOD CT VLASIS DR VOSSHILL DR WALNUT POINT CT WARBLER CT WARNER CT WARWICK LN WATFORD DR WELLINGTON ESTATES DR WELLSHIRE CT WENDEVY CT WESTGLEN VILLAGE DR WESTPAR DR WESTRUN DR WESTSIDE DR WESTWOOD DR WETHERBURN RD WETHERBY TERRACE DR WHISPERING FOREST DR WHISPERING VILLAGE CIR WHISPERING WILLOW CT WHITE ACRE CT WHITE TREE CT WHITE TREE LN WILD OAK CT WILDBRIER DR WILDFLOWER CT WILDFOREST CT WILDWOOD PKY WILLOWICK DR WINDCLIFFE DR WINDMILL DR WINDSOR MILL DR WINDY ACRES ESTATES DR WOERTHER LN WOODGREEN DR WOODHILL ESTATES DR WOODLAWN TERRACE CT WOODMAR CT WOODRUFF DR WOODRUN CT WOODRUN DR WOODS MILL RD WOODSIDE TRAILS DR WYNN PL

ON NG

942

939

748

749

656

680

688

7E 3B 3B 3B 6E 3E 5C 4D 6G 6G 1G 5G 4D 4D 4F 3D 5F 4E 4D 5F 7E 6C 7F 5G 3H 2I 1I 5G 8E 7C 7E 3B 3H 3B 1D 1C 3D 6E 2F 4F 4F 2I 4C 5G 4E 3E 2C 3G 2H 2H 8D 6D 3C 7F 9D 9D 5D 4F 3H 3C 5D 2D 2F 3E 3D 3B 6B 7B 8D 8E 8E 8D 4F 3G 3G 9D 8D 7B 6B 6B 3G 2E 6B 4F 8D 6C 6B 7B 5E 8B 2G 5E 3H 6C 7A 4F 5D 3F 5C 7E 1I 2H 2H 1B 7A 8E 9D 8C 4E 8D 4E 6F 6F 4E 4C 6G 2D 3C 5D 7C 7D 7A 7C 2F 2F 6E 4D 5E 5F 4C 8E 6D 6C 7F 9C 7E 7F 6E 7E 4E 6F 7B 7B 6F 6F 5F 8B 5G

532

406

763

PINE

938 935

729

73

LEMONWOOD DR LENNOX DR LERING CT LERING DR LESLIE LN LEXBRIDGE LN LILYBUD CT LINDELL DR LINDY BLVD LINDY CT LITTLE HILL CT LOCK DR LOG HILL CT LOG HILL LN LOG TRAIL DR LONDONDARY DR LORCHRIS CIR LUCERNE CROSSING CT LUCERNE PLACE DR LYONS AVE MADRINA CT MAEVE CT MAGNOLIA TRACE DR MANCHESTER RD MANORCREST LN MANORS WAY MANSIONHILL DR MAPLE LN MARK WESLEY LN MARSTEN CT MARYWOOD CT MAYFAIR DR MAYMONT DR MEADOW BRIDGE DR MEADOWBROOK COUNTRY CLUB EST MEADOWBROOK COUNTRY CLUB WAY MEADOWBROOK DR MELANIE MEADOWS LN MERCER MANOR DR MID TRAIL CT MID TRAIL DR MILLDALE DR MIMOSA LN MOCKINGBIRD LN MONROE MILL DR MONTICELLO DR MORENA CT MOREWOOD CT MOUNTVIEW CT MUIR VIEW DR NANCEEN CT NANCY PL NANTUCKET DR NASSAU WAY NEW BALLWIN OAKS CT NEW BALLWIN OAKS DR NEW BALLWIN RD NEWBURY DR NEWFIELD CT NEWPORT LN NEWTON PL NORMAN GATE DR NORTHMOOR DR NORWICH CT NORWOOD CIR NOTTINGHAM DR OAK BOROUGH CT OAK BOROUGH DR OAK BRIDGE DR OAK COMMONS DR OAK LEAF MANOR CT OAK MEADOWS CT OAK PASS CT OAK PATH CT OAK PATH DR OAK RIDGE TRAILS CT OAK RUN LN OAK TOP CT OAKBRIAR FARM CT OAKBRIAR FARM DR OAKLEIGH WOODS DR OAKMONT CIR OAKMONT FARM DR OAKNUT CT OAKTON RIDGE CT OAKWOOD FARMS CT OAKWOOD FARMS LN OAKWOOD TERRACE CT OLD BALLWIN RD OLD KIEFER CREEK RD OLD OAKS DR ORCHARD AVE ORKNEY CT PALM BAY DR PANHURST CT PARK DR PARKER DR PARKROSE CT PARKWAY DR PAULA VALE CT PEBBLE LAKE DR PENNY CT PENNY LN PICARDY HILL DR PIERSIDE LN PINE HOLLOW CT PINE RIDGE TRAILS CT PINE TERRACE DR PINE TREE LN PINE VILLAGE CT PLEASANT GROVE AVE POINTE LANSING CIR POINTE LANSING CT POINTE LUCERNE CT PORTSDOWN RD PORTWIND PL PRINCETON GATE DR PROVIDENCE RD QUAIL DR QUAIL TERRACE CT QUAIL VILLAGE CT QUAILS NEST RD QUAILVIEW DR QUINNMOOR DR QUINNMORE DR RADFORD LN RAINBOW CIRCLE CT RAMSEY LN RASCH CT RAUSCHER DR RED PINE CT REDSTART DR REINKE RD REIS BEND RD REJUVENATION LN REMINGTON PLACE CT REMINGTON PLACE DR REMINGTON WAY CT REMINGTON WAY DR RENEHALE DR RETHMEIER DR RICHLAND MEADOWS DR RIDGE OAK CT RIES BEND RD RIES CT RIES RD RIETZKE MOUNTAIN TRL ROBIN HILL LN

400

934

931

728

733

624

755

749

754

748

284

WINDY ACRES ESTATES DR

105

109

VICTORIA POINTE CT

101

720

718

714

716

GE CT

FOX BRIAR LN

FOX HOLLOW WOODS DR

R VILLA

326

718

706

CEDA

710

723

719

715

711

727

726

720

714

710

390

761

378

382

706

750

739

735

731

727

723

719

715

740

752

736

732

728

716

724

419

415

776

775

424

404

416

408

420

412

714

752

742

746

745

737

725

733

729

374

380

815

401

814

816

724

360

369 373

377

811

389

827

835

823

831

834

830

826

822

818

835

828

824

820

714

722 288

804

790

786

806

810

818

814 833

829

430

450

442

434 438

437 441

445

453

449

751

453

747

437

507

750

775

CASTLE TERRACE 743 CT

502

728

319 323 327 331

837

821

250

247

818

814

300 304

302 306 310 314

312

336 340

344 341 345 349 353 357 361

812

808

822

826

830

849

841

845

846

842

431

511

520

508

651 872 878

818

679 687

85

1H 6F 2C 6F 4F 4C 4D 6G 7G 1B 1B 4C 7F 5D 4G 2B 3D 4E 6D 3F 7F 8E 8E 2A 2H 1B 1B 2B 8E 7E 5F 3F 6F 4F 6G 2A 1A 4E 7E 4F 2G 1G 5C 1A 3G 9C 7C 7D 6D 6D 7C 3D 3G 2I 7B 7C 2H 3D 3D 4F 4F 7C 2H 4E 7E 2B 7E 7E 7E 3H 7E 2I 3D 3F 4F 4F 7B 3H 4E 7E 2F 2H 3I 1H 5G 8E 4G 4G 3B 2G 4G 4D 2G 4C 2F 2G 4C 4F 4F 7F 7F 7F 7F 7F 2E 8F 8F 8F 8F 8F 3I 2H 2E 6F 4C 2H 1I 2H 5D 2F 6C 6C 6G 2H 6F 5F 5F 6E 7F 5F 5F 2C 4D 5F 3E 3D 4C 6C 2H 6B 6C 6C 3D 3H 5F 3G 4E

151

700

751

652

720

744

821

827

548

239

235

231

204

VILLAGE CREEK CT

902

901

834

838

842 873

965 957

408

938

934

930

429 410

414

411

415

407 802

816

822

813

817

821

606 610

605 609

622 626

630

621

634

HO

AF

138

625

667

670 682

COURTWAY PL COVENANT PLACE CT COVENTRY FARM DR COVERT CT CRACKELWOOD DR CRESTLAND DR CROSS HILL CT CROWN PARK CT CROWSNEST DR CYPRESS TRACE CT CYPRESS TRACE DR DALE CT DAVID HARRISON LN DEBULA DR DEER MEADOWS CT DEL EBRO DR DELRAY CIR DENBIGH TER DENNISON DR DEVON CT DICKENS FARM LN DOGWOOD HILLS CT DOWN HILL DR DOWNALL GREEN DR DUTCH MILL DR EAGLE CHASE CT EAGLES GLEN CT EAGLES LANDING CT ECHO HILL CT ECHO HILL DR ELM ST ELMCREST DR ESSEN LN ESSEX MILL DR FAIRVIEW CT FAIRWAY LAKE CT FAIRWOOD FOREST CT FALMOUTH DR FAR HILL DR FAWN MEADOWS DR FIELDSTONE LN FIVE MEADOWS LN FLESHER DR FOREST CLUB DR FOREST LEAF DR FOREST VALLEY DR FOREST VILLAGE DR FOX BRIAR LN FOX DEN DR FOX HOLLOW WOODS DR FOX VILLAGE CT GANAHL DR GARDENLEAF CT GARDENWAY DR GATEFORD DR GATEFORD RIDGE CT GATEHALL LN GEREMMA CT GEREMMA DR GILLA CT GILLA DR GILLHAM CT GLENMEADOW DR GLENN DR GOLDWOOD DR GOLFVIEW DR GOLFWOOD DR GOVERNOR CT GOVERNOR DR GRAYWOOD DR GREAT HILL DR GREEN LANTERN LN GREENBRIAR LN GREENMORE DR GREENYARD CT GREENYARD DR GREYSTOKE CT GUENEVERE DR HAPPY CT HARVEST HILL CT HATTERAS DR HELMSDALE CT HENRY AVE HENRY OAKS CT HENSLER CORDES LN HICKORY KNOLL CT HICKORY TREE CT HICKORY TREE LN HICKORY VIEW LN HIDEAWAY LN HIGH MEADOWS DR HIGHLAND DR HIGHLAND RIDGE DR HIGHVIEW DR HILL TRAIL DR HILLBROOK DR HILLSDALE DR HOLLOWAY RD HOLLOWAY RIDGE CT HOLLY GARDEN CT HOLLY GARDEN DR HOLLY GREEN CT HOLLY GREEN DR HOLLY HAVEN DR HOLLY TERRACE CT HOLLYBEND CT HOLLYBEND DR HOLLYBUSH CT HOLLYLEAF CT HOLLYLEAF DR HOLLYRIDGE CT HOLLYRIDGE DR HOLSHIRE WAY HOWARD DR HUNTLEIGH DR IRON LANTERN DR IRONGATE WALK IRONWOOD DR IVY CT IVYWOOD DR J B HUNT CT JACOB LN JAMBOREE DR JARES CT JASMIN PARK CT JEFFERSON AVE JEFFERSON RD JOYCE CT KACEY LN KEHRS MILL BEND CT KEHRS MILL BEND DR KEHRS MILL RD KEHRS MILL RIDGE DR KEHRS MILL TRL KENILWORTH CT KENILWORTH LN KENT CT KEYSTONE FARM DR KINGRIDGE DR KLAMBERG LN KYLEMORE DR KYLEWOOD PL LAKEWOOD LN LALOR DR LARKHILL LN LEA MEADOWS DR LEICESTER CIR

142

629

LLY LE

132

633

5

4

632 646

141 HWY 1I AGEAN WAY 2H ALGONQUIN DR 3E ALVERSTON CT 7C AMBER JACK CT 6G AMBER JACK DR 6G ANDANTE DR 2B ANDOVER LN 3E ANNONDALE LN 3F ANTIOCH LN 3E APPLEGATE LN 5D APPLESTONE DR 8E ARBOR HAVEN DR 8E ARBOR RIDGE CT 9E ARBORWOOD DR 7E ARMSTRONG LN 5G ASHBOURNE DR 4E ASILOMAR CT 8F ASPEN TRAIL DR 3F ASPEN VILLAGE DR 7D AULD SPANISH CT 4F AZTEC DR 4F BABERTON DR 3D BALERO CT 3H BALINA DR 4F BALLPARK DR 5F BALLWIN COMMONS CIR 6E BALLWIN COMMONS DR 6E BALLWIN ESTATES CT 7F BALLWIN MANOR DR 5F BALLWOOD DR 7E BALLYSHANNON CT 6C BALTRAY CT 6C BARHAM DOWN DR 2I BARKER CT 6G BARKER LN 6F BARTON LN 5D BAXTER ACRES DR 4G BAXTER HEIGHTS CT 4G BAXTER RD 4G BAYWILLOW DR 3H BEDFORD LN 3B BELLERIVE DR 3E BENBOW CT 3F BIG BEND RD 8F BIRCHWOOD DR 5D BITTERFIELD CT 3I BITTERFIELD DR 3I BITTERWOOD DR 6E BLAZEDWOOD CT 7E BLAZEDWOOD DR 7E BLUE RIDGE PLACE CT 3D BLUE SAGE CT 4F BLUE SAGE DR 4F BOLTON DR 4F BRADFORD ESTATES CT 3B BRASS LAMP DR 3G BREEZEVIEW DR 7G BREEZEWOOD DR 2G BRIARHILL CT 8E BRIARWYCK DR 3D BRIDGEPORT DR 3C BRIGHT MEADOWS DR 4G BRIGHTFIELD DR 8F BRIGHTSPUR LN 3G BRISTOL CT 4C BRITE STAR CT 4F BROOKMONT FARM CT 6B BROOKSIDE LN 6F BROOKTREE DR 2H BUCKHURST CT 7B BUCKHURST DR 7B BURGUNDY LN 3I BURLINGTON MILL DR 4F BUSH DR 6E CALICO LN 2G CAMARGO DR 2B CAPITOL LANDING DR 2B CAPRICE GARDENS CT 3E CARAVEL CT 8F CARDEL DR 4F CARINA CT 6C CASCADE LAKE CT 8F CASTLE FOREST CT 8C CASTLE GLEN CT 8C CASTLE MANOR CT 6C CASTLE MEADOWS CT 8C CASTLE PINES CT 8D CASTLE PINES DR 8C CASTLE RIDGE CT 8C CASTLE RIDGE DR 9C CASTLE TERRACE CT 8D CAYBETH DR 4F CEDAR RUN DR 8D CEDAR TRAIL DR 3F CEDAR TREE LN 4G CEDAR VILLAGE CT 7D CENTER CT 5C CHAMPION WAY DR 3G CHANCELLOR HEIGHTS DR 3I CHARBRAY DR 2B CHAROAK DR 8D CHAROLAIS DR 2B CHARTRAND CT 2B CHERRY HILL DR 3C CHERRY RIDGE CT 8E CHEVINGTON CT 1G CHIPLEY CIR 3E CHOWNING CT 2B CHURCHILL LN 3D CLA TER RI DR 3B CLARKSON MILL CIR 1A CLARKSON RD 1A CLAYBEND DR 3C CLAYBORN DR 1F CLAYHEATH CT 3C CLAYMONT COURT CIR 2E CLAYMONT COVE CT 3D CLAYMONT DR 3E CLAYMONT ESTATES DR 2E CLAYMONT PLACE DR 2E CLAYMOOR DR 1F CLAYTON CORNERS DR 1H CLAYTON CROSSING DR 3B CLAYTON MEADOWS CT 2F CLAYTON POINTE CT 1F CLAYTON RD 2F CLAYTON RIDGE DR 3C CLAYTON VALLEY CT 1F CLAYTONBROOK CT 3C CLAYTONBROOK DR 2C CLAYWORTH DR 3H CLEAR CREEK CT 8E CLEAR MEADOWS DR 4G CLETA CT 8F CLETA DR 8 CLUBHOUSE DR COACHGATE CT COACHGATE LN COBBLESTONE LN COLUMBARD DR COOL MEADOWS DR CORAL TER CORONADO DR CORONET DR COUNTRY CLUB DR COUNTRY CREEK CT COUNTRY DOWNS DR

226

139

141

1005

136

818

653

220

946

945

6

1024

128

901

655

6

910

233

509

313

315

500

317

501

438

432

434

436

102 101

E DR RN

AS HB OU

MONROE MILL DR

581

572

562

580

576

570

232

566

545

557

549

553

558

RS MILL DR

SPOONE

581

CT

234

PP Y

HA

233

FALMOUTH DR

209

607

PLEASANT GROVE AVE

584

103

110

580

268

105

274

276 266

103

228

104

253

128 126

123

124

121

118 116

BIRCHWOOD DR

CORAL TERRACE

110

641

639

637

635

633

631

629

627

312

330

328

326

334

332 333

331

325

327

323

329

326

324

328

320

330

322

421

423

R LN

425

418 420

403

AND OVE

409

414 412

410

408

417

406

419

404

421

402

423

400

425

420 422 424

426

327

433

317

430

323

312

444

511

509

507

504

431

665

661

418

416

414

412

417

405

423

401

422

417 420

400

418

416 409

411

413

406 408

337

410 412

335

336

416

329 330

502

418

334

CIR

324

IPL EY

CH 504

506

502

502

283 281

277

442

459

CLAYMONT PLACE DR

403 404

414

422

419

606

602

548

554

558

549

547

543

535

539

231

271

269 WHITE TREE CT

267 258

248

245

240

616

620 619

615 611

LN

DR 108

612

137

610

EE

606

TR

602

TE

105

HI

117

W

RI LL MI

500

428

501

441

420

CAPRICE GARDENS CT

613

608

604

DR

AN GATE

NORM

434

541

557

425

351

548

544

540

526

534

538

413

412

408

400

409

629

407

627 625

CT

623 621

VE

CO

401

622

620 618 616

614

612

610

269

267

265

271

266

268

582

163

608

643 701

705 706 901

900

904

908

200

204 904

916

912

908

304

969

961

964 960

956 952

438

527

531

270

579 573

565

778

E RID

645

643

631

627

E DG

E PL AC E DR

632

S

KE HR

LU CE RN

637

136

636

LO G

107 101

88

628

LN LL HI

70

76

71

95

123

QUAIL DR

REINKE RD 212

520

524

528

N DR

GTO RIN

657

2

3

100

806

659

1

1002

101

5

1010

520

4

942

134

526

941

138

TER

272

LONDONDARY DR

421

578

574

564

570

619

615

611

623

630

622

618

610

614

705

703

701

BABER

706 704

702

700

MO NT

CL AY

322

CT CE

LN

ILL

PLA GE

CHU RCH

304

BLU 701

247 678

664

103

MIMOSA LN

TON DR

CIR

360

LR AY

361

358

814

DE

359

812

357 806 804

351

807 805

352

350

348

803

340

351

346 344

349

NORW

SU

300

269

714

712

278

LIN

710

E DR

276

624

260

715

620

713

CT

261

LL

HI 609

608

LO G

712

710

303

852

347

850

345

R D

848 846

341

825

336

D LN

843

OO EW

335

841

OOD

LAK

CIR

UR Y LN

804

805

W SKY 256

DR

736

142

140

DB

O O W 328

326

327

325

808

806 807

809

E SKY LINE

810 808

806 804

715

241

237

234

714 712

136

134

132

138

154

133

141

139

137

143

77

811

809

809

807

812 233

235

146

144

147

844

FF D

RU

15324

15330

836

835 346

343 812 810

808

806 805

807

808

806

804

810

804

813 814

812

813 811

814

15487

15493 917

905

909

913

919

219

910

906

914

917

913

909

905

949

925

921

937

941

945

929

953

933 932

940

944

936

CT

202

CARINA CT

210

AY

219

224

BA LTR

966

962

958

954

950

946

938

973

969

939 922

965

927

957

958

KW

OA

215

918

232

962

S CT 945

941

937

D FA RM

OO

942

325

321

1209

317

313

309

1201

1112

340

347

343 339

335

331

344

327

340

323

336

319

332

328

324

6

320

103 2 103

8 102

4 0

102

0 110

308

102

454

968

173

1208

318

314

111 1

310

181

169 1037

1013

1009

1005

1017

1033

1021

1025

1029

1001

998

994

990

1024

1032

1028

1004

1020

1012

1016

1008

1000

985

989

981

1023

1027

1007

1011

1003

1019

977

1015

1010

1014

986

978

972

968

BROOKMONT FARM CT

JACOB LN

279

390 1111

S DR OW

AD

1112

213

209

229

314

318

322 335

399

DR

RD

410 1117

GA TE FO

RICH

1108

ME

ND LA

500

9

508

512

516

504

507

511

515

14

519

523

15 502

506

510

408

514

536

511

524

520

523

527

533

449

605

S CLU B EST ATE

TRY CO UN

WB RO OK ADO

ME

832

834

830 835

833

839

332

341

330

339 337

335

333

331

816 814 812

810 270

813 811

262

810

808

806 804

811 809

807

812 810

808

806

804

811

809

807

814

436

216

805

251

203 815

824

241

822 820 818

816 225

223

221

227

219

229

231

220

222

224

A LN

218

329

44 153

910

902

957

905

816 817

237

239 232

121

OS

402

226

CT 222

LE

219

120

MIM

DR OOK CLA YTO NBR

348

948

945

326

323 321

319

317

315

227

229 231 233

235 224

HIGHVIEW DR

DA 913

915

909

911

913

124

914

912

910

908

909

911

116

15583

15567

805

1052

343

331

942

POR T LN

NEW

1014

3 100

41

537

251

212

311

0

114

313

310

327

335

3

469

135 1389

1352

1442

541

264

256

252

236

260

240

248

244

308

300

252

304

312

316

320

256

CT

TE RR AC E 3

D

114

O

310

O 202

306

KW

114

7

300

304

308 316

309

305

301

311

3 130

1363

766

7

1112BALLWIN OAKS CT NEW 818

810

1116

111

819

1125

1120 1124

1129

1185

7

1

116 1161

5

114 0

9

NE

W

LLW BA

IN

DR KS OA 1196

8 2 115

1160

4

114

114

116 1168

D

810

830

4

114

114

6

1149

113

1177

113

1132

1181

1133

1128

1156

5

1041

1045

1049

1053

1061

1057

1054

1050

1058

1062

1070

1046

1047

1055

1079

1051

1048

1046

1052 2

1

10 249

241

231

235

257

253

1101

201 205

220

OA 206

7 130 1359

445

CLUB EST

221

13 14

913

915

918

911

914

916

1011

907

903

1005

436

978

428 1009

1011

420

426

415

411

GHA M DR

NOT TIN 400

401 1004

1008

1013

CLA

156

RI DR

TER

558

546

15707

422

1041

1035

1029

1021

1028

1026

1024

1020

1018

1016

1022

502

504

5

1007

500

100

515

503

570

412

931

929

1042

1015

1022

1030

1036

1077

1063

1071

1076

1070

1064

DR ANDANTE

618

927

1025

LA CT

TRAVEL

1017

1083 1068

1062

1050

1056

1038

1032

1044

1020

546

1074

925

130

2370

MEADOWBR

00 159

S LANDI NG CT

EAGLE

15942

1059

1053

1054

1048

1047

1065 1060

15901

1073

DR GOLFVIEW

CHARBRA Y DR

DR

607

1092

1125

1141

1109

GLE N LN

568

1108

MEADOW BRIDGE DR

ROL LING

HICKORY VIEW LN 114

0

1134

1122

397

6

2 141

94

114

1 230 2362

2366

2363

2367 15907

15908

2411

15918

CAPITOL LANDING

548 542 536

530 524

518

514

OOK COUNTRY

298

294

290

286

282

278

274

270

299

295

291

287

283

279

275

271

267

DR

2303

15921

15916 0 1592

521

3

906

696

102

1404

655

658

90

1408

6

CT 3

225

224 643

74

430

102

313

429

103

307

122

116

433

232

311

108

106

104

437

281

230

109

107

105

113

110

108

106

104

441

229

111

109

251

445

274

273

1433

269

267

298

1429

808

812

810

212

290

142

906

900

134

282

2

901

902

130

202

136

129

143

652

904

704

706

708

710

800

802

707

804

709

806

711

801

803

708

805

807

710

809

800

200

148

146

144

141

DR

802

141

149

147

143

1586

905

654

903

804 655

274

CLETA CT

939

214

937

946

208

1587

806

IVY CT

2501 CL AR KS ON RD 2

S TR AC E

1597

ES

PR

CT

15969

63

CY

159

LE N

G S

8

2359

LE

234

EA G

9 235

15944

15936

15915

2367

CT

2385

2320

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ST 5

RE

2365

OO D

237

FO

234

5 233

15933

15927

FA3 IRW

1599

87 159 81 159

88

15918 15945

159

82 159

15993

5

7

15973

1596

1598

8 1597

15972

15966

15960

15952

551

906

656

E ILD

678

808

539

904 658

W

803

DR OD WO 679

810

LE

805

659

825

807

533

900

NG

829

809

TA

833

527

TH DR

902

811

837

813

841

822

CLAYWOR

901

521

826

903

LERING CT

830

907

834

809

513

811

507

813

501

815

810

2

204

9

806

804

1 845

D DR IEL

808

807

146

157

810

809

156

1583

812

211

106

324

R

163

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330

D

179

158

100

1501

E

816

G ID

508

130

195

217

102

318

812

926 811

R

510

DR

CAYBETH DR

317

814

923

4

GE CT 3

700

KS 185

311

818

702

OA

254

1525

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705

108

NG

1517

MILL DR WIND

HO

706

123

169

250

RI SP

1509

833

709

503

5

D CT IEL

505

507

RF

509

511

513

TE BIT

DR

TE RF BIT

820

520

515

504

506

508

517

510

519

512

661

514

D IEL

504

703

E Y AV NR

507

516

509

RF

HE

511

TE BIT

674 663

LN

711

518

GREEN LANTERN

817

TH

513

OR

DR

702

468

470

472

105

214

259

1533

844

RU

667

704

W

919

5

678

446

501

902

814

2

TH

822

816

806

807 HOLLYRID 838

818

821

705

477

500

502

478

476 474

GRAYWOOD DR

AY CL

482 480

803

707

503

614

505

483

9

805

800

630

461

463

8

DR

807

802

632

474

472

476

6

7

904

806 804

704

634

477

5

M

824

808

809

808

706

708

635

486

2

3

NEWFIELD CT

616

515

486

484

HA

701

3

1

673

500

906

707

DR

490

631

487

485

901

707

709

711

709

OW

485

675

669

4

903

711

ILL

633

487

489

5

679

671

622

905

713

708

702

YW BA

492

494

496

4 681

677

620

ER

680

683

488

715

710

703

701

497

480

482

484

486

488

490

682

490

489

717

712

R

705

D

475

477

479

481

483

485

487

684

647

495

814

805

685

636

491

815

TH

826

817

918

900

816

819

714

W

480

482

484

486

488

490

716

643

907

720

716

O

481

687

RO

714

3

686

641

624 622

618

717

828

916

718

D EA

E Y AV NR

NM

495

475

BALERO CT

688

830

818

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617

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287

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857

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212

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316

112

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306

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120

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306

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216

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204 206

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221

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127

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266

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411

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469

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448

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312

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406

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533

309

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260

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310

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108

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438

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316

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259

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246

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347

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305

309

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116

115

118

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SHARON PL

218

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335

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336

160

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423

549

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556

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300

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439

433

609

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407

622

610

614

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444

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602

832

830

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613

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557 565

317

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120

116

205

211

210

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126

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209

212

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232

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127

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327

365

353

313

312

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447

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524

552

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606

518

270

282

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358

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608

575

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544

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502

344

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366

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519

354

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258

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10

362

365

414

418

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503

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637

604

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553

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649

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545

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612

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614

610

606

617

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407

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513

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624

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606

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422

517

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527

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386

416

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301

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411 412 418 426 430 434 438 440

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630

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565

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639

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650

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738

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702 825

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640

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452

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CT

425

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543

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CT

545

544

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540

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547

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528

463

460

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553

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501

525

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475

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559

550

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561

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REMINGTON WAY DR

563

552

242 244 246

247 249 251

MELANIE MEADOWS LN 476

455

216

BR

234

235

106

125

123

107

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MOCKINGBIR

119

207

218

220

237

102

104

111

156

112

211

219

224

239

101

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119

152

106

203

219

228

240

192

140

114

205

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499

565

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253

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480

497

567

566

421

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493

569

568

415

500

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631

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CH

726

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262

485

529

HIL L CT 428

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C E YC JO 256

527

571

570

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237

424

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474

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IR

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860

859

608

188

184

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862

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260

180

172

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SPRING OAKS CT 206

104

112

209

231

237

239

423

162

154

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109

101

117

200

206

214

236

425

430

238

248 253

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465

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543

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433

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506

527

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232

504

677

675

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650

800

536 534

240

547

548

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243 245

234

235

555

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218 222 224

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680

407

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523

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206 208 216

GREAT HILL DR

553

676

678

672

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552

238

481

505

677

675

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CT 744

511

519

524

526

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429

552

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669

675

684

688

554

202

236

241

194

215

166

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865 863

264

101

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205

304

226

230

233

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146

CEDAR TREE LN

204

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150

198

101

113

157

152

308

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438

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904

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268

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530

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107

209

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268

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105

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400

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760

765

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IRONG

MANSIONHILL DR

DR

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271

107

CT

178

613 611

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750

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273

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177

400

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750

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176

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153

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306

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161

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616

615

406

403

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750

747

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511

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620

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173

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165

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115

300

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165

239

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111

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206 208

630

612

562

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638

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237

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222

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575

570

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503

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724

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721

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CT 766 LOW WIL 770

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685

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911

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WHISPERING VILLAGE CIR

522

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705

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588

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716

720

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552

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529

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777

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WHISPERING FOREST DR

749

620

307

350

729

725

780

505

512

ON KT

LE ST

860

737

614

627

869

638

645

330

766

OA

CA

909

621

318

386

734

645

615

DR

TW

681

WOOD

OAK RUN LN 507

635

634

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697

703

511

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640

639

640

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708

711

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352 698

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423

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558

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643

644

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319

320

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227

229

227

AR

559

560

650

649

648

ER W

561

562

658

652

672

W

596

360

742

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OD

707

736

740

730

609

347

747

741

735

737

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703

407

E WO LAG VIL

673

227

230

231

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225

225

523

229

5

D DR

563

564

647

655 656

365

367

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366

482

491

565 566

653

659 660

363

364

358

233 235 237 239 241

476 478 480

446

222

223

223

231

235

561

217 219 221 223 225 474

585

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536

568

659

663

664

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348

TU 678 RFW 676

361

541

570

665

662

670

353

350

338

344

352

359

677

707

676 349

346

334

355

572

669

668 667

462

468 470 472

588

OOD

BLAZEDWOO

571

318 677

322 324

340

330

351

679

708

STRYKE

757

733

644

343

348

711

OAK MEADOWS CT

735

638

866

331

812

816

CASTLE MEADOWS CT

620

504

513

626

611

639

Disclaimer: The maps and data available for access at this website are provided "as is" without warranty or any representation of accuracy, timeliness or completeness. The burden for determining accuracy, completeness, timeliness, merchantability and fitness for or the appropriateness for use rests solely on the user accessing this information. The City of Ballwin makes no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the use of the maps and data available for access. There are no implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. The use acknowledges and accepts all inherent limitations of the maps and data, including the fact that the maps and data are dynamic and in a constant state of maintenance, correction and revision. The maps and associated data do not represent a survey. No liability is assumed for the accuracy of the data delineated on any map, either expressed or implied.

