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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Vol. 88, Issue 96

Jefferson mayor resigns from post Cites health as reason for stepping down Wil Petty

Staff Writer jpetty@civitasmedia.com

Jefferson mayor Dana Tugwell announced his resignation via letter to the Jefferson Board of Alderman on Monday, Nov. 25. “It is now obvious that I cannot satisfactorily fulfill the duties, responsibilities or expectations of the office of mayor for the town of Jefferson,” the letter read. “I deeply regret that my health conditions have brought us to this point, but we need to acknowledge that and take corrective action.” Tugwell had served as mayor for the town of Jefferson for 14 years. Tugman had not presided over an aldermen meeting for several months. Alderman Bluferd Eldreth

Wil Petty | Jefferson Post

Members of the Jefferson Board of Alderman discuss the next steps to take, following the resignation of town mayor Dana Tugman. They are (from left:) Charles Caudill, Luther Anderson,Bluferd Eldreth, town manager Cathy Howell, Max Yates and Mark Johnston.

was selected as mayor pro tem during the time Tugwell had been away. “I appreciate the confidence and I’m sorry that the mayor has not been with us for awhile,” Eldreth said. “I wish he could have contin-

ued on.” Tugwell in his letter said it was his intent to serve his full term as mayor but now realizes that is no longer possible. “I cannot see any fairness or decency in my keeping the title of mayor while others fulfill the

duties of that office,” the letter said. “Therefore, it is with deep regret that I ask you (the alderman) to consider this as my letter of resignation from the office of mayor of the town of Jefferson.” The board unanimously ap-

proved Tugman’s resignation. As mayor pro tem, Eldreth will now automatically serve as mayor for the remainder of Tugwell’s term which runs through 2016. “The board will now have to decide what they want to do as far as finding a new alderman,” said town manager Cathy Howell. Following the acceptance of Tugwell’s resignation, the board unanimously passed a resolution commemorating the former mayor. In other action taken by the Jefferson Board of Alderman: . Aldermen Bluferd Eldreth, Mark Johnston and Max Yates were sworn in, following their re-election. . The board approved minutes from previous meeting. . The board discussed upcoming garbage plan bids. . In attendance were: Aldermen Luther Anderson, Charles Caudill, Bluferd Eldreth, Mark Johnston and Max Yates. Also in attendance was town manager Cathy Howell.

Social Services The season for giving provides assist for heating Christina Day

Staff Writer cday@civitasmedia.com

Wil Petty | Jefferson Post

Wil Petty | Jefferson Post

The Operation Christmas Child drive in Ashe County collected 1,015 shoeboxes to be distributed to impoverished children globally. The drive was sponsored by Samaritan’s Purse and children from Generation Excellent helped load the boxes at the First Baptist Church in West Jefferson into a truck provided by Hometown Furniture. Pictured are: Jordan Bare, Caroline Bare, Haley Bare, Issac Kolseth, Josiah Kolseth, Cayla Miller, Noelle Miller, Pam Miller, Shayla Miller, Leah Privette, Quinn Privette and fundraising organizer Lauren McClure.

As temperatures in Ashe County begin to fall, residents in need of help heating their homes can contact the Ashe Department of Social Services. Amanda Marze, a supervisor at the Work First division of Social Services said that they will begin accepting applications for the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) on Monday, Dec. 2. In order to qualify for assistance from LIEAP, applicants must be 60 years of age or older, or disabled and receiving services through the division of Aging and Adult Services, and have income equal to or less than 130 percent of the poverty level. Applicants’ liquid assets cannot exceed $2,200. The benefits for those who qualify for LIEAP can

vary. All households with wood heat can receive up to $200 in assistance, while those using kerosene, fuel or propane can receive between $200 and $400, depending on household size and income. Another program offered by Work First, the Crisis Intervention Program, (CIP) started on Friday Nov. 22. The program is already out of federal funding. “It started Friday and ended Friday,” Marze said. “Our funding for this program was cut by $40,000 this year.” Marze said she encourages all of those in need who feel that they may qualify for LIEAP to apply at Family Central. She warns that it differs from CIP in that it is not immediate and that assistance can take between four and six weeks. Once qualified, checks See HEAT | 6

Downtown businesses ready for Small Business Saturday Wil Petty

Staff Writer jpetty@civitasmedia.com

Wil Petty | Jefferson Post

Founder Adam Ham (left) and Program Director Amanda Hodges started Operation Christmas Cheer in 2012 as a way to provide stocking gifts for children in the county. Last year, Ham provided stockings for 51 children and this year wants to raise that number, with the community’s help, to 125 stockings.

Operation Christmas Cheer enters second year in Ashe Wil Petty

Staff Writer jpetty@civitasmedia.com

With the Christmas season around the corner, Operation Christmas Cheer is starting up again in Ashe County. Last year, founder

Adam Ham was able to provide stockings to 51 children in the county. This year, he hopes to be able to provide 125 children with the stockings. “During the summer months I sell new toys at See CHEER | 6

Business owners throughout West Jefferson’s downtown area are preparing for the holiday rush as Small Business Saturday is approaching. The shopping holiday started in 2010 as a counterpart to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, two days which cater to larger chains. The day focuses more on locally-owned businesses, to help give them a boost. “(The day) is good for bring people into our business,” said Tabetha Howell, owner of Tab-A-Dees, located on West Jefferson’s Backstreet. “It has been advertised and more people are learning about it occurring every year.” Tab-A-Dees has been open for two years and the

Wil Petty | Jefferson Post

Lisa Willingham, co-owner of The Artists’ Theatre in West Jefferson, stands with items at her shop. The Artists’ Theatre, among other businesses in the county, will participate in Small Business Saturday during Thanksgiving weekend.

weekend after Thanksgiving remains one of its busiest weekends. “It is a big shopping day for us,” Howell said. “It might not be as busy as it is on the main street, but we are getting more people

directed toward us.” Howell said there will be specials for Black Friday and Small Business Saturday, with some items being 25 percent off. For Ashe County Cheese, the weekend after

Thanksgiving is its busiest weekend of the year. “We have a lot of people coming in locally and buying trees, but a lot of local people stay and we’re thankful for that,” Josh Williams, owner of Ashe County Cheese said. “It is our busiest weekend of the year.” For the weekend, Williams said the store offers more of its products to sample as a way to show appreciation. Also, the factory will run those two days so people can see how the cheese is made, and some items will be discounted. Williams said they are anticipating their biggest sales days ever this weekend. “Traffic for us has been up all year,” he said. “We look for it to possibly be See BUSINESSES | 6


Page 2

Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

Chamber extends invitation for Christmas Crawl event

District Court decisions The weekly session of the Ashe County District Court was held Nov. 14, with the Honorable Jeanie Houston presiding. These decisions were handed down by the court: Susan Michelle Graham: (F) obtain property under false pretense – conversion to misdemeanor set by bailee (P) no contest (J) PJC. Pay restitution, CC. Dustin Michael Hurley: (T) driving while license revoked – two counts, cons. (P) no contest (J) guilty, 45 days suspended sentence, 12 months supervised probation. $100 plus CC. Randy Lydall: (M) assault on a female (P) not guilty (J) PJC. Struck agreement, remit CC.

Christopher R. Miller: (M) misdemeanor larceny – 3 counts, (M) attempted larceny, (M) resisting a public officer – cons. (P) no contest (J) guilty. 120 days active. Devante T. Mountain: (M) misdemeanor breaking and entering, (M) misdemeanor larceny (P) no contest (J) guilty. 45 days suspended sentence, 18 months supervised probation, pay $900 restitution, CC. Transfer probation to Caldwell County. William Edward Small: (T) driving while impaired (P) guilty (J) guilty. 60 days ACJ suspended sentence, 12 months supervised probation, 24 hours CWS, $100 plus CC. (T) driving while license revoked (P) guilty (J) PJC

WEST JEFFERSON

The Ashe County Chamber of Commerce wishes to extend an invitation to you to be a part of the Christmas Crawl happening from 5-8 p.m., Friday, Dec. 6, 2013. Please come out and enjoy a variety of free, delicious refreshments including hot apple cider and the Christmas trees and wreaths decorated for the season by the Chamber featuring Chamber Ornaments from the past and present. There will be a door prize so don’t forget to enter while you are here. This year the chamber

celebrates the 21st edition Christmas Ornament featuring Mount Jefferson State Park, designed by local artist Bessie Clay. We will have signed, numbered ornaments available for your purchase and this year when you buy the Mount Jefferson ornament you can choose a free ornament from a selection of previous years. We also have mugs, magnets, ornament stands, coasters and Ashe County decals available for purchase that would make stocking stuffers. Other previous year’s ornaments will be for sale

This year’s Christmas Or n a m e n t , designed by Bessie Clay and featuring Mount Jefferson State Park, will be offered for sale during the Christmas Crawl. Submitted photo Jefferson Post

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Jefferson Post

Friday, November 29, 2013

Page 3

Obituaries

Ella Mae Greer Ham Ella Mae Greer Ham of Jefferson died on Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013, at her home. She was 74. Mrs. Ham was born on June 28, 1939, in Mullins County, W. Va., to the late Charles and Mary Sweeney Greer. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Edward Ham; and a son, Charles Edward Hamm. Mrs. Ham was the manager at Shatley Springs Restaurant for 36 years. She loved being around and working with people. She was a loving mother and grandmother. Funeral services were held on Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, at Ashelawn Memorial Chapel by Rev. Larry Shepherd. Burial followed in Ashelawn Memorial

Gardens. The family received friends on Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013, at Ashelawn Memorial Chapel. Mrs. Ham is survived by a son, Randy Ham of Winston-Salem; daughter, Teresa Lee Wingler of North Wilkesboro; daughter, Patricia Peters of Wil-

kesboro; daughter, Karen Marie Ham of Jefferson; daughter, Lisa Barker of Lansing; a dear friend (daughter) Donna Howell; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. Flowers were appreciated, or memorials may be made to Medi Home Hospice, P.O. Box 421, Jefferson, NC 28640 or the American Cancer Society, c/o Lisa Bottomley, 87 Montview Drive, Sparta, NC 28675. Words of comfort and remembrance may be viewed or sent to the family through our website at www.ashelawn.com. Ashelawn Memorial Wil Petty | Jefferson Post Chapel & Gardens was Works of art and crafts will be on sale at the Ashe County Arts Council during its Tree Fest entrusted with Mrs. Ham’s Exhibit. The showcase started on Nov. 25 and will run through Dec. 31 with a reception taking arrangements. place from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 6.

Cara Sue Dollar Gentry Cara Sue Dollar Gentry, a resident of Ashe County, passed away Friday, Nov. 22, 2013, at Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center in Danville, Ky. She was 73. She was born April 27, 1940, in Baldwin to the late Worth Theodore Dollar and Vea Johnson Dollar. Along with her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Reeves Carlton Gentry; and her son, Douglas Kirk Gentry. She was a member of Jefferson Methodist Church. Survivors include her sons, Daniel Carlton Gentry of Danville, Ky., and

Dwayne Theodore Gentry and his wife Tracy, both of Lexington, Ky.; brother John Dollar and his wife Janice, of Hickory; sister Betsy Dollar Reeves and her husband Ralph, of West Jefferson; grandchildren Dana

Gentry Jackson and her husband Chris, Christopher Gentry, Makenzy and Addison Gentry, all of Lexington, Ky., Anna Gentry Hatfield of Richmond, Va., and Alyce Gentry Fogel of Smyrna, Ga.; great grandson Henry Graham Hatfield; and three nieces Melanie, Melissa and Jessica. The family will receive friends from 1-2 p.m., Saturday Nov. 30, 2013, at Stith Funeral Home in Danville, Ky. Services to follow at 2 p.m. Services led by Pastor George Smith. An online guestbook is provided at www.stithfuneralhome.net.

