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June 2, 2013 Volume 105, No. 131

2013 TROY STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

INSIDE

Cloudy skies, sunny outlook Festival goes on despite weather BY MELANIE YINGST Staff Writer myingst@civitasmedia.com

Cobbler impresses her guests She doesn’t like to cook — but loves to bake. Though Nancy Deal had only one strawberry recipe — Strawberry Cream Cheese Cobbler — to enter into the Troy Daily News’ annual strawberry recipe contest, it was enough. Deal said she got the recipe from North Pole Savings on Facebook, where she has found several other good recipes. “I tried it out on my husband’s poker club a couple weeks ago,” said Deal, who retired after 35 years with Vandalia schools as a kindergarten teacher. “They loved it. It’s really good with a dollop of ice cream on it.” See Valley,

Page B1. IAMI COUNTY OUNTY MIAMI

OMMUNITY GUIDE UIDE COMMUNITY & VISITORS REFERENCE 2013

The skies may have been gray and ominous, but the smiles were warm and sunny as vendors and non-profit organizations made their strawberry sales Saturday afternoon at the Troy Strawberry Festival.

STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER

The Queen’s Float, sponsored by Fulton Farms, rolls through downtown Troy during the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival parade.

TROY Fletcher United Methodist Church Pastor Andy Perry said he and his fellow congregation members prayed the rain would be kept at bay for their chocolate-covered strawberry sales. Perry said congregation members had hand-dipped more than 25,000 strawberries Friday in preparation for the church’s first year at the festival with the sweet strawberry sales. “We are hopefully optimistic that we will be sold out by the end of the day,” Perry said as he passed containers of the whiteand chocolate-dipped berries to customers. The STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER funds raised by the choco- Pastor Andy Perry from Fletcher United Methodist Church helps festival-goers

with an order of chocolate-covered strawberries Saturday on the levee in Troy A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF THE TROY DAILY NEWS AND THE PIQUA DAILY CALL

Community Guide 2013 Get your complete guide toall things in Miami County for 2013. Inside today’s newspaper.

INSIDE TODAY Business.....................A12 Calendar.......................A3 Crossword ....................B7 Dates to Remember .....B6 Deaths ..........................A6 Pamela Susan Moya Virginia L. Hensler George Brubaker Richard L. Benkert Movies ..........................B5 Opinion .........................A4 Property Transfers........C4 Sports...........................A7 Travel ............................B4 Weather......................A12

OUTLOOK Today Storms High: 76° Low: 64° Monday Cooler High: 70° Low: 50°

Complete weather information on Page A12. Home Delivery: 335-5634 Classified Advertising: (877) 844-8385

6

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• See FESTIVAL on 2 during the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival.

Pop Rocks’ show goes ‘international’ BY MELANIE YINGST Staff Writer myingst@civitasmedia.com

TROY

members — Troy City Schools students in the The Troy Pop Rocks can third through eighth grades add “international enter— showed off their stunts tainers” to their growing in a surprise performance list of accomplishments. set up by Troy Mayor The members of the Troy Michael Beamish, Troy City Pop Rocks jump rope team Council President Marty showed off their skills and Baker and other city of jump rope tricks for the Troy officials, for the mayor and other dignitaries Japanese visitors from from Takahashi City, Japan, Takahashi City. after the Strawberry Takahashi City Mayor Festival Parade on Takanori Kondo’s smile said Saturday. it all after the students At the Troy Rec gymna- i n c l u d e d B e a m i s h • See POP ROCKS on 2 sium, the Troy Pop Rocks

STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER

Troy Pop Rocks jump rope team members Taylor Dankworth, back left, and Zoey Geuder, back right turn the ropes in the “Wheel Traveler” stunt for Mayor Mike Beamish, his wife, Ginny, a delegation from Takahashi City, Japan, and others Saturday at The Rec in Troy.

Fans flock as parade returns BY MELANIE YINGST Staff Writer myingst@civitasmedia.com For the Sanger family, the only place to watch the annual Troy Strawberry Festival Parade is front and center of the Troy Public Square, with the pink fountain behind them. The Strawberry Festival Parade made a triumphant return to the city streets Saturday morning after the

TROY hometown tradition took a year off in 2012 due to the Adams Street Bridge closing. For Daryl and Sharon Sanger of New Carlisle, it’s a tradition that has spanned 15 years and a fun way for them to treat their grandchildren to doughnuts and chocolate milk in the early morning hours in order to stake a claim at “their” spot. “We make sure we get here every year,” Sharon said. The grandparents said they’ve sat in the same spot for 15 years and never missed the festival parade until last year. The Sangers set up their chairs at 7:30 a.m., well before the first float hit the street at 9 a.m. “It’s one of the best and the longest parades around — we love it,” • See PARADE on 2

West Milton woman killed in accident BY MELODY VALLIEU Staff Writer mvallieu@civitasmedia.com A West Milton woman is dead following a three-car accident Saturday afternoon. According to Miami County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Chris Bobb, Jackie R. Martin, 22, of West Milton, died as a result of the injuries she sustained in an accident that occurred at approximately 2:32 p.m. Saturday at the intersection of Fenner and Wilson roads. Bobb said the accident 1 occurred when a car driven by

CONCORD TWP. Alexandra Meyers, 23, was traveling northbound on Wilson Road when it failed to observe a stop sign and was struck by a second vehicle, which was headed west on Fenner Road. He said after vehicle two hit Meyers’ car, it pushed her car into a third vehicle, which was stopped at a stop sign. Meyers, 23, was taken was by Troy EMS to Upper Valley STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER Medical Center, where she was treated and released. Martin At least two victims, including a child, were air lifted by CareFlight as

a result of a multiple car crash at the intersection of Wilson and

• See CRASH on 2 Fenner roads around 2:30 p.m. Saturday.

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MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Festival • CONTINUED FROM 1 late-covered strawberries will go to the church’s outreach ministries throughout the year. Speaking of an optimistic forecast, the Troy Noon Optimists organization was confident the rain and storms would be kept at bay as they sold their strawberry barbecue sauce and strawberry butter on the Great Miami River levee. Stan Phillips said sales of their strawberry barbecue sauce and jars of butter were steady as the crowds were undeterred by the cloudy weather Saturday afternoon. “So far the weather hasn’t impacted us,” Phillips said. Bottles of the strawberry sauce were on display for $5 apiece as visitors stopped by the Troy Noon Optimists for a sweet strawberry sample at the tent. Phillips said the organization had more than $10,000 in sales last year and hoped to raise more funds this year. The money raised by the sales at the festival goes to Troy High School scholarships, youth activities, Troy’s Halloween parade and the WACO kite fly-in and speaking contests, Phillips said.