808

813

CT

763

614

326

331 333 339

347

344

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576

329

331 677

678

327 329

332

336

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379

501

761

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749

CASTLE PINES 504

688 324

326

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515

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312

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694

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761

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566

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314

322

324

TRAGO CREEK DR

783

779

406

RU

418

422

426

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327

702

BITT ERW

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321

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636

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740

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406

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4

476

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640

110

304

117

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MANCHESTER RD

14820

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119

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107

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630

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307

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635

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480

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118

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809

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WESTGLEN VILLAGE DR

800

550

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BALLWIN COMMONS DR

201 203

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256

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312

122

TR AI LS

122 112

14799

105

14830

396 392

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215

218

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526

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569

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573

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810

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430

429

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319

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387

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325

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253

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422

421

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443

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806

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335

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339

RS

418

630 309

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315

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759

254

323

326

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359

W

249

OLD BALLWIN RD

307 311 315

319

705

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414

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629

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308

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317

322

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311

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468

805

351

358

352

361

406

405

409 413

414

476 480

484

488

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347

352

342

WEST RUN DR 902

CASTLE GLEN CT

812

DR

307

1115

1101

1107

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901

CT

AM

401 406 406

464

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283

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320 324 328

104

430

434

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452

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343

346

322

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925

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336

318

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349

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329

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372

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321

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296

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316

315

QUAIL 350 VILLAGE

C

368

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245

805

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309 313 317 321

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850

846

842

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LL AG E

245 247 250

312

309

314 320

240

242

248

247

306

303

308

315

316

332

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280

286 290

300

297

296

302

830

861

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308

314

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293

292

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318

322

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288

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864

860

825

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852

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287

328

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283

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310 314

268

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267

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280

279

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297

255

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246

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270

244

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238

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231

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242

246

624

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227

236

235

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622

126

225

230

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630

286 290

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133

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14837

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RD

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14915

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627

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307

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128

206

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312

310

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238

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14960

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217

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307

305 303

205

234

283

400

138

215

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287

284

114

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110

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206

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213 228

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319

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311

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321

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FAWN MEADOWS

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606

623

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141

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115

604

611

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140

117

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110

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BALLWIN

609

619

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144

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132

226

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627

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119

120

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725

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W ORCHARD AVE 15001

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14913

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111

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112

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114

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607

618

613

631

266

605

616

629

219

241

252

272 274 276

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840

866

417

420

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119

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614

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624

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299

240

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836

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589

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315

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307 305

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617

323

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310

486

483

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490

305

642

625

318

319

284

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129

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3 4

295

576

574

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306

312

307

15

488

485

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CT

633

322

323

215

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641

326

17

2

214

506

572

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332

327

207

304

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295

331

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215

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570

559

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588

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233

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559

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221

554

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312

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569

571

587

333

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218

546

530

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510

248

552

555

AG

DR

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551

516

335

378

375

360

306 304 302

294

556 L CT S MIL 560 UE

563

560

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201

251

525

521

567

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107

127

126

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380

377

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528

536 540 544

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535

546

STODDARDS MILL DR

525

128

127

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232

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527

260

CT 246

563

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495

314

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489

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316

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287

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309

300

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547

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561

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571

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213

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118

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601

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319

315

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565

212

217

559

563

570

561

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POINTE LUCERNE

WHITE ACRE CT

221

217

RENEHALE DR

126

118

201

231

232

GREENMORE DR

312

317

313

R

240

227

248

229 225

216

256 250

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233

222

579

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577

244

237

226

224

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567

590

583

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574

250

215

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594

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597

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133

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318 316 314

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107

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233

232

230

323

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555

557

236

106

238

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265

240

238

108

347

343

382

327

322 320

ST ANDREWS CT 312

427

424

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13

492

491

493

309

WILDBRIER DR

345

200

429

R

311

499

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312

304

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336

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314

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127

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615

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612

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304

318

313

323

320

315

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428

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103

109

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224 226

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516

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319

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349

374

367

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320

430

376

369

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322

LN

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AL

336

3

502

495

320 325

221

CHAMPION WAY DR

303

5

403

402

327

316

306

353 1

373

346

338

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414

424

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425

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313

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11

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410

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515

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371

329

324

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333

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4

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7

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326

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346

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320

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144

154

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243

245

CE

435

142

156 408

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247

246

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405

407

411

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325

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419

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349

329

CT

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326

325

439

306

402

327

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328

419

325

333

508

W

304

331

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249

250

354

351

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396

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320

325

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308

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246

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356

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314

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CT 316

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254

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422

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301

310

315

316

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416

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UN

511

518

514

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512

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505

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517

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515

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505

503

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400

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319

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412

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CT

421

419

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104 101 102

256

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611

613

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287 291 295

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15230

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226

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872

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CT

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106

264

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246

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LUCERNE CROSSING CT 102

107 105 103 100 101

108

240

283

283

279

360

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517

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WELLSHIR

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580

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280

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118

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262

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101

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227

258

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448

556

263

270

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428

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218

273

268

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309

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427

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576

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114

6

373

114

DR

852

212 216

244 248

259

266

269

272

EST FOR

307

972

463

588

WHI

A DR MM

110

110

242

259

263

256

255

352

455

565 569

GE

943

311

548

573

255

208

260

251

258

262

265

268

OO BR

287

315

312

451

577 581

585 589

519

LL O

120

116

107

243

210

252

AGE VILL

1

0

369

115

275

LA VIL

444

557

1260

844

254

261

264

283

453

E DR 552

253

257

260

271

100

457

256

267

883 331

316

100

540

249

826

857

122

1229

1237

263

884

CT

1008

532

235

825

6

1120

549

512

1446

1460

853

122

1230

1234

1238

259

335

544

AC

250

106

120

111

15225

15240

112

736

6

N

450

540

TE 530 RR

247

723

121

BY

426

426

428

SHE266 101 FFIE 102 LD CT

257

264

105

NEW BALLWIN RD

926

922

900

329

255

1217

536

4

532

ER

252

144

106

230

237

251

323

6

447 516

262

113

110

925

921

233

440

WE TH

254

APPLEGATE LN

734

224

ON CT

225 229

245

239

439

515

313

DE

120

15221

251

SHANN

219 221

279

446

539

315

284

124

126

109

107

243

203

203

900

880

542

506

524

BALLY

208

122

8

8

912

204

CT

215 217

247

419

ELL

211

220

877

442

1130

SEW

530 535

934

2

519

518

519

501 125

500

523

529

0

121

209

870

1012

438

256

645

115 113

112

15253

206

207

216

251

1213

101

449

121

20

OWS

511

1440

N CT

507

1428

1439 145

426

501

1306

1435

PLETO STEE

HLAND ME AD RI C 1431

1255

422

425

445

1128

503

403

1403 1427

7

402 421

930

112

4

417

1312

1423

449

209

1123

134

425

1419

1251

416

409 1320

1415

1119

8

1599

1411

441

RO

1215

CT

1230 1236

437

508

317

286

124

15287

202

205

208

212

255

319

1242

1247

201

2

1170

1173 1203

ST 21 OK E

1235

933

339

134

434

1407

EY

1239

1243

122

AV E RS TO

1166

1163 1167

GR

8

410

433

4

320

318

407

282

275

140

122

117

116 114

238

327

434

8

1162

1159

13 3

2

1345

426

323

318

410

405 400

332

325

CLAYMONT DR 600

319

415

334

323

609

CE

331 329

327

324

321

278

145

625

119

118

110

225

315

1040

422

RR

259

140

65

59

602

53

120

111

219

311

430

1158

929

323

445

1368

T CT

6

1328

1142

1155

1336

1122

113

113

228

377

332

465

137

1380

1044

1150

1151

450

1360

456

5

215

1207

351

402

414

418

1

9

1147

457

422

986

338

317

113 113 1143

461

414

217

235

307

113

211

8

4

0

304

300

263

58

115 113

114

1203

308

9

401

405 409

413

418

430

441

438

453

1106

405

409 413 417 421 425

112 1121

265

35

605

117

114

112

DEBULA DR

305 306

121

121

1206

1117

1113 1105

429

433

410

8

401

320

330

4

0

1114 1110

601

TI

414

331

322

TA

15103

1202

113

113

1126

1118

397

326

207

935

121

1103

1104

1122 389

393

331

406

346

359 361

381 385

365

312

1313

402

311

1400

RS

1547

HU

1595

342

353

TE

262

130

119

116

113

15471

901

249

NO 330 R CT

349 RIDGE CT GATEFORD 357

323

408

N

429

DR

CK RA MA 412

413

411

409

264

136

118

117

115

112

REINKE DR

MA

337

345

R

332

326

150

123 121

109

OAKWOOD FARMS LN

341

270

212

218

200

7

266

206

BA 931 Y 227 DR MAEVE CT 231 236

412

275

142

112

115

116

236

200

943

LM

223

949

ST LE

262

278

330

437

426

1591

258

334

449

398

1592 8

CA

246

326

CT

331

443

418

157

E OAK

322

CT 334

394

8

CT

318

1355

392

121

242

267

274

314

E AC RR TE

388

417

1570

4

8

317

323

1351

1562

1566

2

N

1409

1558

1

5

0

0

0

1554

1567

4

8

238

254

259

263

1160

P

1342 1348

391

121 121 122

123

123 123 2

234

255

271

213

226

201

205

230

235

336

961

952

218

201

207

PA

333

329

408 406

404

402

AL G

431

14828

218

225

953

226

251

332

980 963

222

247

328

1164

TO

1334

H DR OUG

CK

1550

1563

BOR

4 142

1546

1559

157

OAK

142

1542

1555

157

387

1

1417

121

5

383

142

1347

384

114

RIDG 303

131

1538

BU

1539

379

T DR

1534

380

RS

1530

1535

375

1343

376

HU

1526

1531

372

CK

1460

BU 371

1522

7

1

9

3

7

AW DL

1311

1541

367

1518

1339

OO

335

1514

1335

368

6

1330

1331

364

124 124

1312

1327

340

360

359

1241 1243

1323

356

355

363

1302

1319

352

351

W

300

348

347

372

231

230

215

312

336 344

366

1527

502

123

332

1461

354 360

1523

RD

123

328 335

348

1519

ST S NE AIL

122

324

342

1506

1515

QU

122

320

336

371 1503

223 227

226

976

981

212

4

1152

1159

K

219

222

977

197

365

114

1151

1163 116 7

1

OA

218

193

206

275

1155

1

5

215

243

341

1136

117 120 9

211

214

343

1132

9

120

1502

337

DR

113

207

3

207

210

239

333

RM

229

120 121 121

226

206

324

321 329

1108

1116

1120

203

1225

1507

221 225

1124 1128

1131

226

222

218 214 210

1511

220 224

T FA ON

1104

1123

316

GE CT

217

KM

1100

1111

1119

1127

PANHURST CT

209 213

216

228

208

1103

1107

307

247

305

208 212

223

OA

243

204

THORNRID

211

215

16

244

239 241

502

205

1004

6

232

231 235

1550

201

3 FARM CT 219 OAKBRIAR 15

1112 OAK BOROUGH CT

7

200

204

OAKBRIAR FARM DR

200

306

1031

5

9

203

207

1042

952

KEYSTONE FARM DR

194

227

218 220

1064

219 223

1060

214

190

1043 1039

OAKWOOD FARMS LN 1056

206

210

215

227

1067

205 209

1063

1068

1072

1059

1075

1071

1102

1066

193

1075

COLUMBARD DR

957

6

190 1069 1065 1073

CI

328

325

15208

KYLEMORE DR 209

336

327

416

244

125

124

233

968

RY

334

332

127

126

122

234

969

BU

338

335

333

326

273

A CT MM

154 148

119

114

123

235

973

LLY

15134

RE

160

600

102

128

125

121

636

965

249

141

128

127

122 120

702

185

HO

GE

601

124

121

129

9

300

149 126

125 123

118

ROJEAN DR

189

530

RE

161

167

155 135

104

M O

328

280

252

251

100

634

340

331

290

247

624

HIGHLAND DR 127

120

REDSTART DR

178

350

GE

612

144

623

110

531

248

629

156

152

148

115

961

536

257

319

267

147 143

15302

177

255

244

MANCHESTER RD

104

257

246

242

624

164

160

151

T

41

47

114

15455

LN

323

318

15475

E

332

349

104

403

TU RN

501

403

401

407 404

342

329

628

640

122

VLASIS DR

106

105

549

333

347

738

908

106

916

914

107

15505

DG RI XB LE

334

331

C

472

342

342

127

133

906

912

105

481

709

340

338

LL

407

405

405

344

407

402

433

195

501

410

409

404

403

435

506

504

502

411 406

403

424

401

508

NORTHMOOR DR

415 408

413

LN

H

402

LN

CH

RT

505

504

QUINNMORE DR

335

438 437

507

506

503

333

426

248

233

168

TIO

O

346

341

418

288

235

155

139

128

737

128

146

142

117

118

411

626

HI

415

404

285

261

250

237

178

421

406

400

252

239

AN

510

CT

344

402

254

241

635

172

46

DR

263

243

637

28

126

120

117

1

PE

403

256

639

179

OR TH

345

LW

505

500

417

410

409 415

NI KE

506

418

508

507

512

419

OAKMONT CIR

525

519

406 513

513

348

LW

417

405

260

166

611

647

119

115

707

839

RC

124

121

113 108

251

641

650

O SS

KE NI

410

258

110

910

531

629

837

835

339

842

CI

W

116 119

253

630

CR

CT

LE

606

125

SMITH DR

122

255

249 247

604

609

527

LO

518

501

505

130

129

123 135

R LN RIA

BO

236

BURTONWOOD LN

ROMINE CIR

LILYBUD CT

NB

237

RA

IN

127

739

126

124

125

EE

803

607

610

124

129 131

GR

805

242

234

126 127

124

YS

287

245

173

118

NN

261

257 258

656

625

112

94

244

238

232

130

429

816

271

DR

249

131

106

240

260

418

409

259

256

254

252 250

621

604

125 119

113

246

241

518

0

273

253

262

258

256 254 252

250 248

239

259

257 255

253

249

617

260

255 253

251 249

247

238

138

616

700

252

245

262

402

537 531

400

426

414

304 301

305

251

542

SU

530

412

669

549

543

511

501

404

430

435

530

411

246

250 248

236

315

311 307

660

270

268 266 264

244

134

326

324 322

320

420

315

261

265

263

242

230

150

329

533

KENILWORTH LN

309

331

330

272

262

240

228

334

327 325

265

411

405

438

525

424

536 408

494

508

417

402

319

336

335

328

323

246

802

338

337

345

708

340

336

274

LIND EL L DR

254

802

DR

245

344

332

350

264

626

346

836

NT MO

AY CL

280

803

ER

776

321

255

803

DR

802

803

LN

348

343

419

480

511

519

BRIARWYCK DR

413

627

510

6

323 348

266

ON

426

CT

RY

561

350

801 345

343

427

440

503

442

436

430

542

458

426

425

465

473

528

433

457

423

1525

48

344 346

345

257

EIFF

521

152

829

831

259

802 265

782

0

828

339 341

ND LO

DA

352

342

335

S MIL L RD

DR

419

449

515

4

1524

826

UR Y LN

343

337

466

443

511

8

1523

824

DB

15212

2

1522

0

822

927

929

HL

247

151

145

820

6

1528

931

NA

253

RAU SCH

157

155 153

SU

343

243

149

842

818

2

1527

344

259

STR

239

148

WENDEVY CT 115

114

8

933

141

121

1527

837

265

N RD

167

127

4

825

932

DR

1526

830

828

934

TL AN D

1526

15310

936

938

905

117

112

CT

ER NT

ES

118

907

107

5

POR TSD OW

120

112

915

CE

838

122

116

910

111

836

124

RK WA Y DR

115 113

833

204 202

ME CT

206

205

HILLSDALE DR

PA 980

109

837

208 207

907

DR

827

CUMBERLAND PARK LN

209

202

CORONET

125

121

TWOSO

241 239

213

206

203

201

CR

210

205

981

838

ND DR

221

213

207

834

STLA CRE

240

238

340

342

K DR

LIND ELL

813

815

211

914

123

252

827 338

KE HR

GA

250

244 242

236

214

OO

260

254

816

212

916

263

DR

ET

NS

243

826

217

BR

261

SU

245

907

215

KENT CT

209

IGH TLE HUN

304

909

828

915

832

921

307

204

911

243

212

917

15336

920

206

913

234

220

218

15318

928

309

922

223

217

15314

S 930

924

310

216

214

OW

272

D DR TLAN

207

826

818

209

830

218

211

ES

925

210 208

832

220 219

217

TE TA ES

954

314

926

CR

923

915

301

215

UB

942

301

919

917

225

4

334

900

306

305

316

918 916

914 912

908

AD

1526

Y CL TR

943

966

962

CE RD

309

318

920

310

314 312

306

ME

916

314

313

302 300

910

958

318

317

310 308

TO L CT

303

345

950

322

321

313

309

IS

306

325

320

315 316

BR

965

IDEN

329

322

317

318

311

308

416

403 326

940

946

809

354

353 854

853

427

416

HOLSHIRE WAY

535

437

15182

448

435

354

353

811 356

355 856

855

462

458 454

441

355

808

815

358

449

356

810

DR

OD

453

780

362 363

357

858

857

829

840

347

942

WO

819

860 823

827

831

350 349

938

949

407

352 351

934

945

411

328

354

353

930

937

941

839

357

355

DR

PROV

LN

K

933

H CT HEAT

328

325

415

330

324

IC W WAR 944

424

510

524

327

419

359

940

926

929

BEND

532

329

CLAY

327

946

941

331

423

332

840

361

922

925

428

329

944

427

334

362

363

956

918

921

CLAY

949

336

63

334

952

431

336

333

917

440

342

344

CKET DR

346

156

55

953

435

ST WE

463

459

6

UN K CO

347 NANTU

156

947

338

439

338

945

340

914

443

340

527

1522

OO

RD

349

353

351

344 447

T DR EPOR BRIDG

7

DR GE N RID YTO 10 CLA 906 154

475

346

941

RD

N TO

AY CL

2

15400

348

342

337

15701

15498

339

76

78 79

1521

BR

LL

15548

9

15534

5

1557

339

15526

1557

9

341

47

1 1

15362

943

77

4

15404

345

75 56

54

52

48

15407

15510

51

50

15186

MI

OW

2

15569

2

345 343

49 47

6

3

1540

74

15178

S

AD 5

1103

OK CT

1560

15605

1012

15583

1010

1008

1557

49

1567

8

15

BRO 400

35

1024

1027

ME

TON

4

1006

100

100

1007

8

1020

7

154

CLAY

3

1005

100

15617

55

9

410 404

15623

156

14 10

HR KE

418

406

LN

403

D LN

11

46

548

448

73 58

554

467

435

72

507

950

409

D

405

57

15

13

45

1020

71

15138

930

415

407

59

16

12 1026

62

60

673

555

70 451

922

417

101

406

17

19

15421

408

404

OR DF BE

44

15425

BE DF OR

156

1025

156

2

515

101

530

1123

1021 1023

538

506

531

5

549

1017

1010

534

113

542

1015

578

566

D

X

402

1009

543

NO

18

42

1006

414

409

61

22

41

1046

974

512

584

540

573 561

968

520

1103

562

554

414 418

R

20

21 40

416

420

68 69

43

954

N LE

403

914

518 517

64 63

24

1050

960

1117

537

510

527

571

533

563

555

585

541

556 548

921

949

1135

LERING DR 569

943

402

554

545

3

405

401

407

405

403

CT

R

26

27

23

39

904

937

408 406 404

902

509

66 67

25

30

38

908

424

D

32

34

37

977

RE NA

FA IR

413

510

65

28

36

1054

1

419

M AY

417

409

557

466

465

460 456 454

452

439

29

31

8

1056

2

17

CHA 955 953 RTR AND CT

989

MO

417

410

105

3

16

926

509 501

473 421

419

4

15

906

918

532 524 516

415

413

411

5

CT

DR

EBRO

DEL

927

1004 523

6

ENA

909

912

33

35

7

12

O DR

15024

920

DEL EBRO DR

407

8

MOR 11

917

CAM ARG

922

910

8

9

921

919

924

1037

908

1086

15910

15926

109

928

926 638

630

622 614

603

CLAYMONT COURT CIR

23

2

2

932

646

633

621

615

604

ON MEAD CLAYT

625

159

9

10

5

106

923

1010

649

AIS DR

626

617

447

651

1592

CHA ROL

644 636

588

468 469

463 461 459

457

628

620

614 1081

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ZON NG MAP CITY OF BALLWIN, MISSOURI

9 0

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I

Existing Ballwin Zoning Map 25 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


History of Growth in Ballwin The maps on this page depict the history of growth, both residential and commercial, within Ballwin. Note that the current municipal boundary of Ballwin is shown in the maps. Ballwin’s boundary changed multiple times over the decades through annexation. The most significant decades for growth for residential occurred in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Much of the current commercial development along Manchester Road was built in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

Prior to 1950

1950’s and 1960’s

1970’s and 1980’s

1990’s and 2000’s

2010 - 2017 26 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Growth in West County West County has seen significant growth in recent decades. It is important to understand the context of Ballwin in this regional growth. The maps on this page shows commercial and residential growth in West County since 2000. The commercial development map shows limited new commercial development in Ballwin since 2000. Significant commercial development occurred in the Chesterfield Valley and key locations along Highway 141. Residential development has been widespread throughout nearby communities and the unincorporated areas of St. Louis County south of Ballwin. Within Ballwin, residential development since 2000 has been mostly infill development on remaining vacant parcels, subdivided larger parcels, and by replacement of tear downs.

Commercial Development in West County Since 2000

Residential Development in West County Since 2000 27 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


EXISTING ECONOMY AND JOBS Ballwin Business Profile The City of Ballwin is home to one of the region’s most robust commercial and retail environments. Centered on Manchester Road, retail dominates the corridor with over 1.6 million square feet of commercial/retail space. The corridor includes retail districts with large national anchors flanked by smaller retail stores, modest strip centers and small standalone businesses (local and some national chains). There is a significant concentration of car dealerships, consuming significant acreage along the Manchester Road corridor. Additional small enclaves of retail and commercial uses are also located at the intersection of Clayton and Kehr’s Mill roads.

28 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Offices uses are concentrated around the Barn at Lucerne area, Claymont Plaza, along Manchester Road and in repurposed houses located on West Orchard and Kehr’s Mill Road, north of Manchester. There is limited office space available in the City.

there are a variety of primarily chain restaurants, including a significant fast food presence.

Ballwin currently has 275 businesses with active licenses based on data made available by the City. Most of the businesses fall within two (2) business sectors. The businesses generally consist of retail stores or personal services businesses, which include dry cleaners, salons (beauty and spa), financial advisors, banking and insurance. Additionally,

MAY 2019


Generally, the retail developments were constructed between 1960 and 2001, with select reinvestment and façade improvements having been made to structures in both the large and strip centers. Select redevelopment has occurred in the past five to six years, with sites reconfigured and newly constructed buildings. A survey of the commercial areas identified notable vacancies, especially in the larger retail centers. While Ballwin does not collect real estate taxes, St. Louis County’s assessed value of its commercial properties does provide some insight into how widely conditions can vary in the same market. For example, between 2012 and 2018, Central Plaza shopping center experienced a nearly 90% increase in assessed value ($3.84M in 2012 versus $7.23M in 2018) while Ballwin Plaza, its neighbor immediately to the west, has seen a nearly 20% drop in its assessed value. While the significant increase in Central Plaza’s assessed value is anomalous and may be in part attributable to under- or overestimating its assessed value over time, the difference between the two properties does demonstrate the marked difference in commercial vitality that can co-exist in the same community. There are virtually no undeveloped sites along the Manchester Road corridor with the exception of one site located west of Old Town Plaza at Ballfield Drive, which is currently for sale. Additionally, Old Town Plaza and Ballwin Plaza could potentially accommodate new development on out-parcels given the large expanse of parking lots.

29 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Change in Assessed Commercial Property Value (2012 to 2018)

MAY 2019


Employment Ballwin residents are primarily employed in six (6) employment sectors. Employment in sales and office professions is 23%, Management 22%, Education and Legal 14%, Service occupations 12%, Computer and Engineering positions 9% and Healthcare professions 8%. The remaining residents are employed in the protective service, construction and production/ transportation sectors. Most Ballwin residents work in St. Louis County (81.9%) with 18.1% working outside of the County or the State of Missouri. The unemployment rate in Ballwin has ranged from 1% in Oct. 1999 to 7.6% in August 2009. The ACS estimated the unemployment rate at 4.2% in April 2016: however, Homefacts. com indicates that the rate in April 2018 is 2.5%, which would be consistent with Bureau of Labor Statistics data which shows the State and County unemployment rates being 3.6% and 3.5% respectively.

Employment Density in St. Louis County (2015) Source: LEHD on the Map, 2015

30 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Commuting Most of Ballwin’s residents are employed outside of the community requiring them to commute to work. The ACS estimates that the mean travel time for residents to commute to their place of employment in 2016 was 25 minutes. ACS data also indicated that 9.3% of residents had a commute time of less than 10 minutes with 36.6% traveling over 30 minutes. The majority (92%) of the population use personal vehicles to commute to work, while only 0.4 % rely on public transportation. It should be noted that 6.7% of residents do not commute to their place of work but work at home. The nearby map shows the commuting patterns for workers in Ballwin. The arrow on the left shows the number of incoming commuters, people who come from communities other than Ballwin each day to work. The arrow on the right shows the number of Ballwin residents who leave to work elsewhere. These arrows do not indicate direction of travel, just inflow and outflow. Finally, the circular arrow shows the number of Ballwin residents who also work in Ballwin. While these commuting numbers vary slightly from the 2016 ACS data, they show the overall trend that most residents commute outside of Ballwin for their jobs.

31 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Commuting Patterns in Ballwin Source: LEHD on the Map, 2015

MAY 2019


EXISTING HOUSING Overview Neighborhoods and housing are frequently mentioned by residents as key strengths for Ballwin. With a range of housing types and price points, along with being in the highly desirable school districts of Rockwood and Parkway, the Ballwin residential market is often highly sought after. This section will review existing data and trends in housing in the City such as types of housing, market values, changes in market values, parcel sizes, and the trend of infill housing.

32 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Key Housing Statistics The total number of housing units in Ballwin increased to 12,435 total units in 2010 from 12,062 in 2000. The ACS estimates that the number has declined to 12,011 units in 2016. This decline is probably the result of older smaller homes being demolished and replaced with larger homes on combined residential lots. The data indicates a stable mix of owner occupied homes versus renter occupied since 2000 when 82.9% of homes occupied by owners and 17.1% occupied by renters. In 2010, these numbers shifted slightly to 82.8% owner occupied and 17.2% by renters. Ballwin has maintained a higher proportion of owner occupied homes (Ellisville 78.8%, Chesterfield 77.3%, Manchester 77.7%) than the surrounding communities except for Clarkson Valley where 98.2% of homes are owner occupied and only 1.8% are occupied by renters. Per 2016 ACS data, 80.4% of homes in Ballwin were owner-occupied versus 19.6% of renters, a slight decrease in owner-occupied residences from 2010.

in size and often does not offer the design and amenities of newer homes (open plan, number of bathrooms etc.). There are pockets of homes with 1800 SF or less throughout the central area of Ballwin both north and south of Manchester Road. The average household size has remained fairly consistent from 2010 (2.56 persons per household) to 2016 (2.60 persons per household). This same trend is seen in the surrounding communities with Ellisville at 2.47/2.54, Chesterfield at 2.42 /2.44, Manchester at 2.5/ 2.60 and Clarkson Valley at 2.98/3.03.

The housing values in Ballwin and the surrounding communities remain strong with Ballwin having an owner occupied median home value of $238,400 based on the 2016 ACS. Ellisville homes had a median value of $227,700; Chesterfield $347,000; Manchester $216,100; and Clarkson Valley $592,500.

Source: American Community Survey

The housing stock in Ballwin in terms of type is relatively homogeneous. Significantly, 81.6% of homes in Ballwin are single unit, detached residences. Small apartment complexes of 5 to 19 units represent 10.5% of the housing stock. Single unit attached and 2 unit homes represent 4.3% of the housing stock. In terms of age, approximately 66.6% of the housing in Ballwin was constructed in 1979 or earlier. Older housing stock is typically smaller 33 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Housing Units Built per Decade in Ballwin MAY 2019


Housing Types According to the 2016 ACS, there are 12,011 total housing units in Ballwin. The totals include: 9,802 single family detached houses, 382 single family attached houses, 1,395 apartment units in small structures (2-9 units), 317 apartment units in medium structures (10-19 units), 93 apartment units in large structures (20 or more units), and 18 mobile homes.

Source: American Community Survey

Housing by Type in Ballwin 34 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Housing Value Based on St. Louis County appraised values, there is a solid range in housing based on price, with a significant percentage of homes in the $175,000 to $325,000 range. There are also areas of more modestly priced homes ($150,00 or less) along with pockets where home prices exceed $400,000 and even $500,000.

Single Family Residential - Appraised Value

35 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Changes in Residential Property Values For the most part, residential properties in Ballwin have appreciated in value since 2012 in comparing values to 2018. Some pockets of the City have shown decreases in residential values. However, additional analysis would have to be done comparing data from more years to fully evaluate these areas.

Change in Assessed Residential Property Value (2012 to 2018)

36 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Home Size The size of single family homes in Ballwin ranges from less than 1,000 square feet to over 4,000 square feet. The older neighborhoods of Ballwin tend to have the smaller homes of under 1,800 square feet. Newer subdivisions in the southern and northern parts of the City tend to have the larger homes of over 3,000 square feet, although pockets of large homes exist throughout the City. For comparison, the National Association of Home Builders report that the average size for a single family home in 2016 was 2,635 square feet.

Single Family Residential - Home Size (Square Feet)

37 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Single Family Homes - Parcel Size Most parcels for single family homes in Ballwin are under one-half acre. Parcel size does not necessarily corelate to the age of the home. Many older homes are located on parcels greater than one-half acre or one acre.

Single Family Residential - Parcel Size

38 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Infill Housing In recent years, there has been an increase of infill housing in Ballwin. Infill housing, in this context, is defined as either new housing on an undeveloped lot within an established neighborhood or redevelopment of an existing residential property. Redevelopment can take several forms, but is typically a tear down of a smaller home that is then replaced with a new, larger home. If the parcel is large enough, as

part of the redevelopment, the parcel will be subdivided into smaller lots with multiple new homes. The aerial photos on this page shows two examples of infill housing in Ballwin.

Example #1 shows an example of infill housing. The two parcels (approximately two acres and one acre each) on the left photo were combined and then subdivided into multiple lots (approximately one-quarter to one-third acre each) for new home construction (right photo).

Example #1 Example #2 shows another example of infill housing. The parcels on the left photo were subdivided into multiple lots for new home construction (right photo).

Example #2 39 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


EXISTING COMMUNITY ASSETS AND INSTITUTIONS Overview A strength of Ballwin is the number and quality of community assets and institutions available to City residents. This section highlights key community facilities including: ■■ Civic Buildings ■■ Education ■■ Health ■■ Libraries ■■ Public Safety ■■ Utilities

40 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Community Assets and Institutions 41 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


P1

Vlasis Park

H2

Old Ballwin School House

S2

Metro West Fire Protection District

H1

Bacon Log Cabin

R2

Ballwin Athletic Association

P3

The Pointe

42 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


School Districts Among the top reasons families choose to live in Ballwin is the access to high quality, nationally recognized public schools. Portions of Ballwin are served by the Rockwood School District, the largest school district in St. Louis County and the third largest in the state of Missouri. The rest of Ballwin is served by the Parkway School District, which is the third largest district in St. Louis County and in the top 10 statewide. Four of the six public schools located inside the boundaries of Ballwin are within the Rockwood District (Ballwin, Westridge, and Woerther Elementary Schools, and Selvidge Middle School), while two elementary schools in Ballwin are within the Parkway District (Claymont and Henry). Both Rockwood and Parkway are recognized as being among of the highest performing school districts in the country. Rockwood has 11 different schools that have received Blue Ribbon Awards for Excellence in Education from the U.S. Department of Education (including some that received Blue Ribbon Awards more than once), while 17 Parkway schools have been recognized with National Blue Ribbon Awards. The National Blue Ribbon Schools Program recognizes schools whose students achieve at very high levels or schools that make significant progress in closing the achievement gap. Meanwhile, the State of Missouri recognizes achievement with Gold Star Awards. Ten schools in Parkway and fifteen schools in Rockwood have earned Gold Star Awards from the State of Missouri (some on multiple occasions).

In addition to providing exemplary educational services, the two districts make their school buildings and grounds available for other community uses when not being utilized for educational or district programming. Parkway and Rockwood are two of only four districts in the State of Missouri to earn the Standard and Poor’s AAA bond rating for their stable financial condition and responsible management of district resources.

Rockwood School District Parkway School District

Rockwood was named a 2016 National School District of Character by Character.org and Parkway was named to this list in 2017. Both Rockwood and Parkway School Districts earned 98.6 percent overall scores on the most recent (2017) Annual Performance Report (APR) released by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Three of the four high schools in Parkway and three of the four high schools in Rockwood earned “Silver Medal Awards” from U.S. News & World Report in their 2018 ranking of the country’s Best High Schools. 43 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

School Districts in Ballwin MAY 2019


Fire Districts Ballwin falls within portions of three separate fire protection districts, which provide first responders and protective services in the event of fires or medical emergencies. Nearly all of Ballwin is served by Metro West Fire Protection District, with Station Number 1 located on Manchester in the heart of Ballwin. In addition to basic firefighting services, Metro West is the designated first-responder agency for all other non-crime emergency situations. According to District Chief Krause, over 75% of services provided by Metro West revolve around EMS, including falls among seniors in their homes. Other services include permits and inspections, community emergency preparedness, risk reduction, and safety education.

Metro West Fire Protection District West County EMS and Fire Protection District Monarch Fire Protection District

The Metro West Fire Protection District has been recognized as an “Internationally Accredited� agency since 2011. The northeast corner of Ballwin is served by the West County EMS & Fire Protection District, which had started as the Manchester Volunteer Fire Department in 1908. This district covers 21 square miles within portions of Ballwin, Manchester, Town & Country, Twin Oaks, Winchester, and unincorporated St. Louis County. A very small portion of Ballwin, at the northernmost tip, is in the Monarch Fire Protection District. This district traces its roots to 1925 when it started with one volunteer fire station and later grew to become the Chesterfield Fire Protection District. Since 2003 the district has been known as the Monarch Fire Protection District, which now covers more than 62 square miles and services all of or part of the cities of Ballwin, Chesterfield, Clarkson Valley, Creve Coeur, Maryland Heights, Wildwood, and unincorporated St. Louis County.

Fire Districts in Ballwin

Through a mutual aid arrangement, all three districts provide support and assistance to areas in Ballwin that are outside their official boundaries if their first responders can reach locations more quickly than the designated district or if the incident requires more assistance than the district can provide.

44 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Police

Utilities

Libraries

Ballwin is served by the Ballwin Police Department. Ballwin established a full-time police department in 1964. Today the Police Department has over 60 employees including 51 Commissioned Officers, 10 Dispatchers, two Police Clerks, and one Reserve Officer.

Ballwin is served by a number of regional utilities and service providers. They include the following:

Ballwin is not served by a library within the City limits. However, two St. Louis County libraries are in close proximity to the City. The Daniel Boone Branch is located at 300 Clarkson Road in Ellisville. The Grand Glaize Branch is located at 1010 Meramec Station Road in Manchester.

Ballwin residents have cited low crime and safety within the community as a top strength for living and working in Ballwin. The City has also been named as one of the safest cities in America.

■■ Ameren: Electrical Service ■■ Spire: Gas Service ■■ Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District: Sewer Service ■■ Missouri American Water: Water Service ■■ Phone/Cable: Multiple ■■ Republic Services: Trash/Recycling Services

The Ballwin Police Department has its own communication center which receives all 911 and non-emergency calls for Ballwin and Manchester. The Ballwin Police Department has a number of community programs including Nixle, which is a community information service that provides important information about crime and traffic situations.

45 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


EXISTING TRANSPORTATION Overview The City of Ballwin’s transportation “strengths” lie within its robust roadway network. There is a genuine street hierarchy providing defined vehicular routes to and within the City. The existing roadways are generally in good condition and offer a high level of service in all but the very peak commuter periods, and even in those times still operate within industry guidelines of acceptability. A high percentage of streets have sidewalks on one or both sides, creating a relatively dense pedestrian network. Furthermore, there is good transit mobility utilizing this roadway network. Finally, there is also strong vehicular and pedestrian access to individual parcels throughout the City. The weaknesses in the system are the impacts of too-much access, multiple driveways that create both vehicular and pedestrian conflicts – impacting safety and efficiency, especially in the Manchester Road Corridor. The Manchester corridor, while being a “backbone” of the City’s transportation and economic

46 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Planned Transportation Projects network, creates a barrier to north-south travel of all modes especially pedestrians. Another weakness is the lack of an interconnected bicycle network, including both on-street and trail facilities. Public support already exists to address the major identified weaknesses: Manchester Road and a bicycle network (a fact confirmed by early stakeholder and public engagement for this Comprehensive Plan). And several studies have independently been done in the past to define these weaknesses and recommend potential solutions, although the majority of them were “shared” studies between multiple jurisdictions. The opportunity lies within an effort to mesh these previous recommendations with public support into a focused plan for the City of Ballwin to “own” and incorporate independently, empowering the City to pursue projects and funding as desired.