Winifred Elliott Rash Mrs. Winifred Elliott Rash of Lansing died on Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, at the Margate Health and Rehab Center. She was 85. Mrs. Rash was born on March 12, 1928, in Ashe County to Thomas and Flora Elliott.She was the youngest of four children. Mrs. Rash was preceded in death by her parents; husband Virgil C. Rash; and two brothers, Ray-

mond Elliott and Bluford Elliott. Winifred’s first job was cooking at Ashe Memorial Hospital, later she worked for Belk’s Department Store in West Jefferson. She married Virgil C. Rash on July 15, 1953. Winifred later worked at Sprague Electric until her retirement. Among other interest were being involved with

her church choir for which she played the piano for many years. She was a member at Oak Grove Baptist Church. Winifred will be deeply missed by her family, her church, her neighbors and friends. Mrs. Rash is survived by her son, Gary Rash and wife Sandy of Lansing; sister, Ruth Huffman of Scottsville; two grand-

Arts Council hosting Tree Fest ’til Dec. 27 Wil Petty

Staff Writer jpetty@civitasmedia.com

The Ashe County Arts Council is bringing in the Christmas season by hosting its Tree Fest exhibit from Nov. 25 through Dec.31 at the Arts Council Center in West Jefferson. Miniature paintings will line the walls of the gallery, alongside seven trees that were donated by Hudler Carolina Tree Farms located in Ashe County. “The paintings are all miniatures, 12x12 image size or smaller. They are priced appropriately for Christmas gifts,” said Linda Dreyer, director of operations for the Arts Coun-

cil. “(The paintings) can be purchased right off the wall and you don’t have to leave them until the end of the exhibit like we usually do.” The paintings are done with different mediums including acrylic, watercolor and fiber. Dreyer said the trees were decorated by different members of the community with special themes. “Grandma’s Tree” will promote a family theme of love and nostalgia for the holidays while “Navidad en España” will focus on the culture of Spain. Other trees will focus on reading, the outdoors, the birth of Jesus, “Up on the Rooftop,” and handcrafted decora-

tions. All of the trees were used to represent the community’s involvement with the arts. The gallery will be the centerpiece for the other holiday events including Saturday with Santa, Holiday Open House and the official reception. “The reception is actually going to be during the Christmas Crawl,” Dreyer said. “That is just like our Gallery Crawl only it’s focused on Christmas.” The Christmas Crawl will take place from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Dec. 6. The Arts Council will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for holiday shopping.

Flora Minnie Brooks Woodie Flora Minnie Brooks Woodie of Salisbury passed away Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, at Carolina’s Medical Center, Charlotte. She was 84. She was born on April 10, 1929, in Warrensville, daughter of the late Thomas Daniel Brooks and Frances Minnie Church Brooks. She was the wife of the late Edward Hampton Woodie Jr., for 55 years and retired from W.G Hefner VA Medical Center. She took pride in her flower and vegetable garden. She will always be remembered as a loving wife, mother and grandmother. She showed kindness and generosity to everyone she knew. Preceding her in death were her brothers: Garney,

Millard, Arden, Harley, Sheridan, Earl and Ray Brooks; and sister, Ina Bell Roten. She is survived by her seven children: Edward and Billy Woodie of Salisbury, Marshall Woodie of Nashville, Tenn.; Darlene Duckett of Cowpens, S.C.,

Joyce Hartman, Kathy Earnhardt and Merinda Ellenburg of Salisbury; brother, Wade Brooks of Fleetwood; sisters, Ethel Barker and Dempsey Phillips of Oxford, Pa., and Osalea Pennington of Warrensville. She was the grandmother of 20 grandchildren; 31 great-grandchildren; and three greatgreat grandchildren. A funeral service was held on Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, at Summersett Memorial Chapel, officiated by Rev. Joel Hiatt. A graveside service followed at the U.S National Cemetery, 501 Statesville Blvd, Salisbury. Memorials may be made to the National Kidney Foundation, www.kidney. org .

Hiring seasonal workers risky The National Retail Foundation predicts that retailers will hire between 720,000 and 780,000 seasonal workers this holiday season. Owners can help mitigate risks by planning ahead for the hiring process, taking the time to train the new workforce, assigning duties that employees are capable of and qualified for, and ensuring individuals can meet expected physical demands. Employers need to have a clear idea of when employees will be needed and introduce them to the workplace setting and company policies and procedures. Small-business owners should train employees on issues that could put the business, its employees or customers at risk, such as ladder safety and how to properly store inventory and stock shelves.

00655844

(Raleigh) News & Observer

00656866


Public Opinion “...were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” — Thomas Jefferson, 1787

Where is Waldo? Where is Wolfe? Do people in North Caro- instant I finished ‘Look Homelina remember Thomas Wolfe, ward, Angel.’ Thomas Wolfe their once famous son, author taught me that the great books of “Look Homeward Angel,” change you immediately and whose books helped many of forever.” “Lookaway, Lookaway,” us get through the transformation from childhood to adult- Wilton Barnhardt’s inside fichood and opened the door to tional look at Charlotte, has an appreciation of fine writ- been compared to Wolfe’s treatment of Asheville. Barning? Do his words still inspire hardt has one of his characters new writers to open their mention Wolfe as “a manicmental guts and spill out their depressive and drinker.” In his award-winning first words and stories? For answers to those novel, “A Short Time to Stay questions, I decided to play Here,” Terry Roberts describes an Ashea “Where’s ville boarding Waldo?” type house “with its game and look pinched, puritanifor Wolfe in cal proprietor, a recent North woman named Carolina-related Wolfe.” books to see if Ron Rash, in I could find any “The Cove,” inevidence of his troduces “an old continuing inman, tall and fluence. gaunt, stooped In “What I through the open Came to Tell doorway, his You” by Ashehands and leather ville’s Tommy D.G. Martin apron smudged Hays, according One on One with white dust. to one reader, ‘W.O Wolfe, at Thomas Wolfe’s your service,’ the spirit “hangs over the novel like a shimmer- stonecutter said, and made ing mist.” A young boy named a slight bow. ‘How may I asGrover is the lead character. sist?’” In “Return Trip,” a story in His father is director of Asheville’s Thomas Wolfe house, Elizabeth Spencer’s upcoming where much of the action book “Starting Over,” Wolfe’s takes place. The father named ghost plays a role as one of his son after Eugene Gant’s the story’s characters insists younger brother and his sister on visiting the fire-damaged after Sudie, both characters memorial at Wolfe’s mother’s in “Look Homeward, Angel.” “The Old Kentucky Home” The action begins in Riverside boarding house. “‘It is for my soul,’ he exCemetery, where Wolfe is buried and Hays’s characters visit plained. ‘I have got to live again. Every little bit helps. their mother’s grave. Lee Smith’s “Guests on Didn’t Wolfe have an awful Earth” is set in Asheville, so family? I wonder how he stood it is easy for her to have her it.’” “‘Think of all that talent in main characters visit Wolfe’s “mother’s boardinghouse that one house. Busting to get downtown” and his grave at out. And it did.’” As her characters drive away Riverside. The title of Wiley Cash’s from the memorial, Spencer debut novel, “A Land More writes, “Gray, old-fashioned, Kind than Home” is a tribute rambling and unsavory, the old house had still managed to Wolfe. Here is the complete quote to assert itself. The long-ago from Wolfe’s “You Can’t Go meetings, quarrels, seductions and heartaches of that big lumHome Again.” “Something has spoken to bering man’s life, the family’s me in the night, and told me torments, had all smoked up that I shall die, I know not right out of the windows and where. Saying: ‘To lose the porches to sit on the backseat earth you know, for greater of the car, leaning awkwardly knowing; to lose the life you over, speaking in their ears.” Where is Waldo, I mean, have, for greater life; to leave the friends you loved, for great- Where is Wolfe? Everywhere I looked. er loving; to find a land more D.G. Martin hosts “North kind than home, more large Carolina Bookwatch,” which than earth.’” Pat Conroy’s new memoir, airs Sundays at noon and “The Death of Santini,” re- Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNCnews his longstanding grati- TV. For more information or tude for Wolfe’s influence on to view prior programs visit his writing. He once wrote, the webpage at www.unctv. “My writing career began the org/ncbookwatch

(USPS 441-810)Member MemberNC NCPress PressAssociation Association (USPS 441-810) Published twice weekly by Jefferson Times Inc., P.O. Box 808 Published weeklyAve. by Civitas Media LLC, Box 808 203twice S. Second West Jefferson, NCP.O. 28694 203 S. Second Ave., West Jefferson, NC 28694 Periodicals Postage paid at West Jefferson, NC 28694 Periodicals postage paid336-846-7164 at West Jefferson, NC 28694 Phone Phone 336-846-7164 E-Mail editorial@jeffersonpost.com Emailrates cclark@civitasmedia.com Subscription in Ashe County - $38.00/year Subscription rates in Ashe County - $38/year In North Carolina - $48.01/year In North Carolina - $48.01/year Editor/General Manager CliffClark Clark Editor/General Manager Cliff Assistant Editor Linda Burchette Staff Writer Wil Petty Staff Writer Adam Orr Staff Writer Dylan Lightfoot Sports Writer Nathan Ham Sports Writer Nathan Ham Classified/legals Donna Bauguess Advertising Sales Teresa Roark Laws Advertising Sales Teresa Roark Laws Advertising Sales John Sears Classifieds/Legals Kay Hart Mail Room Department Mail Steve RoomBurchette Department Postmaster: Send Julia address Beck changes to: Jefferson Post changes to Postmaster: Send address P.O. BoxPost 808 Jefferson West Jefferson, NC808 28694-0808 P.O. Box West Jefferson NC 28694-0808 All Allcontent contentcopyright copyright2012 2012 by Jefferson Times Inc. and may not be reproduced without by Civitas Media LLC permission. and may not be reproduced without permission.

Page 4 Friday, November 29, 2013

Letter to the editor

Commishioners let county down Dear editor, At the Nov. 18 Ashe County Board of Commissioners’ meeting, Commissioner Gerald Price proved yet again why he lacks the basic capacity to effectively serve when he voted in opposition to the High Country Council of Government’s long-range bicycle plan. Said Price, “There’s a lot of times there are bicyclists out there and I see it very, very hazardous for them. I also think about the people that are trying to get back and forth to work and I don’t see that gentleman on his bicycle paying 55 cents per gallon for a road tax either.” Let’s start with safety. Price recognizes the hazards of cyclists and vehicles sharing the road, but he isn’t interested in reducing the hazards, as the plan would do, even with the N.C. Department of Transportation footing the bill. Brilliant Mr. Price. But Price, the poster boy for hypocrisy, outdoes himself with his gas tax argument. This self-admitted tax evading “sovereign citizen,” who also doesn’t make his legally incurred car or mortgage payments, thinks others SHOULD pay taxes. Furthermore, Price evidently has no concept of cycling’s importance to the county and must be unaware of the numerous cycling events bringing in hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. For example, a 2012 ASU study of the Blood, Sweat and Gears ride determined that 1,200 non-local riders spent an av-

erage of $495 each throughout the High Country. Another major ride, the Blue Ridge Brutal, is one of the primary fundraisers for the Ashe Arts Council and Civic Center. Certainly he’s unaware that Railroad Grade Road is classified as one of the top 10 bicycling routes in the state. Apparently he also has no idea that Biking Buddies is an Ashe County cycling business or that SSSink has, for years, produced decals for bicycles, including many professional cycling teams. Heck, it seems he doesn’t even know Walmart is in the bicycling business. It looks like he’s also unaware Ashe County receives a two percent sales tax on every business transaction involving the sale of bicycles, bicycle components, accessories and apparel. Nor does he seem to realize local and non-local cyclists pay their “road tax” every time they buy county gasoline for their vehicles. Fortunately, the board voted 3-1 to adopt the plan. It was such a “no brainer” even Gary Roark uncharacteristically voted in favor. And speaking of Roark, perhaps if he spent less time bad-mouthing our former county manager and more time focusing on his job, the county’s sustained double-digit unemployment could be cut. Commissioner Roark, if there’s actual justification as to why you and your cohorts forced Dr. Mitchell to resign, why don’t you share it with the entire county rather than a select few?