2013 TROY STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER

Elisabeth Norman, 6, Cora Hildebrand, 4, and Charlotte Norman, 4, make believe they are playing strawberry fairies Saturday while sitting together on the levee during the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival. Strawberry Festival manager Heather Dorsten said she was pleased with the crowds who chanced the weather for crafts and festival food. “So far we are pleased to see the crowd still came out,” she said. “All the

organizations said they’ve been doing pretty well and we’ve had a good response from our crafters as well.” Troy Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Sabra Johnson said she also was pleased to see the weather hold off

Saturday afternoon. “The crowds are just wonderful and we are so pleased people came out to support the festival,” Johnson said. The Troy Area Chamber offered Troy, Ohio U.S.A. souvenirs such

Today Festival Site Hours — 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Berry Bike Tour — Parking Lot Behind Troy High School, 7:30 a.m. Classic 10k Run — Troy Memorial Stadium, 7:30 a.m. Shortcake Special Run (2,000 meters) — Troy Memorial Stadium, 7:35 a.m. Car Show — Troy Community Park, 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Awards at 4 p.m. Worship Service — Lower Levee Dining Tent, 8:30 a.m. Free Entertainment — Levee (three stages), 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Softball Tournament (Coed) — Duke Park, 11 a.m. Diaper Derby — Center Stage, noon

us.” Troy Junior High School student Zach Sanger said his favorite part of the parade was looking for his dad on the F & P America float. “My favorite is probably all the floats — especially the one my dad was on today,” Zach said. Strawberry Festival Manager Heather Dorsten said the parade was a success and a welcome return to the festival’s line-up. “It went great,” Dorsten said. “We were able to hold opening ceremonies before the parade and got to dye the fountain red. We still had our moment, which was good.” More than 130 units took part in this year’s parade, which was teleSTAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER vised live on Channel 5 by The Troy High School Marching Band performs “The Party Rock Anthem” the Troy Public Access Saturday for Strawberry Festival parade-goers in downtown Troy. team.

2013 Miami County Household Hazardous Waste Drop-off When: Wednesday, June 5th from 2pm to 6pm Cost: $1/pound, PCB Ballasts $2.65/pound Where: Miami County Sanitary Engineering, 2200 North County Road 25-A, Troy, Ohio

“It was cool to perform for people from another country,” Becker said. “We’ve only performed for people in Ohio, never from a foreign country.” Troy Pop Rocks coach Josh Oakes said it was an honor for the group to show off their hard work in front of the city’s guests. “It was an honor they thought of us,” Oakes said. “To have been thought of to do something like this and be asked by our city to do this was special.” The Troy Pop Rocks have performed at halftime basketball games at local high schools, but also college halftimes including The Ohio State University, Ohio University and other colleges around the state.

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Date of birth: 10/5/62 Location: Dayton Height: 6’1” Weight: 160 Hair color: Brown Eye CHRISMAN color: Hazel Wanted for: Non-support

5’7” Weight: 180 Hair color: Brown Eye GARRETT color: Brown Wanted for: Failure to appear — Non-support

William C. Hall Jr. Date of birth: 11/05/85 Location: Piqua Height: 6’1” Weight: 200 Hair color: Black Eye color: HALL Brown Wanted for: Theft, assault, criminal damaging and disorderly conduct

Chelsea LeDoux

City of Troy Mayor Mike Beamish and his wife, Ginny, along with others, and a delegation from Takahashi City, Japan, including Takanori Kondo, Jiro Ueda, Sumiko Egusa and Shigehiro Nigo react as members of the Troy Pop Rocks jump rope team perform Saturday at The Rec in Troy.

The driver of the third vehicle received no injuries, and the driver’s name also was not available as of press time. The Troy Police Department and Ohio State Highway Patrol assisted the sheriff’s office at the scene. Bobb said the

crash investigation team was at the sight of the accident Saturday evening. He said no alcohol or drugs were believed to be involved. Charges are pending following an investigation, Bobb said.

STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER

Crash • CONTINUED FROM 1 was a passenger in the vehicle. Meyers’ 3-year-old daughter also was transported by CareFlight to Children’s Medical Center. Bobb said having spoken to family, the little girl’s injuries did not seem to be

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Ronald Chrisman

• This information is provided by the Miami County Sheriff’s Office. These individuals were still at-large as of Friday. • If you have information on any of these suspects, call the sheriff’s office at 4406085. • Location identifies the last known mailing address of suspects.

serious and she is expected to make a full recovery. The driver of vehicle two, which hit the car driven by Meyers, also was taken to Upper Valley Medical Center. Bobb said the driver’s name and condition was not available as of press time.

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demonstrations after their performance. The group also had several standing ovations for the Troy Pop Rocks performers as they whirled and twirled, flipped and flopped to music with their ropes in tow. “I’m old,” Kondo said with a laugh. With help from an interpreter, Kondo said he enjoyed jumping rope with the Pop Rocks and hopes the Japanese students from Takahashi City, who will be visiting in August, are able to enjoy a Troy Pop Rocks jump rope clinic or performance. Sixth-grade student Riley Becker said she enjoyed the special surprise demonstration with Troy’s special guests from its sister city.

Date of birth: 3/8/94 Location: Piqua Height: 5’8” Weight: 180 Hair color: Brown Eye color: ALEXANDER Blue Wanted for: Trafficking drugs

Date of birth: 12/14/90 Location: Troy Height: 5’9” Weight: 135 Hair color: Blonde Eye color: LEDOUX Green Wanted for: Theft

Pop Rocks • CONTINUED FROM 1 and Takahashi City’s president of women’s chamber of commerce Sumiko Egusa in “The Stacker,” which was captured on video by Shigehico Ningo, finance director of the Japanese City. “Wonderful and awesome,” Kondo said after passing out gold bookmarks to the Troy Pop Rocks team. The gold bookmark features the city’s famous landmark, the Bitchu Matsuyama Castle. “I have seen students in elementary school jump rope, but only simple, easy jumps — this was just awesome — I’ve never seen such great tricks before.” Kondo said he enjoyed being a part of one of the Troy Pop Rocks’ stunt

Jesse Alexander

as golf balls and golf towels, camping chairs, blanSommer Garrett kets and other Troythemed collectibles. Date of birth: 11/15/80 The festival site opens Location: Piqua at 10 a.m. and will close at Height: 6 p.m. today.