At this time, there are no major projects planned for the area network. However, there are several smaller, roadway-maintenance projects listed in the region’s Transportation Improvement Program (TIP; currently for fiscal years 2018 – 2021). These include: ■■ Ramsey Lane Bridge over Fishpot Creek Replacement (2018) ■■ Ries Road Bridge over Fishpot Creek Replacement (2018) ■■ Baxter Road Resurfacing and Shared Use Path: Manchester to Clayton Road (2020) ■■ Holloway Road Resurfacing: Manchester Road to Baxter Road (2021) In addition, the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) plans to resurface and address any necessary improvements required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) on Manchester Road west of MO 141 by year 2027.

MAY 2019


Introduction - Mobility In regards to transportation to and from and/ or within a community, there are two main characteristics of interest: mobility and access. Mobility is the means to travel between destinations and how freely one is able to do so. Accessibility relates to the traveler’s ability to reach a destination. Mobility is provided by multiple modes (vehicles, transit, non-motorized‌), including many trips that require the use of more than one. For example, driving a car to an employer or school includes a walk trip at either end. In broad terms, mobility is more directly influenced by physical and operational characteristics of the travel network. For example, an interstate highway may provide great mobility, but limited accessibility to adjacent land uses; while a driveway to an office building provides excellent accessibility to that facility, but limited mobility. Accessibility is a function of how a transportation network is structured, but also depends on land use patterns, available modes and geographic area. When land is developed with greater density and multiple land uses are clustered together, accessibility to goods and services may be enhanced.

47 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Moving people is an important goal of most transportation agencies. In an urban environment, however, restricting access to individual properties may be necessary to allow for the smooth, uninterrupted flow of traffic on the adjacent roads (called access management). Accessibility determines the adequacy of the transportation system and the value to related activities, such as commerce, employment, recreation, and overall quality of life. A balance between mobility and accessibility is often necessary to achieve community goals (Institute of Transportation Engineers, 2016).

Interstate freeways are an example of providing high mobility.

MAY 2019


Existing Vehicular Mobility The City of Ballwin is served by a wellconnected hierarchy of roads, as shown in Figure 1. This hierarchy includes: ■■ Local roads: typically, low-volume, lowspeed, and short-distance streets serving homes and neighborhoods ■■ Collectors: provide connections between local streets and arterials ■■ Arterials: higher-volume, higher-speed facilities used to travel longer distances between cities or major destinations ■■ Interstates: for regional and long-distance travel. Note that as roadways shift from local to Interstate (as shown in the legend), the mobility of the facility increases (while the number of access points generally decreases). The northwest and northeast corners of Ballwin are entered via Clayton and Kehrs Mill Roads, both minor arterials connected to regional routes (MO 141 and MO 340, respectively). Similarly, at its southern boundaries, Ballwin is accessed via Big Bend Road, another minor arterial that intersects MO 141 and, further east, Interstate-270. The central, east-west, corridor of Ballwin is MO 100 or Manchester Road (and Historic Route 66). Although having a principal arterial bisect the City can be problematic to north-south travel within the City (especially via non-motorized modes), it provides for a high level of mobility to and within the City of Ballwin.

48 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Existing Major Road Hierarchy in West County (Source East-West Gateway)

MAY 2019


Existing Transit Mobility Considering its suburban location, Ballwin is served well by area transit (communities west of Clarkson Road have a single route connection, if any). MetroBus Routes #57, #57X and #58X currently traverse the City. Together, these Routes offer connections to the surrounding communities in West County, downtown St. Louis, and to MetroBus and MetroLink transfer points, providing transit mobility throughout the region. Beginning in year 2019, Metro plans to roll out a new

transit plan for the St. Louis region to include a simpler, yet more frequent network. The MetroReimagined Draft Plan (spring, 2018) included the three existing Routes within Ballwin, although that plan is currently in review, with a second draft anticipated in the fall. More information on the plan can be found on Metro’s website: https://www.metrostlouis. org/reimagined/.

Existing “Ballwin Station” Bus Stop on Manchester Road.

Existing MetroBus routes in Ballwin and Vicinity (Source Metro)

49 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Existing Bicycle & Pedestrian Mobility Regarding non-motorized forms of transportation, the City of Ballwin has a good network of pedestrian sidewalks and crosswalks especially compared with other cities of its size and setting. The map on the following map illustrates sidewalk coverage within the Ballwin area. It should be noted that, although there are good pedestrian facilities throughout the City, Manchester Road acts as a barrier to north-south pedestrian travel. The City currently has a limited number of bicycle facilities. Most are on-street bicycle routes, accommodated via wide lanes or shoulders, or “sharrow� markings in the driving lanes. However, there are dedicated bike lanes on Clayton Road (shown in the adjacent photo) between Baxter and Kehrs Mill Roads. In October 2007, a Community Wide Trail System Plan was released for the Cities of Ballwin and Manchester. The study estimated there were already more than 20,000 people engaged in bicycling activity within the study area, including children riding to/from schools and adults regularly riding for exercise. It was determined an improved bikeway and pedestrian system for the two cities would improve safety, increase non-motorized travel, improve public health, and reduce vehicular traffic. Therefore, in addition to the general goal of improving pedestrian mobility, additional plan goals included establishing an organizational framework for the plan and developing both multipurpose trails and an on-street bikeway system within the following 50 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

10-20 years. Two of the major components in the plan were the Fishpot and Grand Glaize Greenways, following the paths of those creek alignments. However, there was disagreement within the Ballwin community over how to proceed with the plan, and implementation stalled. As with many similar efforts, a key issue is the trade-off between off-road trails or paths and an on-street network: off-road trails and paths appeal more to families and recreation pursuits but are typically more expensive to obtain right-of-way and construct versus on-street facilities where the right-ofway, and even pavement, may already exist but are shared facilities with vehicles.

Existing “Bike Lane on Clayton Road.

Existing residential sidewalk in Ballwin.

Existing pedestrian crosswalk across Manchester Road. MAY 2019


Existing Sidewalks Especially in newer subdivisions in the southern part of the City, Ballwin has a fairly extensive existing sidewalk network. Older subdivisions tend to lack sidewalks or only have sidewalks on one side of the street. There are also key gaps in the existing sidewalk system where a short segment of missing sidewalk creates a barrier for mobility, especially for accessible routes.

Existing Sidewalks in Ballwin 51 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Existing Transportation Access Throughout the City of Ballwin, there is robust local access. Individual parcels, whether residential or commercial, typically have at least one driveway or sidewalk. The ease of mobility and plentiful access to Ballwin destinations are a positive attribute of the City, contributing to the feeling that Ballwin is “in the middle of everything�, yet easy to reach. However, the plentiful access does create congestion issues, especially within the

52 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Manchester Road corridor, due to the high volume of turning movements introduced at multiple points. A visual of how individual access points can crowd the roadway is shown below. When each of these driveways and local street connections accommodates inbound and outbound turning movements in both directions, vehicle paths overlap, queues form, and safety is impacted. Over the past several years, efforts have been made to reduce the number of access points through

combination and/or elimination of driveways and creating cross-access between adjacent parcels as lots are redeveloped and/or roadways are reconstructed.

MAY 2019


Existing Traffic Volumes An important factor of vehicle mobility is the volume of existing traffic on roadways within the City. Traffic count data was collected from the City of Ballwin, St. Louis County Department of Transportation and the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT). The map on this page shows the existing volumes on major roadways in the City of Ballwin area. It should be note the area volumes are all within the expected range for their roadway classification. Although there is congestion and delays during peak travel periods, the area road network is operating as expected, and generally within industry guidelines of acceptability. More specifically, Manchester Road, while carrying significant volumes of traffic does achieve acceptable levels of service during the peak hours. The Manchester Road Great Streets Master Plan, (discussed in the following section) states that the overall impediment to transportation performance in the corridor relates to access management problems and the lack of a more coordinated street grid network (i.e. parallel secondary streets).

Existing Traffic Volumes in Ballwin 53 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


2011 Manchester Road Great Streets Master Plan The East-West Gateway Council of Governments (EWGCOG) released the Manchester Road Great Streets Master Plan in January 2011. It was the result of a fifteen-month planning process for the Manchester Road corridor between MO Routes 141 and 109. The multi-jurisdictional effort included representatives from the Cities of Ballwin, Ellisville, Manchester, Wildwood, and Winchester, EWGCOG, MoDOT, the West St. Louis County Chamber of Commerce and the Manchester Road Executive Committee. EWGCOG’s Great Streets Initiative aims to encourage local civic and government leaders to rethink the way communities plan and use their street corridors, to consider the full built environment (land uses) and all modes of transportation against the backdrop of healthy economic decisions. The goal of the Manchester Road Great Streets Master Plan was “to outline a roadmap for short-term and long-term land use changes and associated public improvements to the corridor”. Throughout the process there was significant stakeholder and public outreach. The final master plan included recommendations to revise and/or cluster existing and future developments to create town centers and neighborhood districts within the corridor as well as open space corridors (including Fishpot and Grand Glaize Creeks) for the City of Ballwin. These clusters, by design, would calm traffic and create pedestrian-friendly environments. Therefore, the plan additionally identified potential future transportation connections to increase access to/from and across Manchester Road. Such a broad plan can take decades to accomplish and the only transportation component of the Manchester Road Great Streets Master Plan implemented in the City of Ballwin so far has been improved wayfinding signage. However, consideration of the recommendations and goals is ongoing and having the long-term goals in place allows the City to work with other jurisdictions such as MoDOT and EWGCOG to identify funding for future projects.

The Manchester Road Great Streets Master Plan defined the following key recommendations for transportation. The maps on the following page illustrate the key recommendations. ■■ Incorporate access management guidelines • Include cross-access agreements and connected parking lots ■■ Establish a grid network of streets parallel and perpendicular to Manchester Road • Consider “back streets” or “service roads” behind businesses ■■ Additional signals at select intersections • Within Ballwin, five additional signalized intersections for vehicles are proposed. Four would be located at Highview Drive, Reinke Road, Steamboat Lane and Shirley Lane, with a fifth to the east between Timka and Lock Drives • Additional pedestrian-only signals are recommended for intersections of Manchester at Ballwin Plaza, Quail and Birchwood Drives, Larkhill Lane and Lock Drive ■■ Install a landscaped median in the center of Manchester Road • After strong parcel access is confirmed via the supporting network ■■ Incorporate an improved bicycle and pedestrian network • Maintain two travel lanes in each direction and incorporate adjacent sidewalks and bike lanes on both sides of the roadway ■■ Work with Metro to implement Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service along the Manchester Road Corridor • (Note: the MetroReimagined Draft Plan does not incorporate BRT service but does specify increased frequency on Manchester Road.) ■■ Promote shared parking opportunities including adoption of incentive programs

54 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


2011 Manchester Road Great Streets Plan - Illustrative Master Plan (Source East-West Gateway)

2011 Manchester Road Great Streets Plan - Final Access Management Plan (Source East-West Gateway)

2011 Manchester Road Great Streets Plan - Thoroughfare Hierarchy (Source East-West Gateway)

55 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


2007 Community Wide Trail System Plan In October 2007, a ‘Community Wide Trail System Plan’ was released for the Cities of Ballwin and Manchester. The study estimated there were already more than 20,000 people engaged in bicycling activity within the study area, including children riding to/from schools and adults regularly riding for exercise. It was determined an improved bikeway and pedestrian system for the two cities would improve safety, increase non-motorized travel, improve public health, and reduce vehicular traffic. Therefore, in addition to the general goal of improving pedestrian mobility, additional plan goals included establishing an organizational framework for the plan and developing both multi-purpose trails and an on-street bikeway system within the following 10-20 years. Two of the major components in the plan were the Fishpot and Grand Glaize Greenways, following the paths of those creek alignments. However, there was disagreement within the Ballwin community over how to proceed with the plan, and implementation stalled. As with many similar efforts, a key issue is the trade-off between off-road trails or paths and an on-street network: off-road trails and paths appeal more to families and recreation pursuits but are typically more expensive to obtain right-of-way and construct versus on-street facilities where the right-ofway, and even pavement, may already exist but are shared facilities with vehicles.

56 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

2007 Community Wide Trail System Plan

MAY 2019


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The Gateway Bike Plan (published in 2011), identified several potential future bike facilities within the City of Ballwin and surrounding area, including multi-use paths, shared lanes, and dedicated lanes. This plan is a cooperation between many local agencies including: the Great Rivers Greenway District, East-West Gateway Council of Governments, St. Louis County, Metro, Trailnet, and the Missouri Department of Transportation. A benefit of that cooperative agreement is that the Gateway Bike Plan is consulted prior to implementation of infrastructure projects and efforts are made to incorporate and fund components of the plan during any new construction. A portion of the proposed Gateway Bike Plan network for the City of Ballwin and the surrounding area is shown on this page. Although the plan did Gateway Bike  Plan not incorporate the Fishpot and Grand Glaize Recommended  On-­Street  Facility Greenways suggested by the 2007 Community Bike Lane Wide Trail System Plan, it does identify a network of on-street facilities Bike Boulevard within the City of Ballwin and specify the appropriate application Buffered Bike Lane Tracklanes, paved (e.g. dedicated or sharedor Cycle bike Climbing Lane shoulders, etc...).

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EXISTING PARKS AND RECREATION Overview

Existing Parks

Ballwin has a strong existing park and recreation system. Parks and recreation has been cited by residents as one of the top strengths of living in the City.

Vlasis Park

The City is currently undertaking a detailed parks and recreation master plan. This comprehensive plan will examine park and recreation issues at a high level with a focus on parks and open space from a land use perspective. The City’s parks and recreation master plan will examine in detail park and recreation facilities, programs, and future recommendations.

At 31 acres, Vlasis Park is Ballwin’s largest park. It features a baseball diamond, a playground, four tennis courts, restrooms, two ponds (one of which is stocked with fish), two pavilions, a walking path, two sand volley ball courts, and eight horseshoe courts. Vlasis Park hosts the “Ballwin Days” festival, one of the largest community events in the St. Louis area. A volunteer committee that exceeds 100 members plans and carries out the activities each year that include live entertainment, sporting events and game booths that attract more than 60,000 visitors to the three day event.

The Pointe

The park, at 13 acres, includes a pavilion, playground, and The Pointe Recreation Center. The Pointe Recreation Center is a modern community recreation facility with indoor pool, fitness center, gym, meeting space, and other amenities.

Holloway Park

Holloway Park is home to Ballwin’s North Pointe Family Aquatic Center. The North Pointe Family Aquatic Center was opened in June 2003. Visit the North Pointe web page for more information. Holloway Park is located at the North end of The North Pointe Aquatic Center. It features two lighted tennis courts, a playground, and a pavilion.

Ferris Park

Ferris Park is a nine acre neighborhood park that includes a soccer field, playground, comfort station, nature trails, and a pavilion.

Ballwin Golf Course

The Ballwin Golf Course is a nine-hole public golf course just south of Holloway park. The City acquired the course in 1974 and remodeled the clubhouse in 1994.

New Ballwin Park

New Ballwin Park is a seven acre neighborhood park that offers open space and active recreation opportunities such as two tennis courts, a multipurpose court with four basketball goals, a playground, a sand volleyball court, restrooms, a pavilion for picnicking, a walking path, and fishing.

58 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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Existing Park Acreage Metric

Existing Park Proximity

Benchmarking existing parks and recreation is often not a precise endeavor. In the past, communities have often benchmarked to recommended ratios from the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA). However, these ratios often did not take into account size of facilities (i.e. size of playgrounds versus number of playgrounds) and regional differences.

The circles on the park map on the following page represents a 1/2 mile radius from each park. A 1/2 mile represents a typical walkable distance. Manchester Road is a major barrier to accessing parks by walking or biking.

Today, a better metric is to compare against averages from other communities. Compared to other Midwest communities, Ballwin is on the low end of park acreage per population. However, this does not take into account private parks and open space such as the Ballwin Athletic Association, school grounds, and home owner association open space. In addition, Ballwin is located near Ellisville’s Bluebird Park and major regional parks including Castlewood State Park and Queeny Park. In terms of acreage distribution, Ballwin Golf Course is the largest acreage representing over one-third (37 percent) of total park / recreation acres in the City.

As the map shows, there is a lack of accessible park space in western and eastern sections of the City. However, these areas may be served by other open space and recreation amenities such as home owner association open space or school and church grounds.

Acres

Holloway Park Vlasis Park New Ballwin Park The Pointe Ferris Park Ballwin Golf Course

27 31 7.5 13 9 51

Total

138.5

Ballwin Population Acreage per 1,000 Population - Ballwin 1 Acreage per 1,000 Population - Median for Midwest 2

30,300 4.57 10.97

Analysis of Existing Park Acreage (1) Population based on 2010 census. (2) Source: National Recreation and Park Association 2016 ‘NRPA Field Report’

59 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Existing Parks and Open Space 60 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


NATURAL RESOURCES Green Infrastructure The mature tree canopy in the neighborhoods of Ballwin not only helps to define the character of the neighborhood, but the trees provide tremendous environmental benefits such as stormwater reduction, reduced heat island effect, habitat, and improved air quality. The map on this page shows that Ballwin benefits from a large extent of tree coverage except for the Manchester Road corridor and other pockets within the City.

Tree Canopy Coverage in Ballwin

61 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Flood Hazard Areas Ballwin has a limited number of flood hazard area due to its upland location away from most major bottomland areas. Small areas of flood hazard exist along Kiefer Creek, Fishpot Creek, and Grand Glaize Creek. The map on this page shows areas of 1% annual chance flood hazard (100-Year Flood Zone) and 0.2% annual chance flood hazard (500-Year Flood Zone). The largest extent of flood hazard areas is along the Grand Glaize Creek at the Ballwin Golf Course and along a tributary of the Grand Glaize Creek near Forest Leaf Drive at the border of Ballwin and Manchester.

Flood Hazard Areas in Ballwin 62 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Topography Ballwin has over 260’ of elevation change with a high point of approximately 750’ near Clayton Road and Kehrs Mill Road and a low point of approximately 482’ along Kiefer Creek at the southern edge of the City. Ballwin sits just east of the dividing line between watersheds. Most of Ballwin’s stormwater flows southeast through Kiefer Creek, Fishpot Creek, and Grand Glaize Creek into the Meramec River. A small part of the northern sections of Ballwin drain northward through creeks (including Creve Coeur Creek) that drain to the Mississippi River.

Topography in Ballwin 63 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


ANNEXATION HISTORY Overview

1981

1978

1981 1976 1959 1996 1989

1996

1999

1954

1981

1987

1991

1974 1977

1969

1950

1837

The map on this page shows the annexation history of Ballwin. Ballwin has grown extensively over the decades through annexation starting in 1950. The last annexation occurred in 1999.

1950

1972 1954 1999

1973 1974

1980

1989

RIES RD

1999

NEW BALLWIN RD

The comprehensive plan is a great opportunity to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of various annexation options. As Ballwin is essentially built-out, future growth will come in the form of annexation or redevelopment. The planning team will evaluate three possible annexation scenarios during the comprehensive plan process. Changes to population, community services, and financial impacts will be evaluated to determine advantages and disadvantages of each annexation scenario. Evaluating the annexation options does not commit the City to pursue annexation, but the comprehensive plan evaluation will allow the City to make an informed decision in the future.

1995

Annexation History of Ballwin (Source: City of Ballwin)

64 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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CITY OF BALLWIN 2018 PROPOSED ANNEXATION MAP PLAN

Process The map on this page shows the “Map Plan” that was submitted to the St. Louis County Boundary Commission in June 2018.

NCO RPO RA TE D

As part of the comprehensive plan process, the planning team evaluated three possible annexation scenarios. Changes to population, community services, and financial impacts were evaluated to determine advantages and disadvantages of each annexation scenario.

CHESTERFIELD

UNI

BALLWIN ELLISVILLE

UNINCORPORATED

MANCHESTER

WILDWOOD

Annexation is a multi-step process in St. Louis County. There is a six-year cycle in St. Louis County divided between a “Map Plan” phase and a “Proposal” phase. For the current cycle, municipalities had to submit maps of potential boundary changes by July 1, 2018. A “Map Plan” reserves the right to pursue annexation during the “Proposal” phase. The “Proposal” phase is between April 15, 2019, through July 1, 2022. Submitting a “Map Plan” does not commit Ballwin to submit a proposal, nor does the “Map Plan” commit Ballwin to submit a proposal for the entire area shown in the submitted “Map Plan.” For example, in 2012 Ballwin submitted a “Map Plan” showing a boundary adjustment for potential annexation south of the City. However, Ballwin did not submit an annexation proposal. Any annexation proposal must be approved by the St. Louis County Boundary Commission and by voters in both Ballwin and the area subject to the proposal.

TOWN & COUNTRY

UNINCORPORATED

VALLEY PARK

UNINCORPORATED

2018 Possible Annexation Map Plan - City of Ballwin (Source: City of Ballwin)

65 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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3 Community Engagement


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Overview Public involvement is a very important part of the planning process. Comprehensive plans are an opportunity to develop consensus on a community vision and community priorities that will help shape growth in the community for the next 20 years. The planning team has utilized traditional and online engagement techniques to engage the community. An effective public engagement process includes informing, educating, identifying, prioritizing, and building consensus so that a shared vision is not only determined, but a commitment to implementation is developed.

Future Engagement Community engagement has included: ■■ Stakeholder and focus group meetings ■■ Citywide survey ■■ Community open house ■■ Brochures ■■ E-Newsletters ■■ Website ■■ Social media ■■ Steering committee ■■ Attending community organization events

Engagement will continue throughout the planning process. The steering committee will meet five more times, three more community open houses will be held, and the interactive website will be updated throughout the planning process. In addition, e-newsletters will be sent periodically to everyone who has participated in the planning effort so they can remain informed and involved. Updates in the planning process will be posted on the City website and at: www.BallwinsBlueprint.com

The planning team will continue to engage residents in multiple ways to ensure that they are included in the planning process.

68 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


What We Have Heard One of the key purposes of the engagement process is to identify key issues and concerns within the community. The planning team has heard a lot about the City from its wonderful residents. There is truly a passion from the community for making Ballwin a great place to live and work. This page summarizes some of the key items that were heard during the engagement process and analysis by the planning team.

Community Strengths ■■ Central location with ease of access to local and regional resources and assets ■■ Excellent schools and school districts ■■ Safe community with low crime ■■ Good place to raise a family ■■ Sense of community and small town feel ■■ Outstanding community recreational facilities and strong park system ■■ Stable, fiscally responsible, and transparent local government ■■ City services ■■ Diverse range of singlefamily homes ■■ Well-educated, economically affluent population ■■ Well maintained City ■■ Access to shopping and dining ■■ High quality of life

69 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Community Weaknesses ■■ Fully-built community with limited opportunity for new residential or commercial development ■■ Age of retail / commercial areas ■■ Lack of bicycle facilities and connectivity ■■ Impediments to northsouth traffic and pedestrian circulation ■■ Older housing stock in select areas that is less appealing to modern, even first-time home-buyers ■■ Lack of vehicular access management (conflicts with driveways, etc) ■■ Gaps in the pedestrian network ■■ Shuffling of major retail tenants between commercial developments – filling one gap while creating another ■■ Lack of diversity in housing options beyond single family homes ■■ Absence of identifiable, physical ‘town center’ ■■ Lack of a cohesive City image

Threats to the Community ■■ Aging neighborhoods ■■ Changing residential character ■■ Decline of retail ■■ Decline of City revenues ■■ Aging infrastructure ■■ Increased traffic congestion ■■ Aging schools ■■ Aging population ■■ Competition from neighboring communities that may be ahead of the curve in terms of development trends

MAY 2019


STAKEHOLDER AND FOCUS GROUP MEETINGS Stakeholder and Focus Group Meetings Overview Stakeholder meetings have multiple benefits. The meetings identify community values,vision, goals, and potential issues early in the planning process. The meetings also allow for a more robust and honest dialogue than is often possible in a larger public meeting setting. In addition, the stakeholder meetings are an excellent way to develop lines of communications to promote the public open houses, surveys, and other comprehensive plan activities. The planning team conducted numerous stakeholder and focus group meetings in Spring and Summer 2018. The planning team will follow-up with stakeholders during the planning process.

70 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

External Stakeholder Meetings External stakeholders are agencies and organizations that may not be located directly in the City, but often have impacts within or nearby to the City such as utilities, transportation agencies, school districts, and the county. Meetings included: ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Metro West Fire Protection District MoDOT Parkway School District Rockwood School District. St. Louis County Boundary Commission St. Louis County Planning Department

Internal Stakeholder and Focus Group Meetings Internal stakeholders are residents, organizations, developers, and businesses that are located or have interests within the City. Meetings included: ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Bedrin Organization City of Ballwin Police Department City of Ballwin Staff City of Ballwin Aldermen Homeowner Associations Leadership Focus Group Meeting Jay Wolfe Toyota Scion Krause-Basler Team / Keller Williams Realty L3 Corporation NRE Management Rotary Club of West County Vanderbilt Homes

MAY 2019


OPEN HOUSE #1 - MAY 15, 2018 “What exactly is a comprehensive plan, and will this address traffic on Manchester?” Those were just a couple of questions asked by Ballwin residents who came out to the Ballwin Golf Club on May 15, 2018 for the first community open house of Ballwin’s comprehensive planning process. At this event, community residents and stakeholders from around Ballwin were able to learn about the planning process, review the progress achieved to date, contribute ideas, and meet members of the planning team from The i5Group, the consultants selected by the City to facilitate and manage the process.

With informational display boards spread throughout the room at the golf club, attendees were able to get fairly quick overviews of the schedule for the whole process - from kickoff this past March through the anticipated adoption by the Board of Aldermen in March of 2019 – and the broad range of information gathered through the data collection and existing conditions analysis phase of the process.

In addition to illustrating information and updates for the attendees, some of the displays provided opportunities for immediate input from attendees. Among the questions asked at some of these displays were “How should Ballwin be different in twenty years than it is today?” “What type of housing is needed?” and “What is missing in the area of commercial and retail offerings / services?”

Introduction - Mobility 71 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Open House #1 cont.... Open House displays focused on: ■■ Evaluating annexation options – with maps showing annexation history from 1950 onward and other annexation map plans from 2006 and 2012 in comparison with what might be submitted by the City in 2018, and an overview of the annexation process. ■■ Maps showing existing parks, existing tree coverage areas, and existing flood hazard areas within the City and nearby. ■■ Existing land use, from single family to commercial to industrial to parks and recreation – and everything in between. ■■ Maps showing where and when residential and commercial development have taken place in the broader west county area from pre-1950 through the present ■■ Zoning and employment data ■■ Transportation, including average daily traffic counts on some of the key streets and roads within and providing access to Ballwin, and the sidewalks within the neighborhoods and subdivisions.

72 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Meanwhile other displays provided additional opportunities for attendees to participate more directly in the process by marking up maps to show destinations where residents currently walk or bike and/or where they would like to walk or bike and the current or potential barriers, such as unsafe intersections, along those routes. To help planners, City officials, and other stakeholders see who was part of the evening’s process, attendees had the opportunity to show on a map of Ballwin where they live and/or work. Dots on the map indicated a broad cross section of the community, with dots showing attendees’ homes from 141 to Kiefer Creek and from Clayton to Big Bend and all points between.

MAY 2019


Open House #1 - Representative Responses

What do you love about living in Ballwin: ■■ Great parks / recreation / The Pointe ■■ Friendly neighborhoods / friendliness / small town feel ■■ Low crime / Safety ■■ Access / Location

Where do you walk or bike now, or would like to walk or bike. Existing barriers to walking and biking. 73 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

How should Ballwin be different in 20 years than it is today? ■■ Added quality, stable commercial establishments / Get business into the empty spots. / encourage more aesthetic features in retail / Revitalized retail and destination for entertainment for Ballwin “outsiders” / Tear down the very old, very ugly strip malls / Hopefully seas of parking will be gone for good ■■ More community feel ■■ An actual town center or “downtown” area. ■■ More pedestrian friendly / walkable (There are no walking areas like Kirkwood or Maplewood. Maybe develop some more non-Manchester business areas that are more pedestrian friendly) ■■ More modes of transportation, more traffic calming ■■ Connection of trails for walking and biking with other munis

What type of housing is needed to keep and attract a diverse spectrum of residents (young families, singles, retirees, etc)? ■■ Be sure that teardowns are used appropriately for lot sizes / No more McMansions ■■ Senior citizens complex / Senior age-inplace services / Small senior housing in residential areas / Affordable senior living What is missing in terms of commercial and retail offerings / services? ■■ Destinations to walk to and hang out / socialize in. / Mixed-use centers including living with walkable distance retail / Mixeduse plaza and condos with restaurants (like 5th street in St. Charles) ■■ More small businesses and local restaurants and less (chain) retail and restaurants ■■ Create a “start-up” community ■■ Entertainment ■■ Need more entertainment venues to keep people in Ballwin (outdoor concert, theatre venues) ■■ Live theatre / Concert amphitheater

MAY 2019


OPEN HOUSE #2 - SEPTEMBER 13, 2018 A diverse mix of Ballwin residents and community stakeholders came out to The Pointe recreation center on September 13 for the second of three community open houses during Ballwin’s comprehensive planning process. While viewing display boards with details and illustrations related to results from the community survey conducted over the spring and summer, and other data collection and analysis conducted to date, attendees were able to meet and exchange ideas with representatives from The i5Group, the consultants selected by the city to facilitate and manage the process. Poster boards throughout the room provided highlights of the recently released Discovery Report, which detailed the results of the community survey, including graphics showing key findings, maps of community assets, and other information gathered over the past six months.

74 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

As members of the community learned more about the draft plan categories and key goals, they were able to ask questions and share their perspectives and comments with the planners, including whether anything is missing from the goals and values listed in the Discovery Report and on the display boards. The evening also served as the launch for the community-wide visual preferences survey. Whereas the previous survey of the community focused on identifying key themes and priority issues to be pursued through the planning process, the visual preference survey focuses more directly on some of the physical features of near or long-term developments that will shape the character of Ballwin in the coming years. With poster boards illustrating a variety of different images related to key issues to be addressed in the plan, from infill housing and mixed-use development to pedestrian and bicycle crossings and community entry markers, attendees recorded their preferences

regarding what they did or did not like about the various options. Another key feature of the open house was an opportunity for planners to get feedback from community stakeholders on whether the process is on track or whether there are concepts or issues that are still missing. Those attending this event registered their assessment of the process so far by “voting” with sticky dots on one of the display boards. All indicated that they thought the process was either “great” or “generally good” at this stage of the process.

MAY 2019


OPEN HOUSE #3 - NOVEMBER 29, 2018 On Thursday, November 29, residents and stakeholders from throughout Ballwin, along with some residents of areas under consideration for annexation, gathered at The Pointe at Ballwin Commons for the third and final open house of Ballwin’s comprehensive planning process. With the stated purposes of providing the community with an overview of what has gone into the planning process to date and sharing draft components of the comprehensive plan, display boards were arranged throughout the meeting room to allow attendees to see visual highlights of the plan and discuss the details with members of the planning team. The previous open house included boards depicting visual representations of different approaches for addressing infill housing, transportation improvements, pedestrian safety, and commercial and mixed-use design elements. Consequently, this session offered the results from that past meeting and the visual preference survey that had been conducted with residents throughout Ballwin in September. Several other boards displayed possible strategies for addressing traffic congestion on Manchester, potential long-term redevelopment concepts for Manchester Road, especially in the context of residents’ interest in a new “town center” style of mixed-use development near the heart of the community.

annexation area indicated a desire to see the annexation happen so that they once again could receive quality City services from Ballwin. After viewing all of the display board and talking with planning consultants or City staff who were present, attendees were encouraged to provide their thoughts and feedback in writing via comment forms. Through these forms and in-person comments, attendees expressed general support for the direction of the planning process, along with a mix of critiques and compliments.

“Really appreciate the in-depth look at all aspects of the plan and that you have encouraged active participation by residents.” Comment from Attendee

Of particular interest to some attendees from areas just outside Ballwin’s current borders were the displays showing analysis of areas for possible annexation. One former Ballwin resident who now lives in the proposed south 75 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


HOME OWNER ASSOCIATION LEADERS - FOCUS GROUP MEETING On April 17, 2018 representatives from 43 subdivisions and homeowners’ associations from around Ballwin gathered at the Ballwin Golf Club to discuss their thoughts about Ballwin’s challenges and opportunities. Facilitated by planning professionals from The i5Group, the firm selected by the City to coordinate Ballwin’s comprehensive planning process, the attendees engaged in focused conversations about some of the topics that will influence the direction of the planning process as it takes shape over the next six months. Divided into small groups, participants exchanged and discussed responses to questions about the greatest strengths of living in Ballwin, the challenges facing Ballwin over the next twenty years, indications that Ballwin is moving in the right direction, and things they would like to change. The individual tables then reported out to the whole group the common themes and answers to the different questions that reflected consensus opinions.

among the challenges facing Ballwin or aspects attendees would like to change involved traffic, pedestrian safety, the need to improve or beautify conditions at some of the older shopping centers along Manchester, and a desire for more mixed-use retail, commercial, and dining options along Manchester, along with more of a town center.

regarding what they love about living in Ballwin. Attendees posted their responses to the last open-ended question on the wall for all to see, with responses ranging from “the people” to “safety,” “location,” “recreation,” and “schools.” from attendees.

Upon completion of the meeting, as a reminder of what this process seeks to preserve and build upon, participants had one additional opportunity to express their individual opinions

The respectful and healthy dialogue among community residents, including many who didn’t know each other before the evening, reflected some common responses to the question about the strengths of living in Ballwin: there seems to be widespread opinion that Ballwin is a place that is friendly and welcoming, with a strong sense of community. Other strengths identified by residents included safety, great schools - in both Parkway and Rockwood School Districts, and the proximity to various services and amenities. Meanwhile, 76 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


RAISING AWARENESS OF THE PLANNING PROCESS Multiple materials have been used to raise awareness of the comprehensive plan and to engage residents. Engagement materials have included: ■■ Brochures ■■ E-Newsletters ■■ Social Media ■■ City Website and Plan Website ■■ Banners ■■ Press Releases Updates during the planning process are shared via social media including Twitter, Instagram, and the City’s Facebook page with the hashtag #BallwinsBlueprint. The dedicated website for the plan is www.BallwinsBlueprint.com

Banner promoting the community survey at the information booth at Ballwin Days.