Interestingly enough, Commissioner Judy Poe wasn’t in attendance and didn’t vote, but she’s no supporter of cycling’s benefits. Long-time readers will recall Poe led the opposition preventing the Virginia Creeper (cycling) Trail’s extension into Ashe County before being elected to the board. Numerous economic studies have documented the folly of that decision. In 2008, the Virginia Creeper Trail’s economic impact was estimated to be between $2.3 and $3.9 million annually. In a 2011 Virginia Tech study, over half the businesses surveyed in Damascus, Va., said 61 percent of their business came from trail users. One business owner said there’s not a business in town not impacted by the trail. Damascus is a trail-based financial success due to tourism and as someone once told me, imagine the economic boom had the trail been extended to Lansing or beyond. Failing to recognize opportunities to expand tourism, grow businesses, increase property values and, most importantly, create jobs is just another example of ineffective vision and governance. There’s been a lot of that lately and this county deserves a board that’s forwardlooking, competent and populated with individuals dedicated to the public interest rather than narrow parochial interests. Price and Poe must go. Ken Lynn Fleetwood

Liberal claims get reality check In North Carolina, that For North Carolina liberals intent on recover- favorable territory was suping some political power posed to be the state of in Raleigh, a funny thing the economy. Liberals and happened on the way to a Democrats had planned to quorum: reality intruded blame conservative policies on their most-cherishwed and Republican politicians claims about the two biggest for North Carolina’s jobless, substandard economic issues in N.C. politics. Well, okay, liberals prob- recovery. Only, according to the latest data from the ably don’t find it funny. What are those two big- Bureau of Labor Statistics, the state’s ecogest issues? nomic recovery Health care has been neiand economic ther jobless nor growth, of substandard. course. The diBLS consastrous launch ducts two of the Affordmonthly surable Care Act veys to generexchanges has ate employcrumbled Presiment data. One dent Obama’s of them, the credibility and larger one, surpublic approvveys employers al, made Kay about changes Hagan’s Senate John Hood in payrolls. seat vulnerable John Locke Foundation The other, the in 2014, and smaller one, introduced a new generation of voters to surveys households to detertimeless wisdom about the mine, among other things, inability of coercion and the unemployment rate. Accentral planning to deliver cording to the payroll suron the grandiose promises vey, North Carolina added 30,000 net new jobs during of clueless politicians. Although some left-wing September and October. So bitter-enders are continuing far this year, state employto defend Obamacare, smart ment is growing by an anDemocrats are already strat- nualized rate of 2 percent, egizing how best to distance faster than the national averthemselves from the fiasco. age of 1.7 percent. According to the houseA common method will be to express regret and then hold survey, North Caroliquickly shift the debate to na’s unemployment rate was 8 percent in October, down more favorable territory.

from 9.4 percent in October 2012. Our jobless rate is no longer in the top 10. It is even lower than that of two neighboring states, Tennessee (8.4 percent) and Georgia (8.1 percent). On the other hand, the household survey suggests that essentially all of the drop in North Carolina’s unemployment rate over the past 12 months occurred because people previously looking for work dropped out of the workforce. It shows no net gain in employment. That doesn’t comport with the payroll survey in North Carolina, which found 80,000 more jobs in October 2013 than in October 2012. Economists tend to believe the broader payroll survey is more credible. The household data may well be adjusted upward in the coming months. But we don’t have to wait until then to assess political claims about North Carolina’s economy. Longer-term data are available — and devastating to the liberal argument. You may remember that back in 2011, then-Gov. Bev Perdue proposed to close a $2 billion deficit in North Carolina’s General Fund budget in part by extending most of a temporary sales-tax increase scheduled to sunset in the 2011-12 fiscal year. The newly elected Republican legislature, pursuing a more fiscally con-

servative course, rejected her proposal. As a result, the state sales tax dropped by a penny, reducing the state tax burden by more than $1 billion a year. Liberals predicted dire economic consequences. They argued that any positive effects of reducing the sales tax would be swamped by massive layoffs of government workers — which would, in turn, weaken consumer spending and hamper North Carolina’s economic recovery. Using more realistic assumptions, conservatives predicted that lowering North Carolina’s sales tax would create thousands more jobs in the private sector than might be lost from spending restraint in the public sector. What happened? From June 2009 to June 2011, North Carolina’s rate of job growth was an anemic 0.5 percent, lower than the national average of 0.7 percent. From June 2011 to October 2013, by contrast, North Carolina employment grew by 174,000 jobs, or 4.4 percent vs. a national average gain of 3.8 percent. Even the household survey shows a healthy gain of 122,000 jobs. Strike two. Time for liberals to change the subject, again. Hood is president of the John Locke Foundation. For more information, visit www.johnlocke.org


Page 6

Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

Something to Be thankful for: Homelessness declines in N.C. Stephanie Carroll Carson NC Press Service

This Thanksgiving, an increasing number of North Carolina families and individuals celebrated the holiday at their own kitchen table, instead of on the street. Statewide homeless rates are declining - down 11 percent in the last year - thanks in part to a change in how agencies assist the homeless population. Placing individuals in housing used to be one of the last things on the to do list of strategies - but that’s changing, explains Emily Carmody, project specialist with the North

Carolina Coalition to End Homelessness. “Once people have a stable place to live, they really are able to address a lot of the different issues,” she stresses. “Finding a job, going to school, getting into treatment or recovery - all of that’s a lot easier when you have a place to go home to at night.” Carmody adds that some communities have had even larger reductions in homelessness. In Winston-Salem, it’s down 29 percent, and Wilmington has seen a 15 percent decline. Much of the funding comes from the federal HUD program. State mon-

ey for research and training in North Carolina has been eliminated in the last two budget cycles. Tim West, program supervisor of the Community and Business Development Department for the City of Winston-Salem, said his community’s success is largely driven by a plan implemented by the United Way of Forsyth County that started in 2007. “The focus on housing folks as quickly as possible once they become homeless is really what made us successful,” he said. “And we really need to give a lot of credit to our 10-year plan to end chronic home-

lessness.” With fewer dollars, Carmody said cities have learned to be strategic with their spending. “I think right now, what we’re seeing is kind of the fruits of that labor,” she said, “of that concentrating on getting some of the individuals who have been in our systems for a long time and have the highest needs into housing. And now, we’re seeing how that movement has helped our system.” A small number of North Carolina communities did see increases in homelessness between 2012 and 2013, including Asheville and Durham.

County crime report Staff report

Oct. 28 Joshua Dean Maine, 25, of Creston was charged with breaking and entering and larceny after breaking/ entering. Bond was set at $10,000. Maine was released later that day. Dennis Lee Lyalls, 32, of West Jefferson was charged with two counts of breaking and entering, two counts of larceny after breaking/entering and two counts of possession of stolen goods. Bond was set at $35,000. Joyce Lynn Owen, 52, of Lansing was charged with driving while impaired and drinking beer/wine while driving. Bond information is unknown. Owen was released the next day. Oct. 29 Lowell Young Dolinger, 55, of West Jefferson was charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle. Bond was set at $500. Dolinger was released later

that day. Oct. 30 Derrick Ray McDonald 29, of Salisbury was charged with non-support of a child. Bond was set at $494.74. McDonald was released on Nov. 13. Kevin Keith Adolph, 36, of Crumpler was charged with non-support of a child. Bond information is unknown. Oct. 31 Robert Doyle Cox, 32, of Lansing was charged with simple assault. Bond was set at $10,000. Cox was released on Nov. 2 Nov. 1 Ricky Carroll Greer, 30, of West Jefferson was charged with assault on a child under 12. Bond information is unknown. Greer was released the next day. Nov. 3 Ronnie Allen Hall Jr., 22, of Jefferson was charged with assault on a female. Bond was set at $1,000. Hall was released later that day.

Businesses From page A1 the busiest day we’ve ever had. We tend to feel that way every year and it usually is.” Williams said the business will bring in extra help and an extra cash register to help customers get served faster. The Artists’ Theatre on Main Street is also preparing for the busy weekend. “I am hoping a lot more people come into town that are local folks, not just our second home owners,” said Lisa Willingham, co-owner of the Artists’ Theatre. “I hope our local folks will come and shop downtown. It is always good to see everybody around the holiday time, but we want them to come here as often as possible.” Willingham said that she has been putting up Christmas decorations throughout the shop to help put everybody in the Christmas spirit. The store will also

Heat From page A1 are sent directly to the resident’s fuel provider. Work First will be accepting applications for LIEAP from Dec. 2 to Jan. 31, 2014. Those who do not qualify initially will have an opportunity to apply beginning Feb. 1, if there is available funding left. “I want the community to feel free to inquire,” Marze said, “We’re hopeful that we’ll get additional funding. We want to be able to help everybody.”

There may also be another opportunity to apply for CIP in mid-January. If additional funds are re-allocated, Work First will accept applications for CIP from residents whose income falls below the 150 percent poverty line. Those who qualify for the program are able to receive vouchers of up to $300 for wood assistance or $600 for fuel assistance or electric assistance, if cutoff is imminent.

Ashe residents have been able to turn to the Blue Ridge Opportunity Commission (BROC), in the past for heating assistance. BROC Case Manager Louise Ham said that so far this year, they do not have any funding for fuel assistance, but she is hopeful that FEMA funds which have been applied for will be granted soon. BROC does have available funds to help with electricity cutoff notices.

Its fundraising group, the “We Care Planning Committee,” runs ongoing events to provide for those Ashe County residents who need assistance. For more information on BROC and their upcoming events, call (336) 384-4543. To apply for heating assistance, visit the Work First office at Family Central 626 Ashe Central School Road, Jefferson or call (336) 982-7800 for inquiries.

Operation Christmas Cheer accepts different toys for the stockings and tries to have at least 12 items per stocking. The items can range from candy, toys and clothing to age appropriate CDs, movies and books. “It was such a rewarding process last year that I decided to make it a fullfledged organization for this holiday season,” Ham said. “This year we are doing stockings for children and the elderly members

of the county.” Ham said he started the fundraiser last year, when the happiness of children during the holiday season was weighing on his mind, following the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. “Christmas is a time when every child no matter who they are or what has happened should be filled with joy,” Ham said. Knowing that isn’t always the case, I began to won-

der if there was something I could do to help and spread some holiday cheer to the local children.” Ham said the organization is still looking for people who need a little extra cheer during the season. Potential candidates include those who may be ill, have a low income or have recently lost a close friend or family member. Items for the drive can be dropped off at Geno’s Restaurant in downtown West Jefferson and the

be providing refreshments such as apple cider and cookies as a way to show appreciation to the store’s customers. “I will probably do 10 percent off everything storewide,” she said. “I have new merchandise and inventory in the store. I’m hoping that folks will come down to look at different things they have not seen before.” The shop sells paintings and different arts and crafts. Willingham said she is hopeful this weekend, as well as the upcoming Christmas Crawl on Dec. 6, will be amongst the shop’s busiest days. For that to happen, Willingham said, the weather has to cooperate. “I’m hoping that we will have that crisp weather that will get everybody in the spirit, but that it is not cold enough to keep everybody inside,” Willingham

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Cheer From page A1 flea markets and had several boxes of them left over,” he said. “That’s how I came up with the idea for ‘Operation Christmas Cheer.’ I had toys and bought some stockings then took to Facebook to help find the kids in the community who needed help in the cheer department. Ham said that the reply was large and he soon had to return to social media for help and donations.

Mark of Eden Hair Salon. Other sponsors for the fundraiser include Creative Occasions Company and Top Dawg Landscape Inc. All of the monetary proceeds donated will go directly toward filling the stockings. Ham said it costs approximately $15 to fill one stocking. There will be a pick up party on Dec. 23, where those nominated for stockings will come and receive their gifts, and Santa will be on hand to help cel-

ebrate. If a person who is receiving a stocking is unable to be there, the organization will deliver the gifts on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. “We have been very lucky to have great support from the community so far this year,” Ham said. To donate or for more information call Ham at (336) 977-0702 or visit the Facebook page at w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / XmasCheer.


Jefferson Post

Friday, November 29, 2013

Page 7

Farmers Market to offer seasonal crafts Wil Petty

Staff Writer jpetty@civitasmedia.com

The Ashe County Farmer’s Market is returning to West Jefferson for four days for a holiday market. “Basically, it’s the same market,” said John Smyre, market manager for the Ashe County Farmer’s Market. “We will have greenery, wreaths, trees, mantle pieces and items like that. A lot of our regular craft vendors will be participating

File photo | Jefferson Post

Jennifer Pharr Davis, who holds the unofficial record for hiking the Appalachian Trail, will speak at the Ashe County Public Library at 10 a.m. Dec. 11

Speed hiker to visit library Christina Day

Staff Writer cday@civitasmedia.com

The Ashe County Public Library invites the public to attend its “Meet the Author” event featuring long distance hiker Jennifer Pharr Davis. Davis holds the unofficial record holder for fastest hike of the Appalachian Trail. The North Carolina native and 2012 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, will be discussing her second novel, “Called Again: A Story of Love and Triumph”at 10 a.m., Wednesday Dec. 11. In July of 2011, Davis set an unprecedented record by completing the 2,181-mile trek of the Appalachian trail that runs from Georgia to Maine in 46 days, 11 hours and 20 minutes. Her feat, accomplished by hiking an average of 47 miles per day, is detailed in her latest book. Not only did Davis set records and become a star of the hiking community on her journey, but she also fell in

love with her husband, Brew. “We are so excited to host Jennifer,” said Kim Grindrod, adult services librarian at the Ashe County Public Library. “She’s a very dynamic speaker and a wonderful role model for folks wanting to overcome odds. She also fits in nicely with our new Heath and Wellness Circle that we are starting in December.” The library will spend the new year focusing on all aspects of wellness, beginning with physical health. “[Davis] is a perfect prelude to kick off our wellness circle,” said chief librarian Suzanne Moore. Moore said on a more personal note, that as a child she read books on hiking and dreamt of hiking the Appalachian Trail. “I’m really excited to meet Jennifer and hear about her adventures.” For more information on this and other upcoming events at the Ashe County Public Library, visit www. ashelibrary.com.