Parade • CONTINUED FROM 1 Daryl said. The Sangers sat with their grandchildren Zach Sanger, 12, and his younger sister Laylah, who live in Troy. Laylah said her favorite part of the parade was the cheerleaders and the dance teams. Laylah was decked out in her strawberry earrings as she sat with her grandparents with the fountain behind her. “It had bubbles in it,” Laylah said. “The waterfall is pretty.” The Sangers said they have the best view of the parade, with their chairs directly facing down South Market Street with the fountain at their backs to take in the parade. “We love it,” Sharon said. “We’re not looking sideways — we get to see them come right toward

MIAMI COUNTY’S MOST WANTED

Love, Shelby


LOCAL

A3

&REGION

June 2, 2013

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

FYI

Show is from 6-8:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1058 Knoop Road, Troy. The event will include purveyors of flowers, native Ohio plants, vintage garden accessories, art, antiques, artisans, landscapers, great food and more. Non-profits participating again this year will include Hospice of Miami County “For All Season Gift Shop” and West Central Ohio Bee Keepers Association. Admission is $5. For more information, call (937) 335-1904.

• BREAKFAST SET: The American Legion Post No. 586, Legion Riders, Community Tipp City, will offer an allyou-can-eat breakfast from Calendar 8-11 a.m. for $6. Items available will be eggs, CONTACT US bacon, sausage, sausage gravy, hash browns, toast, waffles, pancakes, fruit, French toast, biscuits, cinCall Melody namon rolls and juices. Vallieu at • WAGON RIDES: 440-5265 to Aullwood will offer draft horse wagon rides from 1list your free 2:30 p.m. at 1000 calendar Aullwood Road, Dayton. items.You Following admission to the farm, rides are $1 per percan send FRIDAY son. Each ride lasts about your news by e-mail to 30 minutes. mvallieu@civitasmedia.com. • DISCOVERY WALK: • FRIDAY DINNERS: A family discovery walk Dinner will be offered will begin at 2:30 p.m. at from 5-8 p.m. at the Aullwood Audubon Center, Covington VFW Post 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. An 4235, 173 N. High St., Covington. Aullwood naturalist teacher will lead this Choices will include a $12 New York leisurely walk along Aullwood’s trails to strip steak, broasted chicken, fish, discover the natural delights of summer. shrimp and sandwiches, all made-toorder. • CHICKEN FRY: The Pleasant Hill MONDAY VFW Post No. 6557, 7578 W. Fenner Road, Ludlow Falls, will offer a three• CRAFTY LISTENERS: The Crafty piece chicken dinner with french fries Listeners will meet from 1-2:30 p.m. at and macaroni salad for $7 from 6-8 p.m. the Milton-Union Public Library. Chicken livers also will be available. Participants listen to an audio book and • PREHISTORIC OHIO: Join anthrowork on various craft projects. pologist Andrew Sawyer from the • STORY CORNER: Stories will be Sunwatch Indian Village at 2 p.m. at the read to children from 6:30-7 p.m. in the children’s area of the Milton-Union Public Troy-Miami County Public Library to uncover Ohio’s archaeological history. Library. • FINE READING: Children can come Learn about the remains and artifacts of Ohio’s first native inhabitants from the to the Milton-Union Public Library and end of the last ice age 12,000 years ago receive $3 off their fines for every half to the introduction of the first European hour of reading. explorers that arrived in the late 1600s. For more information, call 339-0502 or TUESDAY visit www.tmcpl.org. • LITERACY MEETING: The Troy Literacy Council, an all-volunteer organization, will meet at 7 p.m. at the Hayner Cultural Center in Troy. Adults seeking help with basic literacy or wish to learn English as a second language, and those interested in becoming tutors, are asked to contact the message center at (937) 660-3170 for more information. • TINY TOTS: The Tiny Tots program will be from 1-1:30 p.m. at the MiltonUnion Public Library. The interactive program is for children birth to 3 years old and their parents and caregivers. • BOARD MEETING: The Covington Board of Education will meet at 6 p.m. in the board of education office, 25 Grant St. The purpose of this meeting is to vote on a resolution to proceed with the OSFC building project and any other action that may come before the board.

WEDNESDAY • PERI MEETING: The Miami County Chapter of the Ohio Public Employee Retirees will meet at 11:30 a.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 248 Wood St., Piqua. Lunch is $10, payable at the door. Call Beth at 335-2771. Speaker will be state representative Richard Adams. The meeting is open to any current or retired Ohio public employee. • STORY HOUR: The Milton-Union Public Library will have a summer story hour at 10:30 a.m. for children kindergarten through second grade and 1:30 p.m. for children third through sixth grade. Programs include puppet shows, stories and crafts. Contact the library at (937) 698-5515 for weekly themes. • KIWANIS MEETING: The Kiwanis Club of Troy will meet from noon to 1 p.m. at the Troy Country Club. Jim Luken, a fellow Kiwanian, will give a presentation on the history of the Miami-Erie Canal with a focus on Miami County. For more information, contact Donn Craig, vice president, at (937) 418-1888.

THURSDAY • CHILDREN’S PROGRAM: A Boonshoft children’s program will be from 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library. Children up to fifth grade and their caretakers will explore the environment of the dinosaur and understand about possible causes for their extinction. Learn about fossils and take home a cast of Ohio’s state fossil. • FRIENDS MEETING: The New Friends of the Milton-Union Public Library will meet at 6:30 p.m. • SS SIMPLIFIED: As you near retirement, one of the biggest financial decisions you’ll need to make is when to begin receiving your Social Security retirement benefits. Join Susan Swinehart from SagePoint Financial at 6:30 p.m. at the Troy-Miami County Public Library to learn more about how your age and other factors can affect your retirement benefits. For more information, call 339-0502 or visit www.tmcpl.org. • DISCOVERY WALK: A morning discovery walk for adults will be from 8-9:30 a.m. at Aullwood Audubon Center, 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. Tom Hissong, education coordinator, will lead walkers as they experience the wonderful seasonal changes taking place. Bring binoculars.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY • GARDEN SHOW: The 15th annual spring Lost Creek Garden & Antique