Starting with the Spring 2018 edition of the Ballwin Life magazine, there are regular updates about comprehensive plan.

Article about the comprehensive plan in the West News Magazine. Banner for the community survey at The Pointe.

77 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Focus group meeting with home owner association leaders in April. MAY 2019


Plan Website A dedicated website for the comprehensive plan is available at www.BallwinsBlueprint. com. The website allows residents to follow the progress of the plan by staying up-to-date on the plan schedule, review deliverables and plan information, and find out about upcoming plan events. As of July 2018, there have been over 1,600 page views of the website since the website went live in April 2018. The website also includes an online map comment tool where residents can make comments on a Google map regarding problematic intersections, development sites, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, community assets, problem areas, and general comments.

Map Commenting Tool 78 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Cover Page of Plan Website - www.BallwinsBlueprint.com MAY 2019


HIGHLIGHTS OF THE COMMUNITY SURVEY Survey Overview A citywide comprehensive plan survey took place from May 1 thru June 19, 2018. The survey was available online via the website www.BallwinsBlueprint.com and via paper copies at the first Open House and at City Hall. Response to the survey was strong. There were close to 600 responses to the survey. Of the 592 total responses, 591 took the survey online and one (1) took the paper version of the survey. An important aspect of the survey is that the survey is a tool at the beginning of the planning process to help inform the overall plan. The

79 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

survey helps the planning team confirm trends and identify issues that may have been missed during other engagement activities. The survey is not an end product, but is a beginning. The survey included 27 questions. The survey sought to balance the time commitment of respondents while gaining insights into particular areas and issues. The majority of the questions were multiple choice. However, most questions also allowed respondents to make additional comments to provide further insights.

An online survey has several advantages. One, the online survey allows respondents to make in-depth comments. Second, the survey connects residents to the process. By taking the survey, respondents are connected to the project website and other forms of project communications for the remainder of the planning process. Finally, an online survey allows a greater range of respondents including those who work, visit, or shop in the City. Highlights of survey responses are shown on the following page. The full survey results are included as part of the appendix.

MAY 2019


Distribution of Survey Responses The map on this page shows the distribution of survey responses. Overall, there were 592 survey responses. As the map shows, there were several responses from outside the City limits. Some of these responses were from respondents that only work in the City or for other reasons such as owning property in the City. Not all 592 responses are mapped. Some responses had incomplete street addresses or could not be geocoded on the map. Ballwin - Comprehensive Plan Survey

Q2 What best describes you? Answered: 587

Skipped: 5

I live in Ballwin

81% 81%

I work in Ballwin

2% 2%

I live and work in Ballwin

11% 11%

None of the above (pleas...

6% 6% 0%

WER CHOICES

n Ballwin

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

Q2: What Best Describes You?

in Ballwin

80 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan and work in Ballwin

80%

90% 100%

RESPONSES 81%

478

2%

10

11%

64

Distribution of Survey Responses MAY 2019


Q6 What are the top three strengths of living or working in Ballwin? (choose up to three) Q6: What are the top three strengths of living or working in Ballwin? (choose up to three) Answered: 538 Skipped: 53 34%

Location.

All Responses

34% 57%

Good schools.

First Tier (Top Responses) ■■ Low crime. ■■ Good schools.

57% Park and recreation...

33% 33%

Second Tier

58%

Low crime.

■■ City services (snow removal, leaf pickup, police, etc). ■■ Location. ■■ Park and recreation opportunities.

58% Natural environment.

7% 7%

Aesthetics of the community.

7% 7%

Sense of community.

Highlights

14% 14%

Amenities provided by ...

Younger Respondents (34 years old or younger)

1%

■■ Less emphasis on city services. ■■ More emphasis on dining and shopping.

1% Low cost of living.

8%

Older Respondents (65 years old or older)

8% Dining and shopping...

■■ Greater emphasis on city services. ■■ Greater emphasis on the city’s fiscal responsibility (no property taxes, etc).

12% 12%

Community events.

4% 4%

The City's fiscal...

New Residents (5 years of less)

16%

■■ Slightly greater emphasis on location and low crime.

16% Employment opportunities.

1% 1%

City services (snow remova...

39% 39%

Other (please explain)

3% 3% 0%

10%

20%

30%

All Responses

WER CHOICES

on. schools.

81 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

RESPONSES 34%

182

57%

309

MAY 2019


7 What are the three biggest issues facing Ballwin in the next 20 years? (choose up to three) Q7: What are the three Answered: biggest issues facing Ballwin in the next 20 years? (choose up to three) 538 Skipped: 53 Decline of retail.

37%

All Responses

37% Keeping and attracting a...

20%

First Tier (Top Response) ■■ Traffic congestion.

20% Maintaining quality of...

18%

Second Tier

18% Traffic congestion.

■■ Deteriorating infrastructure (streets, sewers, etc). ■■ Decline of retail.

52% 52%

Deteriorating infrastructu...

39%

Third Tier

39% Lack of amenities fo...

■■ Loss of trees and natural environment. ■■ Lack of alternative transportation options (biking, walking, transit). ■■ Keeping and attracting a diverse spectrum of residents (young families, singles, retirees, etc.). ■■ Maintaining quality of residential housing. ■■ Vacant or underutilized properties.

3% 3%

Lack of housing...

5% 5%

Rising cost of community...

13% 13%

Vacant or underutilize...

18%

Highlights

18% Changes to neighborhood...

9%

Younger Respondents (34 years old or younger)

9%

■■ Slightly greater concern about loss of trees and natural environment.

11%

Aging schools.

11% Loss of trees and natural...

21%

Older Respondents (65 years old or older)

■■ Greater concern about deteriorating infrastructure.

21% Lack of a city wide identit...

6%

New Residents (5 years of less)

6% Employment opportunities.

■■ Greater concern about traffic congestion.

3% 3%

Lack of alternative...

20% 20%

Other (please explain)

10% 10% 0%

10%

20%

30%

82 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

WER CHOICES

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

RESPONSES

MAY 2019


Q8. What is one thing would you most like to see changed in the City? This was an open ended question and there was a wide spectrum of comments. This page summarizes the top categories of the most received comments and lists representative comments.

Traffic Congestion / Road Conditions

Retail / Restaurant & Commercial Space Desires

“An alternate route to Manchester road would be amazing. High traffic times are awful.” “Traffic.” “Traffic congestion.” “Safe driving on Manchester Rd.” “Better access off Manchester to ease congestion, and Community gathering spots.”

“More restaurants and retail shops.” “Less strip malls.” “More unique stores and restaraunts.” “More locally owned eateries.” “Less empty shopping centers.”

Parks, Recreation, & Trails

Pedestrian Safety & Infrastructure

(100 comments)

(40 comments)

“Investment in connecting parks and trails for SAFE use.” “More open space.” “More Parks and less Development.” “Add pickleball courts. “More bike paths.”

(59 comments)

(34 comments)

“Better system of trails and walking paths.” “Safe walking to Manchester road, …. More sidewalks for kids to walk to school safely.” “Bike trails connecting parks and the two recreation centers to one another.”

City Operations / Local Politics

Town Center

(24 comments)

(20 comments)

“More positive interaction between the governing officials and residents.” “That the new government center not be built on existing parkland.”

“To have an identifiable town center (such as Kirkwood and Webster Groves).” “I would love to have a real downtown...a destination people can walk, bike, or drive to, and simply hang out for the day.” “It would be great to have a community center/ town center/ square.”

83 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


HIGHLIGHTS OF THE VISUAL PREFERENCE SURVEY Mixed-Use Development - Open House Voting

i5

Survey Overview The visual preference survey was a tool to start to translate what has been heard into a preferred community design. The images were intended to illustrate conceptual ideas and do not represent specific or actual proposals. There were six categories of images with five images in each category. Categories included: ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Infill Housing Mixed-Use Development Neighborhood Commercial Community Entry Features Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossings

Mixed-Use Development Above: Participants at the second Open on September take the preference survey. opment (retail,House housing, office, etc). Long-term, as13th redevelopment takesvisual place along Manchester Road, what is your preference for mixed-use development? Below: Example of the results from the online visual preference survey. Many commercial corridors, such as Manchester Road, are transitioning from big box and strip retail to more mixed-use devel9 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan - APPENDIX: Visual Preference Survey Results

p

p Participants had two opportunities to take the visual preference survey. The first opportunity was at the second open house for the comprehensive plan on September 13, 2018, at The Pointe. The other opportunity was online from September 13 to October 10, 2018, via the project website at www.BallwinsBlueprint. com.

A

Over 340 responses were collected as part of the online visual preference survey.

Visual Preference Survey - Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Visual Preference Survey - Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Q12 Rate the image above.

Q13 Rate the image above. Answered: 323

Skipped: 22

Visual Preference Survey - Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Q14 Rate the image above.

Skipped: 19

Answered: 324

60%

60%

60%

50%

50%

50%

40%

40%

40%

30% 20% 10% 0% Highly Desirable

Desirable

Neutral

Undesirable

Highly Undesirable

B

ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Highly Desirable

36.56%

117

Desirable

42.81%

137

Neutral

13.44%

43

Undesirable

5.63%

18

Highly Undesirable

1.56%

5

TOTAL

320

This page highlights a few of the results of the visual preference survey. The full survey results are included as part of the appendix.

C

30% 20% 10% 0% Highly Desirable

Desirable

Neutral

Undesirable

ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Highly Desirable

3.10%

Highly Undesirable

30% 20% 10% 0% Highly Desirable

10

Desirable

16.72%

54

Neutral

38.39%

124

Undesirable

32.51%

105

Highly Undesirable

9.29%

Skipped: 18

Desirable

Neutral

Undesirable

Highly Undesirable

ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Highly Desirable

45.37%

147 126

Desirable

38.89%

Neutral

8.64%

Undesirable

4.94%

Which image do you most Visual Preference Survey - Ballwin Comprehensive Plan prefer: Q17 Which image above do you most prefer. 30

TOTAL

2.16%

Highly Undesirable

323

TOTAL

Answered: 323

28 16 7 324

Skipped: 19

60% Visual Preference Survey - Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Visual Preference Survey - Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

50%

Q15 Rate the image above.

Q16 Rate the image above.

40%

Answered: 324

D 84 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Most Preferred

2nd Most Preferred

Answered: 320

OCTOBER, 2018

Answered: 323

Skipped: 18

60%

60%

50%

50%

40%

40%

12 / 47

30% 20% 10% 0% Highly Desirable

Desirable

Neutral

Undesirable

ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Highly Undesirable

E

Skipped: 19

30% 20% 13 / 47

14 / 47

30%

10%

20% 10%

0% Image A

0% Highly Desirable

Desirable

Neutral

Undesirable

Highly Undesirable

ANSWER CHOICES

ANSWER CHOICES

RESPONSES

Highly Desirable

14.81%

48

Highly Desirable

3.41%

Desirable

42.90%

139

Desirable

11.46%

Neutral

21.60%

70

Neutral

28.48%

92

16.67%

54

Undesirable

44.89%

145

Highly Undesirable

4.01%

13

Highly Undesirable

11.76%

TOTAL

324

Image C

Image D

Image E

RESPONSES

Undesirable

7 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan - APPENDIX: Visual Preference Survey Results

Image B

11

Image A

Image B

Image C

TOTAL

37

38 323

41.18%

133

7.12% 45.20% MAY 2019

23

OCTOBER, 2018

146

Image D

5.88%

19

Image E

0.62%

2


4 Plan Principles, Goals, and Recommendations


OUR COMMUNITY VALUES Community values are the building blocks of the plan. They are the core beliefs of City residents and help shape the plan vision, principles, and goals.

We value.... Our high quality of life.

Our high standard of city services.

Our great schools and highly rated schools.

Our state-of-the-art recreation facilities.

Our strong sense of community.

Our increasingly diverse population.

Our location that is accessible to regional destinations and local amenities.

Our diverse range of housing choices.

Our community as being one of the safest in the region.

86 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Our City as being a great place to raise a family.

MAY 2019


PLAN PRINCIPLES Overview The seven plan principles shape the goals and recommendations of the comprehensive plan. This chapter presents the plan principles along with the goals and recommendations associated with each plan principle. Each plan principle is rooted in one or more of the core community values for Ballwin. There is a list of preliminary metrics (Measuring Our Success) at the end of the plan principle section. These metrics provide suggestions on key measures to track so that the City can gauge implementation and the success of the plan. Chapter 8 ‘Implementation’ includes detailed actions for implementing the goals of this Chapter.

Strong Neighborhoods

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

Oustanding Community Services

Comprehensive Plan

A Strong Sense of Place

87 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

A Modern Transportation Network

A Resilient Local Economy and City Revenues

MAY 2019


PRINCIPLE #1

Strong Neighborhoods Core Community Values “Our strong sense of community.” “Our diverse range of housing choices.” Ballwin’s sense of the community is cited as key reason why people love to live in the City. Tree lined streets and walkable neighborhoods add richness to community character. A wide range of housing choices promotes diversity. Ballwin’s strong neighborhoods are the foundation for the City’s present and future.

88 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Key Goals: 1.1 Ensure infill development respects the character and context of the surrounding neighborhood. 1.2 Diversify housing choices to ensure a spectrum of residents (families, seniors, college grads, single, etc). 1.3 Ensure upkeep and maintenance of homes to preserve property values.

MAY 2019


GOAL 1.1: Ensure infill development respects the character and context of the surrounding neighborhood. 1.1A Require Additional Guidelines, Including Residential FAR, for Infill Development

69% Desirable

55% Undesirable

In recent years, there has been an increase of infill housing in Ballwin. Infill housing, in this context, is defined as either new housing on an undeveloped lot within an established neighborhood or redevelopment of an existing residential property. Most residents were open to infill development since it brought in new residents and new investments into neighborhoods. However, there were concerns when infill housing was out-of-scale or did not fit architecturally with the neighborhood. The City should adopt additional guidelines for infill development, including the use of residential Floor-Area-Ratio (FAR) requirements. The guidelines should provide flexibility for additions or redevelopment, but would prevent “McMansions” that are out-of-scale to the neighborhood. Options for establishing a residential FAR include a citywide FAR or a site specific FAR based on adjacent sites and neighborhood context. Infill requirements should also address stormwater. Additions or redevelopment are often too small to fall within MSD review requirements, but their cumulative effect citywide can greatly increase stormwater runoff. Many communities have adopted stormwater requirements to supplement MSD’s requirements. 89 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Above: Results from the Visual Preference Survey. Most respondents found infill housing acceptable, but had concerns about new housing that was out-of-scale or did fit architecturally with the neighborhood. (Images that were in the survey were not from Ballwin)

Example of FAR Shown here are two examples of existing residential Floor-AreaRatio (FAR). As the City develops guidelines, existing FAR in different neighborhoods should be evaluated.

Example 1

House: 2-Story, 5,300 sf Lot: 20,000 sf FAR = 0.26

Example 2

House: 1-Story, 1,900 sf Lot: 12,500 sf FAR = 0.15

MAY 2019


GOAL 1.2: Diversify housing choices to ensure a spectrum of residents (families, seniors, college grads, single, etc). Currently, single family housing dominates the housing market in Ballwin. Approximately 82 percent of housing types in Ballwin are single family. The City needs to have a greater diversity of housing choices to ensure a spectrum of residents in the future.

1.2A Encourage Mixed-Used, with Residential, as Commercial Areas Redevelop. As commercial areas redevelop along Manchester Road and elsewhere, encourage mixed-use with residential. See Goal 3.1A 1.2B Encourage Senior Housing and Universal Design Ballwin, along with many communities across the nation, is aging as the baby boom generation retires. The City should encourage senior housing to accommodate this demographic trend. In addition to development targeted toward seniors, the City should encourage universal design as part of new residential development. Universal design accommodates users of all ages, size, ability, or disability. Universal design helps to ensure that development accommodates a wider age spectrum and is seen less as targeted housing toward “seniors” or other market sectors.

90 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

1.2C Evaluate Inclusionary Zoning as the City Updates it Zoning Code

Communities with reputations for good school systems, as is the case in Ballwin, with the high-performing and overwhelmingly wellregarded Parkway and Rockwood School districts, often have high property values. As demand for housing within the district outpaces supply, home costs continue to move upward, making it difficult for low to moderate income families to afford to live within the community. Inclusionary zoning, sometimes referred to as inclusionary housing, is a zoning-based tool, which provides requirements or incentives for housing developers to include a certain percentage of affordable housing units along with market rate housing units. In recent years various policymakers and organizations addressing the need for more affordable housing have endorsed the concept of inclusionary zoning. A 2012 report prepared for St. Louis County Department of Planning’s Office of Community Development suggested that an inclusionary zoning ordinance would be a means of ensuring “that low and moderate income households have equal access to jobs and resources,” and that density bonuses could be used as incentives to encourage developers to “include affordable housing in their projects—particularly in areas with high rents and home values.”

MAY 2019


Inclusionary zoning can either be mandatory or voluntary. Mandatory requires developers to build affordable units in exchange for various incentives, which can include development rights or density bonuses. This method, although met with some resistance from developers, has produced more affordable units than the alternative. Voluntary allows developers the opportunity to “opt-in” in exchange for incentives. Most ordinances establish thresholds for developments that would be affected by the provision. The specifics of how many units a developer would need to build before the requirements kick in or before they become eligible for incentives have been across the board and reflect the broad spectrum of particular needs and desires of the diverse communities where they have been implemented. The largest study of inclusionary zoning programs, Inclusionary Housing in the United States: Prevalence, Impact, and Practices conducted by Lincoln Institute of Land Policy in 2016 and published in 2017 reported that there are no inclusionary zoning programs in the State of Missouri. However, within the past year, the City Council of Columbia, Missouri, directed their Community Development and Planning staff to research the topic for possible future action.

91 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

With the of the lack of precedent within the State of Missouri, Ballwin should further evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of inclusionary zoning. When the City updates its zoning code, the City should consider including inclusionary zoning policies. If there is concern about Ballwin acting singularly in adopting inclusionary zoning policies, the City should advocate for St. Louis County to enact a county-wide inclusionary zoning ordinance.

What is an Affordable House in Ballwin? Is housing affordable in Ballwin? It depends. Compared to many of its neighboring communities, Ballwin has a significant amount of relatively affordable single family housing stock, as well as apartments and other multi-family housing options. The existing floor of single family housing prices range from $100,000 - $125,000 in appraised value. According to Zillow, the market rate for these homes range in the upper $160,000’s to lower $180,000’s. This would translate to about $900/month in mortgage payments (including taxes and insurance) or $1,200/month to rent (according to Zillow). Affordable housing has various definitions, but a common definition is that housing costs (rent, mortgage, insurance, taxes, utilities, etc) should be no more than 30% of income. A new teacher may have a starting salary of approximately $43,000 and thus would have available about $1,075/month for housing costs. So, for a new teacher, housing costs would be at the borderline of affordability. Also, while the median household income in Ballwin is quite high at almost $90,000/year, almost 15-percent of households have incomes less than $35,000, according to the 2017 American Community Survey. These households are likely spending above 30% on housing costs, especially if they have recently obtained housing. In many ways, Ballwin is at a transition point. While housing costs are still relatively affordable, especially in comparison to neighboring communities, the good schools and high quality of life in Ballwin are putting increased pressures on housing costs.

MAY 2019


1.2D Evaluate Accessory Dwelling Units as an Option for Increasing Affordable Housing Opportunities Accessory dwelling units (ADUs) are separate housing units that are distinct from existing single family homes but on the same parcel and under the same ownership of the single family home. Sometimes ADU’s are referred to as “granny flats”, “in-law apartments”, or “carriage units”. Variations include attic or basement apartments within a single family home, an attachment to the home, or a separate building, sometimes as an apartment above a garage. By allowing or encouraging development of ADUs, a municipality can increase opportunities for individuals and families to live in communities with otherwise scarcity of housing or market rates out of the reach of lowto-moderate income households. And because ADUs are usually significantly smaller than and often contained within existing structures, such as the primary house or garage, they also represent an option for increasing the number of housing units within a community without much or any impact on the character and look of the community.

fixed-income pensions or residents grappling with loss of income due to unemployment or divorce. For renters, such as younger adults who may be new to the job market or for single parents wanting to move into the Parkway or Rockwood School Districts but otherwise not able to afford to purchase a home, ADUs offer an alternative to the limited supply of apartments currently on the market within Ballwin. Currently, Ballwin’s zoning ordinances prohibit what is referred to as “secondary dwelling units”. As Ballwin updates its zoning code, the City should evaluate allowing accessory dwelling units. The allowance of ADU’s should include requirements for architectural treatments, set-backs, density, and floor-arearatio.

ADUs increase affordable options for both homeowners and renters. For new, prospective homebuyers who otherwise would not be able to afford to buy houses in areas where prices are outside their affordability range, or for existing homeowners who can no longer afford their mortgage, property taxes or maintenance costs, ADUs offer the prospect of rental income to supplement other sources of income used to cover mortgage payments. This may be especially appealing to retirees who rely on 92 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


GOAL 1.3: Ensure upkeep and maintenance of homes to preserve property values. 1.3A Be Pro-active in Educating Homeowners on Maintenance, Upkeep, and Code Requirements. The City should be pro-active in educating homeowners on maintenance and upkeep. Strategies could include yearly or semiannual education classes, bulletins, and homeowner guides. Many communities have excellent guides that educate homeowners on maintenance and construction. One example is Maryland Heights’s ‘Guide to Home Improvement’, which is a resource for residents in determining wen permits are needed for common residential projects.

1.3C Continue Occupancy Inspection Requirements That All Buildings, Before They Can Be Sold or Occupied By a New Resident, Tenant or Business, Must be Inspected By the City. The existing City policy is to require occupancy inspections for all buildings before they can be sold or rented. This policy should continue as it helps ensure the proper maintenance of property.

1.3D Support Short-term Rentals in Accordance With Obtaining Permits With the Procedures and Requirements for Issuance of Occupancy Permits. Short-term rentals such as Airbnb or VRBO are a popular resource for visitors and homeowners. The City should have reasonable policies related to short-term rentals including homeowners wishing to rent their homes be required to have necessary permits with the procedures and requirements for issuance of occupancy permits.

1.3B Track Code Enforcement to Identify Neighborhoods That May Show Signs of Decline. The City should track code enforcement violations with GIS mapping to better identify neighborhoods in the City that may be showing early signs of decline. The City can use this data to better target pro-active home maintenance programs (see Goal 1.3A).

93 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


PRINCIPLE #2

A Modern Transportation Network Core Community Value “Our location that is accessible to regional destinations and local amenities.” A popular phrase for Ballwin is that it is “20 minutes from everywhere”. Machester Road is both a blessing and a curse. It is a blessing in terms of providing retail traffic, but a frustration for local drivers making short trips. A modern transportation network for Ballwin will lessen local need for Manchester Road while also providing community wide investments in biking, walking, and transit.

Key Goals: 2.1 Encourage cross-access along Manchester Road commercial properties to relieve stress on Manchester Road. 2.2 Increase vehicular connectivity that parallels Manchester. 2.3 Fill in critical gaps in the citywide sidewalk system. 2.4 Promote a connected pedestrian and bicycle network to connect city destinations and nearby destinations such as Castlewood State Park. 2.5 Improve north-south pedestrian and bicycle connection across Manchester Road. 2.6 Increase connectivity and safety with new and realigned intersections in Ballwin. 2.7 Strengthen resident connections to transit.

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GOAL 2.1: Encourage cross-access along Manchester Road commercial properties to relieve stress on Manchester Road. It is well-known that the frequent access points to Manchester Road (driveways and crossstreets) impede the operational performance of the roadway. The significant number of curb cuts and the lack of connectivity between individual parcels funnel nearly all traffic onto Manchester Road and create additional short trips and turning movements within the traffic stream. In an effort to combat this situation, the City of Ballwin has encouraged the dedication of Cross-Access Agreements.

2.1A Institute Access Management Guidelines for Permitting Approvals “Access Management� refers to a collection of tools and policies that can improve safety, aesthetics, and traffic flows and has been employed by roadway agencies for several years. Both the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) who maintains Manchester Road and St. Louis County (Clayton, Baxter, Big Bend, Kiefer Creek, and portions of New Ballwin, Kehrs Mill, and Sulphur Spring Roads) have published Access Management Guidelines and require permit applicants to meet these guidelines to be granted access to their roadways. The guidelines address issues such as driveway spacing and geometrics, turning movement permissions, corner clearance, and roadway medians.

2.1B: Provide Incentives to Existing Property Owners to Achieve Access Management Goals In an effort to achieve the desired goal of limiting access points to Manchester Road, the City should initiate a program to coordinate with current property owners to consolidate and/or remove parcel driveways where appropriate (e.g. multiple driveways, potential shared driveways, and driveways adjacent to intersections). An example of potential incentives that the City should evaluate are cost share programs where the City would assume the cost of closing curb cuts if property owners enter into cross access agreements. Another option would be for the City to assume the legal cost of recording cross access agreements.

It is recommended that the City of Ballwin adopt similar access management guidelines as part of the permitting process for new projects within the City, including requirements for cross-access agreements when applicable. These can be a unique document or a requirement to follow the guidelines of another agency. It is further recommended that Access Management requirements be formally integrated into both the project development and City programming processes. These requirements should restrict the number of parcel access points and mandate crossaccess as well as restrict access adjacent to intersections for both new and re-development.

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2.1C: Reduce Parking Requirements and Include Shared Parking Credits for Developments The consolidation of parking areas would provide more efficient use of real estate along the corridor – including providing additional space for consolidating driveways, installing pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and creating green space. In addition, reducing surface parking areas would support a denser, walkable, community-feel in the commercial areas.

The 2011 Manchester Road Great Streets Plan, by the East-West Gateway Council of Governments, recommended the following modifications for zoning regulations in relation to parking: ■■ The elimination of minimum parking requirements for parcels containing less than 20,000 square feet in land area. ■■ For parcels over 20,000 square feet in land area: • A minimum of 1 and 1/8 parking spaces per residential unit, of which a minimum of 1/8 parking space per residential unit will be provided as Shared Parking. • For non-residential uses, a minimum of 3.5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of nonresidential Gross Floor Area (GFA) provided for Shared Parking with no maximum limits. New on-street parking spaces created in conjunction with a development, in addition to what previously existed, may be counted toward the minimum requirement for Shared Parking. • A maximum of 5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of non-residential GFA or two spaces per residential unit may be provided for Reserved Parking. The report additionally recommended the following Shared Parking incentives to promote Shared Parking strategies: ■■ Elimination of any stipulations against Shared Parking facilities in City codes. ■■ Implementation of a Shared Parking model to provide for reduced requirements for parking for different uses. ■■ Elimination of any code-based requirements that discourage public access or the merging of parking lots. ■■ Identification of available pooled liability protection programs or insurance policies whereby owners of different parking facilities can pool resources and purchase a joint replacement policy. This type of policy would provide for public access across multiple parking lots at lower insurance rates compared to existing policies. Parking consolidation can improve the overall performance and appearance of the Manchester Road corridor in the near term, prior to the redevelopment or conversion of existing land uses. Similar to the Access Management goals, the City can work with landowners now to consolidate and/or coordinate Shared Parking arrangements within the corridor. For example, Ballwin could work with the owner of a retail store that closes earlier to arrange for neighboring restaurants to utilize their parking spaces after business hours.

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GOAL 2.2: Increase vehicular connectivity that parallels Manchester Road. 2.2A Adopt a Long-Term Parallel Street Plan and Coordinate with Property Owners to Achieve As a significant arterial within west St. Louis County, Manchester Road supports a high volume of vehicular traffic that is a mixture of commercial traffic (short trips) and commuter traffic (longer distance trips). The abundance of short trips and turning movements deteriorates the corridor operations during the peak periods. A long-term goal to minimize the effects of commercial traffic is to install streets running generally parallel to Manchester Road, in order to provide additional east-west access for local

traffic along the corridor. These roads could function as “service roads” behind businesses, or in the preferred situation, could function as “main streets” for various shopping districts or town center areas, emphasizing walkability, pedestrian and bicycle amenities and connections, and slower traffic speeds. The parallel streets could furthermore be connected with north-south links in strategic commercial areas to provide for a downtown-like grid of streets. The grid network would help to disperse traffic and relieve bottlenecks on Manchester Road by allowing traffic to circulate within commercial nodes, and would help to calm traffic and reduce vehicle speeds.

Given the level of development within the Manchester Road corridor, parallel streets would likely be installed over several years as redevelopment occurs. However, it is recommended the City recognize a plan for these connections and encourage their installation during property redevelopment. The map on this page represents the potential implementation for parallel streets and connectors that fits within the existing and anticipated redevelopment within the Manchester Road corridor.

Long-Term Parallel Street Plan to Manchester Road 97 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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Another key benefit of the long-term implementation of the parallel street network is that a majority of the properties along Manchester Road will have access to a signalized intersection. The areas shown on the map on this page represent development tracts that can be accessed, via a signalized intersection to the parallel street network. The long-term access also assumes that new intersections, that the plan recommends, are implemented.

Each color represents development tracts that will have access to a signalized intersection upon the long-term implementation of the parallel street network.

Signalized Intersection Access Areas with Long-Term Implementation of Parallel Street Plan 98 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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2.2B As Parallel Streets are Added, Consider Additional Medians Along Manchester Road The volume of vehicular turning movements throughout the corridor is enhanced by the presence of the center turn lane, which allows for unprotected left turns at most locations. Not only do these left-turns interrupt the traffic stream, they can create confusion and safety concerns as drivers become more distracted or delayed and take risks. Although the center turn lane is necessary to provide access to all parcels within the existing corridor, this situation can be addressed as a parallel network expands. Installing a median (preferably landscaped, for aesthetics) in the center of Manchester Road restricts these movements, providing increased safety and more efficient traffic operations.

However, on the south side of Manchester, there is access to the existing development from both cross-streets, as well as a connecting parallel street (Jefferson Avenue). Therefore, the existing median break for westbound traffic could be removed and all turns restricted to Ries Road and Ballpark Drive. On the north side of Manchester Road in this same segment, left-turn access is provided only for the Fire Station (and would likely remain). All other parcels are accessed via parallel or cross-streets.

could be extended to Holloway Road. Similarly, as access management and parallel roads are implemented throughout Ballwin’s Manchester Road corridor, additional medians could be installed.

Moving to the west, an existing parallel street (W. Orchard Avenue) provides rear access to the parcels on the north side of Manchester Road between Ballpark Drive and Holloway Road. If similar access can be provided to the parcels on the south side, the existing median

For example, a partial median currently exists between Ries Road/Seven Trails Drive and Ballpark Drive; restricting westbound left-turns to a single location between the two signals.

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GOAL 2.3: Fill in critical gaps in the Citywide sidewalk system. In general, the City of Ballwin has a robust and well-maintained network of pedestrian sidewalks and crosswalks for a city of its size and setting. However, there are some noticeable gaps within the sidewalk network as well. Small improvements to the sidewalk network can result in significant benefits for community wide connections. The adjacent map identifies the priority locations for sidewalk and crosswalk additions within the City. 2.3A: Connect existing sidewalk links in priority locations. There are a few noticeable gaps within the sidewalk network that impair pedestrian travel. These locations include sidewalk segments where none exist (Seven Trails Drive, Wildwood Parkway, and the south end of New Ballwin Road) or where there are short gaps of a single/few parcels (Reinke Road and Lark Hill Lane).

Priority sidewalk locations (typ)

2.3B Install sidewalks in neighborhoods with little existing coverage There are also some residential areas within Ballwin that lack any sidewalk facilities. Some of these areas are older neighborhoods of connecting streets and others are single “nooutlet� streets off a major collector or arterial. The priority to filling in these holes is to begin with the residential entry roadway or spine of the neighborhood (such as Providence Road and Mayfair Drive) adding sidewalks to the street branches when possible.

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Priority Sidewalk Locations

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2.3C Add Supplementary Sidewalks to Key Network Links or Where Significant Demand Exists

striping is warranted in an effort to highlight the presence and safety of the non-motorized network.

In some locations, a sidewalk on both sides of the road would provide for additional pedestrian safety and capacity (Claymont Drive, Ries Road and Old Ballwin Road).

Furthermore, redevelopment proposals should incorporate additional sidewalk and crosswalk connections within their footprint to provide pedestrian connections between destinations (not just parcels) and support shared parking. Pedestrian thru-paths can shorten walking distances and improve overall safety.

2.3D Maintain and Enhance the Sidewalk System as Redevelopment Occurs Although sidewalk coverage and maintenance are strong within Ballwin, the existing sidewalks can be inconsistent in size and proximity to the adjacent roadway. It is recommended that the City and developers strive to install sidewalks of a minimum width of five feet, increasing this width whenever possible, especially in “town center” areas to facilitate community gathering, shopping, and outdoor dining. In addition, there is a preference for sidewalk “buffers” (spacing between the roadway curb and sidewalk sometime as referred to as the “tree lawn”) on roadways to reduce noise, increase safety, and have room for street trees and street lighting. The recommended minimum width of the tree lawn should be five feet. However, the limited width of many existing road right-of-ways limits the tree lawn to four feet or less.

Tree lawns should be greater in width along higher speed and higher volume roads.

Pedestrian street lighting.

Sidewalks in residential areas should be 5 feet min. In commercial and mixed-use areas, sidewalks may be 10-15 feet in width or greater to accommodate streetscape elements.

Additional pedestrian considerations include wayfinding and information signage, places to rest, and opportunities to install shade and shelter. New development or redevelopment should include crosswalk striping (continental style) across driveways, intersections, and pedestrian connections across parking lots. Crosswalk 101 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Typical Sidewalk MAY 2019


GOAL 2.4: Promote a connected bicycle network to connect City destinations and nearby destinations such as Castlewood State Park. A frequent request among Ballwin residents is to have a more robust bicycle network. Currently, the only marked facility is dedicated on-street lanes on Clayton Road. Public input during the process identified the cycling demands as predominantly recreational with a preference for off-street facilities where possible. This desire is also being addressed through the current Parks Master Planning process. 2.4A: Widen a Sidewalk on Select Streets to Create Multi-use Paths (“Pedways”) To accommodate both recreational cycling and pedestrian movements, it is recommended that shared-use paths (“pedways”) be installed on primary roadways throughout the City. These routes are identified in the adjacent graphic by blue markings. Ideally, these paths are eight to ten feet wide (with a minimum width of six feet) with a two to three-foot buffer between the pedway and adjacent roadway. These pedways would be ideal facilities for recreational cycling especially for children and riders uncomfortable in shared traffic situations.