The Ashe County Board of Commissioners is currently accepting membership applications for individuals interested in serving their community through membership on the Ashe County Board of Health. Currently there are two vacancies: a Public/At-large member and a Registered Pharmacist member. Applicants must be a citizen of Ashe County and should possess an interest in promoting health for the community. The Appalachian District Board of Health meets every other month, generally at a dinner meeting in Ashe County. All citizens of Ashe County wishing to apply should mail a fact sheet containing pertinent information to: Ashe County Administrative Offices, Attention: Ann Clark, 150 Government Circle, Suite 2500, Jefferson, NC 28640, or through email to aclark@ashecountygov.com. Applications will be received through December 20, 2013.

as well.” The market will run from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 30 and Dec. 7. There will also be a special Friday market on Nov. 29. While there will be some produce vendors at the market, the holiday season puts a larger focus on crafts. Smyre said there will be apples on the first Saturday and throughout the season, produce vendors will be selling greens and other winter vegetables.

“This is a special market for the holiday season,” he said. The Holiday Market has been around for the last seven to eight years and provides consumers an opportunity to purchase Christmas gifts from area craft makers. “We definitely want everybody to come out and shop at the holiday market this year,” Smyre said. For more information about the Ashe County Holiday Market, go to www.ashefarmersmarket.com/

Shop smart and safe this holiday season Many North Carolina consumers have already started shopping for the holidays, and Attorney General Cooper encouraged them to take steps to avoid common problems such as items that can’t be returned, gift cards that can’t be used and lost orders. “For many of us, giving gifts is an important part of holiday celebrations,” Coo-

per said. “Make your holidays even more enjoyable by avoiding potential headaches, shopping smart and spending wisely.” • Buying from stores you know improves the odds that you’ll be able to return or exchange a purchase. To check out a company’s track record, call the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division at 1-877-5-NO-

SCAM or contact your local Better Business Bureau. • Shop safely online, too. Stick to well-established companies with secure web sites (look for a lock icon on the site and a web address that starts with “https”). • Learn about refund and return policies. Stores aren’t required by law to accept returned merchandise, so ask about policies before you buy.

• Consider paying by credit card to improve your chances of getting a refund if the retailer goes out of business. If you order a gift that never arrives, you may be able to dispute the charge. • Criminals and scammers don’t take a holiday. Always be aware of your surroundings and protect your wallet and access to your credit or debit cards when in public.

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Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

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Page 8

Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

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For people with diabetes, taking a multivitamin every day can mean much more than a little protection versus the common cold. Research is finding that multivitamins can be the first line of defense against many different types of infections, including respiratory infections and influenza. “Once a person with diabetes gets an infection, it’s much harder for them to get rid of it, and it can lead to dire consequences, even death,” said Registered and Certified Dietitian-Nutritionist Debra Spector. “And since some diabetic patients don’t normally respond well to treatment,

Submitted photo | Jefferson Post

Nutritionists recommend multivitamins for helping control diabetes.

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Page 8

Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

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Submitted photo | Jefferson Post

Nutritionists recommend multivitamins for helping control diabetes.

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found in the diabetes section of a drugstore, not the vitamin section — allows a diabetic person to be proactive with their health, and avoid nutrient deficiencies that can lead to problems. The year-long study among 130 patients, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that the incidence of infection was much lower among diabetics who took a multivitamin versus those who did not. Infection occurred in only 17 percent of diabetic patients who took a multivitamin versus the 93 percent who took a placebo. The study also found that regular multivitamin usage reduced the rate of minor urinary tract and gastrointestinal infections in people with diabetes. Because of the nature of the disease, it’s not uncommon for diabetics to experience nutrient deficiencies. Diabetes medications and frequent urination can lead to the loss of vital nutrients that protect the body. “Since there are many health risks that can result from vitamin and mineral deficiencies, I encourage my diabetic patients to find a multivitamin supplement with more potent levels of important nutrients to meet their needs,” said Spector. “It should contain Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA), an important nutrient that most ‘regular’ multivitamins do not have. I like Multi-betic Diabetes Multi-Vitamin since it has 23 important nutrients, including ALA, designed to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels, support vision and promote nerve function.”products at www.diabeticproducts. com.


Jefferson

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Sports

Nathan Ham, Sports Writer (336) 846-7164 nham@civitasmedia.com

ONLINE Game of the Week video can be found at jeffersonpost.com

North Surry tops Lady Huskies Nathan Ham

Sports Writer nham@civitasmedia.com

North Surry put the clamps on the Husky offense, holding Ashe to just 25 points to get a 4225 victory. Ashe scored just seven points in the first half and struggled with North Surry’s height in the paint, particularly Malaya Johnson who recorded five blocks and three steals.

The Lady Huskies surpassed their first half point total in the third quarter alone, but the Greyhounds continued to be efficient with the ball, adding on to the 21-7 halftime lead to take a 33-16 lead at the end of three. Junior Morgan Hawks paced the Greyhounds with 10 points and led the team with seven steals and four assists. Johnson finished with

nine points, 12 boards, five blocks, four assists and three steals. Maggie Hawks added eight points, Casey White had five, Jordan Badgett scored four and Erin March scored four. Abby Andrews and Taylor Hill both hit a free throw apiece. Paige Spell had Ashe’s top scoring total with eight points. Ashton Lee scored three points on a pair of

shots beyond the arc. Freshman Chloe Sullivan scored four, Morgan Hudler two points, as did Sydney Grubb and Hallie Brown and Savannah Brooks rounded out Ashe’s scoring with a third-quarter free throw. The Lady Huskies are 0-2 in the early season. North Surry is 1-0. These two teams will turn right around and face each other next on Dec. 3 at North Surry.

Savannah Brooks fights for position in the lane.

Nathan Ham Jefferson Post

JV basketball update Nathan Ham

Sports Writer nham@civitasmedia.com

Photos by Nathan Ham | Jefferson Post

Grace Miller (left) dribbles by a North Surry player last Friday.

The junior varsity boys moved to 2-0 with a win over North Surry, while the JV girls’ squad is still seeking that first win of the season. North Surry 36, Ashe 25 The Greyhounds got 12 points from Cidney Funk to lead the team to a victory on the road. Gianna Federico led Ashe with six points. Alayne Spencer added four points as did Amber Miller. Hannah Andrews had three while Courtney Sawyers, Amanda Gambill, Grace Miller and Olivia Patton each scored two points. Ashe 48, North Surry 33 The Huskies looked impressive once again, cruising to a 15-point win last Friday. Kris Lonidier was Ashe’s high scorer with 12 points. James Bittle and Colin Ellis both chipped in seven points. Dante Shuler scored five; Judd Price added four, as did teammates Tristen Jones and Coco Clay. Malachi Poe had three and Noah Blevins scored two. Every Husky player that saw time on the court hit at least one shot. Both JV teams will be in action this weekend in the Miller Insurance/Dr. Pepper JV Invitational Tournament at ACHS.

Freshman Judd Price scored four points in Friday’s win over the Greyhounds.

Nathan Fletcher scores 22 to lead 5 Warriors sign with area colleges Greyhounds past Huskies 64-53 Nathan Ham

Sports Writer nham@civitasmedia.com

Nathan Ham

Sports Writer nham@civitasmedia.com

Nathan Fletcher’s 22 points helped propel North Surry to a 6453 win against the Huskies last Friday. Fletcher scored 14 of those points in the second half to blow open a 3126 game at the halftime break. Ashe opened the game with a balanced scoring attack. Seven different Husky players scored in the opening quarter. Overall, the Huskies shot 47-percent from the field, but it was the defense that had trouble with the Greyhounds. Marcus Sawyers added 17 points, Mason Hawks had eight and Tanner Hodgin had seven. For the Huskies, senior guard Devan Sheets scored 11 points and grabbed four rebounds. Fellow senior Cullen Ashley dropped in nine points and had a team-high six rebounds. Bradley Lucas added eight points and six rebounds, Connor

Nathan Ham | Jefferson Post

Junior Bradley Lucas drives to the basket for a layup. Lucas finished with eight points.

Bowers had seven points and Alex Spencer added seven points. Gavin Woodie scored five points, Evan Owen had three, Kaleb Sexton finished with two and Parker Shelton added a free throw. The Huskies are 0-2 overall and will rematch this North Surry team next Friday in Mount Airy. This was the greyhounds’ first game of the season.

ACPR volleyball champs Congratulations to the Westwood Ford Mustangs who finished the 2013 Ashe County Parks and Recreation Volleyball Season in first place. The team won the championship in the fourth through sixth grade division. Team members were: Alyson Greer, Mckenzie Pope, Allison Brown, Ashley Dollar, Braylin Miller, Sydney Greer, Emma Goodman, Ashlynn Jones, Abby Aldridge, Olivia Hardy, Katie Matheson, Sarah Harris. Mascot - Addison Dollar. Coached by Angela Brown, Amy Dollar and Kristy Alridge. The team was sponsored by Ashe County Ford.

Submitted photo | Jefferson Post

One of the top high school basketball programs in the country will be sending five athletes to the collegiate level next season, including four of those that will be playing in N.C. Shelton Mitchell, Kem Ubaru, Caleb Martin, Cody Martin and B.J. Stith, seniors at Oak Hill Academy in Mouth of Wilson, Va., all signed their National Letter of Intent with their respective schools during the early signing period that ran from Nov. 13 through Nov. 20. Twin brothers Caleb and Cody Martin signed to play at N.C. State. Caleb is currently ranked as the 59th best senior in the country right now according to ESPN. Cody is also highly-ranked, sitting inside the top 30 among the nation’s best small forwards. The brothers started out their career at Davie County High School.

Photo Courtesy | Oak Hill Academy

Five seniors on this year’s Oak Hill Academy team signed their Letters of Intent to play college basketball. From left to right: Shelton Mitchell (Wake Forest), Cody Martin (N.C. State), Kem Ubaru (UNC-Ashville), B.J. Stith (Virginia) and Caleb Martin (N.C. State).

Mitchell was a star point guard at Cuthbertson High School the past two seasons, but decided to transfer to Oak Hill for his senior campaign. The 6-3 guard is currently sidelined with a knee injury until January. Mitchell will be playing at Wake Forest next season and is ranked as the nation’s 25th best point guard. Stith is following in his father’s footsteps by attending the University of Virginia. Bryant Stith is still currently the leading scorer in UVA history

and is the fourth-leading rebounder at the school. Ubaru, a 6-5 small forward, will head to UNC-Asheville next fall. The Warriors are currently 9-1 overall with that lone loss coming to Quality Education Academy in Winston-Salem. Those two teams will rematch at Oak Hill in February. Oak Hill will resume play on Dec. 3 after a week off from games for the Thanksgiving Holiday. The Warriors will host Ridgeview High School.