JUNE 8 • FUNDRAISER FOR ANIMALS: The Miami County Humane Society and Troy Rec Center will have a joint fundraiser from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Troy Rec Center in downtown Troy. The event will include the Troy Animal Hospital, D.A.R.E., children’s games for prizes, 50/50 and basket and item raffles, cake walk, face painting, food items and more. Mugs T-shirts, sweatshirts and Animal Friends cards will be for sale. Pop Rocks also will offer a jump rope clinic for a $10 donation, and participants must bring their own rope. Call the Troy Rec at 339-1923 to preregister for the clinic. Participants are asked to bring cat or dog food, treats or litter to donate. • FISH FRY: The Pleasant Hill VFW Post No. 6557, 7578 W. Fenner Road, Ludlow Falls, will offer an all-you-caneat fish fry and smelt dinner with french fries, baked beans and applesauce for $8 from 5-7 p.m. • MOORE REUNION: The Moore family reunion, family of Estille Lucy Moore, will be from 1-4 p.m. at Troy Community Park, Shelter No. 7. Family are asked to bring a covered dish and the meal will be eaten at 2 p.m. • DISCOVERY DAY: Join Brukner staff on the second Saturday of every month this summer from 2-4 p.m. for hands-on fun for all ages, including adults. Staff will bring nets out for catching dragonflies, going to the creek and searching for crayfish and learning to use binoculars as participants search for backyard birds. Each program will include something cool you can take home to remember all you’ve learned. Visit www.bruknernature center.com for more information. Registration is preferred, but not required and is free for BNC members, non-member admission fee is $2.50 per person or $10 per family. • CREATE A PLANTER: A “Create Your Own Concrete Planter” craft program for adults will begin at 11 a.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library. Registration is required. Join staff as they get their hands dirty and make planters and stepping stones out of concrete. A rain date is planned if canceled. • TEEN TERRARIUM: A teen terrarium craft program will begin at 3 p.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library. The class is open to students 13-17. Make an indoor, low-maintenance garden for your room. Materials will be supplied, but feel free to bring in your own container. This is an outdoor program; plan for the weather. • DAR MEETING: The Piqua-Lewis Boyer American Daughters of the Revolution will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the YMCA Robinson Branch, 3060 South County Road 25-A, Troy. The program will be by Terry Purke concerning the Revolutionary War and Miami County. Hostesses will be Debbie Miller, Jane Behm and Kathy Thompson. There also will be installation of our new officers. • SPAGHETTI DINNER: The American Legion, 301 W. Water St., Piqua, will offer a spaghetti dinner beginning at 5 p.m. Meals will be $5 per person and $2.50 for children 8 and y0unger. Carry outs will be available. • DISCOVERY WALK: A family discovery walk will begin at 2:30 p.m. at Aullwood Audubon Center, 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. An Aullwood naturalist teacher will lead this leisurely walk along Aullwood’s trails to discover the natural delights of summer.

Sculptor to conduct workshop Nationally renowned Atlanta sculptor Andy Cunningham will conduct a week-long sculpture workshop at the new Lincoln Community Center Art House from 10:30 a.m. to noon June 3-7. Originally from Cleveland, Cunningham has been teaching at Woodward Academy in Atlanta for more than 25 years. He is recognized as a prominent national figure in sculpture who recently had a piece purchased for the permanent collection at the Lamar Dodd Art Center in

TROY LaGrange, Ga. He is a graduate of Georgia State University, has been an adjunct professor of ceramics at Georgia State, and he is department head for Governors Honors Program with the Department of Education in Georgia since 2005. Twelve students from Lincoln Community Center have been selected to work with Cunningham for a week. They will learn to use a subtractive technique

of sculpture using the classical medium of plaster. The finished pieces will be available for public viewing in the Lincoln Art House for a week following the workshop. Hours are Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30 to 6 p.m., or by appointment. A slideshow of the sculptures and events of the week will be available at www. LincolnArtHouse.com. For more information, contact Shane Carter, director of the Lincoln Community Center, at 335-2715.

COLLEGE BRIEFS

Bluffton University

Meyer of West Milton. Jessica Lynn Deeter, daughter of Roger and Stephany Deeter, Troy, has BLUFFTON — earned a bachelor’s degree Bluffton University students, alumni and friends in youth ministries and gathered for the universi- recreation. Nicholas Richard ty’s annual May Day and commencement festivities, Smith, son of Jeff May 4 and 5. The institu- Hardesty and Vickie Smith, Troy, earned a tion’s 113th commencement ceremony, held May bachelor’s degree in social work. 5, recognized 279 graduTyler Leland Wright of ates. Presenting “Bending Troy, earned a bachelor’s that arc” was this year’s degree in mathematics. commencement speaker, Earning a master’s Dr. J. Denny Weaver, professor emeritus of religion. degree in business administration: Logan Scott Local graduates Billing, Eric L. include: Kreinbrink, Glenn William Amanda Jane Bryner of LaCombe, Amy Michelle Tipp City, earned a bacheLong LeVan and Robert J. lor’s degree in organizaMagoteaux Jr., all from tional management. Troy. Earning a bachelor’s degree in organizational Columbia Law management: Harold Eugene Bailey II, Heather School E. Bolton, Melissa Herrmann, Aaron R. Long, TROY — Jessica L. Zachariah Carlysle Subler, daughter of Susan Mumford and Rita A. and John Subler of Troy, Smothers, all from Troy, received her juris doctor and Tara Leslie Saettelfrom Columbia Law School

in May, where she was named a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar. While at Columbia Law School, Subler served on the board of the Columbia Law Women’s Association, was active on the Columbia Business Law Review and participated in the Mediation Clinic. She plans to join Kirkland & Ellis LLP in New York City after successful completion of the New York Bar Exam.

Heidelberg University TIFFIN — Heidelberg University Provost Dr. David Weininger has released the names of 305 students named to the spring semester dean’s list. Included on the list is Austin Hunter, a sophomore criminal justice and political science major from Tipp City.

MILITARY BRIEFS

Cody R. Walling SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Air Force Airman Cody R. Walling graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, WALLING eightweek program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Walling is the son of Tammy Walling of Troy. He is a 2012 graduate of Troy High School.

COSIP

Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

Donald B. Cosip

Airmen who complete basic training earn four SAN ANTONIO, Texas credits toward an associ— Air Force Airman ate in applied science Donald B. Cosip graduatdegree through the ed from basic military training at Joint Base San Community College of the Air Force. Antonio-Lackland, San Cosip is the son of Antonio, Texas. The airman completed Lilibeth Cosip of Tipp City. an intensive, eight-week program that included He is a 2012 graduate training in military disci- of Tippecanoe High pline and studies, Air School, Tipp City.