Pedway locations (typ)

What is a “pedway”? See examples on the following page for examples of pedways.

Pedway Locations

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In many of the locations identified, the pedways could be installed within the space between the roadway and existing back of sidewalk. In addition to a pedway along Manchester Road, there are also multiple pedestrian crossings of the route identified. These points would provide prime locations for enhanced pedestrian and bicycle crossings of the corridor such as grade-separation. Installation and construction of most pedways would require coordination with St. Louis County and MoDOT but could also potentially utilize available transportation funding programs.

Above example of pedways. A pedway is essentially widened sidewalk. Ideally, it should meet the standards of a multi-use path (minimum of 8-feet in width). However, existing limitations of available right-of-way width may prevent the standard multi-use path from being met. A widened sidewalk (“pedway�) would still be beneficial for pedestrians and family bicyclists.

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2.4B Identify Preferred On-street Bicycle Routes Additional on-street bicycle facilities within Ballwin will provide cyclists the opportunity to traverse the City in all directions. The recommended on-street routes are identified by purple markings in the adjacent graphic. Many of Ballwin’s subdivision streets have low traffic volumes and adequate width to easily allow cyclists to share the lanes with vehicles. Marking these routes with painted “sharrows” on the pavement will identify their mixed-use for both cyclists and drivers. 2.4C Publish a Ballwin Bike Network Map Preparing a map of the available bicycle network for Ballwin residents will serve to address the demand for facilities as well as keep the public informed of additions to the system. This map can be a graphic published on the City’s website as well as periodically presented within the City’s magazine or other distributions. 2.4D Incorporate Bike Parking Into Existing and Proposed Developments The City should identify existing and new opportunities to add bicycle parking at destinations throughout Ballwin to encourage non-motorized commuting and local travel. Bicycle racks can be required as a condition of approval in the permitting process. Ballwin should have a standard bike rack design. However, creative, art inspired bike racks should also be encourage since these custom bike racks can contribute to aesthetic appeal and place-making.

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On-Street bicycle routes (share-the-road)

On-Street Bicycle Routes

On-Street bicycle routes should include sharrows to designate share-the-road routes that are too narrow for dedicated bicycle lanes. MAY 2019


2.4E Develop a Greenway along Fishpot Creek as Commercial Areas Redevelop The 2007 Ballwin ‘Community Wide Trail System Plan’ recommended greenways (trails) along Fishpot Creek and Grand Glaize Creek. However, the biggest hurdle to the implementation of the greenways was the private ownership of almost all the land adjacent to the creeks. Substantial easements would be required on numerous commercial and residential properties. The hurdle of private ownership was a big reason the implementation of the plan stalled. Closer to Manchester Road, Fishpot Creek runs along multiple commercial properties. As these commercial properties redevelop over the next 10-20 years, there is an opportunity to implement the greenway along this section. If these areas redevelop as mixeduse, the greenway could be an asset for the development. The proposed greenway has the potential to connect to future pedways and sidewalks as well as provide a location for a potential grade-separated crossing of Manchester Road.

Greenway location

Proposed Greenway Location

The City should encourage the long-term development of the greenway along this section of Fishpot Creek. A successful beginning segment of greenway could provide incentive for private owners to work with the City toward expansion.

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GOAL 2.5: Improve north-south pedestrian and bicycle connection across Manchester Road. It is widely acknowledged that Manchester Road acts as a barrier to north-south pedestrian travel and that some destinations are difficult for pedestrians to reach by nature of its development patterns. The 2011 Manchester Road Great Streets Plan, by the East-West Gateway Council of Governments, recommended a general spacing of crosswalks across Manchester Road of 220- to 330-feet. The Plan also recommended that the local communities and MoDOT time traffic signals to provide sufficient crossing time for pedestrians, including additional lead time for pedestrians to begin crossing Manchester Road before vehicles begin their movements. Pedestrian accommodations through and across the Manchester Road corridor will be enhanced through the efforts to address Goals 5.3 and 5.4. Additional measures to specifically improve north-south crossings can also be implemented. 2.5A Coordinate with MoDOT to Strengthen Pedestrian Treatments on Manchester Road There are currently six signalized intersections of Manchester Road within the City limits: Maple Lane, Ries Road/Seven Trails Drive, Holloway Road, Ballpark Drive, New Ballwin Road, and Ballwin Plaza. The existing signals incorporate standard pedestrian crossings and pedestrian signals at some of their approaches (generally one north-south crossing and one or two east-west crossings). The City should coordinate with MoDOT to upgrade the crosswalk striping at the existing 106 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

crosswalks to a continental style crosswalk, which offers greater visibility, raising awareness of pedestrian crossing locations for both nonmotorized and motorized traffic. This effort may require cost-sharing and/or maintenance agreements with MoDOT. In addition, MoDOT plans to resurface and address Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements on Manchester Road west of MO 141 by the year 2027. The City should coordinate with MoDOT during their planning and design for that project to assure that every approach at the signalized intersections receives pedestrian treatments (signals and striping). These additions make travel easier for pedestrians as well as elevate their priority throughout the corridor.

Example of continental pedestrian crosswalks. All pedestrian crosswalks in the City, including Manchester Road, should be continental style crosswalks.

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2.5B Conduct a Feasibility Study to Evaluate the Potential for a Grade Separated Crossing Near Vlasis Park There is potential for a grade separated crossing over Manchester Road near Vlasis Park. A bridge may be possible near Ballpark Drive while a tunnel may be possible at the intersection of Ries Road and Manchester Road, based on current topography.

A

B C

A feasibility study is the next step to evaluate the potential for a grade separated crossing. The feasibility study should examine applicable code implications, utility impacts, property impacts, and feasibility level cost estimates. Brief description of the identified alternatives for a feasibility study are listed below. A

Pedestrian Bridge - Alternative A

The existing topography north of Manchester Road works well for a pedestrian bridge. The Regions Bank driveway would be impacted. South of Manchester, the topography slopes to the south, making the landing of the bridge difficult. The bridge would have to tie into a structure or parallel Manchester Road to the east.

B

Pedestrian Bridge - Alternative B

C

Pedestrian Tunnel

Potential Grade Separated Locations Near Vlasis Park

79% Desirable

Similar to Alternative A except less property impacts on the north side of Manchester Road. Both alternatives are impacted by existing power lines along Manchester Road. The topography is potentially well suited for a pedestrian tunnel at Manchester Road and Ries Road. The former City Hall site should be a new community-wide destination (Vlasis Park Commons) that the pedestrian tunnel could connect. On the south side there are property impacts. Also, the depth and location of utilities will have to be verified.

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Almost 80% of respondents rated a pedestrian tunnel as desirable as part of the Visual Preference Survey. MAY 2019


GOAL 2.6: Increase connectivity and safety with new and realigned intersections in Ballwin. 2.6A Enhance Pedestrian Treatments at Signalized Intersections The majority of the signalized intersections on major arterials within Ballwin include pedestrian crosswalks and signals. However, many of the intersections on Clayton and Big Bend Roads (maintained by St. Louis County) and New Ballwin Road (under the City’s jurisdiction) could be improved by re-striping the crosswalks in a continental pattern and by adding crosswalks and pedestrian signals to missing approaches (typically one of the crossings of the primary route). Installing these additions will require coordination, and possibly costsharing, with St. Louis County, but could also potentially utilize available transportation funding programs. (This effort also applies to most signalized intersections on Manchester Road, but is addressed under Goal 2.5). 2.6B Realign North-South Roadways as Identified along Manchester Road to Create Signalized Intersections In addition to the existing signalized pedestrian crossings of Manchester Road, there is one unsignalized, mid-block pedestrian crossing near Old Ballwin Road. This crossing is demarked by a continental crosswalk, yieldline pavement markings for the approaching traffic, and pedestrian crossing warning signs. There is a small median refuge island, but no additional traffic control. There have been several accidents at this location, including at least one pedestrian fatality. Although northbound traffic is prohibited from turning 108 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Existing enhanced mid-block crossing

Improve mid-block crossings (See Goal 2.6E)

Pedestrian enhancements at existing intersections (typ). (See Goals 2.5A and 2.6A)

Improve mid-block crossing (See Goal 2.6E)

Potential new intersections (See Goals 2.6B and 2.6C)

Existing intersection with continental style crosswalks.

Proposed New Intersections and Improvements to Existing Intersection

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left onto Manchester Road, drivers routinely make this movement creating potential conflicts with pedestrians. MoDOT has stated their preference is not to install pedestrian signals or beacons at the crossing. In an effort to both improve the pedestrian accommodations in this segment of Manchester and to add to the north-south corridors within the City, it is recommended Ballwin pursue a realignment of Old Ballwin Road and/or Steamboat Lane in order to create a new signalized crossing of Manchester and north-south connection. The City can pursue the connection with the current landowners and/or as redevelopment occurs in the parcels between the two crossroads north and south of Manchester Road. Once the roads are realigned, a signalized intersection can be pursued. It should be noted that both realigned connections and signal installation would require the approval of MoDOT including investigation to confirm the new signals do not degrade existing traffic operations. However, the signals on Manchester Road, like many primary arterial roadways in St. Louis, are part of a progressive system – meaning the corridor is connected in an effort to sequence the timing along the corridor from east to west and vice versa. In such a system, there is potential to insert a signal within the progression without adding unreasonable burden to the adjacent signals.

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Another location where signals are routinely requested is Reinke Road. The existing bridge of Hillsdale Drive across Fishpot Creek offers the potential to make another cross Ballwin north-south connection if the two roadways can be realigned to meet. Again, the realignment can be pursued based on ownership interests and/or redevelopment potential within parcels on either the north or south side of Manchester Road. 2.6C With Redevelopments, Consider Relocating Signals to Achieve Better NorthSouth Connections As redevelopment proposals happen within the Manchester Road corridor, the City should carefully consider the connection(s) to the surrounding road network, both existing and future (including proposed parallel routes). If there is greater potential to accommodate more north-south movements (pedestrian, bicycle, and/or vehicular) by relocating existing signals, the City should coordinate those relocations during the construction process. One example is the intersection of Manchester Road at Maple Lane, which is currently a cul-de-sac street. If parallel road connections exist, or are anticipated, for the north side of Manchester, relocating the signal to the west may accommodate greater volumes of northsouth trips.

2.6D Evaluate the Need for Pedestrian Signals at Clayton Road at Country Club Drive It is recommended that the addition of pedestrian signals be evaluated for the intersection of Clayton Road at Country Club Drive. Claymont Elementary School is located on Country Club Drive approximately 1,000-feet south of Clayton Road, and serves students commuting from its north. The nearest pedestrian crossings (striped or signalized) of Clayton Road are at the intersection with Baxter Road, over ½-mile to the east and Kehrs Mill Road, almost one-mile to its west. The pedestrian signals could potentially be a full signalized intersection (vehicular and pedestrian signals) or pedestrian-actuated signals, depending on the results of the investigation and coordination with the St. Louis County Department of Transportation.

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2.6E Improved Mid-Block Crossings There are several striped mid-block pedestrian crossings throughout the City of Ballwin. Midblock crossings refer to striped pedestrian crossings of a roadway that are not at a stopcontrolled location (such as a stop-signed or signalized approach of an intersection, or a location between intersections). Most of these crossings are already striped with the preferred continental striping; it is recommended that any that are not be converted during striping and pavement maintenance activities.

treatments, such as pedestrian-actuated beacons or signals. These additional facilities may be warranted at locations where traffic speeds and/or volumes are higher and where there is a concern of drivers failing to yield to pedestrians. It is recommended that any such locations of concern be evaluated for these enhancements.

In addition, there are some locations, such as Holloway Road at Clear Meadows Drive, Kehrs Mill Road at Skyline and Sunset Drives, and New Ballwin Road at Westglen Village Drive, that may warrant additional pedestrian

2.6F Evaluate Geometric Improvements at Claymont Road and Baxter Road One location noted by residents as a source of confusion and safety concerns is the intersections of Claymont and Holloway Roads with Baxter Road. The two “tee” intersections are located roughly 220-feet apart with individual, and unique, geometries (such as the northbound right-turn “bypass” lane). A redesign study is recommended for this intersection. As Baxter Road is under the jurisdiction of St. Louis County, the investigation should begin with an inquiry and coordination with that agency.

Existing mid-block crossing along Henry Avenue near Henry Elementary School. This mid-block crossing is already enhanced with a pedestrian-actuated signal. Other existing mid-block crossings in Ballwin should be evaluated for enhancements with a pedestrian-actuated signal or beacon (see Goal 2.6E). 110 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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GOAL 2.7: Strengthen resident connections to transit. A desire for a strong transit service in Ballwin was demonstrated during the community survey and feedback. The City should consider this demand during coordination with Metro in regards to current and future routing decisions. Improvements to the local pedestrian and bicycle network achieved through the previous goals will serve to strengthen resident connections to transit. Lighting enhancements will encourage transit use by commuters who frequently travel before and after daylight hours. 5.7A: Coordinate improvements to existing bus stops on Manchester, Clayton, and Big Bend Roads

Furthermore, during coordination, the City can determine whether parking within the vicinity of any of the local routes or stations is warranted. If so, individual property owners can be approached in regards to sharing available parking for bus commuters. 5.7B: Incorporate transit stops and services into redevelopment proposals As redevelopment occurs, identify neighborhood centers or density “nodes” on Manchester Road and coordinate placement, consolidation, or relocation of transit stops. Encourage developments to incorporate transit stations and transit support areas (such as parking or restrooms).

Attractive and functional transit stations can promote the availability and elevate the desirability of transit usage within the City. A good example is the “Ballwin Station” bus stop for eastbound Manchester Road east of New Ballwin Road. Shelter, seating, and a trash receptacle provide comfort for transit users while a bike rack enables travelers to connect multiple modes. The station itself acts as a monument within the City and highlights residential services. The City should coordinate with Metro to identify additional key stations of Bus Routes #57, #57X, and #58X and implement similar improvements.

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PRINCIPLE #3

A Resilient Local Economy and City Revenues Core Community Value “Our high quality of life.� Manchester Road, with over 30,000 vehicles a day, has traditionally been the retail hub for the City generating robust revenues and providing the high standard of services for which the City is known. However, with changing retail trends, Manchester Road and other commercial areas will evolve in the next twenty years.

Key Goals: 3.1 Re-position strategic retail sites along Manchester Road to reflect trends toward mixed-use development. 3.2 Support neighborhood commercial nodes that are mixed-use and target local businesses and entrepreneurs. 3.3 Continue to diversify City revenues to be less dependent on local sales tax. 3.4 Strive to diversify commercial sectors and business base.

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GOAL 3.1: Re-position strategic retail sites along Manchester Road to reflect trends toward mixed-use development. 3.1A Support Mixed-Use Development on Manchester Road Manchester Road is Ballwin’s primary commercial district and is dominated by retail development that ranges from large national anchors flanked by smaller retail stores to modest strip centers to small stand-alone businesses (local and some national chains). It is also home to automotive dealerships that occupy significant acreage. While there continues to be re-investment and redevelopment of older retail facilities of all sizes along Manchester, including partial demolition and new construction to update Ballwin Plaza that was initiated during the course of this planning process, outdated buildings and large vacancies are not uncommon along the corridor. Aging shopping centers with multiple vacancies or the loss of one or more big box retailers can negatively affect the viability of neighboring vendors, the attraction of shoppers from in and outside of Ballwin and ultimately the community’s image. Additionally, while the existing car dealerships (which occupy 20-acres in total along Manchester) are long-term business owners in Ballwin and have made an investment in their properties, it is not uncommon for dealerships to relocate to less developed locations that offer expansion opportunities and the ability to update their facilities. The ongoing re-investment in retail development that Ballwin has experienced reflects confidence by property owners and 113 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

developers in the vibrancy of the Ballwin market. At the same time, the vacancies and shifts in Ballwin’s retail outlets reflect broader, national changes in consumer spending and the negative impact of online purchasing on brick and mortar outlets. In addition, redevelopment has not introduced significant net new retail to the community. In many instances, vacancies at Ballwin shopping centers are backfilled with retail outlets that are moving from one location on Manchester to another. For example, the redevelopment of Ballwin Plaza referenced above involves the relocation of two big box stores from other Ballwin centers. The facelift and rejuvenation of one location is resulting in vacancy and potentially financial challenges in another part of the community. The changing retail landscape has not escaped the notice of Ballwin residents. The community survey

revealed that Ballwin residents consider declining retail as one of the three top concerns for the Ballwin community over the next twenty years. Ballwin should be prepared to advocate for and take advantage of opportunities to reposition existing retail and/or potentially vacated automotive dealership properties in a manner that reflects preferences for mixeduse development. Mixed-use development responds to people’s desire for walkable neighborhoods that create a sense of community through complementary residential, office and retail offerings and which typically provide public gathering and greenspace. The typically compact developments are more dense and create economic efficiencies through shared infrastructure and parking, resulting in reduced impacts on the

Concerns About Existing Retail Ballwin residents consider declining retail (and declining revenue) as a top concern.

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environment, and provide vibrant communities where people can live, work and play. Further, office and/or residential uses create a builtin customer base for retail outlets helping to ensure long-term viability. While mixed-use strategies have been key to urban redevelopment across the nation, the mixed-use model more recently has been deployed in suburban markets. Mixeduse redevelopment along Manchester Road offers a viable next step for re-purposing large and aging retail centers with large expanses of parking that were constructed and, in some instances, renovated for big box retail. Developments that combine office, retail and/or

residential uses supported by public gathering/ green space in appropriate locations also can contribute to creating a sense of place and community character. The City should consider mixed-use redevelopment that complements and builds on the concept of creating a town center by transforming the former City hall site to serve as a gateway to Vlasis Park and as the center of Ballwin.

residents an opportunity to retire and downsize in Ballwin, providing them with walkable access to restaurants, shopping, entertainment etc. Similarly, it could also provide an amenity rich alternative to attract new young couples and families (older Millennials) that is more affordable and modern than single family options currently available.

Ballwin residents also expressed a desire for alternatives to single family housing within the City that would appeal to retirees and younger families just starting out. Mixed-use development that incorporates multi-family housing could offer existing Baby Boomer

Intermediate

Long-Term Mixed-Use combines office, retail, restaurant, and residential uses supported by public gathering areas. This type of place-making is popular among Millennials, singles, and recent retirees looking to downsize.

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Above: One example of transitioning from traditional retail to mixed-use development. See Chapter 7 for more detail. MAY 2019


3.1B Encourage Retail Outlets Adapted to Contemporary Trends for Manchester Road Commercial Corridor While large mixed-use redevelopment is a long-term opportunity for Ballwin’s primary commercial corridor, municipal advocacy for retail outlets that have adapted to new consumer spending habits and preferences or are somehow unique can more immediately contribute to maintaining a stable market. While changes in consumer spending habits have hurt traditional models of retail shopping, brick and mortar outlets are not going away anytime soon, and the industry is evolving to meet consumers’ needs. Finally, retail center design is also evolving with a move toward locating shops closer to the street with parking behind or in the center. This configuration provides traffic calming and eliminates the visual of a sea of parking.

and Sephora. In addition, actively attracting retailers that would be unique to the St. Louis region (i.e., Ballwin is their only location) also provides an opportunity to set Ballwin apart from other communities. Retailers augmenting bricks and mortar outlets with services or features that enhance the shopping experience should likewise be encouraged. For example, DSW has begun to offer an in-store spa for manicures and pedicures in select locations, and Joann is retooling some of its stores with new interactive features like a Creator’s Studio for classes and community events. Shoppers at these updated

stores can also get coffee or rent time on a sewing machine. When taken together, Joann is seeking to create a crafting experience rather than simply selling its products. Outlets that offer purely experiential services, e.g., fitness, recreation and entertainment venues, also offer opportunities to backfill vacant retail and do not face on-line competition.

Ballwin should promote or actively seek to attract retailers that have adapted to omnichannel retailing – offering (often multiple) on-line avenues and brick and mortar options for shopping and then coordinating the experiences between their digital and physical presence or “channels.” Such retailers are delivering seamless, consistent and convenient purchasing experiences that are appealing to younger consumers and that are increasingly appreciated by their parents and grandparents. Examples of retailers that have been recognized as effectively deploying omnichannel strategies include Orvis, Value City Furniture, Starbucks, Chipotle, Crate & Barrel Photo source: Joann Fabrics

Joann Fabric’s Creator’s Studio is an example of experience based retail that enhances the shopping experience with classes, access to equipment, socializing, and other amenities.

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3.1C Update Zoning Code to Encourage Mixed-Use Development, Place-Making, and the Goals of the Plan Ballwin has previously taken steps to foster mixed-use redevelopment along Manchester Road by adopting the Manchester Road Revitalization Overlay District (MRD) as part of its existing zoning code in 2007. The MRD establishes objectives for development that promote a pedestrian friendly, compact and energy efficient development which allows for a mix of retail, commercial, business and residential uses and which promotes connections with adjoining neighborhoods. The MRD also establishes architectural and site design standards that ensure quality, aesthetically pleasing redevelopment. While the overlay district has had some success, the usability of the overlay district, in combination with the underlying zoning district, has not been as successful as it could be. The main disadvantage of the overlay district is confusion on standards and intent of the overlay district versus the underlying zoning district. The City should update its zoning code and development regulations to reflect the vision and goals of this comprehensive plan. A priority should be the update of the zoning code for commercial areas to ensure compatibility and promotion of mixed-use as outlined in the Future Land Use Plan.

shows the expectations and requirements of the zoning. This clarity is especially important for mixed-use areas where form is usually more important than use. With an updated zoning code, Ballwin can better take advantage of mixed-use redevelopment opportunities. The City can use its zoning code to pro-actively promote its vision for mixed-use redevelopment to property owners and managers and real estate developers, especially those that have successful mixed-use developments. Marketing is an important next step that will communicate the City’s goals and interest in new development models for its Manchester corridor. In addition to enhancing Ballwin’s likelihood of securing meaningful, modern redevelopment, by augmenting its outreach and engagement, the City should be in a stronger position to ensure it is informed about changes in the local market and to know earlier about redevelopment efforts so that its perspectives and interests are addressed at the beginning of the process.

Above: Example of a form-based code.

The zoning code should incorporate form-base elements. A form-base code uses graphics and images to explain required architectural design and site design standards. The benefit of a form-based code is that it more clearly 116 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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GOAL 3.2: Support neighborhood commercial nodes that are mixed-use and target local businesses and entrepreneurs. 3.2A Promote Mixed-Use Neighborhood Community Development. Ballwin has a few aging neighborhood commercial developments, particularly at Kehr’s Mill and Clayton, that offer an opportunity for neighborhood mixed-use redevelopment. The Barn at Lucerne is an iconic, historic building in the community around which an assortment of office, retail and homes have developed. The most recent at the southwest corner of Clayton and Kehr’s Mill builds on that architecture and houses offices and a popular local restaurant. While there is a cluster of development, there is little connection between the surrounding offices, retail and homes along Kehr’s Mill, south of Clayton or to the Claymont Shopping Center and office buildings north of Clayton. The 8.6acre Claymont Shopping Center has one of the highest elevations in the area with views of downtown St. Louis on a clear day. It is surrounded by condominiums on the north and west. Notwithstanding these features and recent façade improvements, the property continues to be significantly under-utilized in terms of vacancy and tenant type and is bordered on the east by a gas station and aging office and medical buildings. Family-oriented, neighborhood mixed-use redevelopment offers an opportunity to create a more vibrant hub that supports and services the surrounding community. As noted earlier, there is a growing appreciation for connected, walkable environments and people, in particular Millennials and Baby-Boomers, like 117 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

to live in amenity rich enclaves. Older, underutilized commercial/retail properties provide an opportunity for new in-fill redevelopment that caters to this age cohort. Neighborhood uses might include luxury condominiums with offices that are supported by locally-owned restaurants and retail which also cater to the surrounding neighborhoods. Ultimately, to be successful, mixed-use developments should offer uses that are compatible and build on the location’s existing offerings, community needs, viability and community fabric. Ballwin residents voiced an interest in additional, local (as opposed to chain) eating establishments. Neighborhood mixed-use developments create an opportunity to attract local restaurants (ranging from casual familydining to a wine bar or even fine dining) as well as services that are supported by residents and workers in the development and by the larger community. Dialogue with community residents has also indicated a strong interest in greater residential options for Baby Boomers wishing to downsize but remain in the City. Given its elevation and location, Claymont Shopping Center might be an appropriate location for apartments targeting active retirees (as well as young couples and singles) and which includes complimentary office, dining and retail offerings.

Again, as with the Manchester Road corridor, Ballwin will enhance the potential for neighborhood mixed-use redevelopment by actively interfacing with potential developers and property owners to advocate for redevelopment that meets its vision and goals of economic and community vibrancy.

91% Desirable

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Top results from the Visual Preference Survey for neighborhood commercial. Residents have a strong preference for neighborhood commercial that is walkable, mixed-use, and has a sense of place. MAY 2019


3.2B Support & Increase Commercial Options for Entrepreneurs Ballwin appears to have a substantial number of home-based businesses based on the significant percent of individuals who work in their place of residence and census information that suggests a high level of self-employment in the community. Home-based businesses in Ballwin are a potential market for back-filling existing, under-utilized neighborhood retail centers. For example, Claymont Shopping Center has received a number of inquiries from entrepreneurs who live nearby about moving their businesses out of their homes and leasing space at the center. Unfortunately, spaces are sized and configured in a manner that does not meet the needs of businesses looking for their first commercial space.

Photo source: Instagram @TechArtista

In the near term (assuming mixed-use redevelopment is a long-term goal for select locations), Ballwin should advocate that property owners or brokers of the neighborhood commercial centers consider creating spaces that will accommodate the needs of early stage or start-up companies, including working with firms or other organizations to develop co-working space. Active support would include ensuring existing planning and zoning requirements do not undermine such opportunities.

Photo source: Instagram @opo_startup

Start-up and co-working spaces are an opportunity to serve many of the current home-based businesses in Ballwin while backfilling existing neighborhood commercial centers that have vacancies.

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GOAL 3.3: Continue to diversify City revenues to be less dependent on local sales tax. 3.3A Generate Additional Revenues from Recreational Facilities

some initial insight into Ballwin’s strengths and any opportunities for expanding usage.

Ballwin is fortunate to have excellent recreational facilities (the Pointe, North Pointe Aquatic Center, the Ballwin Golf Course and Club and parks and pavilions) that currently generate meaningful revenues for the City. Importantly, the City’s efforts to promote greater usage have resulted in increased revenues from this source.

3.3B Evaluate Implementation of Use, Real and & Personal Property & Local Economic Development Taxes

While strong, current usage suggests that the City’s recreational facilities have the potential to generate additional fees and membership revenues that could help offset losses in sales tax revenues. Based on membership as of September 2018, there are over 11,000 households in Ballwin; yet current Ballwin resident membership at all membership levels stands at approximately 1600. Efforts to increase membership and rentals of Ballwin’s recreational facilities along with sponsorships would benefit from the development of a robust marketing plan that not only targets Ballwin residents but local businesses and residents in the surrounding communities. Allocating the appropriate resources for plan development and then implementation will be key. In addition, and more immediately, touring other communities’ recreational complexes to understand amenities and pricing structure would be helpful to assess where Ballwin’s facilities stand in the ‘market’ and may provide 119 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

With no real or personal property taxes, Ballwin relies significantly on sales tax revenues to support its operations and services: sales tax comprises 40% of the City’s revenues. The balance of City revenues is derived from public utility licenses, licensing and permit fees, community program revenues, motor vehicle taxes and fees, court fines and a St. Louis County road tax. Generally, sales tax revenues from historic sources have remained flat or declined over the last three years. Continued decreases in sales tax revenues have the potential to negatively impact the City’s ability to deliver its high level of community services. A County-wide public safety tax new in 2018 will increase sales tax revenue going forward. The proceeds of this tax, however, are available only for public safety purposes.

sales tax on catalogue or on-line sales. Notably, the City has authorized a real property tax but has maintained it at a zero rate. Municipalities are also authorized to levy a sales tax of up to ½ cent for economic development. Significantly, the tax is targeted at strengthening and/or diversifying a community’s economic base, including long term economic development preparation. The funds cannot be use for retail projects, other than in downtown or historic areas. The legislation also requires cities to establish an economic development board to approve use of the funds. The funds could be used for land acquisition, infrastructure for business parks, street extensions and matching dollars for state and federal grants. Sales tax would an additional source of revenue for Ballwin to support economic development. Timing and communication with the community will be vital if Ballwin elects to pursue imposing a nominal real or personal property tax. Any tax is likely to meet with greater acceptance when economic conditions are good and if residents understand that the need for the tax is to ensure continued quality services from city government.

If retail sales tax revenues continue to decline, Ballwin should consider implementing a use, economic development, real and/or personal property tax. A use tax is typically imposed on sales of products purchased from outside of Missouri where no Missouri sales tax is collected, e.g., internet and catalogue sales. Note that it is also possible that changes in Missouri law will allow municipalities to impose MAY 2019


GOAL 3.4: Strive to diversify commercial sectors and business base. 3.4A Continue to Enhance Support for Local, Small and Home-based Businesses Small businesses are job creators and key contributors to the local economy. In addition to a range of local small businesses that occupy Ballwin’s commercial corridors, it appears that a meaningful number of residents are selfemployed or operate home-based businesses. Nationally, about 50% of small businesses are operated from home. Ballwin has taken important steps to promote local businesses, including its “Shop Ballwin First” efforts, community events, and by featuring local businesses in Ballwin Life Magazine. The City also participates in the

local chamber, which although not Ballwin specific, provides access to local business owners. Building relationships with local businesses is important for supporting their growth and expansion in the community. These efforts help sustain the vibrancy of the local economy and enhance quality of life in the community. The City should continue to engage with local small businesses with an eye to understanding any needs or gaps that they may have. Initial dialogue with local firms will be helpful in gauging interest in and the types of business development assistance that are needed. A follow-up survey of Ballwin businesses would be beneficial in assessing gaps and interest

from the broader business community. The survey should be tailored to opportunities that the City is capable of addressing and that are not likely to compete with the local chamber. For example, Ballwin initiated small business support might include networking events, hosting informational sessions about municipal processes or services (e.g., permitting) and/or coordinating resource fairs or events targeting public and private business development assistance (e.g. local banks’ small business development loan programs, the Small Business and Technology Development Center services etc.). Should Ballwin discover that local business needs are not effectively addressed by the west area chamber, the City should consider establishing a Ballwin-centric business association. Connecting with home-based businesses also appears to represent an opportunity to build wealth in the community and to grow the next wave of brick and mortar business that will occupy Ballwin’s commercial districts. By supporting such firms and building relationships with them, Ballwin is setting the stage for retaining these businesses in the City as they grow. Helping to create a pipeline of small firms that are candidates for any coworking space that develops and ultimately are positioned to backfill local real estate contributes to continued community economic vitality. In order to understand and then support Ballwin’s home-based businesses, it is important for the City to develop a baseline

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of information on the actual number and type of home-based businesses in the community. A review of West County Chamber members that are home-based would be a good starting point. Additionally, establishing a home business registration process would be a low or no-cost measure (for both businesses and Ballwin) to begin to quantify and interact with Ballwin home entrepreneurs. An effective communication plan to promote registration and the City’s goal of developing networking and other supportive offerings to help home entrepreneurs grow their businesses will be important in securing participation. Assuming there is a meaningful number of firms identified, Ballwin should anticipate developing support services based on these firms’ needs. As with local brick and mortar business outreach, the City could use focus groups or a survey to help define gaps and opportunities. Examples of potential business assistance would include lunch and learns on topics like business insurance, legal topics, marketing, organization and so on. Other opportunities include networking, conferences and even financial support for businesses wishing to graduate into commercial space.

3.4B Promote Diversity of Commercial Offerings The vast majority of Ballwin’s commercial space is dedicated to retail development. Promoting a greater diversity of commercial uses, such as office and medical facilities, has the potential to increase local employment opportunities, expand access to important services for residents and by introducing additional employees to the community, and foster greater resiliency for local retail outlets. As part of its engagement with local real estate brokers and developers, Ballwin should encourage consideration of alternative uses for redeveloped sites or backfilling existing commercial space.

A greater diversity of commercial uses, such as office and medical facilities, has the potential to increase local employment, expand available services, and foster greater economic resiliency. 121 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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PRINCIPLE #4

A Strong Sense of Place Core Community Value “Our strong sense of community.� Ballwin has a rich history and many historical buildings that have immense character. However, the City is also dominated by commercial areas that have little distinction. A sense of place is not created solely by architecture, infrastructure parks, or nature; but instead a combination of all those elements in way that roots Ballwin in its own context that is charming and welcoming.

Key Goals: 4.1 Integrate place-making into commercial corridors and throughout Ballwin. 4.2 Transform the former City hall site to serve as a gateway to Vlasis Park and as the center of Ballwin. 4.3 Create welcoming entries into the City and Ballwin Town Center. 4.4 Stewardship of the natural resources that define neighborhood and community character.

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GOAL 4.1: Integrate place-making throughout Ballwin, especially commercial corridors. What is “place-making”? It is a trendy term that is not always easily defined. A whole book could be written on the qualities and how to achieve a “sense of place”.

91% Desirable

84% Desirable

79% Desirable

70% Desirable

Place-making is not solely architecture, public places, landscaping, infrastructure, signage, or pedestrian amenities. It is the combination of all those elements and the siting and interaction of those elements that create a sense of place. Luckily, people usually know place-making when they see it or experience it. This page highlights some of the results of the visual preference survey where residents rated images that had a strong place-making as highly desirable. William H. Whyte’s book ‘The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces’ was one of the first attempts to define the qualities of placemaking. Today, LEED for Neighborhod Development (LEED-ND) and SITES (Sustainable SITES Initiative) are two of the best rating systems for measuring successful place-making. As the City updates its zoning code and development regulations, LEED-ND and SITES should be used as a reference and guide. Chapter 6 of this comprehensive plan shows in more detail potential place-making strategies being applied to typical commercial areas in Ballwin.