Page B2

Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

Community Calendar Hayes School of Music’s Appalachian Gospel Choir at Appalachian State University in the Broyhill Center’s Rosen Concert Hall. The program includes “Please Be Patient” by James Cleveland, “Oh Lord You’re My Everything” by Richard Smallwood, “His Eye is on the Sparrow” by Martin and Gabriel, and “Bless the Lord” and “Comfort Ye” by McCutchen. Admission is free and the public is invited. Dec. 4 12 p.m. Nathans Creek Extension and Community Association Club Meeting and Christmas Party will be held at Nathans Creek United Methodist Church. 5 p.m. Seasonal Reading Challenge Kick-off and Wrap Up. Come to the Ashe County Public Library and collect your prizes and discover what’s new for the Winter Reading challenge. Remember while you don’t have to show to win, but you do have to be there to get your page count tickets included in the drawing. Dec. 6 4 - 7 p.m. Book Signing. Come and meet local author Bobby Scarlett. He will be signing his first novel Grace Mountain, at Scarlett Creek, West Jefferson. 5 - 8 p.m. Christmas Holiday Crawl. Downtown West Jefferson will be alive with the holiday spirit. Sixteen galleries will be open showing off their holiday finery. Special holiday promotions, refreshments and holiday entertainment will be available. The Ashe Arts Center will have their opening reception for artists participating in the Tree Fest. Come

out and do some holiday shopping and support your local artists. For more information, call 336-846-2787. 7 p.m. Ashe County Cattlemen’s Association Meeting will be held at Family Central. $25 membership for the entire year, $8 guest meal. Please RSVP by Friday, Dec. 6, so there will be adequate materials, seating and meals available for participants. For more information, or to reserve your seat, call 336-8465850. Dec. 7 8:30 - 11:15 a.m. Saturday with Santa will be held at the Ashe Arts Center. Bring the kids for a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Santa will be available for photos. Mrs. Claus’ Kitchen will be open with stories and there will be an arts and crafts table, and milk and cookies. Children will receive a book and holiday gift bag. Space is limited and reservations are encouraged and the charge is $5 per child. For more information, call 336846-2787. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. First Grayson Children’s Center Christmas Bizarre Fundraiser will be held at the Grayson County High School cafeteria in Independence, Va. There will be homemade items, face-painting, and pictures with Santa. 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Ashe County Arts Council Annual Open House will be held in the gallery of the Ashe Arts Center with eight beautifully decorated trees, miniature paintings, holiday gift ideas and handmade ornaments. The friends and neighbors of the Arts Council

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are invited to stop by and enjoy refreshments, greet the staff and savor the sights, sounds and smells of the holiday season. For more information, call 336-8462787. 3 p.m. Hibernation Station. What do all the animals do for winter? Meet the New River State Park ranger at the N.C. 221 Access Area and find the answer to this and other questions on the habits of our area animals. Dec. 8 7:30 p.m. The Ashe County Choral Society’s Annual Holiday Concert will be held at the Ashe Civic Center in West Jefferson. Formed in 1985, is under the direction of Grady Lonon and accompanied by Michael Bell. The concert will feature both sacred and secular music of the season. The concert, a perfect way to usher in the holiday season, is both a tradition and a highlight of the holiday season in Ashe County. Tickets are $12 adults, and $5 students and are available at the Ashe Arts Center. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 336-8462787. Dec. 17 11 a.m. Blue Ridge Opportunity Commission, Inc. (BROC) will hold a public hearing on its Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) for the initial stage of the planning process for program year July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. The hearing will take place at the BROC Ashe Office, Warrensville Community Center, Warrensville. For more information, call the Ashe Office at 384-4543.

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Photo courtesy of Drive to End Hunger | Jefferson Post

Volunteers help at Drive to End Hunger Event.

Empty holiday tables for North Carolinians of all ages this year Stephanie Carroll Carson NC News Service

The seven food banks in North Carolina have found themselves working harder than ever to feed North Carolinians facing food insecurity. According to the North Carolina Association of Food Banks, the state ranks near the top in the country when it comes to citizens facing a food shortage. One in four children is in need, and one in seven older adults faces the same problem. Kay Carter, CEO, Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina, described the situation. “We’re hearing from, particularly, the emergency pantries that requests for assistance are way up. They can’t keep food on the shelves,” Carter said. While some of the need stems from the lack of living-wage jobs to replace those lost in the recession, the problem is magnified by recent reductions in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits that affected 1.7 million North Carolinians at the beginning of November. A 2012 study by the Food Research and Action Center found that the Triad region had the fourth-highest rate of food insecurity in the country,

with almost 24 percent of its citizens struggling to buy food. Clyde Fitzgerald is the executive director of Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina, Winston-Salem. He explained that the region’s loss of manufacturing and textile jobs - and their subsequent replacement with jobs requiring higher skills - has made it difficult. “We are essentially importing people from other states, other regions, to take those jobs, and we’re not putting people back to work,” Fitzgerald said. Asheville ranks third in the country when it comes to food hardship. Suzanne Black, associate state director, AARP North Carolina, asked North Carolinians who find themselves with enough to eat to remember their neighbors in need. “Donate time, volunteer, help others, sort food and get food together,” she urged. “Donate money so they can purchase food at a low cost, and that can make a big difference to get more food in their pantry.” According to AARP, 9 million older Americans nationwide face the risk of hunger. People who want to help can log onto the AARP website, www.drivetoendhunger.org.

N&O series prompts calls for change in laws Dan Kane and Colin Campbell

The News & Observer

State officials want to review pension laws after salary maneuvers by some community college presidents and their boards created the potential for significantly increasing the presidents’ retirement pay at public expense. A News & Observer series, “Checks Without Balances,” revealed last week that four community college presidents and their boards used elimination of a state cap on presidents’ salaries to convert tens of thousands of dollars in perks such as car and housing allowances into salary money.

00650792

Nov. 29 - Dec. 7 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Holiday Market Schedule for the Ashe County Farmers Market is as follows: Friday, Nov. 29; Saturday, Nov. 30; Saturday, Dec. 7. Nov. 29 5 p.m. Hometown Christmas. Bring the whole family to downtown West Jefferson for a Hometown Christmas Celebration at the Backstreet Park. It’s the annual lighting of the town Christmas tree, carolers, Santa, free hot chocolate and rides on the antique fire engine. Nov. 30 Santa at the Mercantile. Bring the kids down to the Todd Mercantile. Meet Santa, enjoy free hot chocolate and cookies. The Mercantile is located at 3899 Todd Railroad Grade Road, Todd. 2 p.m. Winter Birds. Join the New River State Park Ranger at the Visitor Center for a PowerPoint presentation to learn about birds that winter in our area. 5 p.m. Jimmy W. Johnson Elvis Tribute. Witness a true Elvis experience at Jimmy’s Christmas Farewell Show at the Blue Ridge Dinner Theater. The Blue Ridge Dinner Theatre is located at 9331 N.C. 16 S, in Glendale Springs. For more information, call 336-2462900. Dec. 1 2 p.m. Animals of the New River. Meet the New River State Park 221 Access Visitor Center for a look at some of the frequent animal visitors of the parks riparian zone. Dec. 3 8 p.m. Gospel Choir Performance. Keith McCutchen directs the

One president retired two years later; the rest are all nearing retirement age. Perks for Wilkes Community College President Gordon Burns were a part of the newspaper’s investigation. State pensions are based on the four highest consecutive years of pay, which means the perks-to-salary conversions could boost those pensions by as much as $52,000 a year. Such pension spiking is legal under state law. Action by state lawmakers in 2010 gave community college boards the discretion to spend as much local money on salaries as they wanted. “Obviously, we expect the folks who are given that additional authority to act in good faith and use good judgment,” said Senate leader Phil Berger, an Eden Republican. “It does raise concerns with me and I know with other legislators about how that additional authority has been utilized in this instance.” Attorney General Roy Cooper also criticized the way the community college boards boosted pensions. “That’s not the best way to handle that,” said Cooper, a Democrat considering a run for governor in 2016. “The whole process should be re-examined.”


BEFORE THE CLERK 13-SP-131 NOTICE TO CREDITORS

LEGALS STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF ASHE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified on 15 November, 2013 as Administrator CTA of the estate of INA MARIE GREER JORDAN, late of Ashe County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against said estate to present the same to the undersigned, on or before the 20th day of February, 2014, or this Notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons, firms and corporations indebted to said estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned. This 22nd day of November, 2013. Ina Marie Greer Jordan, Administrator CTA c/o John B. “Jak” Reeves, Attorney for Administrator CTA REEVES LAW FIRM, PLLC P.O. Box 67 West Jefferson, North Carolina, NC 28694 Publish:11.22.13/11.29.13/12.3 .13/12.13.13 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Erma Lois Badger, deceased late of Ashe County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons having claims against the estate of said deceased to present them on or before 8th day of February, 2014, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment. This thee 30th day of October, 2013 For the Estate of Erma Lois Badger Lois B. Miller 505 Laurel Woods Dr. Wilkesboro, NC 28697 PUBLISH:11.8.13/11.15.13,11. 22.13/11.29.13 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Ruth Bare Mash,deceased late of Ashe County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons having claims against the estate of said deceased to present them on or before 15th day of February, 2014, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment. This the 15th day of November, 2013. For the Estate of Ruth Bare Mash Judy Mash Neaves 472 C Bare Road West Jefferson, NC 28694 PUBLISH: 11.22.13/11.29.13/12.6.13/12. 13.13

Having qualified as Executor for the Estate of Ruth Bare Mash,deceased late of Ashe County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons having claims against the estate of said deceased to present them on or before 15th day of February, 2014,LEGALS or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate will please make immediate payment. This the 15th day of November, 2013. For the Estate of Ruth Bare Mash Judy Mash Neaves 472 C Bare Road West Jefferson, NC 28694 PUBLISH: 11.22.13/11.29.13/12.6.13/12. 13.13 NORTH CAROLINA ASHE COUNTY NOTICE TO CREDITORS Having qualified as Executor of the estate of Brayden Hawke Roten, late of Ashe County, North Carolina, this is to notify all persons having claims against said estate to present the same to the undersigned on or before the 21st day of February, 2014, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned. This 19th day of November, 2013. Michael Ray Roten, Executor Of the Estate of Brayden Hawke Roten, Deceased JOHNSTON AND JOHNSTON Attorneys at Law Post Office Box 398 Jefferson, North Carolina 28640 Publish: 11.22.13/11.29.13/12.6.13/12. 13.13 STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF ASHE

IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK 13-SP-131 IN THE MATTER OF THE SALE OF LANDS OF WAYNE D. FOGLEMAN Under foreclosure by John Benjamin “Jak” Reeves, Substitute Trustee

IN THE MATTER OF THE SALE OF LANDS OF WAYNE D. FOGLEMAN Under foreclosure by John Benjamin “Jak” Reeves, Substitute Trustee

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Notices Child Care Health Consultation Grant Request for Proposals Ashe County Partnership for Children Health Program The Ashe County Partnership for Children is seeking proposals from organization(s) for the provision of child care health and safety consultation to child care providers in Ashe County. The overall goal for this proposal will be to contribute to the development of high quality child care by providing expertise and experience relative to evidence-based health and safety policies and practices in child care settings. The ACPC will use Smart Start funds to contract with an organization employing a public health nurse licensed in the state of North Carolina to provide education, skills training, resources, technical assistance and consultation to providers in licensed child care settings, both center-based and family child care homes. Grantee may also provide referrals to health care resources to families of young children enrolled in these child care settings. Eligible applicants include North Carolina based local public health agencies, local non-profit organizations, physician organizations, medical clinics, hospitals, and/or home care agencies that have a history of providing resources or services to child care providers and have expertise in child care health and safety. Please contact Kay Philipp at the Ashe County Partnership for Children at (336) 982-4588 for required forms and information. Proposals are due to the Partnership office by 3:00pm on December 6, 2013.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Ashe County Partnership for Children is seeking proposals for evidence-based programs beginning July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015 from agencies to address the following need areas: *Improve the quality of early care and education *Increase access to early care and education *Enhance parenting skills *Enhance social and emotional development of young children *Enhance early intervention services for children at-risk of developmental delays or disabilities *Enhance physical health and well-being of young children *Improve school readiness outcomes One-on-one technical assistance is mandatory for new bidders. Technical assistance will include logic model training, RFP process, and information about Smart Start. Please contact Kay Philipp, Executive Director, at 336-982-4588 or kayp@ashechildren.org with your intent to apply by December 2, 2013. The deadline for receipt of proposals is 3:00 pm on Friday, December 6, 2013. Miscellaneous

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NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain deed of trust executed LEGALS by Wayne D. Fogleman dated 31st day of March 2008 and recorded in the Ashe County Public Registry in Book 00380 at page 1829-1844, default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured, and said deed of trust being by the terms thereof subject to foreclosure, the undersigned will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, at the Courthouse door in Jefferson, North Carolina, at 2:00 p.m. on the 13th day of December, 2013, the lands conveyed in said deed of trust, the same lying and being in Pine Swamp Township, Ashe County, North Carolina, and being more particularly described as follows: BEING all of Lot 5 of Deep Gap Estates as shown on plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 99, Ashe County Public Registry, to which plat reference is hereby made for a more complete description of said lot. The above described property is subject to restrictions of record in the Ashe County Public Registry in Book 190, at pages 371-372, to which record reference is hereby made for a specific recital of said restrictions. House on Property contains Four (4) rooms; Two (2) Bedrooms, One (1) Bath with 808 Square Feet of Gross Living Area. Lot 5 is 1.31 acres. Parcel Number 15239-204005. At the time of sale, the highest bidder shall immediately make a cash deposit in the amount of five (5%) per cent of the amount of the bid or Seven Hundred Fifty ($750) Dollars, whichever is greater. This the 4th day of November 2013. John Benjamin “Jak” Reeves, Sub. Trustee Reeves Law Firm, PLLC PO Drawer 67 West Jefferson, North Carolina 28694 336-246-7172 Publish: 11.29.13/12.6.13