IRS case gets tea party steamed up CINCINNATI (AP) — While it’s clear that Ohio tea party activists are fired up over recent disclosures that the Internal Revenue Service targeted conservative groups, what that will mean to politics in the pivotal swing state is still a little hazy. The investigation into IRS actions has given people opposed to big government and high taxes a rallying focus in recent weeks. The case has extra significance in Ohio because the key IRS office involved is in Cincinnati, and organizations such as the Ohio Liberty Coalition, Dayton tea party and several other state tea party groups and activists are among those who complained about being subjected to burdensome extra scrutiny in their efforts to gain tax-exempt status. “The (Barack) Obama administration should have let sleeping dogs lie,” said George Brunemann, a Cincinnati tea party leader who helped organize a town hall-style forum Wednesday night that brought out hundreds of activists and had an online audience. “They have given people a new reason to be engaged. They were using the IRS as a hammer

against us, and they got caught.” The White House has said none of its senior officials was involved in the targeting, which came during 2010-12. After helping Republicans win big in Ohio in 2010, including the governorship, the tea party saw a Democratic president carry their state in 2012 while GOP Treasurer Josh Mandel fell to Democrat Sherrod Brown in the U.S. Senate race. “Disappointment can lead to a decline in activity; this happens to a lot of groups,” said University of Akron political scientist John C. Green. The IRS case has led to “a revival,” Green said, but he added there had already been renewed activity in Ohio by tea party leaders over other issues aimed

at state Republican leaders. Some tea party leaders and other activists are unhappy about GOP Gov. John Kasich’s support for expansion of Medicaid coverage and a severance tax on the oil and gas industry. They are also upset over Republican U.S. Sen. Rob Portman’s change of heart for same-sex marriage.

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OPINION

Contact us David Fong is the executive editor of the Troy Daily News. You can reach him at 440-5228 or send him e-mail at dfong@civitasmedia.com.

Sunday, June 2, 2013 • A4

T AILY NEWS • WWW .TROYDAILYNEWS .COM MROY IAMIDV ALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS .COM

In Our View Miami Valley Sunday News Editorial Board FRANK BEESON / Group Publisher DAVID FONG / Executive Editor

ONLINE POLL

(WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM)

Question: Did you attend the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival? Watch for final poll results in next Sunday’s Miami

Valley Sunday News. Last week’s question: Do you plan on attending the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival?

Results: Yes: 21% No: 79% Watch for a new poll question in next Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” — First Amendment, U.S. Constitution

EDITORIAL ROUNDUP Detroit Free Press on redefining the war on terror: In an address remarkable for both its candor and its humility, President Barack Obama sought Thursday to limit the scope of his predecessor’s global war on terror, pivoting from a full-court campaign of military pre-emption to a new era of proportionality and political engagement. Squarely confronting critics who have decried his administration’s unprecedented use of unmanned drone strikes and its continuing detention of suspected terrorists at Guantanamo, the president pledged to curtail both practices and called on federal lawmakers to facilitate the transition to a containment effort that relies less heavily on military force. He said Gitmo has become “the symbol around the world for an America that flouts the rule of law” and warned that “history will cast a harsh judgment” if the U.S. continues to imprison suspects indefinitely without prosecuting them before criminal juries or military tribunals on American soil. … For Obama, Thursday’s address to the National Defense University was an effort to distance both his presidency and the United States from the open-ended war on terror then-President George W. Bush declared in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He noted that five years have passed since “the premise for opening Gitmo — that detainees would not be able to challenge their detention — was found unconstitutional.” And he acknowledged that casualties inflicted on innocent civilians have damaged U.S. credibility with both the people and governments of strategically important allies. Among the most refreshing themes in Thursday’s address was Obama’s call for the expanded use of diplomacy and foreign aid, both of whose effectiveness has been grossly underestimated. As the president noted, current expenditures on foreign assistance constitute “only a tiny fraction of what we spend fighting wars that our assistance might ultimately prevent.” A single speech will scarcely bring about the sea change Obama seeks. But the shift in focus and tactics that he outlined Thursday is both worthwhile and long overdue, and America’s long-term efforts to contain terrorism can only be enhanced by its swift implementation. New York Times on nuclear weapons funding: The United States has about 180 B61 gravity nuclear bombs based in Europe. They are the detritus of the cold war, tactical weapons deployed in Belgium, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Turkey to protect NATO allies from the once-feared Soviet advantage in conventional arms. But the cold war is long over, and no American military commander can conceive of their ever being used. Even so, President Obama has put $537 million in his 2014 budget proposal to upgrade these bombs. When all is said and done, experts say, the cost of the rebuilding program is expected to total around $10 billion — $4 billion more than an earlier projection — and yield an estimated 400 weapons, fitted with new guided tail kits so that they are more reliable and accurate than the current ones. This is a nonsensical decision, not least because it is at odds with Obama’s own vision. In a seminal speech in Prague in 2009 and a strategy review in 2010, Obama advocated the long-term goal of a world without nuclear arms and promised to reduce America’s reliance on them. He also promised not to field a new and improved warhead. But the B61 upgrade would significantly increase America’s tactical nuclear capability and send the wrong signal while Obama is trying to draw Russia into a new round of nuclear reduction talks that are supposedly aimed at cutting tactical, as well as strategic, arsenals. In addition to overspending on warheads, Obama has cut the Global Threat Reduction Initiative program, which reduces and protects from terrorism vulnerable nuclear material at sites worldwide, by 15 percent from 2013 levels. His budget is being rewritten by Congress, but in the nuclear area it is a disappointing, and befuddling, measure of his priorities.

THEY SAID IT “So far we are pleased to see the crowd still came out. All the organizations said they’ve been doing pretty well and we’ve had a good response from our crafters as well.” — Troy Strawberry Festival Manager Heather Dorsten, on the crowds that came to the festival Saturday “It’s one of the best and the longest parades around — we love it.” — Troy Strawberry Festival parade attendee Daryl Sanger “It was cool to perform for people from another country. We’ve only performed for people in Ohio, never from a foreign country.” — Troy Pop Rocks jump rope team member Riley Becker, on performing in front of a delegation from Takahashi City, Troy’s sister city in Japan

Video game companies not telling the truth Telling the truth. The whole truth. Without being prodded. Nothing in the world could be easier. And yet, heading into the next generation of video game consoles, the two biggest players — Microsoft and Sony — are, for the most part, refusing to do just that. With every gamer very impatiently waiting and trying to decide which company’s upcoming machine to throw their money at, there are tons of questions about the Playstation 4 and newly-christened XBox One that everyone wants to see answered — and just about all of them revolve around digital rights management (DRM) and always-online requirements. Both companies had chances to answer those questions and quell the many, many rumors that have their consumers up in arms and ready to boycott the next-gen consoles in their hour-long unveiling pressers. Both companies actively chose not to. Sony chose to show off its new controller and some of the coollooking games that will be on the Playstation 4 — without ever showing the console itself. Microsoft heard the criticisms of