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Key Characteristics of Successful Place-Making ■■ High quality architecture that is appropriately scaled, high quality materials, thoughtful articulation, and pedestrian level facades that are welcoming with windows, doors, and details. ■■ Gathering spaces that promote a variety of social experiences and accommodates large and small groups and individuals. ■■ Pedestrian scaled and walkable. ■■ Landscaping that is thoughtful in providing shade, softening hardscape and buildings, and helping to articulate gathering areas. ■■ Attention to the transition from public areas to private areas. These “semi-public” transition areas help to avoid the fish bowl effect. ■■ High attention to details such as seating, lighting, landscaping, paving, and fencing. ■■ Perception of safety with good sight lines, multiple areas of ingress / egress, and appropriate lighting. ■■ High connectivity via walking, biking, transit, and vehicular. Parking should be screened.

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4.1A Encourage Mixed-Use Redevelopment Along Commercial Corridors That Can Help Distinguish Ballwin From Its Neighbors, With a Unique Sense of Place. Same as Goal 3.1A 4.1B Update Zoning Requirements to Ensure Place-Making as Redevelopment Occurs. Same as Goal 3.1C 4.1C Evaluate with Ameren the Feasibility of Buried Electric Lines Along Manchester Road. The electric lines along Manchester Road are a visual eyesore that also limit other enhancement opportunities such as street trees and ornamental lighting. The burial of electric lines is not a small undertaking. However, the City should evaluate the potential long-term benefits of buried lines. Besides aesthetics, other benefits include increased resiliency from storm damage and lessened maintenance. The City should evaluate with Ameren the feasibility and cost of buried electric lines along Manchester Road.

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GOAL 4.2: Transform the former City hall site to serve as a gateway to Vlasis Park and as the center of Ballwin. The former City hall site should become the focal point of Vlasis Park. This area, to be known as “Vlasis Park Commons”, should be a high profile community asset that is a welcoming entry into Vlasis Park. Ideas for programming Vlasis Park Commons have included an amphitheatre, playground, and other ideas. Whatever the final program, the site should be a destination type civic space. Before defining a final vision and program for Vlasis Park Commons, the City should conduct a feasibility study for the grade-separated crossings as recommended under the plan category ‘Modern Transportation Network’.

Former City Hall Site - Vlasis Park Commons

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GOAL 4.3: Create welcoming entries into the City and Ballwin Town Center. Like many west St. Louis County communities, there is a lack of distinction as you travel from adjacent communities into Ballwin. Many residents expressed a desire to have a more welcoming entry into Ballwin. The visual preference survey explored several options for community entry features. The two types of entry features that were rated the most desirable are shown on this page. One of these highly rated features focus on landscape treatments with architecturally significant planters and monuments. The second highly fated feature was a gateway that extends across the street. However, many residents expressed concern over the cost of entry features and questioned whether entry features should be a high priority. There are also ways to create a welcoming entry besides a monument or gateway feature. Landscaping, street trees, building architecture, and other streetscape elements can also create a welcoming entry. 4.3A Focus community entries and streetscape enhancements within Ballwin Town Center. The City should focus entry features and streetscape enhancements in the Ballwin Town Center area. Ballwin Town Center should include: ■■ Pedestrian lighting with banners. ■■ Street trees. ■■ Streetscape furnishings. ■■ Mixed-use development with place-making elements such as plazas. ■■ Entry features 126 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

56% Desirable

Top Choice at Open House #2

Ballwin Town Center

Ballwin Town Center - Focus Area for Enhancements MAY 2019


GOAL 4.4: Stewardship of the natural resources that define neighborhood and community character. Ballwin neighborhoods are defined in many ways by its mature tree canopy. Majestic oaks and other canopy trees planted when many of the subdivisions were built are now over 50 years old. On many streets, trees stretch over the street. Larger residential lots also have allowed the opportunity for mature trees and large amounts of landscape plantings. In many neighborhoods, homeowner association common ground provides long stretches of uninterrupted natural habitat as the common ground often follows drainage ways. Ballwin’s tree canopy and natural resources are important strengths for the City. From an aesthetic and image perspective, Ballwin’s natural resources help define neighborhood and community character. Nature is also good for property values. Environmental benefits of Ballwin’s natural resources include reduced stormwater runoff, increased water quality, improved air quality, and habitat for wildlife. Residents strongly support the natural resources of Ballwin. Residents have stated that the natural environment is their “favorite” part of Ballwin.

The natural environment... “This is may be my favorite part of Ballwin.” “Love the trees!” Comments from Ballwin residents The natural resources of Ballwin provide tremendous environmental benefits and help define the neighborhood and community character.

Stewardship of Ballwin’s natural resources requires a long-term perspective, knowing that short-term actions may take decades to fully realize the benefits.

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4.4A Encourage the Next Generation of Tree Plantings on Residential Parcels The majority of trees in the City are on private property, usually single family housing parcels. The City should develop a long-term neighborhood forest strategy that focuses on programs and education for homeowners to help ensure a robust, mature tree canopy in existing subdivisions for decades to come.

48% of Ballwin is Covered by Trees

The City already has a residential homeowner tree planting program where homeowners can receive up to a $100 reimbursement for planting a tree between the sidewalk and street (tree lawn). The program, however, has not been widely utilized by homeowners. The City should increase the marketing of the program and also expand the program to include trees planted elsewhere on the residential property (outside of the tree lawn). Priority of the funding should remain for trees planted within the tree lawn. The City should also develop a recommended tree list for the program, focusing on native canopy trees. New regional data is now available to help the City monitor tree coverage and target areas of the City that should be priority areas for new trees. The East-West Gateway Council of Governments released detailed land cover data in 2018 that can better measure land cover types (including tree cover). The map of this page shows that existing tree canopy coverage is almost 48 percent within the City. This should be the baseline for future measurement. The City should strive to ensure that the amount of tree canopy coverage does not fall below 48 percent. 128 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Existing Tree Coverage in Ballwin

The grass land cover map to the right can be a starting point to prioritize tree planting locations.

Existing Grass Land Cover in Ballwin MAY 2019


4.4B Develop a Proactive Management Regime for Public Trees While a majority of trees in Ballwin are on private property, the City does control a large number of trees that are within the right-of-way of streets and City property such as parks. The City should develop a proactive management plan for trees in the City. First, the City should translate its street tree inventory to a GIS database of trees on City property and with street right-of-way. Missouri Department of Conservation TRIM (Tree Resource Improvement and Maintenance) grants can often be used to conduct this work.

4.4C Ensure Landscape Standards Meet or Exceed Best Practices by Other Neighboring Communities, Especially the Use of Native Plants The City should encourage and require native plantings for new development. This will help ensure that the City differentiates itself compared to other communities in the County. The City should compare its landscape ordinances to other community ordinances in St. Louis County and strive to meet or exceed those other community ordinances.

4.4D Enhance Viability of Canopy Trees in Commercial Settings Trees in commercial settings often suffer from the lack of proper soil volume. This lack of proper soil volume will stunt the growth of the trees and also results in decreased life expectancy. As part of the City’s landscape ordinances, the City should require minimum soil requirements for trees. A typical urban tree ideally needs more than 1,000 cubic feet of soil. Structural soils or proprietary products like Strata Cells should also be used in pavement areas to provide necessary soil volumes.

Second, once the GIS database is completed, the City should create a capital program to plant new trees in priority locations. One priority should be the replacement of ash trees that are being removed because of the emerald ash borer. The City is expecting to remove over 2,000 ash trees. The City should also consider the opportunity to plant trees in tree lawns less than 5-feet in width. 5-feet minimum width is the current City standard for the width of a tree lawn to be an acceptable planting location. However, many areas of the City have existing tree lawns less than 5-feet in width. Many tree species are acceptable in narrow tree lawns that don’t negatively impact adjacent sidewalks and street edges. As part of the tree planting program, the City should create a street tree planting master plan to ensure a diversity of tree species (with an emphasis on Missouri natives) throughout the City. 129 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Photo source: Strata Cells

Example of a proprietary structural soil system (Strata Cells). The structural cells provide support for pavement above while allowing uncompacted soil for tree roots. MAY 2019


4.4E Develop a Tree Preservation Ordinance for Oaks and Other Significant Tree Species. Mature canopy trees, such as oaks, have tremendous value in terms of aesthetics, property values, habitat, and environmental benefits. They should be treated as valuable “green infrastructure” in the City. The City should develop a tree preservation ordinance to ensure the long-term viability of significant trees in the City. The City’s Tree Board should recommend the detailed requirements of the tree preservation ordinance. The tree preservation ordinance should include: ■■ The minimum size of tree (in caliper inches) that the ordinance covers. ■■ Requirements for construction or other impacts to the tree root zone. ■■ Requirements for preservation of significant tree species. ■■ Other considerations such as tree species.

4.4F Increase Biodiversity of Subdivision Common Areas The common areas within Ballwin neighborhoods are an important evironmental asset. These areas provide much of the tree canopy for neighborhoods, they act as a riparian buffer for creeks and drainage ways, they infiltrate stormwater, they provide micro-habitats for plants and wildlife, and they increase the overall natural beauty of the City. However, like many natural areas in suburban locations, the common areas lack biodiversity. Biodiversity is the variety of plant and animal life. Many common areas in Ballwin have been infiltrated with bush honeysuckle, which is a non-native shrub that chokes out all other undergrowth vegetation. Increasing biodiversity, with the removal of bush honeysuckle and replacing with native species, is not an easy task. Removing bush honeysuckle is labor intensive and it spreads aggressively. So once the honeysuckle is removed, it takes pro-active maintenance to ensure it doesn’t return.

Bush honeysuckle removal is a very labor intensive process.

The City should encourage homeowner associations’ efforts to increase the biodiversity and the removal of bush honeysuckle. One of the most common ways to assist is to haul dead bush honeysuckle that have been removed by volunteer groups.

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PRINCIPLE #5

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living Core Community Values “Our state-of-the art recreation facilities.” “Our City as being a great place to raise a family.” Ballwin has top notch recreation facilities in The Pointe and North Pointe. Along with its location as the gateway to Castlewood State Park, Ballwin has an opportunity to be a community that is a leader in active recreation and healthy living.

Key Goals: 5.1 Ensure parks and open space within walking distance of all residents. 5.2 Invest in The Pointe and North Pointe to ensure that they remain leading recreation facilities. 5.3 Follow recommendations of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan for facilities and programs. 5.4 Leverage the City’s location as the gateway to Castlewood State Park.

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GOAL 5.1: Ensure parks and open space within walking distance of all residents. The City of Ballwin rightly takes pride in its excellent recreation facilities. However, in term of overall public park acreage, the City falls a little short in national comparisons of public park acreage per population. In addition, distribution of public parks is located within the center of the City, leaving eastern and western areas of the City lacking access to neighborhood public parks. Long-term, the City should strive to ensure that residents are withing walking distance of a public park (which is defined as a half-mile walk without major barriers). In the short-term, there is other semi-public open spaces such as school grounds and home owner association common ground that can be used to supplement City park land to provide residents access to open space.

Priority locations for new neighborhood parks.

The map on this page show that with the combination of public park land, schools, and home owner association common ground there is substantial coverage of residents within walking distance of parks and open space. 5.1A Support the School Districts and Homeowner Associations to Have Resident Access to Open Space Within appropriate limitations (such as nonschool hours), existing school grounds and homeowner association open space are available to residents. The City should continue to support resident access to semipublic open space and be supportive of amenities and programs that increase resident access. 132 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Priority Locations for New Neighborhood Parks 5.1B Provide Additional Neighborhood Scale Parks Per the recommendations of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, the City should establish new City parks in areas of the City that lack parks or open space within walking distance of residents.

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GOAL 5.2: Invest in The Pointe and North Pointe to ensure that they remain leading recreation facilities. The Pointe and North Pointe Aquatic Center are two top recreational assets for the City of Ballwin. Residents stated that the City’s recreational facilities are one of the top strengths of living in the City. The Pointe opened in 1996 and North Pointe Aquatic Center opened in 2003.

continue to invest and upgrade The Pointe and North Pointe Aquatic Center to ensure that they remain leading recreation facilities.

As these two facilities age and other communities invest in new or upgraded recreation facilities, Ballwin runs the risk of falling behind. Per the recommendations of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, Ballwin should

GOAL 5.3: Follow recommendations of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan for facilities and programs. The City conducted a parks and recreation master plan in 2018 that included a citywide survey and two open houses. While this comprehensive plan outlines some key policy recommendations related to parks and recreation, for detailed recommendations regarding park and recreation facilities and programs, the Park and Recreation Master Plan should be followed.

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GOAL 5.4: Leverage the City’s location as the gateway to Castlewood State Park. Castlewood State Park is a huge asset for the St. Louis region and the state of Missouri. With over 700,000 annual visitors, it is the 5th most visited state park in Missouri according to 2015 attendance numbers by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Ballwin is the front door to Castlewood State Park. Although the City does not currently bound the Park, the City should fully embrace its location as the gateway to Castlewood State Park. 5.4A City Branded Castlewood Wayfinding Signage at Key Locations The City should install City branded directional signage at key gateways to the entry of Castlewood State Park including at Manchester Road and Big Bend Boulevard.

5.4B Consider New Tagline and Related Marketing for the City The City should consider a new tagline for the City that fully embraces its location as the gateway for the park. A possible tagline is “Ballwin: Gateway to Castlewood State Park”. Another recommendation of this comprehensive plan is brand Ballwin as a unique community in West St. Louis County. Branding Ballwin as the “Gateway to Castlewood State Park”, would certainly be a unique differentiator for Ballwin compared to its neighboring communities.

5.4C Install Regional St. Louis Visitor Signage at 141/Manchester Road and 141/ Big Bend Boulevard Branding Ballwin as the gateway to Castlewood State Park may be an opportunity for the City to gain exposure along Route 141. The City could sponsor Explore St. Louis wayfinding signage that highlight the exits of Manchester Road and Big Bend Boulevard as routes to “Ballwin: Gateway to Castlewood State Park:.

700,000 Annual Visitors With over 700,000 annual visitors, Castlewood State Park is the 5th most visited state park in Missouri. Photo source: Instagram @castlewoodmo

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PRINCIPLE #6

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin Core Community Values “Our City as being a great place to raise a family.” “Our increasingly diverse population.” “Our community as being one of the safest in the region.” Ballwin has a well deserved reputation in the region as a great place to live because of its great schools, safety, location, and City amenities. However, many communities in the region are safe and have great schools. The City should strive to develop a distinctive image that differentiates itself from other communities.

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Key Goals: 6.1 Brand Ballwin as a unique community in West St. Louis County (ie Gateway to Castlewood State Park, etc). 6.2 Strive to make Ballwin one of the most diverse communities in West St. Louis County. 6.3 Utilize possible annexation to position Ballwin as a leading City in St. Louis County.

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GOAL 6.1: Brand Ballwin as a unique community in West St. Louis County (ie Gateway to Castlewood State Park, etc). Ballwin has a well deserved reputation in the region as a great place to live because of its great schools, safety, location, and City amenities. However, many communities in the region are safe and have great schools. The City should strive to develop a distinctive image and brand that differentiate itself from other communities in West St. Louis County. This comprehensive plan does not propose a specific brand for the City. However, several themes emerged during the planning process that could be candidates for the City to build its brand around. Also, the plan identified core community values that will be beneficial in building community brand.

6.1A Form a Committee to Develop Branding Recommendations for the City The above are just two examples of possible branding themes. The City should utilize an existing committee or form a special committee to develop a final recommendation for a City brand. The City should hire a branding consultant to help facilitate the process and develop strategies to incorporate the branding in local and regional marketing of the City. Branding should also consider citywide branding versus targeted branding for locations such Ballwin Town Center.

One theme is the City as a gateway to Castlewood State Park. This was also discussed in Goal 5.4 to leverage the City’s location as a gateway to Castlewood. (And the City should leverage its location regardless of its final branding theme). Another theme could be positioning the City at the forefront of a sustainable initiative. As Manchester Road carries over 30,000 vehicles per day, perhaps Ballwin could be a leader in electric car charging stations.

The Conquer Castlewood race is an example of Ballwin leveraging its location and branding the City as the gateway to Castlewood State Park. 136 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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GOAL 6.2: Strive to make Ballwin one of the most diverse communities in West St. Louis County. A survey of Ballwin residents and interviews with community stakeholders during the planning process showed strong support for maintaining Ballwin’s success with attracting a diverse population and concerns about keeping the community affordable for households across the economic spectrum.

businesses owned and operated by individuals from underrepresented communities to identify and reach out to various advocacy or support agencies.

Other communities elsewhere have grappled with these same issues and have pursued a variety of municipal policies and/or supported a broad range of community-based efforts to keep their cities and towns both accessible and welcoming. Municipal and communitybased initiatives can foster an environment that welcomes and supports current and potential new residents from diverse backgrounds.

Depending on the need and level of interest, the City and other community organizations can initiate regular (quarterly or semi-annual) “welcome to the community” receptions at which all newcomers can receive welcome packets and meet other residents from throughout Ballwin.

6.2A Establish Community Messaging and Marketing

With the goal of putting the spotlight on the diversity of cultures represented among Ballwin’s residents and businesses – and to reinforce the message that they are welcome and appreciated in the community, hold an

Incorporate message in all Ballwin media releases and more general communications with the community that Ballwin is a “welcoming community” or “open to all” or other similar taglines that reinforce the underlying attitude that individuals, organizations, and businesses from underrepresented communities can live, work, and thrive in Ballwin.

6.2C Welcoming to the Community Receptions and Events

6.2D Multi-Cultural Festival

annual celebration to promote and support the City’s diversity. Partner with nonprofit agencies, such as International Institute of St. Louis, Mosaic, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Ballwin Days could also be an opportunity to incorporated multi-cultural events and programs. 6.2E Establish Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee As a vehicle for facilitating ongoing discussion and input regarding Ballwin’s policies and initiatives to welcome and include diverse populations in the high quality of life Ballwin continues to offer, the City can establish an advisory committee on diversity and inclusion. Membership should reflect minority populations living and working within Ballwin, along with others from various community-based nonprofit organizations that provide services and support to diverse communities.

6.2B Targeted Business Recruitment Initiate active and strategic recruitment of businesses, faith communities, and services that serve diverse populations; work with and through entities with current presence in Ballwin, whether faith communities or 137 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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GOAL 6.3: Utilize possible annexation to position Ballwin as a leading City in St. Louis County. 6.3A Utilize Possible Annexation to Position Ballwin as a Leading City in St. Louis County. Ballwin has grown extensively over the decades through annexation starting in 1950. The City has grown north and south of Manchester Road through multiple annexation. The last annexation occurred in 1999.

recreational facilities. See Chapter 6 for more details on evaluating possible annexation. As part of the comprehensive plan process, the planning team will evaluate three possible annexation scenarios. Changes to population, community services, and financial impacts will be evaluated to determine advantages and disadvantages of each annexation scenario.

Future annexation can position Ballwin more strongly as a leading City in St. Louis County through increased population, land area, and infrastructure. Annexation can also help the City achieve other goals of this plan such as leveraging the City’s location as a gateway to Castlewood State Park. Many residents in potential annexation areas already think of themselves as “residents of Ballwin”. Postal codes list Ballwin as the residential address and many individuals have bought non-resident memberships to Ballwin

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Area #1 for Analysis: “Northeast”

Area #2 for Analysis: “Kiefer Creek”

Area #3 for Analysis: “South”

MAY 2019


PRINCIPLE #7

Outstanding Community Services Core Community Values “Our high standard of City services.� City and community services have consistently been cited by Ballwin residents as one of the top strengths of living in Ballwin. The City should continue to provide outstanding City services and continually coordinate with other service providers to help ensure long-term the high standard of services.

Key Goals: 7.1 Continue excellent services provided by the police department and fire districts. 7.2 Be prepared for natural and man-made emergencies and disasters. 7.3 Continue the City’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP) that clearly communicates five year priorities. 7.4 Provide City services that continue to differentiate Ballwin from neighboring communities. 7.5 Coordination with utilities to ensure efficient capital improvements and maintenance.

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GOAL 7.1: Continue excellent services provided by the police department and fire districts. Residents of Ballwin overwhelmingly expressed pride in and satisfaction with their community’s reputation for safety. Depending on the source, Ballwin regularly is listed as the safest municipality or one of the safest in the State of Missouri. Perhaps because of that status, they also hold their police department in high regard. Although not as clearly associated with the City of Ballwin as the Police Department, the fire and emergency protection districts, also enjoy strong support from the community and have earned reputations for professionalism and quality services.

With that in mind – and the fact that the City itself does not directly manage it fire protection, and emergency services, the City should work closely with the police department and the fire protection districts to: ■■ Continued coordination on the City’s Emergency Operations Plan. ■■ Offer assistance of the City as needed for continued planning and staff development and training. ■■ Continue to utilize City-managed communications vehicles, such as Ballwin Life Magazine, podcast, and blog, to facilitate community engagement and participation in various programs offered by the police department and fire/EMS districts. ■■ Initiate or expand programming to express and publicly acknowledge the community’s appreciation for these public servants, such as quarterly first responder appreciation days or similar events.

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GOAL 7.2: Be prepared for natural and man-made emergencies and disasters. 7.2A Follow the Recommendations of the City’s Emergency Operations Plan The City updated its Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) in 2018. The previous EOP was developed in 2004. The plan outlines actions to achieve: 1) prevent avoidable disasters and reduce the vulnerability of Ballwin residents to any disasters that may strike; 2) establish capabilities for protecting citizens from the effects of disasters; 3) respond effectively to the actual occurrence of disasters; and 4) provide for recovery in the aftermath of any emergency involving extensive damage within the county.

The EOP establishes procedures for dealing with a range of emergencies including natural disaster, hazardous material incidents, transportation accidents, fires, power failures, terrorism, civil disorder, and public health emergencies. The EOP establishes roles and responsibilities for Ballwin offices and departments, lines of communication, and coordination with local, regional, state and federal partners.

place, if needed, based on recommendations by regional, state, and federal partners. City staff and departments should regularly be briefed regarding roles and responsibilities outlined in the EOP. Training for City staff and departments as recommended by the EOP should be monitored and documented.

The City should regularly review and update the EOP. A review should take place every five years and a thorough update every ten years. More frequent reviews and updates should take

GOAL 7.3: Continue the City’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP) that clearly communicates five year priorities. 7.3A Publish Annual Map of Upcoming Capital Projects

of City street conditions (pavement surface evaluation and rating).

Ballwin has a strong reputation for fiscal responsibility in terms of public works and capital improvements. However, in a City the size of Ballwin with over 30,000 residents, miles of streets to maintain, and numerous other infrastructure, it can be difficult for residents to clearly appreciate the long-term schedule of capital improvements.

The City should publish annually the City’s capital improvement program in a user friendly format such as citywide map with upcoming capital improvements highlighted.

The City should continue to communicate with residents short-term and long-term capital improvements. Specifically, the City should publish the results of the its regular analysis 141 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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GOAL 7.4: Provide City services that continue to differentiate Ballwin from neighboring communities. 7.4A Continually Seek to Improve City Services

7.4B Regularly Document and Compare Services by Surrounding Municipalities

7.4C Clarify City Services Compared to Homeowner Association Responsibilities

City services (such as snow removal, leaf collection, etc.) was voted as one of the top strengths of living in Ballwin during the community survey for the comprehensive plan. (Ranked 3rd for top strengths). The City should continue to provide outstanding City services and continually seek opportunities to improve existing City services. For example, in 2018 the City moved to a master street list to update residents on curbside leaf collection.

The City should consider documenting services provided by Ballwin and not adjacent communities and use the information in marketing materials of the City. Especially for new home buyers, who may not yet appreciate municipal services, comparison of municipal services can further position Ballwin as a preferred choice for home buyers.

The City should clarify and establish new policies, if needed, to differentiate city services, such as maintenance of public right-of-ways versus maintenance of homeowner association common ground which is typically the responsibility of the homeowner association.

The City should regularly evaluate City services for opportunities for improvements and cost efficiencies.

We Love City Services! Residents ranked City services as one of the top three strengths of living in Ballwin.

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GOAL 7.5: Coordination with utilities to ensure efficient capital improvements and maintenance. 7.5A Regular Coordination with Utilities and Agencies on Capital Improvements and Maintenance Continue to communicate and coordinate with utilities on a regular basis on capital projects and future development to ensure planned coordination of infrastructure improvements. As part of this comprehensive plan process, the planning team reached out to major utilities and agencies that have jurisdiction over utilities and infrastructure within the City. Utilities and agencies contacted included: ■■ Ameren ■■ Charter Cable ■■ Missouri American Water ■■ Missouri Department of Transportation ■■ Spire ■■ St. Louis Metropolitan Sewer District

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The City of Ballwin already communicates and coordinates with utilities and agencies on upcoming maintenance activities and projects. The City should continue to coordinate and communicate with utilities and agencies on a regular basis, no less than annually, to be proactive in identifying upcoming maintenance and capital projects. The outcomes of utility and agency coordinating should be to ensure that neighborhoods have adequate services; infrastructure is properly maintained; there is capacity for current and future needs; and maintenance and capital projects are coordinate with other utility, agency, or City projects to avoid multiple disruptions to public and private property.

MAY 2019


KEY METRICS - MEASURING OUR SUCCESS Below are key metrics to track so that the City may gauge successful long-term implementation of the plan. For detailed action items, see Chapter 8 - ‘Implementation’.

Description

Principle

Baseline 2016

Data Source

Target

American Community Survey or City Data

Increase from 18% non-single family detached housing units. Measure with updates to census data.

Diversity of housing types.

Strong Neighborhoods

Signalized intersections with upgraded pedestrian crosswalks (continental style crosswalks).

Modern Transportation Network

2018

City Data

Increase from 2018 baseline of zero number of continental style crosswalks. Measure yearly.

Linear feet of new sidewalk and new pedways.

Modern Transportation Network

2018

City Data

Linear feet of new sidewalk and pedways. Measure yearly.

Increase of City revenue.

Resilient Economy and City Revenues

2018

City Data

Increase of City revenue. Measure yearly.

Square feet of new commercial (and mixed-use) development.

Resilient Economy and City Revenues

2018

City Data

Increase from 2018 baseline. Measure yearly.

Maintain or increase from 2018 baseline. Measure every five years.

Increase from 2018 baseline. Measure every five years.

Percent of City covered by tree canopy.

A Strong Sense of Place

2018

East-West Gateway Council of Governments Land Cover Data

Number of residential parcels within 1/2-mile of public parks.

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

2018

City Data

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5 Future Land Use Plan


FUTURE LAND USE PLAN Overview

Land Use Categories

The future land use map is an essential part of implementing the Comprehensive Plan. This chapter illustrates the pattern and character of future land use for Ballwin. The land use plan is to serve as a guide to future development decisions in the City. Each land use category sets out a range of place characteristics that can be achieved through the City’s development policies including the zoning code and subdivision regulations.

The relationship between the land use plan and the zoning map is often misunderstood. A land use plan is a guide for the future use of the land while a zoning ordinance regulates the use of the land in the present.

The future land use map identifies generally what kind of land use patterns should be present throughout the City and where they should be located. The map shows what land uses are appropriate in the future, not necessarily what land uses are in place currently. Often in established areas of the City, the current land use is the appropriate future land use as well.

There are several strategies for implementing the land use plan. One strategy is to update the zoning ordinance to better align with the recommendations of the land use plan. A second strategy is to use the land use plan as a guide when requests for rezoning take place.

As Ballwin is essentially a built-out City, future development in Ballwin will mostly be redevelopment. This will especially be true for Ballwin’s commercial corridors as the age of existing buildings and changing retail trends will likely dictate redevelopment over time.

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The future land use plan, although applicable in the short-term, is really a long-term plan looking at future land use 10, 20, or 30 plus years in the future.

In future updates of the zoning ordinance or in reviewing requests for rezoning, the planning commission should evaluate the context of the land use plan when it was adopted and approved. If conditions have changed since adoption that may warrant a land use different from that shown in the land use plan, consideration should be given to revising the land use plan. If conditions have not changed, strong preference should be given to the recommendations made in the land use plan.

Below are the future land use categories. Each category is explained in more detail on the following pages. ■■ Traditional Residential ■■ Established Residential ■■ Mixed Residential ■■ Mixed-Use: Corridor ■■ Mixed-Use: Neighborhood ■■ Commercial ■■ Industrial / Utility ■■ Institution / Civic ■■ Parks and Recreation ■■ Conservation / Open Space ■■ Ballwin Town Center (District)

Ballwin Town Center is not an individual land use, but a district where priority should be giving for streetscape enhancements, pedestrian improvements, connections to Vlasis Park, and mixed-use development.

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Ballwin Town Center

Future Land Use Plan 147 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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Future Land Use Plan - Detail of Ballwin Town Center Area 148 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

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Ballwin Town Center Guiding Principles Below are additional guiding principals for Ballwin Town Center: ■■ Streets within Ballwin Town Center should have streetscape enhancements including street trees, pedestrian scale lighting with banners, seating areas, and other amenities. ■■ Community gateways should be installed along the streets into Ballwin Town Center (Major gateways along Manchester Road and minor gateways along Holloway Road, Ries Road, and Kehrs Mill Road). ■■ Design guidelines should be developed to ensure continuity of public and private realm improvments. ■■ Ballwin Town Center should be a priority area for pedestrian intersection improvements including the use of continental style crosswalks at Manchester Road. Continental style crosswalks should be along other street intersections within Ballwin Town Center. ■■ Ballwin Town Center should be a priority area for bicycle improvements with recommendations per the plan category ‘Modern Transportation Network.’ ■■ Future redevelopment within Ballwin Town Center should be mixed-use with an emphasis on place-making, architecture, and public areas. ■■ Vlasis Park Commons (the former City Hall site) should be a gateway into Vlasis Park and be a destination type civic space. ■■ Grade separated crossings across Manchester Road should be evaluated as discussed in the plan category ‘Modern Transportation Network’. ■■ Implementation of the parallel street network to Manchester Road.

Community Gateways 149 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Streetscape Enhancements

Overview Ballwin Town Center is not an individual land use, but a district where priority should be giving for streetscape enhancements, pedestrian improvements, connections to Vlasis Park, and mixed-use development. Ballwin Town Center already has a mix of uses including apartments, retail, restaurants, parks, a school, residential, and open space. By focusing on public realm improvements and extending the idea of a town center north-south to “bridge” Manchester Road, Ballwin Town Center can truly become the “center” of Ballwin.

Place-Making

Mixed-Use Development MAY 2019


Traditional Residential Guiding Principles Density: Low to medium densities. Existing densities range from 4.3 units/ acre to 1 unit/acre. Uses: Primarily single family housing. Site Characteristics: High quality architecture. Adherence to neighborhood character for redevelopment and infill development. Long-term stewardship of the tree canopy and natural resources. ■■ Maintain existing property values through code enforcement and proactive maintenance of property. Pro-active maintenance should include homeowner education and other housing programs that address maintenance and code issues. ■■ Walkable development with sidewalk and street trees. ■■ Opportunities for bicycle facilities is limited because of limited street width and right-of-ways. Seek opportunities for share-the-road or conversion of existing sidewalks to “pedways” (wider sidewalks that can be used a multi-use trails. ■■ Neighborhood park or open space should be available within a half-mile walking distance of homes.

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Overview ‘Traditional Residential’ are locations of mostly single family housing with a variety of price points at a low to moderate density. Areas of ‘Traditional Residential’ have been mostly built out, although there may be pockets or individual parcels that can still be developed. ‘Traditional Residential’ is likely to experience less pressure for redevelopment as it is newer development with larger home sizes than other areas of the City. If redevelopment or infill housing does occur, new housing should follow the guidelines for infill housing including housing styles that relate contextually architecturally, have similar setbacks, and massing. ‘Traditional Residential’ shall be highly walkable with sidewalks and tree lawns. Access to parks and open space is important. Neighborhood park or open space should be within a half-mile walking distance of all homes. Increases in stormwater runoff from increases in impervious surface such home additions, driveways, patios, etc. should be mitigated through raingardens or other micro-detention strategies.

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Established Residential Guiding Principles Density: Low to medium densities. Existing densities range from 4.3 units/ acre to 1 unit/acre. Uses: Primarily single family housing. Site Characteristics: High quality architecture. Adherence to neighborhood character for redevelopment and infill development. Long-term stewardship of the tree canopy and natural resources. ■■ Maintain existing property values through code enforcement and proactive maintenance of property. Pro-active maintenance should include homeowner education and other housing programs that address maintenance and code issues. ■■ Residential redevelopment should follow the guidelines for infill housing that includes housing styles that relate contextually architecturally, have similar setbacks, and massing. ■■ Walkable development with sidewalk and street trees. ■■ Opportunities for bicycle facilities is limited because of limited street width and right-of-ways. Seek opportunities for share-the-road or conversion of existing sidewalks to “pedways” (wider sidewalks that can be used a multi-use trails. ■■ Neighborhood park or open space should be available within a half-mile walking distance of homes.

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Overview ‘Established Residential’ are locations of mostly single family housing with a variety of price points at a low to moderate density. Areas of ‘Established Residential’ have been mostly built out, although there may be pockets or individual parcels that can still be developed. ‘Established Residential’ is likely to experience more pressure for redevelopment as it will tend to have older, smaller houses than other areas of Ballwin. Also, its location near the Manchester Road corridor will likely increase redevelopment pressure. If redevelopment or infill housing does occur, new housing should follow the guidelines for infill housing including housing styles that relate contextually architecturally, have similar setbacks, and massing. Redevelopment for mixed-use should have higher density residential as a transition from commercial uses to existing single family uses. Redevelopment solely for commercial use should be discouraged. ‘Established Residential’ shall be highly walkable with sidewalks and tree lawns. Access to parks and open space is important. Neighborhood park or open space should be within a half-mile walking distance of all homes. Increases in stormwater runoff from increases in impervious surface such home additions, driveways, patios, etc. should be mitigated through raingardens or other micro-detention strategies.

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Mixed Residential Guiding Principles Density: Medium to medium-high densities. Densities range from 4-18 units/acre. Uses: Primarily multi-family housing. Site Characteristics: High quality architecture. Walkable development with sidewalks and tree lawns. Buildings should front the street with parking in the rear. ■■ Maintain existing property values through code enforcement and proactive maintenance of property. Pro-active maintenance should include homeowner education and other housing programs that address maintenance and code issues. ■■ Walkable development with sidewalk and street trees. ■■ Neighborhood park or open space should be available within a half-mile walking distance of homes.