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain deed of trust executed by Wayne D. Fogleman dated 31st day of March 2008 and recorded in the Ashe County Miscellaneous Public Registry in Book 00380 at page 1829-1844, default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured, and said deed of trust being by the terms thereof subject to foreclosure, the undersigned will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash, at the Courthouse door in Jefferson, North Carolina, at 2:00 Are You Still Paying Too Much p.m. on the 13th day of December, 2013, the lands For Your Medications? conveyed You can save up to 75% when you fill your in said deed of trust, theand same lying and being in prescriptions at our Canadian Promotional Pine Swamp Township, Ashe International Pharmacy Service. prices ly ... County, North Carolina, and e ric starting at on Our P Get An Extrabeing $10 Off more particularly deCelecoxib* scribed & Free Shipping Onas follows: $61.00 BEING all of Lot 5 of Deep Your 1st Order! mo. OVER 30 PREMIUM Gap on plat s Call the number below andEstates save an as shown Generic equivalent for 12 month Hopper with additional $10 plus get free shipping ible elig of CelebrexTM. Not thereof recorded in Plat Book MOVIE CHANNELS 2 offer. iPad or on your first prescription order with Generic price for 5, Page 99, Ashe County PubCanada Drug Center. Expires Sept. 200mg x 100 30, 2013. Offer is validlic forRegistry, prescription to which plat referorders only and canence not be is used in hereby made for a compared to conjunction with anymore other offers. complete description of CelebrexTM $568.87 Order Now! 1-800-341-2398 said lot. For 3 months.* Typical US brand price Use code 10FREE The to receive above described property for 200mg x 100 this special offer. is subject to restrictions of re- and Ask How! Call Now Please note that we do not carry controlled substances andin a valid cord prescription is required for all prescription medication orders.the Ashe County Public Registry in Book 190, at Call Toll-free: 1-800-341-2398 pages 371-372, to which reAll offers require 24-month commitment and credit qualification. Use of these services is subject to the Terms ofcord Use andreference is hereby Call 7 daysmade a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0513 accompanying policies at www.canadadrugcenter.com. *Offer subject to change based on premium movie channel availability for a specific recital of said restrictions. House on Property contains Four (4) rooms; Two (2) Bedrooms, One (1) Bath with 808 Square Feet of Gross Living Area. Lot 5 is 1.31 acres.We’ll Repair Your Computer Parcel Number 15239-204Through The Internet! 005. Medical Alert Monitoring At the time of sale, the highest Solutions For: bidder shall immediately make 24/7 Slow Computers • E-Mail & Printer Problems a cash deposit in the amount Spyware & Viruses • Bad Internet Connections of five (5%) per cent of the • Easy Setup • Free amount of the bid or Seven Equipment Affordable Rates • Nationwide Hundred Fifty ($750) Dollars, whichever is greater. • Free Shipping Service For Home This the 4th day of November HELP AT THE PUSH & Business 2013. OF A BUTTON! John Benjamin “Jak” Reeves, Call Now For Immediate Help Sub. Trustee Reeves Law Firm, PLLC PO Drawer 67 Call Today: West Jefferson, North CaroService 00 Off lina 28694 Mention Code: MB 336-246-7172 Publish: 11.29.13/12.6.13

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Page B4 Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

Jefferson Post

Friday, November 29, 2013

Page B5

ASHE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL NEWSLINE November 24-30 is National GERD AWARENESS WEEK

Eating smaller portions at mealtime decreases the pressure in the stomas and results in less reux.

What is GERD?

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GERD is a condition caused by stomach contents, including acid, repeatedly reuxing into the esophagus. This causes irritation and other changes to the esophageal tissues. Untreated GERD can result in complications such as esophagitis (inammation of the lining of the esophagus), strictures (narrowing of the esophagus), and even bleeding. GERD can also cause esophageal cancer. GERD is a lifetime disease. The severity of symptoms will usually increase over time. GERD can disrupt daily activities, be responsible for sleep disturbances as well as decreased work productivity. This disease affects all age groups from infants to the elderly.

What are the Symptoms of GERD? Heartburn is the most common symptom of GERD. However, everyone is affected differently. Listed below are some of the symptoms associated with GERD, but others can be experienced.

Common Symptoms

Heartburn * Chest Pain Regurgitation ** Mild swallowing difďŹ culties (dysphagia) * Che s tPai nt Al way ss e e ki mme di at eme di c al at t e nt i o nf o ranyc he s tp ai no r di s c o mf o r t .Che s tp ai nc aus e db y he ar tp r o b l e msc anb ev e r ys i mi l ar t op ai nf r o m GERD.Anyp o s s i b l e he ar tc o ndi t i o nmus tal way sb e r ul e do utďŹ r s t .

Less Common Symptoms Chronic cough Hoarseness Chronic sore throat Dental problems Recurrent pneumonias Worsening asthma

* * Mi l dSwal l owi ngDi f ďŹ c ul t i e s Al t houghdi f ďŹ c ul t ys wal l owi ngi s of t e nac ommons ympt omofGERD, i tc anal s obeas i gnofs ome t hi ng mor es e r i ousands houl dbe pr ompt l ye val uat e d.

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Avoid Overeating

Lose Excess Weight

Excess weight increases the pressure in the abdomen. This tends to make reux worse. Even a small amount of weight loss can be effective.

What Causes GERD?

Medical Therapy – The Goal of Medical Therapy is Acid Suppression GERD is a chronic disease that requires lifetime therapy. It is important to recognize that chronic reux does not resolve itself. Long-term medical therapy is usually effective in controlling the symptoms of GERD. Many medications for GERD are available over the counter. Your doctor may give you a prescription to control your symptoms if over the counter medications do not provide enough relief.

Antacids

Antacids work by neutralizing stomach acid. They can provide fast relieve from occasional heartburn, but the relief is usually short term.

HT blockers reduce acid production in the stomach by blocking a signal that leads to acid secretion. They are usually obtained over the counter.

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)

Proton pump inhibitors work by turning off some of the acid pumps in the stomach’s acid producing cells. They are more effective in decreasing stomach acid production than H2 Blockers. Most PPIs are available only with a doctor’s prescription.

There is a strong relationship between long standing GERD and the development of cancer of the esophagus. Since 1975, the risk of GERD induced esophageal cancer has increased 600%. This is the fastest increase of any cancer known and less than 15% will survive this deadly malignancy. A cancer risk assessment is an important part of the GERD evaluation. It a pre-cancerous condition called Barrett’s esophagus is present, it will be detected in your evaluation. Barrett’s esophagus is present in 10 to 15% of GERD patients. Its detection is very important since it will inuence your treatment and follow up. Barrett’s esophagus is a consequence of long standing reux and is seen in patients as young as their twenties. Many patients with Barrett’s have only mild GERD symptoms. In fact, Barrett’s esophagus can be seen in patients experiencing no GERD symptoms at all.

The High Country Heartburn Treatment Center team understands that GERD is a disease that can disrupt your life. Help is available through a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation. Form the moment you call, you will receive highly personalized care that treats not only you as a patient but as a person. Our patients and the High Country Heartburn Treatment Center team collaborate in developing an individually tailored treatment plan.

Avoiding Trigger Foods Avoid fatty, spicy, or fried foods. For some people foods that contain fat such as ice cream, whole milk, peanut butter, meat and others cause the most severe symptoms. SpeciďŹ c trigger foods vary from person to person. Omit the foods that cause problems for you.

Mountain Hearts Center for Prevention and Wellness

Christmas Special!

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Severe GERD symptoms 2 or more times weekly Medications needed for reux symptoms, even intermittently, for more than several months Incomplete relief while taking GERD medications Experience any GERD-like symptoms after the age of 50 GERD medication on a daily basis DifďŹ culty swallowing (prompt evaluation indicated) Chest pain (prompt evaluation indicated) General concern about symptoms

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Whether you just want accurate information, or you are ready to schedule an appointment, give the High Country Regional Heartburn Treatment Center a call at 846-0755. Our mission is responding to your needs and offering convenient, world-class treatment for heartburn, delivered by professionals who truly care for your well-being. It is a healthcare experience unlike any other. So take control of your life!

      

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Call now to schedule your appointment! New business hours: Monday-Friday 6:00am-8:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-11:00am, and Sunday from 1pm to 5pm.

336 - 8 46 - 0 74 4 Mountain Hearts Center for Prevention Wellness

During the last weekend in October, Libby’s ran a sale from which 10% of the proceeds were donated to Ashe Memorial to assist local women in the ďŹ ght against breast cancer. The sale was a huge success, making the total donation to Ashe Memorial $1,020. This money will be used to pay for mammograms and the readings of mammograms for women who do not have insurance and cannot afford to pay for them. If you or someone you know needs a mammogram but cannot afford it, contact Patty Faw at 846-0781. Ashe Memorial Hospital would like take this opportunity to thank Libby Cockerham for her generosity and continued support. Together we can make a difference!

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When to seek an evaluation:

Available treatments for GERD include lifestyle changes, medications and minimally invasive surgery. Bed Blocks Raise the head of your bead by placing a 2 to 3 inch block or brick under each of the headboard posts. This helps gravity keep uid in the stomach and can assist with nighttime symptoms.

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Diagnostic Testing

Lifestyle Changes

Libby Cockerham, Owner of Libby’s and Laura Lambeth, CEO of Ashe Memorial Hospital.

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Can GERD Cause Cancer?

GERD Treatment Options - Finding relief from the Discomfort

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Surgery

A hiatal hernia, sometimes called a hiatus hernia, occurs when part of the upper stomach bulges, or herniates, into Reasons to consider the Surgical Option the chest cavity. It bulges through the opening in the diaphragm where the esophagus enters the abdominal cavity. • Failure of medications to resolve or improve symptoms The present of a hiatal hernia and how it relates to GERD is often confused. A hiatal hernia can contribute to GERD. • Cost of daily medications In fact, most GERD patients have a hiatal hernia. However, the presence of a hiatal hernia does not necessarily mean • To avoid lifetime medication(s) a person has GERD. • Medication side effects (headache, diarrhea and abdominal pain) • Esophageal cancer concerns A hiatal hernia may increase the severity of GERD in a person who already has a malfunctioning LES. If the LES is • Concerns about disease progression functioning normally, a hiatal hernia alone does not necessarily cause GERD. Diagnostic tests at a Heartburn Treatment Center evaluate the function of the LES, and the presence or absence of a hiatal hernia.

Barrett’s esophagus is a transformation or change of the esophageal lining in response to reux. Barrett’s esophagus can be suspected by visible changes in the esophagus. However, it can only be conďŹ rmed by obtaining small tissue samples called biopsies. These biopsies are taken during and endoscopy which is a visual evaluation of the esophageal lining. Barrett’s esophagus is not cancer but carries with it a risk of ½ to 1% per year.

 

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Surgical therapy is available as an alternative to lifetime medical management. The most common surgical procedure for GERD occurs when the muscle located between the esophagus and the stomach malfunctions. This muscle is called GERD is the Nissen fundoplication. This minimally invasive surgical procedure allows the surgeon to reconstruct the malthe lower esophageal sphincter (LES). When working properly the LES acts like a one-way valve that prevents stomach contents containing acid from reuxing into the esophagus. In patients with GERD, the defective LES allows functioning valve. Successful anti-reux surgery stops the reux and eliminates the need for medications. This surgery is stomach contents to leak back, or reux, into the esophagus. This causes heartburn and other symptoms of GERD. not for everyone, but it is an option for interested patients who meet certain criteria.

What is Barrett’s Esophagus?