Josh Brown Sunday Columnist that decision and put the XBox One itself on display right off the bat — but then focused on all of its bonus capabilities aside from playing games and ignored showing the games themselves, choosing to wait for the upcoming E3 expo for those. I get both decisions, I do. What I don’t get, as a gamer with (hopefully by the time comes depending on prices — which also were not touched on) the cash to shell out on only one of these consoles, is why neither company bothered addressing a single issue that actually matters to us. Especially given how long rumors have been swirling, and the backlash to them. Most of those rumors involve the companies’ stance on used games. Console game developers have been griping about the fact

that gamers can sell their used games back to retailers, who then resell them at discounted prices — and the developers get no share of that second-hand sale. Before either new console was even announced, reports circulated that they would include some form of DRM to ensure gamers couldn’t buy second-hand games, either by requiring connections to the Internet, installing games to hard drives or including activation codes to tie games to user accounts. DRM is a dealbreaker for more than half of the potential buyers out there — and that may be underselling it. Sony said nothing concrete about its stance at its unveiling months ago. Microsoft inexplicably did the same two weeks ago — leading to mountains more criticism for both, as well as tons of incomplete, misinformed or just plain speculatory reports. Naturally, both companies have denied those reports like crazy, but neither has given anything of substance as to what their plans actually are. Just lots of platitudes. “I’m working on rounding up the answers, and they look pretty good,” Microsoft spokesman Larry Hyrb said on Twitter. “It’s a massively important issue, and of

course we are going to do the right thing,” President of Sony Computer Entertainment Shuhei Yoshida said. Rounding up answers? If the console is already built and functioning, don’t you think those answers are important to already have? And the right thing for who? Your customers, or your alreadywealthy publishing company friends? No one is saying. Despite the fact the gaming press is ever-present, no one wants to truly clarify things, maybe because we won’t like the answer. But as instantaneously connected as the world is — particularly the gaming community — thanks to the Internet, Sony and Microsoft still believe they can hold onto the info and release it on their own terms. But if you’re hiding the truth, you may as well be lying. And telling the truth is so easy. Just open your mouth and say it. The gaming world is ready to listen. TDN Sports Editor Josh Brown appears Sundays. Oh well, at least neither one is still a generation behind like Nintendo with its joke of a Wii-U.

Troy

Miami Valley Sunday News

FRANK BEESON Group Publisher

DAVID FONG Executive Editor

LEIANN STEWART Retail Advertising Manager

CHERYL HALL Circulation Manager

BETTY BROWNLEE Business Manager

SCARLETT SMITH Graphics Manager

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LOCAL & NATION

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OBITUARIES

Pamela Susan Moya TROY — Pamela Susan Moya, 59, of Troy, Ohio, died Saturday, June 1, 2013, in Kindred Hospital, Dayton, Ohio. She was born Jan. 20, 1954, in Covington, Ky., to the late Harley Jones and Roberta (Calender) Jones. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, Lucas and Michelle Moya of Stafford, Va.; grandchildren, Makayla and Lasario Moya; sister, Winona Hanks of Florida; nieces, Joani Powers and Jackie Prichard; and great-niece, Lyndsay Yeager all of Kentucky. Pamela attended Georgetown College in Kentucky. She was a member of the St. Patrick Catholic Church, Troy. Pamela was formerly employed with AT&T Company, Martin Marietta Company and Federated Department Stores. Memorial service will be at 1 p.m Monday, June 3, 2013, at Baird Funeral Home, Troy, Ohio, with the Rev. Fr. James Duell officiating. Friends may express condolences to the family through www.bairdfuneralhome.com.

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Jean Stapleton, TV’s ’70s Edith Bunker, dies at 90