Overview ‘Mixed Residential’ are locations that are intended to provide a variety of housing choices and price points from moderate to moderatelyhigh density. Areas of ‘Mixed Residential’ have been mostly built out, although there may be pockets or individual parcels that can still be developed. ‘Mixed Residential’ includes housing choices of duplexes, apartments, and condominiums, and other similar type densities. Mixed Residential may also include single family. ‘Mixed Residential’ should be a transition land use from commercial and mixed-use areas to single family. ‘Mixed Residential’ shall be highly walkable with sidewalks and tree lawns. Access to parks and open space is important. Neighborhood park or open space should be within a half-mile walking distance of all homes. Garages and parking should be at the rear of the lot behind buidlings. Buildings should front the street.

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Commercial Guiding Principles Density: Medium to medium-high densities. Uses: Retail, office, restaurants, commercial. May also include mixed-uses. Site Characteristics: High quality architecture. Walkable development with sidewalks and tree lawns. Buildings should front the street. Parking in front should be limited to one parking bay with additional parking in the rear or side. ■■ Carefully transition to adjacent residential areas with extensive landscape buffering, avoidance of light spillage, compatible architectural treatments, and step down of building heights. ■■ Walkable development with sidewalk and street trees. ■■ Place-making is important with pedestrian scaled entrances, gathering areas and site amenities that contribute to the public realm. ■■ Along Manchester Road, implementation of a parallel street network to Manchester Road that is pedestrian friendly and by provides access to signalized intersections. Curb cuts along Manchester should be limited. ■■ Transit, such as buses or shuttles, should be accommodated.

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Overview ‘Commercial’ are locations that are intended to serve a wide geographical area with uses such as retail, commercial, office, and restaurants. While there may be flexibility in the type of businesses, aesthetics of the buildings and the site should be of key importance. National retailers and brands are a key feature, although local businesses should be encouraged. The speed and volume of automobile traffic may necessitate building setback from adjacent roadways. When buildings are setback, parking should be minimized in the front with additional parking in the rear or sides. Pedestrian and bicycle connections should be provided from the street through parking areas. Aesthetic appearance should be a priority with high quality materials and extensive landscaping. Individual buildings should have thoughtful architecture with massing variation, horizontal and vertical articulation, and careful detailing. Place-making is important with pedestrian scaled entrances, gathering areas and site amenities that contribute to the public realm.

MAY 2019


Mixed-Use: Corridor Guiding Principles Density: High intensity. Uses: A mix of uses including retail, dining, office, hotels, apartments, condominiums, and townhomes. Uses could include just one of the above uses, but mixed-use is highly encouraged. Site Characteristics: High quality architecture. Building placement that promotes an walkable environment with parking in the rear or sides of buildings. ■■ Great emphasis on the public realm including plazas, courtyards, and extensive landscaping. ■■ A highly walkable and bikable environment with buildings and street layouts encouraging a pedestrian friendly environment within the development and to connections with adjacent neighborhoods. ■■ Carefully transition to adjacent residential areas with extensive landscape buffering, avoidance of light spillage, compatible architectural treatments, and step down of building heights. ■■ Along Manchester Road, implementation of a parallel street network to Manchester Road that is pedestrian friendly and by provides access to signalized intersections. ■■ Transit, such as buses or shuttles, should be accommodated.

Overview ‘Mixed-Use: Corridor’ land use is intended for larger sites along Manchester Road and other major transportation corridors. The service area for ‘Mixed-Use: Corridor’ will be regional, taking advantage of the high volume of traffic. ‘Mixed-Use: Corridor’ may also service local and neighborhood areas. ‘Mixed-Use: Corridor’ is mixed-use with retail, dining, office, hotels, apartments, condominiums, and townhomes. Uses could include just one of the above uses, but mixed-use is highly encouraged. ‘Mixed-Use: Corridor’ is highly walkable; a mix of activities; and a great emphasis on the public realm with streetscape amenities, plazas, and courtyards. Along Manchester Road, areas should incorporated the long-term parallel street network recommendations. The parallel street network and side streets should be pedestrian friendly with wide sidewalks, street trees, lighting, and other amenities. Transition from ‘Mixed-Use: Corridor’ to adjacent residential areas should be carefully considered with extensive landscape buffering, avoidance of light spillage, compatible architectural treatments, and step down of building heights. Place-making is important with pedestrian scaled entrances, gathering areas and site amenities that contribute to the public realm.

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Mixed-Use: Neighborhood Guiding Principles Density: Medium to high intensity. Uses: A mix of uses including retail, dining, office, apartments, condominiums, and townhomes. Uses could include just one of the above uses, but mixed-use is highly encouraged. Site Characteristics: High quality architecture. Building placement that promotes an walkable environment with parking in the rear or sides of buildings. ■■ Great emphasis on the public realm including plazas, courtyards, and extensive landscaping. ■■ A highly walkable and bikable environment with buildings and street layouts encouraging a pedestrian friendly environment within the development and to connections with adjacent neighborhoods. ■■ Carefully transition to adjacent residential areas with extensive landscape buffering, avoidance of light spillage, compatible architectural treatments, and step down of building heights. ■■ Transit, such as buses or shuttles, should be accommodated.

Overview ‘Mixed-Use: Neighborhood’ land use is intended for smaller and medium size sites that are along smaller streets than Manchester Road, such as Kehrs Mill Road, Clayton Road, and New Ballwin Road. The service area for ‘Mixed-Use: Neighborhood’ will generally serve local and neighborhood areas. ‘Mixed-Use: Neighborhood’ is mixed-use with retail, dining, office, apartments, condominiums, and townhomes. Uses could include just one of the above uses, but mixed-use is highly encouraged. ‘Mixed-Use: Neighborhood’ is highly walkable; a mix of activities; and a great emphasis on the public realm with streetscape amenities, landscaping, plazas, and courtyards. As ‘Mixed-Use: Neighborhood’ is usually adjacent to residential areas, careful consideration should be given to being context sensitive to surrounding residential areas. Mixed-Use: Neighborhood should have extensive landscape buffering, avoidance of light spillage, compatible architectural treatments, and step down of building heights. Place-making is important with pedestrian scaled entrances, gathering areas and site amenities that contribute to the public realm. .

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Institution Guiding Principles Density: As existing institutional uses are expected to continue, existing densities should be preserved. Modification or expansion of existing institutional uses should take into careful consideration of adjacent land uses and be compatible in terms of scale, setbacks, and architectural features. Uses: Primarily civic uses such as government owned facilities, community centers, public and private schools, places of worship, historic community buildings, and non-profit institutions. Site Characteristics: As existing institutional uses are expected to continue, preserve existing standards that adhere to neighborhood character. Modification or expansion of existing institutional uses should take into careful consideration of adjacent land uses and be compatible in terms of scale, setbacks, and architectural features. ■■ Sites should be highly accessible including walking and biking connections. ■■ Bicycle and pedestrian improvements should be prioritized within a 1/2 mile radius of schools and community uses. ■■ Building architecture should represent the aesthetic character of the City with an architectural style that enhances the City’s image.

Overview ‘Institution’ land use are locations that are intended to be civic uses such as government owned facilities, community centers, public and private schools, places of worship, historic community buildings, and non-profit centers. As ‘Institution’ generally serves a large number of the public, sites should be highly accessible including walking and biking connections. Schools, especially middle schools, should be located so that areas within a 1/2 mile radius of the school are highly walkable. For existing schools, improvements in pedestrian and bicycle facilities should be a priority within a 1/2 mile radius of the school. As the architectural design of ‘Institution’ buildings are often associated with the overall community character, building should have a high aesthetic design style that enhances the City’s image. If the use or tenant of a ‘Institution’ land use changes, strong preference should be given to the retention of the ‘Institution’ land use, especially for other civic uses. Proposed land use changes for ‘Institution’ should be guided by the context of adjacent land uses, with strong preference given to match adjacent land uses that most largely borders the site.

■■ Sites and building, especially government owned, are encouraged to be LEED certified for buildings and Sustainable SITES certified for site development. ■■ The former City Hall site should remain as a civic use as a key element of Vlasis Park.

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Parks and Recreation Guiding Principles Density: Placement of buildings and structures should follow adopted master plans for each park. Uses: Primarily active and passive uses such as ballfields, playgrounds, picnic sites, trails, and recreation facilities. Site Characteristics: Park-like features including grass lawns and open space, trees and woodland, creeks and water bodies. ■■ Each park should have a master plan to convey community expectations on facilities, usage, buildings, parking, transportation, and art. ■■ Removal of invasive species such as bush honeysuckle is encouraged. ■■ Native riparian buffers along creeks and drainage channels are strongly encouraged. Riparian buffers of native forbs, grasses, and shrubs can better filter pollutants and decrease stormwater runoff better than mowed, cool season lawn grasses. ■■ Sensitive areas such as floodplains, mature woodlands, and steep slopes should have limited intrusions. ■■ Pedestrian and bicycle connections to surrounding neighborhoods are a priority. ■■ Public parks should be within 1/2 mile walk of all residents.

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Overview ‘Parks and Recreation’ land use are locations that include public parks and recreation facilities, public and private golf courses, and other park and recreation facilities which serve the public. While parks may primarily serve active and passive recreation needs, parks are also an opportunity to increase biodiversity through native vegetation and improve water quality through riparian buffers of creeks, drainage corridors, and water bodes. Public parks and recreation facilities should have approved master plans to guide capital improvements and long-term stewardship. Public parks and recreation facilities should be within walking distance of all residents.

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Open Space and Conservation Guiding Principles Density: Structures should be limited. Structures may include maintenance buildings, community buildings, picnic shelters, and other similiar structures. Preservation of open space should be a priority. Uses: Typically passive uses such as homeowner association common land, cemeteries, and other open spaces that include natural habitat, woodland, open lawns and fields, and stormwater detention. Some active uses that are neighborhood focused such as ballfields and playgrounds. Site Characteristics: Natural habitats and open spaces. ■■ The introduction of new impervious surfaces within ‘Open Space and Conservation’ areas should be discouraged except for trails and maintenance access. ■■ Mulit-use trails are encouraged in ‘Open Space and Conservation’ areas. ■■ Removal of invasive species such as bush honeysuckle is encouraged. ■■ Native riparian buffers along creeks and drainage channels are strongly encouraged. Riparian buffers of native forbs, grasses, and shrubs can better filter pollutants and decrease stormwater runoff better than mowed, cool season lawn grasses.

158 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Overview ‘Open Space and Conservation’ land use are locations that include open spaces such as homeowner association common land, cemeteries, and other open spaces. ‘Open Space and Conservation’ typically includes passive uses such as natural habitat, woodland, open lawns and fields, and stormwater detention. Some active uses such as ballfields and playgrounds are part of ‘Open Space and Conservation’ areas, but are typically neighborhood focused. Many existing areas of ‘Open Space and Conservation’ have deed restrictions that the property remain common ground. ‘Open Space and Conservation’ areas are an important environmental community resource providing stormwater management, wildlife habitat, tree canopy, biodiversity, and riparian buffers. The introduction of new impervious surfaces within ‘Open Space and Conservation’ areas should be discouraged except for trails and maintenance access. Multi-use trails are encouraged in ‘Open Space and Conservation’ areas.

MAY 2019


Industrial / Utility Guiding Principles Density: Low density. Uses: Public utility uses such as water storge, electrical substations, etc. Light industrial. Site Characteristics: Intensive buffering from neighboring uses with landscaping and appropriate security. ■■ Limited use within Ballwin. ■■ Intensive buffering from neighboring uses with landscaping and appropriate security. Security fencing should be an ornamental style and not chainlink fencing. Fencing should be buffered and screened by landscaping

159 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Overview ‘Industrial / Utility’ land use are locations that serve public utility uses such as water storage, electrical substations, etc. ‘Industrial / Utility’ land use are also locations that serve light industrial uses. ‘Industrial / Utility’ land use should be limited within Ballwin. The Future Land Use Plan only recommends existing utility parcels be designated as ‘Industrial / Utility’ future land use. Future proposed ‘Industrial / Utility’ land use should be carefully considered with evaluations of the impacts to neighborhood aesthetics, noise, security, traffic, and environmental impacts.

MAY 2019


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6 Scenario Planning


SCENARIO PLANNING - MANCHESTER ROAD CORRIDOR Scenario plannning is a way to explore how Ballwin may look in the future based on the goals and principles of the comprehensive plan.

The scenarios are a prototypical representation of strip retail along Manchester Road. It is not a specific site, but represents typical size and qualities of existing development.

“Intermediate” Scenario

“Long-Term” Scenarios

The “intermediate” scenario explores development that undergoes improvements to sites and buildings to better compete in the changing retail and commercial environment. Public investment to infrastructure such as streets and right-of-way can compliment private investments and contribute to the overall community character.

“Long-term” redevelopment scenarios explore long-term, holistic redevelopment of sites along Manchester Road. While future market conditions will dictate the type of development and when redevelopment may occur, the scenarios show recommended guidelines for redevelopment along Manchester Road, including:

Many of these “intermediate” improvements are already happening along Manchester Road.

■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

162 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Implementation of a parallel street network to Manchester Road that is pedestrian friendly and enhances property values by providing access to signalized intersections for multiple parcels. Place-making within new development that includes plazas, courtyards, landscaping, and other amenities. Multi-use development that encourages a mix of uses including restaurants, retail, office, and apartments / condominiums. Development that is walkable and bikable within the development and from adjacent neighborhoods.

MAY 2019


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Existing “Base Map� Condition A Existing Strip Retail / Commercial

B Existing Commercial / Retail

C Existing Residential C

A

1

1

B 3

Manchester Road

2

The above graphic is a prototypical representation of strip retail along Manchester Road. It is not a specific site, but represents typical size and qualities of existing development.

4

2

1 Large expanses of parking and far set-backs are dated in the context of current retail trends.

2 Frequent curb cuts create congestion and safety issues with a high volume of turning movements at multiple points.

3 Local streets often intersect with Manchester

Road with no signalized intersection. This creates safety issues, especially for left turns.

4 Existing pedestrian crossings of Manchester

Road lack crosswalks on both sides of the intersection and the most up-to-date crosswalk types.

163 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Intermediate Improvements PLAN VIEW A Existing Strip Retail / Commercial

B Existing Commercial / Retail

C Existing Residential C

A 9

2

6

3 7

8 Manchester Road

The above graphic represents “intermediate” improvements. Development and business owners make upgrades to their parcels and buildings to better compete in the changing retail and commercial environment. Public investment to infrastructure such as streets and right-of-way can compliment private investments and contribute to the overall community character. Many of these recommended improvements can be seen in recent site improvements along Manchester Road.

164 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

B

8 1

5

1 Continental style pedestrian crosswalks at all four corners of signalized intersections.

2 Crosswalks across driveways and parking lots. 3 Pedestrian connections from the street to buildings and stores.

4 Reduction of redundant curb cuts.

2 4 7 Infill gaps in the sidewalk network. 8 Landscaping and amenities to create a

welcoming sense of entry, soften masses of pavement, and to screen parking.

9 Conversion of 4-foot sidewalks to “pedways”

(multi-use trail) to provide bicycle connections to commercial centers from neighborhoods.

5 Conversion of redundant entrances to right-in / right-out to reduce left turn conflicts.

6 Access roads to provide cross parcel and

parking lot access. Align access roads with long-term street network recommendations. MAY 2019


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Intermediate Improvements BIRD’S EYE VIEW C C

B

6 2

A

5

3

A

1 2

3 7

8 4

165 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019

9


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Mixed-Use with a Retail and Apartment Focus PLAN VIEW A Retail / Commercial (1-story) B Retail / Office (1st floor) Parking (2nd - 4th floors)

C Mixed-Use

Retail / Restaurants (1st floor) Apts / Condos (2nd - 4th floors)

9

D Mixed-Use

G

Retail / Restaurants / Office (1st floor) Apts / Condos (2nd - 3rd floors)

9

3

8 E

D

F 1

E

6

A

5

7

C A

2

2

Manchester Road

6 10

The above graphic represents an example of a potential “long-term� redevelopment scenario. A key emphasis of the redevelopment is the parallel street network as part of the long-term street network recommendations. The above scenario highlights mixed-use with a emphasis on retail and apartments / condos. Placemaking amenities such as plazas, outdoor seating, and pedestrian friendly streetscapes highlight the development.

4

10

5

1 Parallel side street to Manchester Road

as part of the long-term street network recommendations. Street is very pedestrian friendly with sidewalks, street trees, and crosswalks.

2 Plazas and place-making amenities as part of development.

3 Parking behind development to encourage pedestrian friendly streetscape.

4 Reduction of curb cuts provides opportunity for

additional landscape medians along Manchester Road. 5 Reduction of redundant curb cuts.

166 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

F Office Building (3-story) G Existing Residential

1 B

E Apts / Condos (3-story)

6 Continental style pedestrian crosswalks at all

four corners of intersections. Bumpouts where possible.

7 Crosswalks across driveways and parking lots. 8 Pedways (multi-use trail) to provide bicycle

connections to commercial centers from neighborhoods. 9 Landscape buffer between residential areas. 10 Right-in / right-out of redundant entrances to reduce left turn conflicts.

MAY 2019


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Mixed-Use with a Retail and Apartment Focus BIRD’S EYE VIEW

E

3 G

D

9

1

F

B

2 4

3

6

E

8

A

C

7

1

2 A

4 10

5

167 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Mixed-Use with an Office Focus PLAN VIEW A Office Building (4-story) B Mixed-Use

Retail / Restaurants (1st floor) Offices (2nd - 4th floors)

C Office Building (3-story) D Parking Garage

9

G

F Retail (1-story)

9

E

C

A

2

2

B

A

B

10

The above scenario highlights mixed-use with a emphasis on office space. Other uses include retail, restaurants, and residential (townhomes). Placemaking amenities such as plazas, outdoor seating, and pedestrian friendly streetscapes highlight the development.

G Existing Residential

1

6

The above graphic represents an example of a potential “long-term� redevelopment scenario. A key emphasis of the redevelopment is the parallel street network as part of the long-term street network recommendations.

168 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

8

6

Manchester Road

5

D

C

2

1 7

E Townhomes (3-story)

3 F

4 5

1 Parallel side street to Manchester Road

as part of the long-term street network recommendations. Street is very pedestrian friendly with sidewalks, street trees, and crosswalks.

2 Plazas and place-making amenities as part of development.

3 Parking behind development to encourage pedestrian friendly streetscape.

4 Reduction of curb cuts provides opportunity for

additional landscape medians along Manchester Road. 5 Reduction of redundant curb cuts.

6 Continental style pedestrian crosswalks at all

four corners of intersections. Bumpouts where possible.

7 Crosswalks across driveways and parking lots. 8 Pedways (multi-use trail) to provide bicycle

connections to commercial centers from neighborhoods. 9 Landscape buffer between residential areas. 10 Right-in / right-out of redundant entrances to reduce left turn conflicts.

MAY 2019


Manchester Road - Future Redevelopment Scenarios: Mixed-Use with an Office Focus BIRD’S EYE VIEW

3 G

D 9

C

1

2

B

E

8

A

C

B

4

6

2

A 1

4 10

7

5

169 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019

F


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6 Growth and Annexation Analysis


Ballwin Growth Analysis Overview To develop an overall vision for the future of Ballwin, it is important to understand opportunities for growth. Because Ballwin is essentially fully developed, future growth will come from two principle strategies: redevelopment that increases density of population and land uses and from annexation that increases the geographic boundaries of the community. This section focuses on annexation, while redevelopment is addressed above under Principle 3, “A Resilient Local Economy and City Revenues.” The City has identified three potential areas for annexation and has “reserved” the right to pursue annexation through St. Louis County’s boundary adjustment process. The purpose of this section is to examine the three alternative annexation scenarios and their estimated costs and benefits for the City. The goal is to provide a foundation for the City to evaluate and compare the relative merits of each area in light of their differing characteristics. Each of the areas offers different opportunities for the City as it relates to population, commercial/ retail, recreational and institutional offerings that should be taken into consideration in order to determine which area best meets its strategy and goals for growth.

172 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Key Takeaways of Ballwin Growth Analysis ■■ Ballwin is a fully built community with very limited options for development. New commercial development in Ballwin primarily will be redevelopment and/or infill. ■■ Large expanses of parking at existing retail centers offer opportunities for increasing commercial density through strategic out-lot development. ■■ As in the past, growth for Ballwin will result from annexation of adjoining unincorporated areas to the east and to the south of the community. ■■ Within the existing city limits of Ballwin, the overall population has declined slightly in recent years. Additional housing options, like apartment and condominiums and the increased density provided by mixed-use development, provide an opportunity to stabilize and increase population. ■■ The increasingly older population in Ballwin suggests that many residents are electing to remain in the community as they age. While active senior living options would create an opportunity for older residents to remain a part of the Ballwin community, they also increase housing options for new, younger families. Additional condominiums and apartments also may be appealing to both older residents and provide affordable options for those just starting out.

MAY 2019


ANALYSIS OF POSSIBLE ANNEXATION Overview The comprehensive plan is a great opportunity to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of various annexation options. As Ballwin is essentially built-out, future growth will come in the form of annexation or redevelopment. The comprehensive plan is an opportunity to evaluate potential annexation options. Three possible annexation scenarios are evaluated as part of the comprehensive plan process. Changes to population, community services, and financial impacts have been evaluated to determine advantages and disadvantages of each annexation scenario.

Area #1 for Analysis: “Northeast” 173 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Disclaimer Evaluating the annexation options does not commit the City to pursue annexation, but the comprehensive plan evaluation allows the City to make an informed decision in the future. The three areas of possible annexation that were analyzed are shown on this page. The three areas are identified as: ■■ Northeast ■■ Kiefer Creek ■■ South

Area #2 for Analysis: “Kiefer Creek”

The data for this annexation analysis comes from public sources including the U.S Census Bureau and St. Louis County GIS data. There are limitations with the available data and their degree of accuracy. For example, census blocks do not always align with study area boundaries. Parcel data is not always complete or information is not easily extrapolated. Within the analysis narrative, further assumptions are explained. It is thus important to remember that the results of this analysis should be used in the context of comparing the three potential annexation areas. The results should not be considered absolute. If the City elects to pursue annexation of any of the areas proposed, a more thorough evaluation of the existing conditions within the targeted area along with an assessment of staff capacity and potential capital costs will be warranted.

Area #3 for Analysis: “South” MAY 2019


Annexation Process in St. Louis County Annexation is a multi-step process in St. Louis County. There is a six-year cycle in St. Louis County divided between a “Map Plan” phase and a “Proposal” phase. For the current cycle, municipalities submitted maps of potential boundary changes by July 1, 2018. A “Map Plan” reserves the right to pursue annexation during the “Proposal” phase. The “Proposal” phase is between April 15, 2019, through July 1, 2022. Submitting a “Map Plan” does not commit Ballwin to submit a proposal, nor does the “Map Plan” commit Ballwin to submit a proposal for the entire area shown in the submitted “Map Plan.” For example, in 2012 Ballwin submitted a “Map Plan” showing a boundary adjustment for potential annexation south of the City. However, Ballwin did not submit an annexation proposal. Any annexation proposal must be approved by the St. Louis County Boundary Commission and by voters in both Ballwin and the area subject to the proposal. The map on this page shows a summary of annexation map plans that were submitted in 2018 by neighboring communities of Ballwin.

174 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Map Plans Submitted by Neighboring Communities

MAY 2019


Quick Facts Northeast

Kiefer Creek

South

Population 4,000

Population 1,500

Population 13,600

Residential Units 1,600

Residential Units 600

Residential Units 5,300

Total Appraised Value (All Land Uses) $512,000,000

Total Appraised Value (All Land Uses) $221,000,000

Total Appraised Value (All Land Uses) $1,342,000,000

175 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Northeast Evaluation: Existing Land Use Single family residential is the majority of the existing land use in the Northeast evaluation area. Single family represents over 60 percent of the total land area (excluding right-of-way) and 93 percent of building units in the area. In addition to residential development, there is an enclave of office/commercial developments located at Weidman and Manchester Roads. This commercial area is bordered on the south by retail development along Manchester Rd. Most of the office and retail buildings were constructed during the 1970s. The most recent developments include the Menard’s on Manchester which was constructed in 2013, and the retail development constructed in front of Menard’s along Manchester Road which was developed between 2000 and 2010. The Northeast Area is home to a number of institutional uses including Parkway South Middle School and Parkway’s Pierremont Elementary. Other institutional uses include the Hindu Temple of St. Louis and the Mahatma Ghandi Center, the Islamic Foundation of St. Louis and Al Salam Day School and Christ Prince of Peace Catholic church. The Pegasus Equestrian Center on Weidman Road north of Manchester provides boarding for horses and riding lessons. The Northeast Area adjoins the western boundary of St. Louis County’s Edgar M. Queeny Park.

Existing Land Use

Existing Land Use by Area 176 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Northeast Evaluation: Existing Age of Buildings Most of the buildings in the Northeast Evaluation area were built prior to 1990. The single story office buildings along Consort Drive and Sovereign Drive were built in the mid1970’s through the late 1980’s. The newest commercial land use is the Menards store built in 2013. Older residential areas are centered around Burgundy Lane and Havenhurst Road in the southern and western parts of the evaluation area. A large portion of single family residential was built in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Newer areas of residential include the Manors of Town and Country subdivision centered around Bristol Manor Drive, mostly built in the 1990’s. The newest subdivision, is the small Weidman Manor subdivision built around 2010.

Existing Age of Buildings

177 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Northeast Evaluation: Existing Street Network The Northeast evaluation area is separated from Ballwin by Highway 141. Millwell Drive and Dutch Mill Drive connect Ballwin to the Northeast evaluation area with signalized intersections at Highway 141. Both Millwell and Dutch Mill Drive are subdivision streets. No major streets connect Ballwin to the evaluation area. Within the evaluation area, most streets are subdivision streets providing internal circulation. Weidman Road on the eastern edge is a collector road providing north-south circulation and connections to Manchester Road.

Existing Street Network

178 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Northeast Evaluation: Topography and Flood Hazard Areas The topography of the Northeast evaluation area is similar to many Ballwin neighborhoods will gently rolling topography. Two major drainage corridors flow through the evaluation area. One drainage way flows parallel to Weidman Road and one flows south of Parkway Middle School. A 100-year flood zone exists in the north-south drainage way. A 500-year flood zone exists along the drainage way south of Parkway Middle School. It appears that most of the flood zones are located within subdivision common ground and open spaces, although some private parcels are impacted. A commercial parcels appears to be impacted by a 100-year flood zone near Manchester Road.

Existing Topography and Flood Hazard Areas

179 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Kiefer Creek Evaluation: Existing Land Use The largest land use is almost evenly split between single family residential (44 percent) and land that is categorized as ‘Vacant / Agriculture’ (43 percent). Much of the land categorized as ‘Vacant / Agriculture’ is woodland. There are significant areas of ‘Vacant / Agriculture’ within the floodplain of Kiefer Creek, Spring Branch Creek, and the Meramec River. The next largest land use categories are ‘Duplex / Townhome’ at 6 percent and ‘Institution’ at 5 percent. An 80-acre parcel accounts for most of the ‘Duplex / Townhome’ land use. This parcel appears to only have a small amount of development and is zoned ‘Non Urban’. Institutional uses include the Castlewood Baptist Church on Kiefer Creek Road and a Metro West Fire Protection District facility on New Ballwin Road. From parcel data, it is unclear what the larger institutional parcels in the western section include. The Missouri Wildlife Rescue Center along New Ballwin Road is categorized as ‘Commercial’ land use.

Existing Land Use

Existing Land Use by Area 180 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Kiefer Creek Evaluation: Existing Building Age Age of buildings range from new residential development to buildings dating prior to 1950. The subdivisions off of Kiefer Creek Road were built primarily in the 1990’s. Older residential, dating from prior to 1950, exist along New Ballwin Road and near Castlewood State Park. Scattered residential, built along private roads, has been built in the western section of the evaluation area since 1990. Some of the newest residential was built in the last five years along Forest Circle Trail.

Existing Age of Buildings

181 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Kiefer Creek Evaluation: Existing Street Network Kiefer Creek and steep slopes are major barriers for street connectivity into the Kiefer Creek evaluation area. From Ballwin, the major connection point is from New Ballwin Road that connects into Kiefer Creek Road. Connectivity into Ballwin also includes a T-intersection at Richland Meadows Drive and Kiefer Creek Road. Connectivity to surrounding communities is also limited. The only major connection point is Kiefer Creek Road that connects into Ellisville. Connections to the west into Wildwood is limited to private drives that feed into St. Paul Road in Wildwood. Connections to the south are limited by topography, Union Pacific Railroad, and the Meramec River.

Existing Street Network

182 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Kiefer Creek Evaluation: Topography and Flood Hazard Areas Topography within the Kiefer Creek evaluation area is steeper than the rest of Ballwin. The area is defined by two major ridge lines divided by the creek valleys of Kiefer Creek and Spring Branch Creek. The highest point is close to the boundary of Wildwood with an elevation of approximately 756’. The height of the ridge lines to the adjacent creek valleys can range from 150’200’. Segments of 100-Year and 500-Year flood plain exist along Kiefer Creek and Spring Branch Creek. While there are significant areas of undeveloped land within the evaluation area, the existing steep topography and flood plains are limiting factors for new development.

Existing Topography and Flood Hazard Areas

183 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


South Evaluation: Existing Land Use The largest land use is single family residential (38 percent). The next largest land uses are ‘Vacant / Agriculture’ at 27 percent and ‘Recreation / Parks at 20 percent. Much of the land categorized as ‘Vacant / Agriculture’ is woodland. There are significant areas of ‘Vacant / Agriculture’ within the floodplain of Kiefer Creek, Spring Branch Creek, Fishpot Creek, and the Meramec River. Institutional uses include the Castlewood Baptist Church on Kiefer Creek Road, Oak Brook Elementary School on Big Bend Boulevard, and a Metro West Fire Protection District facility on New Ballwin Road. From parcel data, it is unclear what the larger institutional parcels in the western section include. A few commercial uses exist at the intersection of Big Bend Boulevard and Sulphur Springs Road. The Missouri Wildlife Rescue Center along New Ballwin Road is categorized as ‘Commercial’ land use. The area also includes St. Louis County’s 46-acre Ohlendorf West Park. There is also the small approximately 13-acre Bright Fowler Park. Bright Fowler is undeveloped and is also part of the St. Louis County park system. The South Area also includes the approximately 138-acre Oak Ridge Landfill owned by Veolia Environmental Services. The landfill closed in 2011. When it was in operation, the landfill primarily accepted municipal solid

Existing Land Use waste although it was permitted to accept contaminated soils, asbestos and wastewater treatment sludge as well. It adjoins Castlewood Park on the west and residential uses on the east

Existing Land Use by Area 184 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


South Evaluation: Existing Building Age Age of buildings range from new residential development to buildings dating prior to 1950. The subdivisions off of Kiefer Creek Road were built primarily in the 1990’s. Older residential, dating from prior to 1950, exist along New Ballwin Road and near Castlewood State Park. Subdivisions north of Big Bend Boulevard were built primarily in the 1970’s, with some areas built in the mid to late 1960’s. Scattered residential, built along private roads, has been built in the western section of the evaluation area since 1990. Some of the newest residential subdivisions are located near Castlewood State Park. Forest Circle Trail west of the park, Arbor Valley northeast of the park, and the Arbors at Meramec Bluffs were built in the last ten years. The subdivisions north of the park off on Ries Road were mostly built in the early 1990’s.

Existing Age of Buildings

185 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


South Evaluation: Existing Street Network Kiefer Creek and steep slopes are major barriers for street connectivity in the western section of the evaluation area. Many of the western connections into the evaluaton area are private roads that connect into St. Paul Road in Wildwood. Although Ballwin has a long southern border with the evaluation area, there are limited connection points. From Ballwin, major connection points include New Ballwin Road that connects into Kiefer Creek Road, Ries Road, and Big Bend Boulevard. Minor connectivity includes a T-intersection at Richland Meadows Drive and Kiefer Creek Road, a T-intersection at Arbor Haven Drive, and subdivision connection with Brightfield Drive. Fishpot Creek is an existing boundary for connectivity for the eastern section of the evaluation area. Ballwin has limited opportunity to connect to areas east of Fishpot Creek, even if areas west of Fishpot creek are annexed by the City of Ballwin. Areas east of Fishpot Creek can only be accessed with connections through the communities of Valley Park, Twin Oaks, or Manchester.

Existing Street Network

Connections to the south are limited by topography, Union Pacific Railroad, and the Meramec River.

186 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


South Evaluation: Topography and Flood Hazard Areas Topography within the South evaluation area is steeper than the rest of Ballwin. The area is defined by four drainage corridors of Kiefer Creek, Spring Branch Creek, and the two branches of Fishpot Creek. The highest point is close to the boundary of Wildwood with an elevation of approximately 756’. The height of the ridge lines to the adjacent creek valleys can range from 150’200’. Segments of 100-Year and 500-Year flood plain exist along Kiefer Creek, Spring Branch Creek, and Fishpot Creek. While there are significant areas of undeveloped land within the evaluation area, the existing steep topography and flood plains are limiting factors for new development.