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Three Classes of GERD Medications are Available

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H2 Blockers Abdominal bloating Sleep disturbance Nausea Belching Sensation of something in the back of your throat Bad breath

Libby’s Donates $1,020 to Ashe Memorial Hospital

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                                                     Â?  Â?Â?Â? Â?Â?Â?                   ­€‚ ƒ Â?                         ­€‚ ƒÂ?       December 17, 2013 January 28, 2014 February 25, 2014 March 25, 2014 April 29, 2014 May 27, 2014 June 24, 2014

July 29, 2014 August 26, 2014 September 30, 2014 October 28, 2014 November 25, 2014 December 30, 2014

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Jefferson Post

Don’t be too busy for kindness Leila Harris

“mercy” and come to know Christ as their Savior. As we each look forward to Christmas When we read and study the Acts shopping, but dread the crowds, let us of the Apostles, we must not overlook make sure our behavior is as our Father the barbarians. They are mentioned bewishes. He didn’t command us to just cause of their kindness to Paul and his be nice to those who are nice to us; He crew when they were shipwrecked on commands us to be kind to those “en- the island of Melita. “And the barbarous emies” that jump the line, are rude and people showed us no little pushy, and those who are kindness: for they kindled bestowing most un-Chrisa fire, and received us evtian-like behavior. ery one, because of the Jesus commanded us to present rain, and because be kind to each other, even of the cold.” (Acts 28:2). to those we do not like, Then, as they were gathbecause God is good to evered around the fire, Paul eryone. “But love ye your was bitten by a venomous enemies, and do good, and viper (which did not kill lend, hoping for nothing him as the barbarians exagain; and your reward pected), and he was not shall be great, and ye shall afflicted at all. The barbarbe the children of the Highians witnessed this miraest: for he is kind unto the cle! If we are going to exunthankful and to the evil.” perience a miracle, it will (Luke 6:35, KJV). bring God the most glory if Leila Harris If someone has hurt even the barbarians among or offended us, God will us get to witness it also. avenge in the way that is We are to be kind to each other for most pleasing to Him. He is our Father, the sake of our love for Christ. In Epheand He will take care of us. We are to sians Paul instructs us, “And grieve not trust that His way is best, and do our the Holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are part in being kind to everyone. A kind sealed unto the day of redemption. Let word or action may well be just what all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, this person needs to see “goodness” and and clamour, and evil speaking, be put Special to the Post

away from you, with all malice: And be ye kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” (Ephesians 4:30-32). As children of God the Father, we are to get along with one another and be kind to one another. Jesus said that if we love Him, we are to show it by loving our brothers and sisters in Him—then the world will know that we are His! “By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.” (John 13:35). We may be financially poor, emotionally poor, and physically poor, but we are rich in the grace of God. Let us show it by being kind to one another. Who knows what kind of witnessing we may get to do, or what kind of difference we might get to make in the life of a lost soul—by being kind. “For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the LORD endureth for ever. Praise ye the LORD.” (Psalm 117:2). During this Christmas season, let your motto (and your actions) be this, “Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up.” (I Cor 13:4). Why? Because, “For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the LORD endureth for ever. Praise ye the LORD.” (Psa 117:2).

Friday, November 29, 2013

Page 5

Submitted photo | Jefferson Post

This handcrafted wood nativity will be raffled off during Bethany Methodist Church’s Bethlehem at Bethany event.

Bethany event Dec. 8 Bethlehem at Bethany will be presented at Bethany Methodist Church from 12:30-3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 8. This event will feature nativity scenes from around the world and from your next door neighbors. Ranging from formal crèches to rustic sets, the nativities will be on display in the fellowship hall. There is no admission charge, and refreshments will be provided. Additionally, someone will take home this hand-

crafted wood nativity. Made from local hardwood, this nativity will be a point of pride for the lucky recipient. Tickets can be purchased during Bethlehem at Bethany. Bethany Methodist Church is located at 495 N.C. 194 South in West Jefferson. For more information on this event, or additional Advent presentations, please call Bethany church offices at 336-877-2801 or visit the church website at bethanyumcwy@skybest.com.

Baptist Church. Everyone is encouraged to attend and bring a canned item for Ashe Really Cares. For more information, call Jennie Elliott at 977-3419, or Russell Sheets at 9778332. Dec. 15 6 p.m. “The Judgment” - Christmas program will be held at Glendale Springs Missionary Baptist Church. Refreshments will be served in the church fellowship hall following the program. Pastor Ricky Triplett invited everyone to attend. 6 p.m. “Oh Little Town of Bethlehem” Christmas Play will be presented at Mount Olive Baptist Church. Finger foods and fellowship to follow. Pastor Phillip

Woodring and congregation invite you to attend. 6 p.m. “The Christmas Carole - A Special Request” - Christmas Play will be presented at Beaver Creek Baptist Church. Come join the Marley family as they take a journey with the help of Gabriel, the Angel of Christmas Past, Mike, the Angel of Christmas Present and Archie, the Angel of Christmas Future, to Bethlehem that changes them forever. Dec. 22 11 a.m. “Repeat the Sounding Joy” Christmas Cantata will be presented at Mount Olive Baptist Church. Pastor Phillip Woodring and congregation invite you to attend.

Church Calendar Nov. 29 Ashe Baptist Association Office and Ashe Really Cares will be closed to observe Thanksgiving. Happy Thanksgiving to everyone. Dec. 1 11 a.m. The Sutherland Family from Kannapolis, will be singing at Scottsville Baptist Church. Pastor Rev. Reeves Jones and congregation invite you to attend. Dec. 3 6 p.m. The Annual Minister, Wife, Family and Staff Christmas Dinner will be held at the Friendship Baptist Church fellowship hall. Smokey Mountain Barbecue will be providing the food.

Ashe County Ford of West Jefferson, will be the sponsor. For more information or to reserve your seat, call the Association Office at 846-5631 or email domdblackburn@gmail.com. Please share how many will be coming and whether you prefer chicken or barbecue. Dec. 7 - 8 6 p.m. “A Thrill of Hope:” Christmas Cantata will be presented at West Jefferson First Baptist Church. An instrumental ensemble of eight in addition to handbells will accompany the 30 member choir. The presentation will be held again at the 11 a.m. Sunday morning worship service. The director of the choirs is

Christopher Langdon, a graduate student at ASU, and the accompanist is David Wilson, a senior at ASU. All are invited to attend, no admission will be charged. The church is located on W. Second Street, West Jefferson. For more information, visit the church’s website at www.fbcwjmusic.org. Dec. 8 11 a.m. Christmas Dinner will be held at Beaver Creek Baptist Church immediately following the morning worship service. Bring a covered dish and join us for some good food and fellowship. 6 p.m. “Christmas on Merry Lane” Christmas Play will be held at Pleasant Home Baptist

Church. Pastor Rev. Lonnie Carpenter invites everyone to attend. 6 - 8 p.m. Phoenix Baptist Church will be holding a Live Nativity in the church parking lot. Pastor Rev. Tom Graybeal invites you to come and celebrate Christmas with them. Dec. 13 - 14 7 p.m. Peak Creek Church of the Brethren Presents: “This is Christmas” A musical celebration. The church is located at 2327 Peak Creek Church Road, Laurel Springs. For more information, call 336-6571291 or 336-817-4313. Dec. 14 6 p.m. “In My Father’s House” - Christmas Play will be held at Liberty


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Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

Over 10,000 lights illuminate The Walker Center Christmas tree Decorating the Christmas tree were (from left): Jim Caudill, Mona McRae, Bobby Bouchelle, Lee K. Cornett, Linda Farthing, Melissa Stanley, Susan Phillips, Aileen Bentley, Debbie Cangiolosi, Angela Woodruff, Sue Harrold, James Harrold, Ted Hagaman, Tabitha Hudler, Susan Tolley and Joel Podbielski. Not pictured: Bethany Swaim.

Report: 3rd grade can predict a child’s success in school A special supplement of the Jefferson Post Stephanie Carroll Carson N.C. News Service

Submitted photo Jefferson Post

Wilkes Community College ushered in the holiday season on Tuesday, Nov. 26, by trimming its majestic 16-foot Christmas tree in the Lakey Ballroom of the John A. Walker Community Center. Volunteers Mona McRae, Linda Farthing, Susan Phillips, Aileen Bentley, Sue Harrold, James Harrold and Joel Podbielski along with several Walker Center staff members spent the morning creating the vision especially for guests of the Walker Center. Over 10,000 lights sparkle around the hundreds of delicate ornaments that embellish the tree. “The Lakey Ballroom Christmas Tree has become a tradition at The Walker Center. It is so beautifully decorated with festive holiday lights as well as lovely ornaments and garlands that have been collected over the years. We are so pleased and proud to be able to present this breathtaking touch of Christmas to our community at this special time of year. It is truly a sight to behold,” says Debbie Cangiolosi, lead client development specialist. Bobby Bouchelle, technical assistant and custodian

at The Walker Center, has helped to put the Lakey Ballroom Christmas Tree in place for 24 years. “It is a big endeavor to put the tree up. But it is worth all the effort when we realize the joy it brings to the people who see it, especially the children. I am proud to help make it happen every year.” It takes about a week to fully set up and trim the massive tree which is anchored at the ceiling due to its height. Staff members utilize a man-lift, two 10-foot ladders as well as six-foot ladders to assemble the tree and hang the lights. Volunteers put on the final touches by helping to place the hundreds of colorful ornaments, which have been collected over 26 years. And, every year the tree is decorated a bit differently, but it is traditionally topped with a big bow with long ribbons draping down the sides. Cangiolosi says, “Children and adults alike are enchanted by our marvelous tree, and many from the community make it a point to stop by during the season to see it and take family photo with it. This year guests for our American Big Band “Home for the

Holidays” Christmas Season Show as well as those who attend the various business, community and WCC holiday events will be amazed and delighted when they see this magnificent tree.” Members of the community are invited to enjoy the Christmas tree by visiting the John A. Walker Community Center. Many families take the opportunity to snap some family photos in front of the tree. The volunteer program at Wilkes Community College welcomes new participants. Contact the Lee K. Cornett, volunteer coordinator at 336-838-6262 or lee.cornett@wilkescc.edu for more information. Wilkes Community College, a member of the North Carolina Community College System, is a public, two-year, open-door institution serving the people of Wilkes, Ashe and Alleghany counties and beyond. Established in 1965, WCC continues to build on a strong history of meeting the educational needs and cultural interests of our students, community and workforce. WCC prepares learners for success in a dynamic world.

Third grade is the makeor-break point when it comes to a child’s success, according to a new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and a majority of children are missing the mark. The new analysis found that only 36 percent of third graders are on track with cognitive development. In North Carolina, funding for early care and learning programs such as Smart Start and pre-K has decreased by $101 million since 2009. Tracy Zimmerman, director of strategic communications, North Carolina Early Childhood Foundation, explained why third grade is so crucial. “Children really go from learning to read to reading to learn. What we know about third grade now is that where you are in third grade is a significant predictor of your future academic achievement,” she said.

Currently the North Carolina Supreme Court is considering arguments in a case that will decide if the state must pay for preschool for at-risk students. If the court decides it is an obligation of the state, that could require North Carolina to accommodate 60,000 children at a cost of $300 million annually. In addition to early learning, the report finds that social and emotional skills also help secure success for children. Laura Speer with the Annie E. Casey Foundation said enabling parents to expand their involvement in their children’s lives can help foster that skill set. “Having the flexible work schedule - it’s so important. Also things like providing paid sick leave for parents could make a huge, huge difference,” Speer said. Policy recommendations from the report include programs to support parents so they can care and provide for their children,

increase access to early childhood education for low-income children and develop programs that support a child’s transition to elementary school. The achievement gap between low-income children also is pronounced when it comes to early childhood education: Only 19 percent of children below 200 percent of the poverty level have age-appropriate cognitive skills by third grade. Zimmerman said closing the gap requires an “all hands on deck” approach. “There really is no silver bullet. To really move the needle on the achievement gap, we need to start looking at the root causes and come together across organizations,” Zimmerman said. Research indicates that the first 2,000 days of a child’s life - from birth to age 3 - are the foundation for their future success, she added. The report is available from the Casey Foundation at www.AECF.org.

Submitted photo | Jefferson Post

The recent CNA graduates are (from left, front row) Mychal Shepherd, Amy Carter, Jennifer Murphy, Amanda Finley, (from left, back row) Katherine Payne, Stephanie Matkins, Danielle Krueger and Robert Powers, and they are all from Ashe County.

Wilkes-Ashe Campus congratulates CNA graduates Wilkes Community College-Ashe Campus congratulates its recent CNA program graduates, who were taught by instructor Lisa R. Burgess, R.N. The graduates are: Mychal Shepherd, Amy Carter, Jennifer Murphy, Amanda Finley, Katherine Payne, Stephanie Matkins,

Danielle Krueger and Robert Powers, all from Ashe County. Wilkes Community College, a member of the North Carolina Community College System, is a public, two-year, opendoor institution serving the people of Wilkes, Ashe and Alleghany counties

and beyond. Established in 1965, WCC continues to build on a strong history of meeting the educational needs and cultural interests of our students, community and workforce. WCC prepares learners for success in a dynamic world.