NEW YORK (AP) — Jean Stapleton, the stagetrained character actress who played Archie Bunker’s far better half, the sweetly naive Edith, in TV’s groundbreaking 1970s comedy “All in the Family,” has died. She was 90. Stapleton died Friday of natural causes at her New York City home surrounded by friends and family, her children said Saturday. “It is with great love and heavy hearts that we say farewell to our collective Virginia Lee ‘Ginny’ Hensler Mother, with a capital M,” said her son and daughter, COVINGTON — Virginia Lee “Ginny” Hensler, 81, of John Putch and Pamela Covington, passed away Friday, May 31, 2013, at the Putch, in a statement. “Her Versailles Health Care Center. Ginny was born in Springfield, Ill., on Dec. 30, 1931, to devotion to her craft and her family taught us all the late Louis and Violet (Houston) Pilcher. great life lessons.” She was a retail clerk at Elder Beerman with more Little known to the pubthan 40 years of service. lic before “All In the She was a member of the Covington Presbyterian Family,” Stapleton coChurch. starred with Carroll She was a member of Covington Eagles Aerie No. O’Connor in the top-rated 3998. CBS sitcom about an unreShe was an avid bowler and loved to roller skate. pentant bigot, the wife he She was preceded in death by her parents; daughter, churlishly but fondly called Linda Kay Magill; and eight brothers and sisters. “Dingbat,” their daughter Ginny is survived by her husband of 63 years, Wayne Gloria (Sally Struthers) R. Hensler; two sons and daughters-in-law, Larry and and liberal son-in-law Mary Ann Hensler of Covington and Gary and Amy Mike, aka Meathead (Rob Hensler of Piqua; daughter and son-in-law, Diana and Reiner). Chris Beckstedt of Covington; eight grandchildren, Stapleton received eight Jennifer and James Walker, Derrick Gullett, Jarred Emmy nominations and Gullett, Evan Hensler, Steve and Micah Magill, Shawn won three times during her and Cyndi Magill, Brian Beckstedt and Eric Beckstedt; eight-year tenure with “All three great-grandchildren, Kaelynn, Mackenzye and in the Family.” Produced by Mckenly; and nieces, nephews, other relatives and Norman Lear, the series friends. broke through the timidity Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at of U.S. TV with social and the Bridges-Stocker-Fraley Funeral Home, Covington, political jabs and ranked as with Pastor John Shelton officiating. Interment will be in AP PHOTO the No. 1-rated program for Miami Memorial Park Cemetery, Covington. The family This 1991 file photo shows Jean Stapleton in the off-Broadway musical theater an unprecedented five will receive friends 5-8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral piece called “Bob Appetit.” years in a row. Lear would home. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Pat go on to create a run of Summitt Foundation (Alzheimer’s) www.patsummitt.org. socially conscious sitcoms. and Damn Yankees,” in Archie’s inflated ego,” she 1979. She had no trouble “No one gave more pro- which her performance and added. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.stockshaking off Edith “when She confounded Archie the nasal tone she used in found ‘How to be a Human erfraley.com. Being’ lessons than Jean “All in the Family” attract- with her malapropos “You you finish a role, you’re Stapleton,” Lear said ed Lear’s attention and led know what they say, misery done with it. There’s no Richard “Dick” Lee Benkert Saturday. In a statement, to his auditioning her for is the best company” and deep, spooky connection PIQUA — Richard “Dick” Lee Benkert, 87, of Piqua, open-hearted acceptance of with the parts you play,” Reiner added: “Jean was a the role of Archie’s wife. went to be with the Lord at 8:35 p.m. Friday May 31, others, including her belea- she told the AP in 2002 but “I wasn’t a leading lady brilliant comedienne with 2013, at Piqua Manor Nursing Home. guered son-in-law and after O’Connor’s 2001 type,” she once told The exquisite timing. Working He was born in Piqua on July 16, 1925, to the late Carl and death she got condolence with her was one of the Associated Press. “I knew African-Americans A. and Helen P. (Rengel) Benkert. letters from people who other minorities that where I belonged. And greatest experiences of my On June 21, 1943, in Newport, Ky., he married Mary E. thought they were really actually, I found character Archie disdained. life.” Haines. As the series pro- married. When people Stapleton also earned work much more interestShe preceded him in death on November 8, 2000. gressed, Stapleton had the spotted her in public and ing than leading ladies.” Emmy nominations for Richard is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, Bonnie and Bob Erwin, and Sandra and Hubert Kuhn, all playing Eleanor Roosevelt Edith, of the dithery man- chance to offer a deeper called her “Edith,” she cheerfully high- take on Edith as the char- would politely remind of Piqua; one sister-in-law, Mary Lou in the 1982 film “Eleanor, ner, acter faced milestones them that her name was pitched voice and family First Lady of the World” Benkert, Newburgh, Ind.; five grandand for a guest appearance loyalty, charmed viewers including a breast cancer Jean. children, Kevin and Paula Kuhn of Stapleton proved her Piqua, Ohio, Kelly Thomas of Piqua, in 1995 on “Grace Under but was viewed by scare and menopause. She Stapleton as “submissive” was proud of the show’s own toughness when her Fire.” Ohio, Jill and Chris Bobb of Piqua, Her big-screen films and, she hoped, removed political edge, citing an husband of 26 years, Ohio, Jacquelyn and Larry Wiles of included a pair directed by from reality. In a 1972 New episode about a draft William Putch, suffered a Piqua, Ohio, and Jana and Jabin Nora Ephron: the 1998 York Times interview, she dodger who clashes with fatal heart attack in 1983 Cook of Denver, Colo.; 13 greatTom Hanks-Meg Ryan said she didn’t think Edith Archie as a personal at age 60 while the couple grandchildren; and several nieces was touring with a play romance “You’ve Got Mail” was a typical American favorite. and nephews. But Stapleton worried directed by Putch. and 1996’s “Michael” star- housewife “at least I hope Dick also is survived by lifelong Stapleton went on stage about typecasting, rejectring John Travolta. She she’s not.” friends, Paul and Irene Graham, BENKERT “What Edith represents ing any roles, commercials in Syracuse, N.Y., that also turned down the Piqua, Ohio. chance to star in the popu- is the housewife who is still or sketches on variety night and continued on He was preceded in death by three lar mystery show, “Murder, in bondage to the male fig- shows that called for a with the tour. “That’s what brothers: Carl Benkert Jr., Thomas She Wrote,” which became ure, very submissive and character similar to Edith. he would have wanted,” Benkert and Jerome Benkert. a showcase for Angela restricted to the home. She Despite pleas from Lear she told People magazine Richard graduated from Piqua Central is very naive, and she kind not to let Edith die, in 1984. “I realized it was a Lansbury. High School in 1943. The theater was of thinks through a mist, Stapleton left the show, re- refuge to have that play, Dick had a passion for music and loved Stapleton’s first love and and she lacks the educa- titled “Archie’s Place,” in rather than to sit and walto sing. He proudly served his country as a member of the U.S. she compiled a rich tion to expand her world. I 1980, leaving Archie to low. And it was his show.” Stapleton was born in resume, starting in 1941 as would hope that most carry on as a widower. Marines during World War II. New York City to Joseph “My decision is to go out housewives are not like a New England stock playRichard was a member of Piqua American Legion Post er and moving to Broadway that,” said Stapleton, into the world and do Murray and his wife, No. 184 and Piqua VFW Post No. 4874. in the 1950s and ’60s. In whose character regularly something else. I’m not Marie Stapleton Murray, a He owned and operated Benkert’s Food Market in She attended 1964, she originated the obeyed her husband’s constituted as an actress to singer. Piqua for 20 years. Richard then became a veteran’s role of Mrs. Strakosh in demand to “stifle yourself.” remain in the same role ... Hunter College, leaving for service officer for Miami County for 12 years. But Edith was honest . My identity as an actress a secretarial stint before “Funny Girl” with Barbra Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday June 4, Streisand. Others musicals and compassionate, and “in is in jeopardy if I invested embarking on acting stud2013, at Melcher-Sowers Funeral Home, Piqua with the and plays included “Bells most situations she says my entire career in Edith ies with the American Rev. Ed Ellis officiating. Burial will follow in Forest Hill Cemetery, Piqua. Full military honors will be provided by Are Ringing,” ”Rhinoceros” the truth and pricks Bunker,” she told the AP in Theatre Wing and others. the Veterans Elite Tribute Squad. Calling hours will be from 1noon to 1 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Miami County, P.O. Box 502, Troy, OH 45373. RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) Where others Liles of Joyner’s Funeral Home said. last year, when an effort to restore The family would deeply appreciate cards or letters of Folklorist Jefferson Currie, who them began. That process is about saw trash, Vollis Simpson saw whimmemories or shared experiences you had with Dick. sical, wind-powered whirligigs, cre- began working with Simpson about halfway complete, with a few of the

Whirligig art creator passes

ations with hundreds of moving parts that turned and twirled. The whirligigs were made from recycled heating and air conditioning • George W. Brubaker PIQUA — George W. Brubaker, 94, of Piqua, died at 2 p.m. systems and reflector material Simpson patiently cut into thousands Thursday, May 30, 2013, at Sterling House of Piqua. His of tiny pieces that made the works funeral arrangements are pending through the Jamieson & shine when lights hit them in the Yannucci Funeral Home. dark. His work was featured in museums, backyards, dentist offices and OBITUARY POLICY the 1996 Olympics. “I got caught with a lot of material, In respect for friends and detailed obituary information and I worked it out,” Simpson said in family, the Troy Daily News published in the Troy Daily a 2010 interview with The Associated prints a funeral directory free News, should contact their Press. of charge. Families who would local funeral home for pricing Simpson, 94, died Friday, Beth like photographs and more details.