Existing Topography and Flood Hazard Areas

187 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Annexation - Cost Benefit Analysis Annexation provides a city with the opportunity to enlarge its geographic footprint, increase its population, expand development opportunities and broaden its commercial/retail, employment, institutional and recreational offerings, all of which can help grow its tax base and make it a more desirable place to live. At the same time, additional residents, businesses and infrastructure also may require the expansion of city services with the resulting increase in municipal costs. Analyzing the quantitative and qualitative cost and benefits of a proposed annexation is an important step in helping to determine how each potential annexation fits within the broader context of the City’s longterm fiscal picture. Because the City of Ballwin is virtually fully built-out, much of its most recent growth is attributable to series of annexations from 1955 through 2003. Currently, the City covers 5,754 acres or 8.99 square miles. The City is presently contemplating the annexation of three distinct areas that border its east and southern boundaries. The areas represent the remaining unincorporated pockets of land along the City’s borders and are part of the strategy for continued growth. All of the annexation areas will include the addition of new residents, businesses, institutions and infrastructure, creating both fiscal and qualitative costs and benefits for the City of Ballwin. An annexation may have a positive or negative fiscal impact upon a city. In addition, there may be qualitative benefits or costs which take on an important role in the analysis. Thus, for example, significant 188 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

vacant acreage in a proposed annexation area may not generate any meaningful immediate fiscal costs or benefits for a municipality but may be prime developable land that meets a municipality’s goals for residential and/or commercial growth. To assist Ballwin City officials, staff and residents in evaluating the three proposed annexation scenarios, this section considers and details the potential annual municipal fiscal impact of each proposed annexation area. The table on this page summarizes key aspects of the proposed annexation areas along with estimated total municipal costs (additional expenditures to provide municipal services to the new residents) and revenues that each annexation area is expected to generate through additional taxes and other municipal fees.

annexation of any area exceed the revenues generated. This analysis is based on general, publicly available information and financial data provided by the City. It is important to note that both population and acreage of the proposed annexation areas are based on estimated geographic boundaries that do not align precisely with census tract information. As a result, population and acreage are estimates. If the City elects to pursue annexation of any of the areas proposed, a more thorough evaluation of the existing conditions within the targeted area along with an assessment of staff capacity and potential capital costs would be warranted.

Based on our analysis, all three options provide different opportunities for the City and in no instance did costs associated with the

Annexation Area

Total Population

Total Area

Northeast Area* Kiefer Creek Area* South Area*

3,991 1,481 13,610

757 acres 1,438 acres 3,705 acres

Ballwin

30,404

5,754 acres

Estimated Total Estimated Total Costs Revenues $2M $2.64M $.741M $.972M $6.82M $8.65M * Estimated population & acreage

Summary of Potential Annexation Areas - Future Costs and Revenues

MAY 2019


Annexation - Cost Benefit Analysis: Assumptions Key assumptions and a more detailed analysis of the estimated costs and revenues from each area along with qualitative considerations are discussed below. The fiscal impact analysis draws on the expenditure and revenue categories detailed in Ballwin’s proposed 2018 annual budget. In order to evaluate impact, per capita estimates were developed using Ballwin’s population during the 2010 census (30,404), which is the basis for St. Louis County’s distribution of tax revenues. Per capita expenditures were based on an average of the City’s actual 2016 and 2017 budgets. Where appropriate, per capita revenues were estimated based on actual revenues received by Ballwin from St. Louis County in the last two years (November 2016-November 2018). Notably, some minor (P.O.S.T funds) or unique (project or program specific grants) sources of funding were not included in the per capita revenue estimates. For purposes of the impact analysis, per capita expenditures were developed for the Police Department, Public Works and Parks and Recreation budget categories. A per capita cost was not developed for Administration expenditures as they are primarily staffing costs that are unlikely to be affected by growth in the City’s geography or population, e.g. the City will not add a new City Clerk as a result of future annexation. That being said, depending upon existing capacity and workload, it is possible that annexation may impact costs related to inspections and inspection staffing that are part

189 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

of the City’s budget for Administration. As with certain expenditures, select fees or taxes did not lend themselves to per capita estimates. Thus, the revenue calculation for the lateral sewer fees is based on a flat fee per residential unit, and the business license fee revenues were based on a per square foot assessment of the commercial operation. Notably, business license fees for retail operations were not included. Retail operations are assessed based on the gross receipts from each business: the gross receipts for individual businesses are not made public. Additionally, the St. Louis County road and bridge tax is derived from the levy of $.105 per $100 of assessed value of personal property plus $.103 per $100 assessed value of residential and commercial real property within a jurisdiction. Ballwin’s per capita estimate was used to calculate personal property revenues anticipated from each annexation area plus the actual total assessed real property land value for that area.

works. Based on its 2018 budget, the City employs approximately 4.3 staff per 1,000 residents. It is not anticipated that an increase in population would result in a corresponding increase in staff, i.e., 4.3 new FTEs for each additional 1,000 residents. While an in-depth analysis of current staffing loads and capacities would be required to determine more precisely the impact on City headcount, costs for new staff should be reflected as a function of estimated per capita expenditures. In addition to salaries and benefits, the addition of new employees would have an impact on facility space, equipment and personnel related cost/ operations that should be considered and may not be fully captured in a per capita estimate. It should be noted that roadways within the proposed annexation areas that are part of the St. Louis County street system would likely remain the County’s responsibility. Local and subdivision streets would, however, become the responsibility of the City.

Increasing the City’s footprint may result in the need for additional staffing to deliver municipal services. While there are economies of scale – for example, increasing the City’s population will not require the addition of a second City Administrator, demand for positions in public works, for example, is in part a function of growth in the amount of City roads. Notably, Ballwin’s total FTE headcount has shown a downward trend or remained flat since 2014 with the largest number of staff employed by the police department followed by public

MAY 2019


Cost Benefit Analysis: Northeast Area While the smallest in total acreage, the Northeast Area is highly and densely developed when compared to the Kiefer Creek and South areas, although overall it is less densely populated than Ballwin itself (5.3 persons/per acre). A breakdown of anticipated costs and revenues associated with annexing the Northeast Area is shown on this page. It is important to note that because the business license fees for the area’s retail outlets could not be calculated, revenues for this area are understated. It is possible that larger retailers, like Menard’s, would generate revenue similar to Lowe’s. The age and type of development in the Northeast Area is similar to that found within the City, so it is likely that similar levels of municipal maintenance and service should be anticipated. Of the three proposed annexation areas, the Northeast Area is also the only one with any meaningful commercial development. With essentially no undeveloped land, additional growth would result from redevelopment, and the City is likely to experience the same opportunities and challenges with the Northeast Area’s commercial area as it does with its existing Manchester corridor. Direct access from Ballwin into the Northeast Area would be through existing subdivisions along 141, which may complicate police response times.

190 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

note that that because because the the business business license license fees fees for for the the area’s area’s retail retail outlets outlets could could not not be be calculated, calculated, note revenues for for this this area area are are understated. understated. ItIt is is possible possible that that larger larger retailers, retailers, like like Menard’s, Menard’s, would would revenues generate similar generate similar Figure__ Figure__ Northeast Expenditures Expenditures Northeast BudgetCategory Category Budget

PublicWorks Works Public Police Police Parks&&Recreation Recreation Parks

Percentof ofCity CityBudget Budget Percent 23% 23% 29% 29% 21% 21%

PerCapita Capita Per

$$ $$ $$

164.00 164.00 183.00 183.00 154.00 154.00

Population Population

Total Total

3991 $$ 3991 $$ $$

Total Total

654,524.00 654,524.00 730,353.00 730,353.00 614,614.00 614,614.00

1,999,491.00 $$ 1,999,491.00

Figure__. Figure__. Northeast Revenues Revenues Northeast

Taxor orFee Fee Tax

CapitalImprovement Improvement Capital SalesTax TaxPool Pool Sales Parks Parks PublicSafety Safety Public Internet, CableFranchise Franchise Internet, Cable Motor Vehicle Taxes Fees Motor Vehicle Taxes &&Fees Cigarette Cigarette PublicUtility UtilityLicenses Licenses Public Municipal Court Fines Municipal Court Fines Community Programs Community Programs

LateralSewer Sewer Lateral CountyRoad Road &&Bridge BridgeTax Tax County BusinessLicenses Licenses Business

$$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$

$$

$$

PerCapita Capita Per

89.00 89.00 86.00 86.00 104.00 104.00 52.00 52.00 15.00 15.00 39.00 39.00 5.00 5.00 108.00 108.00 16.00 16.00 100.00 100.00

PerResidential ResidentialUnit Unit Per

28.00 28.00

PerSquare SquareFoot FootValue Value Per

0.10 0.10

Population Population

Subtotal Subtotal

Units Units

3991 $$ 3991 $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ 1561 $$ 1561

Estimated Square SquareFeet Feet Estimated

$$

356,307 $$ 356,307

TotalRevenues Revenues Total

$$

Total Total

355,199.00 355,199.00 343,226.00 343,226.00 415,064.00 415,064.00 207,532.00 207,532.00 59,865.00 59,865.00 155,649.00 155,649.00 19,955.00 19,955.00 431,028.00 431,028.00 63,856.00 63,856.00 399,100.00 399,100.00

2,450,474.00 2,450,474.00

Total Total Total Total

43,708.00 43,708.00

112,005.00 112,005.00

Total Total

35,630.00 35,630.00

2,641,817.00 2,641,817.00

The age age and and type type of of development development in in the the Northeast Northeast Area Area is is similar similar to to that that found found within within the the City, City, The so itit is is likely likely that that that that similar similar levels levels of of municipal municipal maintenance maintenance and and service service should should be be anticipated. anticipated. so Of the the three three proposed proposed annexation annexation areas, areas, the the Northeast Northeast Area Area is is also also the the only only one one with with any any Of meaningful commercial commercial development. development. With With essentially essentially no no undeveloped undeveloped land, land, additional additional growth growth meaningful would result from redevelopment, and the City is likely to experience the same opportunities and would result from redevelopment, and the City is likely to experience the same opportunities and challenges with with the the Northeast Northeast Area’s Area’s commercial commercial area area as as itit does does with with its its existing existing Manchester Manchester challenges corridor. Direct Direct access access from from Ballwin Ballwin into into the the Northeast Northeast Area Area would would be be through through existing existing corridor. MAY 2019 subdivisions along 141, which may complicate police response times. subdivisions along 141, which may complicate police response times.


Cost Benefit Analysis: Kiefer Creek Area With the smallest population and most significant acreage of undeveloped (non-park) land, the Kiefer Creek Area will have the least immediate fiscal impact on the City of Ballwin should it be annexed. Anticipated costs and revenues associated with annexing the Kiefer Creek Area are shown on this page. As the most recently developed area, maintenance and repairs of existing residential streets and sidewalks are less likely in the near term. As a result, the City may experience lower levels of expenditures for this area than the more mature annexation areas. Future growth in terms of both residential and commercial development is possible but is likely to be complicated by the significant changes in elevation that characterize the area, potential underlying geology issues along with the impact of flood plains on developable land. Similarly, municipal infrastructure – roads and sidewalks – may also be challenging and costly to construct. New Ballwin Road, an arterial/collector road, provides direct access to the Kiefer Creek Area from Ballwin, which would allow for ease of access for police. Additionally, annexation of this area would provide further connection of the municipality and its identity with Castlewood State Park.

annexed. Anticipated costs and revenues associated with annexing the Kiefer Creek Area shown in Figures __ and ___. Figure__ Kiefer Creek Expenditures

Budget Category

Public Works Police Parks & Recreation

Percent of City Budget 23% 29% 21%

$ $ $

Per Capita

164.00 183.00 154.00

Total

Total

1481 $ $ $

242,884.00 271,023.00 228,074.00

$

741,981.00

Figure__ Kiefer Creek Revenues

Tax or Fee

Capital Improvement Sales Tax Pool Parks Public Safety Internet, Cable Franchise Motor Vehicle Taxes & Fees Cigarette Public Utility Licenses Municipal Court Fines Community Programs

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Per Capita

89.00 86.00 104.00 52.00 15.00 39.00 5.00 108.00 16.00 100.00

Population

1481 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Subtotal

Lateral Sewer

$

Per Residential Unit

28.00

$

Units

612 $

County Road & Bridge Tax Business Licenses

$

Per Square Foot Value $

0.10

Estimated Square Feet

7,167 $

Total Revenues

191 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Population

$

Total

131,809.00 127,366.00 154,024.00 77,012.00 22,215.00 57,759.00 7,405.00 159,948.00 23,696.00 148,100.00 909,334.00

Total Total Total

17,136.00

44,876.00

716.00

972,062.00

As the most recently developed area, maintenance and repairs of existing residential stree and sidewalks are less likely in the near term. As a result, the City may experience lower le of expenditures for this area than the more mature annexation areas. Future growth in term both residential and commercial development is possible but is likely to be complicated by significant changes in elevation that mark the area, potential underlying geology issues alo MAY 2019 with the impact of flood plains on developable land. Similarly, municipal infrastructure – roa


Cost Benefit Analysis: South Area The South Area, which incorporates the Kiefer Creek Area, is by far the largest proposed annexation area in terms of both population and land area. A breakdown of anticipated costs and revenues associated with annexing the South Area is shown on this page. While the Kiefer Creek portion is more recently developed, the balance of the South Area has more significant areas of development – primarily residential development – that is more mature and similar to Ballwin’s existing development. There is limited commercial development, primarily at Big Bend and Sulphur Springs Road, and opportunities for new office or retail development are not significant. As with the Kiefer Creek Area, much of the undeveloped land in the South Area is along the creek system and would be complicated or even prohibited as a result of potential flood plain impacts. Direct access to the area from Ballwin for purposes of police protection include Ries and New Ballwin Roads along with Big Bend Boulevard that allows for access to the southern-most portion of the area along Sulphur Spring Road. Annexation of the South Area would include incorporating a portion of Castlewood State Park into the City’s boundaries providing additional access to this outstanding amenity via Ries and New Ballwin Roads and further connecting the municipality and its identity with the park. In addition to Castlewood, the South Area also includes two County parks. While the County is likely to retain responsibility for Ohlendorf West, it is quite possible that the County would seek to transfer Bright 192 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Fowler Park to Ballwin. As an undeveloped concerns associated with the property were greenspace, it is unlikely that Bright Fowler disclosed through on-line research. That being 3. South Area would have any significant impact on Ballwin’s said, the landfill was operated for nearly 40 3. South Area expenditures it is which but could increase capital years and itArea, is always issues may The South as Area, incorporates the Kiefer Creek is bypossible far thethat largest proposed The South Area, which incorporates the Kiefer Creek Area, is by far the largest proposed and operating costs should the City install arise that will affect the surrounding community annexation area in terms of both population and land area. A breakdown of anticipated costs any IfinBallwin to annex conflict mayinimpact theanticipated Cityand even annexation area terms were of both population and land area. A breakdown of andimprovements. revenues associated with annexing the creating South Area is that shown Figures __ ___.costs the South Area, the City would add the closed if it is not directly responsible for addressing and revenues associated with annexing the South Area is shown in Figures __ and ___. Figure___ 138-acre Veolia landfill. The landfill is privately any issues.   Figure___ owned and maintained and no health or safety South Area Expenditures South Area Expenditures Budget Category Percent of City Budget Per Capita Population Total Public Works Budget Category

Police Works Public Parks & Recreation Police

23%Budget Percent of City 29% 23% 21% 29%

Parks & Recreation

21%

Figure ___ Figure ___ South Area Revenues South Area Revenues Tax or Fee Tax or Fee Capital Improvement

Sales Tax Pool Capital Improvement ParksTax Pool Sales Public Safety Parks Internet, Cable Franchise Public Safety Motor Vehicle & Fees Internet, Cable Taxes Franchise Cigarette Motor Vehicle Taxes & Fees Public Utility Licenses Cigarette Municipal Court Fines Public Utility Licenses Community Programs Municipal Court Fines Community Programs

Lateral Sewer Lateral Sewer County Road & Bridge Tax County Road & Bridge Tax Business Licenses Business Licenses

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $

Per Capita 164.00 183.00 164.00 154.00 183.00

$

Per Capita Per Capita

154.00

89.00 86.00 89.00 104.00 86.00 52.00 104.00 15.00 52.00 39.00 15.00 5.00 39.00 108.00 5.00 16.00 108.00 100.00 16.00 100.00

Per Residential Unit

$ Per Residential Unit 28.00 $ 28.00

Population 13610 $ 2,232,040.00 Total

Total

2,490,630.00 13610 $ 2,232,040.00 2,095,940.00 $ 2,490,630.00 $ 2,095,940.00 $ 6,818,610.00

Total

$ 6,818,610.00

Population Population 13610 $

Subtotal Subtotal

Units Units

13610 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 5290 $ 5290 $ $ $

Per Square Foot Value Estimated Square Feet Total Per Feet Total $ Square Foot Value 0.10 Estimated Square19,447 $ $

0.10 Total Revenues Total Revenues

Total Total1,211,290.00

1,170,460.00 1,211,290.00 1,415,440.00 1,170,460.00 707,720.00 1,415,440.00 204,150.00 707,720.00 530,790.00 204,150.00 68,050.00 530,790.00 1,469,880.00 68,050.00 217,760.00 1,469,880.00 1,361,000.00 217,760.00 1,361,000.00 8,356,540.00 8,356,540.00

Total Total 148,120.00 148,120.00

Total Total 290,193.00 290,193.00

19,447 $

1,944.00 1,944.00

$ $

8,648,677.00 8,648,677.00 MAY 2019


7 Implementation


IMPLEMENTATION OVERVIEW This Chapter outlines strategies and actions for implementation. The first part of the this Chapter provides the overall framework for implementation. The second part of this Chapter provides detailed actions for implementation. The comprehensive plan is a strategic document. A comprehensive plan is not a zoning ordinance, subdivision regulation, a budget, a capital improvement program or other regulatory document. It is meant to be the basis for the preparation of those documents. It lays out a vision for the future growth and development of the community, and what the community will be like in the future. At the vision and policy level, it will serve as a guide for community decision making. It addresses both where the City will grow and how the City will grow.

City Budget The annual operating budget is the guideline for municipal spending over the coming fiscal year. The Plan shall be considered during preparation of the annual budget to advance the Plan principles and goals. The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) The CIP is a five year budget, updated annually, for prioritizing capital projects in the City. The Plan shall be a guide in prioritizing the capital improvement budget. Development Decisions The Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Aldermen shall use the Plan in guiding land use and zoning decisions. All land use and development proposals will be evaluated in terms of compliance with the Plan.

At times the plan will need to be amended or updated. The Planning and Zoning Commission shall approve all amendments and updates to the Plan. Proposed amendments and updates to the Plan shall take into account conditions that have changed since the original adoption of the Plan. The Planning and Zoning Commission shall regularly review the progress of the Plan. Reviews shall include annual monitoring of the Plan, an in-depth review every five years, and a full update every ten to fifteen years.

Updates to Regulatory Documents City departments shall use the Plan in updating regulatory documents such as the zoning code, subdivision regulations, and other development regulations. Identification of Detailed Planning The Plan provides strategic direction for many topics related to the City’s growth and future. However, additional detailed planning will be required for many elements including transportation, parks, and enhancements.

194 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


DETAILED ACTION PLAN - EXPLANATION Individual components of the Action Plan are described on this page. The Action Plan should be reviewed and updated on an annual basis or as needed to ensure it remains current. Responsibility Identifies primary repsonsibility for the action. Also identifies additional partners such as other City departments, community organizations, non-profits, agencies, and other groups that will need to participate to successully complete the action. Priority While every proposed Plan action is important, not everything can be done at once. A heirarchy of actions better allows the City and partners to focus on priorities. Priorities are rated on a scale of 1 - 3, with 1 being the highest priority. The Plan strives to keep the number of highest priority items to around ten to better focus attention on the top priorities. Plan priorities shall be re-evaluated on an annual basis or as actions are implemented.

195 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Action Timeframe

Type of Action

Short-term (1-3 years) Intermediate (3-5 years) Long-term (longer than five years) Ongoing (ongoing implementation)

Capital Project Actions related to construction or infrastructure. Will generally be part of the City’s capital improvement program. Also includes proposed planning projects necessary to better identify a recommended solution prior to final design and construction.

It is important to note that while most initial plan actions fall within the short-term or intermediate timeframes, this is because many early implementation actions are policy, planning, or regulatory items that set the framework for long-term implementation.

Regulatory Actions to regulatory documents such as zoning, subdivision requirements, or other ordinances. Policy Actions related to City programs, strategies, or policies. Education / Advocacy Programs or initiatives that lead to change through voluntary actions. Often led by organizations, non-profits, and outside agencies in support of City objectives. Partnering Actions that primarily require partnering.

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - Top Priorities

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

1

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

3.1A

1

long-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

2.1A

2.1B

1

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; St. Louis County; MoDoT

Modern Transportation Network

2.2A

2.2B

1

on-going

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; MoDOT; Property Owners; Developers

Connect existing sidewalks links in priority locations.

Modern Transportation Network

2.3A

1

short-term

Capital Project

City - Public Works

City - Planning & Development; Property Owners

Widen a sidewalk on select streets to create pedways.

Modern Transportation Network

2.4A

1

intermediate

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; St. Louis County; MoDoT

Coordinate with MoDOT to strengthen pedestrian treatments on Manchester Road.

Modern Transportation Network

2.5A

1

short-term

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Public Works

MoDOT

Enhance pedestrian treatments at Signalized Intersections

Modern Transportation Network

2.6A

1

short-term

Capital Project

City - Public Works

St. Louis County Department of Transporation

Support mixed-use development on Manchester Road.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.1A

1

on-going

Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Encourage retail outlets adapted to contemporary trends for Manchester commercial corridor.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.1B

1

on-going

Advocacy, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Update zoning code to encourage mixeduse development, place-making, and the A Resilient Local Economy goals of the plan.

3.1C

1

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Promote mixed-use neighborhood community development.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.2A

1

intermediate/long term

Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

A Strong Sense of Place

4.1A

Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Action

Plan Principle

Require additional guidelines, including residential FAR, for residential infill developent.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.1A

Encourage mixed-use, with residential, as commercial areas redevelop.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2A

Institute Access Management Guidelines

Modern Transportation Network

Adopt a long-term parallel street plan and coordinate with property owners to achieve.

Encourage mixed-use development along commercial corridors that can help distinguish Ballwin with a unique sense of place.

196 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

2.4C, 2.4D 2.4C, 2.5D

3.1A

1

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

Additional Partners

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - Top Priorities

Action

Update zoning code to ensure placemaking as redevelopment occurs.

Plan Principle

A Strong Sense of Place

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

4.1B

3.1C

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

1

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development City - Parks and Recreation

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

Invest in The Pointe and North Pointe to Leader in Active Recreation ensure they remain leading recreation and Healthy Living facilities.

5.2A

1

on-going

Capital Project, Policy

Utilize possible annexation to position Ballwin as a leading City in St. Louis County.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.3A

1

short-term

Policy

City - Administration

Encourage senior housing and universal design.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2B

2

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Evaluate inclusionary zoning as the City updates its zoning code.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2C

2

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Evaluate accessory dwelling units as an option for increasing affordable housing opportunites.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2D

2

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Be pro-active in educating homeowners on maintenance, upkeep, and code requirements.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.3A

2

on-going

Education / Advocacy

City - Planning & Development

Track code enforcement to identify neighborhoods that may show signs of decline.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.3B

2

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Provide Incentives to Existing Property Owners to Achieve Access Management Goals

Modern Transportation Network

2.1B

2

on-going

Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Reduce Parking Requirements & Include Shared Parking Credits

Modern Transportation Network

2.1C

2

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Install sidewalks in neighborhoods with little existing coverage.

Modern Transportation Network

2.3B

2

intermediate

Capital Project

Maintain and enhance sidewalk system as redevelopment occurs.

Modern Transportation Network

2.3D

2

on-going

Policy, Regulatory, Capital Project, Parterning

197 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

2.1A

Additional Partners

City - Planning & Development

City - Pulic Works; Property Owners; Developers

City - Public Works

City - Planning & Development; Property Owners

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; St. Louis County; MoDoT; Developers; Property Owners

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

1

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

1

long-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

1.2B

2

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2C

2

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Evaluate accessory dwelling units as an option for increasing affordable housing opportunites.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2D

2

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Be pro-active in educating homeowners on maintenance, upkeep, and code requirements.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.3A

2

on-going

Education / Advocacy

City - Planning & Development

Track code enforcement to identify neighborhoods that may show signs of decline.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.3B

2

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Continue occupancy inspection requirements that all occupied building, before they can be sold or occupied by a new resident, tenant or business, must be inspected by the City.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.3C

3

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Support short-term rentals in accordance with obtaining permits with the procedures and requirements for issuance of occupancy permits.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.3D

3

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Institute Access Management Guidelines

Modern Transportation Network

2.1A

2.1B

1

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; St. Louis County; MoDoT

Provide Incentives to Existing Property Owners to Achieve Access Management Goals

Modern Transportation Network

2.1B

2.1A

2

on-going

Partnering

City - Planning & Development

City - Pulic Works; Property Owners; Developers

Reduce Parking Requirements & Include Shared Parking Credits

Modern Transportation Network

2.1C

2

short-term

Policy, Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Action

Plan Principle

Require additional guidelines, including residential FAR, for residential infill developent.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.1A

Encourage mixed-use, with residential, as commercial areas redevelop.

Strong Neighborhoods

1.2A

Encourage senior housing and universal design.

Strong Neighborhoods

Evaluate inclusionary zoning as the City updates its zoning code.

198 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

3.1A

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

Additional Partners

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

2.2B

1

on-going

Capital Project, Partnering

2.1A

3

long-term

Capital Project, Partnering

2.3A

1

short-term

Capital Project

City - Public Works

City - Planning & Development; Property Owners

Modern Transportation Network

2.3B

2

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Public Works

City - Planning & Development; Property Owners

Add supplementary sidewalks to key network lings or where significant demand exists.

Modern Transportation Network

2.3C

3

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Public Works

City - Planning & Development; Property Owners

Maintain and enhance sidewalk system as redevelopment occurs.

Modern Transportation Network

2.3D

2

on-going

Policy, Regulatory, Capital Project, Parterning

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; St. Louis County; MoDoT; Developers; Property Owners

Widen a sidewalk on select streets to create pedways.

Modern Transportation Network

2.4A

2.4C, 2.4D 2.4C, 2.5D

1

intermediate

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; St. Louis County; MoDoT

Identify preferred on-street bicycle routes.

Modern Transportation Network

2.4B

2.C

2

short-term

Capital Project

City - Planning & Development

City - Pulic Works

Publish a Ballwin Bike Network Map.

Modern Transportation Network

2.4C

2.4B

2

short-term

Education / Advocacy

City - Planning & Development

Incorporate bike parking into existing and proposed developments.

Modern Transportation Network

2.4D

2

on-going

Policy, Regulatory, Capital Project, Parterning

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; Developers; Property Owners

2.4E

3

long-term

Capital Project

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; Developers; Property Owners

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Action

Plan Principle

Adopt a long-term paralle street plan and coordinate with property owners to achieve.

Modern Transportation Network

2.2A

As parallel streets are added, consider additional medians along Manchester Road.

Modern Transportation Network

2.2B

Connect existing sidewalks links in priority locations.

Modern Transportation Network

Install sidewalks in neighborhoods with little existing coverage.

Develop a greenway along Fishpot Creek as commercial areas redevelop.

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering City - Planning & Development

Additional Partners

City - Public Works; MoDOT; Property Owners; Developers City - Public Works; MoDOT

Coordinate with MoDOT to strengthen pedestrian treatments on Manchester Road.

Modern Transportation Network

2.5A

1

short-term

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Public Works

MoDOT

Conduct a feasibility study to evaluate the potential for a grade separated crossing near Vlasis Park.

Modern Transportation Network

2.5B

2

short-term

Capital Project

City - Public Works

MoDOT, City Planning & Development

199 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

Action

Plan Principle

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

Additional Partners

City - Public Works

St. Louis County Department of Transporation

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; MoDOT; Property Owners; Developers

on-going

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Public Works

MoDOT

3

short-term

Capital Project, Partnering

City - Public Works

St. Louis County Department of Transporation

2.6E

3

short-term

Capital Project

City - Public Works

Modern Transportation Network

2.6F

3

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Public Works

Coordinate adding improvements to existing bus stops on Manchester, Clayton, and Big Big Roads.

Modern Transportation Network

2.7A

3

on-going

Capital Project, Partnering, Education / Advocacy

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; Metro; MoDOT; St. Louis County; Property Owners

Incorporate transit stops into redevelopment proposals.

Modern Transportation Network

2.7B

3

on-going

Partnering

City - Planning & Development

City - Public Works; Metro; Developers

Support mixed-use development on Manchester Road.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.1A

1

on-going

Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Encourage retail outlets adapted to contemporary trends for Manchester commercial corridor.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.1B

1

on-going

Advocacy, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Update zoning code to encourage mixeduse development, place-making, and the A Resilient Local Economy goals of the plan.

3.1C

1

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

Promote mixed-use neighborhood community development.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.2A

1

intermediate/long term

Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Support & increase commercial options for entrepreneurs.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.2B

2

on-going

Education / Advocacy, Policy, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Enhance Pedestrian Treatments at Signalized Intersections

Modern Transportation Network

2.6A

1

short-term

Capital Project

Realign north-south roads to create signalized intersections.

Modern Transportation Network

2.6B

2

long-term

Consider relocating signals, with redevelopment, to achieve better northsouth connections.

Modern Transportation Network

2.6C

2

Evaluate the Need for Pedestrian Signals at Clayton Road at Country Club Drive

Modern Transportation Network

2.6D

Improved Mid-Block Crossings

Modern Transportation Network

Evaluate Geometric Improvements at Claymont Road and Baxter Road

200 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

Action

Generate additional revenues from recreational facilities.

Plan Principle

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

A Resilient Local Economy

3.3A

2

Evaluate implementation of use, real and & personal property & local economic A Resilient Local Economy development taxes.

3.3B

2

on-going

Policy, Education / Advocacy

Continue to enhance support for local, small and home-based businesses.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.4A

2

short-term/on-going

Policy, Partnering

Promote diversity of commercial offerings.

A Resilient Local Economy

3.4B

2

on-going/long-termEducation / Advocacy, Partnerin

Encourage mixed-use development along commercial corridors that can help distinguish Ballwin with a unique sense of place.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.1A

3.1A

1

Update zoning code to ensure placemaking as redevelopment occurs.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.1B

3.1C

1

Evaluate with Ameren the feasibility of buried electric lines along Manchester Road.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.1C

Transform the former city hall site to serve as a gateway to Vlasis Park and as the center of Ballwin

A Strong Sense of Place

Focus community entries and streetscape enhancements within Ballwin Town Center.

short-term/on-goingEducation / Advocacy, Partnerin

Additional Partners

City - Parks & Recreation City - Mayor, Board of Alderman & Administration City - Planning & Development

Small business development organizations

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

City - Planning & Development

Real estate developers & brokers and property owners

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

2

long-term

Capital Project

City - Public Works

4.2A

2

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Parks & Recreation

A Strong Sense of Place

4.3A

2

on-going

Regulatory, Education / Advocacy, Regulatory, Partnering

Encourage the next generation of tree plantings on residential parcels.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.4A

3

intermediate

Develop a proactive management regime for public trees.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.4B

2

Ensure landscape standards meet or exceed best practices by other neighboring communities, especially the use of native plants.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.4C

Enhance viability of canopy trees in commercial settings.

A Strong Sense of Place

4.4D

201 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Ameren, MoDOT

City - Planning & Development

All City Departments, MoDOT

Education / Advocacy

City - Public Works

Homeowners

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Public Works

2

short-term

Regulatory

City - Planning & Development

3

intermediate

Regulatory, Education / Advocac

City - Planning & Development

Developers and property owners

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

4.4E

2

intermediate

Regulatory

A Strong Sense of Place

4.4F

3

long-term

Support the school districts and homeowner associations to have resident access to open space.

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

5.1A

2

Provide additional neighborhood scale parks.

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

5.1B

Invest in The Pointe and North Pointe to Leader in Active Recreation ensure they remain leading recreation and Healthy Living facilities. Follow recommendations of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan for facilities and programs.

Action

Plan Principle

Develop a tree preservation ordinance for oaks and other significant tree species.

A Strong Sense of Place

Increase biodiversity of subdivision common areas.

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

Additional Partners

Tree Board

City - Planning & Development

Education / Advocacy

Homeowner Associations

City - Public Works

on-going

Policy

School Districts, Homeowner Associations

2

long-term

Capital Project

City - Parks and Recreation

5.2A

1

on-going

Capital Project, Policy

City - Parks and Recreation

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

5.3A

2

on-going

Capital Project

City - Parks and Recreation

City branded Castlewood signage at key Leader in Active Recreation locations. and Healthy Living

5.4A

3

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Public Works

Consider new tagline and related marketing for the City.

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

5.4B

2

intermediate

Education / Advocacy

City - Administration

Install regional St. Louis visitor signage at 141/Manchester Road and 141/Big Bend Boulevard.

Leader in Active Recreation and Healthy Living

5.4C

3

intermediate

Capital Project

City - Administration

Form a committee to develop branding recommendations for the City.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.1A

2

intermediate

Education / Advocacy

City - Administration

Establist community messaging and marketing.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.2A

2

intermediate

Education / Advocacy

City - Administration

Targeted business recruitment.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.2B

2

on-going

Policy

City - Planning & Development

Welcoming to the community reception and events.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.2C

2

on-going

Policy

City - Administration

202 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

6.1A

5.4B

Explore St. Louis, MoDOT

MAY 2019


Detailed Action Plan - All Plan Goals

Action

Plan Principle

Reference Plan Goal to other Goals

Priority

Timeframe (short-term, intermediate, long-term, ongoing)

Type (Policy, Education/Advocacy, Primary Responsibility Capital Project, Regulatory, Partnering

Multi-cultural festival.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.2D

2

on-going

Establish diversity and inclusion advisory committee.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.2E

2

short-term

Utilize possible annexation to position Ballwin as a leading City in St. Louis County.

A Distinctive Image for Ballwin

6.3A

1

short-term

Policy

City - Administration

Continue excellent services provided by the polic department and fire districts.

Outstanding Community Services

7.1A

2

on-going

Education / Advocacy

City - Administration

Follow the recommendations of the City's Emergency Operations Plan.

Outstanding Community Services

7.2A

2

on-going

Policy, Partnering

City - Administration

Publish annual map of upcoming capital projects.

Outstanding Community Services

7.3A

3

on-going

Education / Advocacy

City - Public Works

Continually seek to improve City services.

Outstanding Community Services

7.4A

2

on-going

Policy

City - Public Works

Regularly document and compare services by surrounding communities.

Outstanding Community Services

7.4B

3

on-going

Policy

City - Public Works

Clarify city services compared to homeowner association responsibilities.

Outstanding Community Services

7.4C

3

short-term

Education / Advocacy

City - Public Works

Regular coordination with utilities and agencies on capital improvements and maintenance.

Outstanding Community Services

7.5A

2

on-going

Partnering

City - Public Works

203 | Ballwin Comprehensive Plan

Partnering

City - Administration

Additional Partners

Nonprofit agencies, Ballwin Days

City - Administration

City - Planning & Development

All City Departments, Local and State Emergency Agencies

City - Administration

MAY 2019


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