New predatory din terrorized early tyrannosaurs Tracey Peake

NC State News Services

00646906

A new species of carnivorous dinosaur – one of the three largest ever discovered in North America – lived alongside and competed with small-bodied tyrannosaurs 98 million years ago. This newly discovered species, Siats meekerorum, (pronounced see-atch) was the apex predator of its time, and kept tyrannosaurs from assuming top predator roles for millions of years. Named after a cannibalistic man-eating monster from Ute tribal legend, Siats is a species of carcharodontosaur, a group of giant meat-eaters that includes some of the largest predatory dinosaurs ever discovered. The only other carcharodontosaur known from North America is Acrocanthosaurus, which roamed eastern North America more than 10 million years earlier. Siats is only the second carchar-

Submitted image | Jefferson Post

Jorge Gonzales produced this image of the Siats Meekrorum.

odontosaur ever discovered in North America; Acrocanthosaurus, discovered in 1950, was the first. “It’s been 63 years since a predator of this size has been named from North America,” said Lindsay Zanno, a North Carolina State University paleontologist with a joint appointment at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and lead author of a Nature Communica-

tions paper describing the find. “You can’t imagine how thrilled we were to see the bones of this behemoth poking out of the hillside.” Zanno and colleague Peter Makovicky, from Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History, discovered the partial skeleton of the new predator in Utah’s Cedar Mountain Formation in 2008. The species name acknowledges the Meeker family for its support of early career paleontologists at the Field Museum, including Zanno. The recovered specimen belonged to an individual that would have been more than 30 feet long and weighed at least four tons. Despite its giant size, these bones are from a juvenile. Zanno and Makovicky theorize that an adult Siats might have reached the size of Acrocanthosaurus, meaning the two species vie for the second largest predator ever discovered in North America.


Jefferson Post

Friday, November 29, 2013

Page B7

Gift Giving

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Ashe Chamber Of Commerce Dec. 6th 5:00 - 8:00 PM

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Introducing the 21st edition of of the Chamber Christmas ornament featuring Mount Jefferson State Natural Area. Designed by local artist Bessie Clay. Signed ornaments available for sale

Mail Delivery Prices In County... 26 Weeks $31.96 ~ 52 Weeks $53.93 Call 336-846-7164 For Mail Subscription Prices Visit our website at www.jeffersonpost.com

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Additional Chamber gifts available: mugs, magnets, ornament stands, coasters, and Ashe County decals

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Page B8

Friday, November 29, 2013

Jefferson Post

Civitas Media

PRO FOOTBALL REVIEW More interviews in Martin bullying case? Howard Fendrich AP Pro Football Writer

Joe Rimkus Jr. | Miami Herald/MCT

Tackle Jonathan Martin, right, and Richie Incognito are seen in their stance before the ball is snapped during a Miami Dolphins practice at the Dolphins training facility during preseason workouts.

counseling for emotional issues. Incognito was suspended Nov. 3 and filed a grievance against the Dolphins seeking to rejoin the team. Without both players, the Dolphins (5-6) lost Sunday to Carolina, 20-16. Afterward several Dolphins said the scandal hadn’t been a distraction. The lawyer conducting the NFL’s investigation into possible bullying on the Miami Dolphins wrapped up an opening series of interviews with every player and coach, along with others who work for the team, last week. A statement released Saturday by Ted Wells’ law firm added: “Our work will continue over

the next few weeks.” The league had not given an indication how long the inquiry might last. Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin says he was harassed daily by teammates, including fellow offensive lineman Richie Incognito. Incognito was suspended indefinitely by the team on Nov. 3, and will miss his third consecutive game Sunday when the Dolphins play the Carolina Panthers. On Thursday, Incognito agreed to postpone his grievance hearing challenging the suspension until Wells completes his investigation. In a statement,

NFL played on a dark day in America

Tim Dahlberg

AP Sports Columnist

Americans grieved in front of their television sets on a brutally grim Sunday afternoon 50 years ago as a horse-drawn caisson took the body of President Kennedy from the White House to lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda. In Dallas, a nightclub operator named Jack Ruby further stunned the nation that day by shooting Lee Harvey Oswald to death in black-and-white images broadcast across the country. And in seven U.S. cities, men put on their shoulder pads, strapped on their helmets and took the field to play games that suddenly didn’t seem so fun anymore. As unimaginable as it might seem today — and did seem to many even then — the NFL played on despite the assassination of a president just two days earlier. “Everyone has a different way of paying respects,” Commissioner Pete Rozelle said that day at Yankee Stadium. “I went to church today and I imagine many of the people at the game here did, too. I cannot feel that playing the game was disrespectful, nor can I feel that I have made a mistake.” Rozelle was wrong on both counts, something he would later admit when he called his decision to play the games the worst mistake he made in 29 years as commissioner. But play them they did, from stadiums in the East to the Los Angeles Coliseum even as the rival American Football League canceled its slate of games and most colleges had canceled theirs the day before. Rozelle would later say he made his decision the afternoon of the assassination based partly on advice from Pierre Salinger, the White House press secretary, who told him Kennedy would have wanted

the games played. The decision was made a bit easier by the fact teams in Dallas and Washington were both playing on the road that weekend and the NBA and NHL went on with their limited schedules. But even within the league there were deep divisions on the propriety of playing before Kennedy had even been laid to rest. The Redskins offered to forgo their $75,000 guarantee so they wouldn’t have to take the train to Philadelphia, and Eagles President Frank McNamee was so unhappy about his team playing that he went to a memorial for the president at Independence Hall rather than the game. “Simply and flatly the game is being played by order of the commissioner,” McNamee said tersely. If there were any great performances that day, they went widely unnoticed. The games were not televised because CBS was devoting its airwaves fulltime to coverage of the assassination, and sports writers of the day were as much in mourning as everyone else. “Big men were playing a boy’s sport at the wrong time,” sports columnist Arthur Daley wrote in The New York Times. Some players — particularly those on the Los Angeles Rams — had no desire to play. They took the field because they had to, because the commissioner had declared the games would go on. Others almost seemed to welcome the respite from the dreariness of the day. “It was hard to think football before the game,” St. Louis quarterback Charlie Johnson said that day. “Then it passed.” “I think everybody felt something,” Chicago Bears tight end Mike Ditka said. “Not having known the man, however, I think he would have not wanted it postponed. So we go out on the field — and it’s business to us — and after the first kickoff all you think about is the Steelers.”

The fans might have been seeking an escape themselves. Despite worries that stadiums could be half empty, games in New York, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh and Philadelphia were all sellouts. And while about 150 tickets were sent back for refunds in Pittsburgh, another 300 were sold the day before the game. At the stadiums, flags were at half-staff and there was a moment of silence before the game. Fans were asked to join in singing the national anthem, and many had transistor radios tuned in to the latest developments in Dallas and Washington. The NFL was hardly the sports behemoth it is today. It had just 14 teams — the Detroit Lions were sold that week for $6 million — and lagged behind baseball and college football in popularity. The league had just weathered a gambling scandal, it faced competition from the upstart yet still decidedly inferior AFL and the first Super Bowl was still four years away. Still, the decision to play was shocking to many, made even more so when the shooting of Oswald was captured on TV just minutes before the East Coast games were scheduled to kick off. So much had happened in the previous 48 hours that it seemed incomprehensible that playing football games would somehow restore some normalcy to a shattered nation. That they played football that Sunday was a blunder Rozelle would come to regret. It was also one the NFL would take pains to avoid after the 911 attacks, when the entire season was pushed back a week while workers dug through the rubble of the World Trade Center. Sports can be a healer, but it can’t heal everything. Certainly not a nation traumatized by the killing of a president who always seemed so full of life. On that painful Sunday a half century ago, nothing could.

WE BEAT THE GAME WHEN IT COMES TO LOW PRICES

PASSING

Q Philip Rivers, Chargers, threw for 392 yards and three touchdowns, including a 26-yard scoring strike to Seyi Ajirotutu with 24 seconds left, in San Diego’s 41-38 victory over Kansas City. QTom Brady, Patriots, was 34 of 50 for 344 yards and three touchdowns in New England’s 34-31 overtime win over Denver. QJosh McCown, Bears, passed for 352 yards — the third-best total of his career and most since 2005 — and two touchdowns with an interception in Chicago’s 42-21 loss at St. Louis. QRyan Fitzpatrick, Titans, completed 30 of 42 passes for 320 yards and two TDs, including a 10-yarder to Kendall Wright with 10 seconds remaining to lead Tennessee past Oakland 23-19. QCarson Palmer, Cardinals, was 26 for 37 for 314 yards and two touchdowns to help Arizona cruise past Indianapolis 40-11. QAlex Smith, Chiefs, had three touchdown tosses in a losing cause as Kansas City fell to San Diego 41-38.

RUSHING QKnowshon Moreno, Broncos, ran for a career-high 224 yards and a TD on 37 carries in a losing cause as Denver fell to New England 34-31 in overtime. QAdrian Peterson, Vikings, had 146 yards rushing and a touchdown on 32 carries in Minnesota’s 26-26 tie at Green Bay. QJamaal Charles, Chiefs, ran for 115 yards and two touchdowns in Kansas City’s 41-38 loss to San Diego. QAndre Brown, Giants, had 127 yards rushing on 21 carries in New York’s 24-21 defeat against Dallas. QEddie Lacy, Packers, ran for 110 yards and a touchdown on 25 carries in Green Bay’s 26-26 tie with Minnesota. QBenny Cunningham, Rams, rushed for 109 yards on 13 carries, most of it in the second half of St. Louis’ 42-21 win over Chicago after Zac Stacy was sidelined with concussionlike symptoms.

RECEIVING QJosh Gordon, Browns, tied a team mark with 14 catches for a franchise-record 237 yards and a touchdown in Cleveland’s 27-11 loss to Pittsburgh. QJulian Edelman, Patriots, caught nine passes for 110 yards and two TDs to help lead New England past Denver 34-31 in overtime. QTiquan Underwood, Buccaneers, had two touchdown receptions in Tampa Bay’s 24-21 win at Detroit. QBrandon Marshall, Bears, caught 10 passes for 117 yards and a score in Chicago’s 42-21 loss at St. Louis. QKeenan Allen, Chargers, had nine receptions for 124 yards to help San Diego edge Kansas City 41-38. QJason Witten, Cowboys, caught touchdown passes of 20 and 2 yards in Dallas’ 24-21 win over the New York Giants.

DEFENSE QKarlos Dansby, Cardinals returned an interception 22 yards for a score and the Cardinals won their fourth in a row with a 40-11 rout of the Colts. QVon Miller, Broncos, ran back a fumble return 60 yards for a touchdown in Denver’s 34-31 overtime loss to New England. QAudie Cole, Vikings, finished with 13 tackles and a sack starting for leading tackler Erin Henderson, who missed Minnesota’s 26-26 tie with Green Bay for a personal matter. QRobert Quinn, Rams, stripped Chicago’s Josh McCown on a sack and then scooped up the ball on a 31-yard return for his first career NFL touchdown in St. Louis’ 42-21 victory over Chicago. QJeff Heath, Cowboys, returned a fumble 50 yards for a touchdown as Dallas edged the New York Giants 24-21. QLeonard Johnson, Buccaneers, returned one of Matthew Stafford’s four interceptions 48 yards for a score to help Tampa Bay top Detroit 24-21.

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MIAMI — Miami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin will likely be interviewed a second time by NFL special investigator Ted Wells about the team’s bullying scandal, a person familiar with the situation said Sunday. The second interview will likely be in New York City or California the first week in December, the person told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because details about the investigation are confidential. Martin alleges he was harassed daily by teammates, including Richie Incognito, who has been suspended. Martin was interviewed for nearly seven hours by Wells on Nov. 15 in New York. Wells spent the past week interviewing Dolphins players, coaches and staff in South Florida, and he also met with Incognito. Wells said his work would continue over the next few weeks on the case, which inspired a national debate about workplace bullying. Martin, a second-year pro from Stanford, left the team Oct. 28 and has been with family in California undergoing

Incognito said he would cooperate fully with Wells, with a goal of rejoining the Dolphins. “We have concluded our initial round of interviews with the Miami Dolphins and spent time with every player and coach, as well as key staff members and management,” Saturday’s statement from Wells said. He went on to thank Dolphins owner Stephen Ross and “players, coaches and staff for their complete cooperation throughout this process.” Wells met last week with Martin in New York. Martin, a second-year pro from Stanford, has said he wants to play football again. He has been with family in California undergoing treatment for emotional issues. Incognito has said he regrets racist and profane language he used with Martin, but said it stemmed from a culture of locker room “brotherhood,” not bullying. Wells is expected to determine the roles of coach Joe Philbin, other coaches and Miami’s front office, and the NFL has said his final report will be made public. Ross has acknowledged that changes are needed and formed two committees to study the team’s locker room culture.

Top performers for week PASSING 11

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The Jefferson Post 11-29-2013