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larger whirligigs still in the pasture, waiting to be moved. The Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park is scheduled to open in November in Wilson, about 10 miles from his home. People from across the world visited Simpson at his shop, and he would happily sit and talk with them. “What Vollis was doing mechanically, creatively and artistically is unparalleled,” Currie aid. “He worked on a scale that was a lot larger than anyone else. And even in that scale, he had a lot of intricacy. And I think that’s one of the things people recognized.

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LOCAL

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Berry good day in Troy TDN STAFF PHOTOS/ ANTHONY WEBER

Elaina Giblin, 2, and her aunt, Leah Giblin, spot the beginning of the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival parade Saturday as it heads toward downtown Troy. Elaina was watching the parade with her aunt and parents, Matt and Kendra Giblin of Troy. According to Kendra Giblin, this is the first parade for Elaina.

City of Troy Mayor Mike Beamish along with Takahashi City, Japan Mayor Takanori Kondo, and festival chairman Jon Dankworth’s family including Susan, Olivia, Taylor and Jonathon Dankworth, pour coloring into the fountain on the Public Square Saturday in downtown Troy.

Former festival chairwoman, Corrie Schweser, left, discusses a visit by a delegation from Takahashi City, Japan with Mayor Takanori Kondo, center, and City of Troy Mayor Mike Beamish Saturday on the Public Square during the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival.

Festival-goers flock to the levee Saturday for the 2013 Troy Strawberry Festival.

7


CONTACT US

SPORTS

■ Sports Editor Josh Brown (937) 440-5251, (937) 440-5232 jbrown@civitasmedia.com

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

TODAY’S TIPS

■ Baseball

• FOOTBALL: The 20th annual Matt Light Football Camp will be held June 10-11 at Harmon Field in Greenville. It is a free two-day camp for boys and girls ages 8-14. The registration deadline is Monday. • VOLLEYBALL: The Lehman High School coaching staff will be host a youth volleyball camp for girls entering grade 4-8 Monday through Wednesday. The cost of camp is $50 and you can register the day of camp. Cost includes camp t-shirt. • BASKETBALL: The Troy Boys Basketball Camp will run from June 4-7 at the Trojan Activities Center. Times will be 9 a.m. to noon for grades 1-4 and 14 p.m. for grades 5-8. The cost is $55, with checks payable to Troy Basketball Parents Association. Camp forms are available at all Troy City Schools, or you can sign up on the first day of camp. For more information, contact coach Tim Miller at 332-6710 or 339-6576. • BASKETBALL: Troy High School girls basketball will be hosting a twoday girls basketball camp on June 3-4 for girls entering grades 1-8 at Troy High School’s new gymnasium. The camp will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and lunch will be provided. The cost of the camp is $55, and arrangements can be made. Girls from anywhere are welcome. If interested, email coach Nathan Kopp at koppn@troy.k12.oh.us or call him at (937) 469-2531. • BASKETBALL: Troy Christian girls basketball will run an elementary camp for grades 1-6 from 10 a.m. to noon June 10-14. The cost is $35. There is also a junior high camp for grades 7-8 from 1-3 p.m. June 10-14. The cost is $35. For more information, contact Dick Steineman at (937) 451-1723. • GOLF: The Milton-Union Bulldog Golf Classic, sponsored by the MiltonUnion Education Foundation, will take place June 22 at Beechwood Golf Course. The tournament is a Texas scramble with a noon shotgun start. The cost is $80 per person or $300 per foursome. The deadline to register is June 15. • GOLF: The Tippecanoe boys basketball program will host a golf outing at 11:30 a.m. June 28 at Homestead Golf Course. Proceeds will benefit the Tippecanoe boys basketball program, and Hickory River Barbecue and drinks will be provided. Visit www.reddevilbasketball.com and click on “Golf” to download a registration form.

Missed chances

SPORTS CALENDAR TODAY No events scheduled MONDAY Legion Baseball Miami Valley Wolverines at Troy Post 43 (7:30 p.m.) TUESDAY Legion Baseball Dayton Dynasty at Troy Post 43 (8 p.m.) WEDNESDAY Legion Baseball Piqua Legion at Troy Post 43 (7:30 p.m.) THURSDAY Softball Division IV State at Firestone Field Covington vs. Strasburg-Franklin (3 p.m.) Legion Baseball Kalamazoo Maroons at Troy Post 43 (7 p.m.)

WHAT’S INSIDE Major League Baseball........A9 NBA .....................................A9 National Hockey League .....A9 Local Sports.................A9-A10 Golf ....................................A10 Tennis.................................A10 Television Schedule ...........A11 Scoreboard .........................A11

JOSH BROWN

A8 June 2, 2013

Devils fall short of regional title BY COLIN FOSTER Associate Sports Editor colinfoster@civitasmedia.com Fresh off their first regional win ever and setting a new school record for wins, the Tippecanoe Red Devils looked poised to take the next step Saturday in the Division II regional final against Jonathan Alder — particularly with their ace Ben Hughes on the mound. But in a game of this magnitude, making the most of your chances is key — and the Red Devils simply didn’t do that in a 3-0 loss to the Pioneers at Athletes In Action Field.

XENIA Jonathan Alder, which finished the game with six hits, scored its first run in the third when Hughes balked with runners on second and third. With runners on second and third in the home fourth, the ball was put in play to shortstop Cameron Johnson, who tried to throw the runner out at the plate, but the ball sailed over catcher B.J. Donathan’s head and plated two runs. STAFF PHOTO/MARK DOWD All of Alder’s runs against Tippecanoe’s Zach Robbins is tagged out by the Johnathan Hughes were unearned. Alder catcher Saturday during the Division II regional title game

■ See DEVILS on A9 at Athletes in Action Field.

■ Track and Field

■ Softball

CIVITAS MEDIA PHOTO/MIKE ULLERY

Covington’s Jackie Siefring runs the 300 hurdles Saturday at the Division III regional meet at Piqua High School.

Champs all around STAFF PHOTOS/BEN ROBINSON

The Triad dugout looks on as Covington’s Casey Yingst belts an RBI triple in the fifth inning Saturday during the Division IV regional championship game in Tipp City. The Buccaneers defeated the Cardinals 4-2 to advance to its third straight state semifinal round.

Three straight Buccs win region again, on to state BY JOSH BROWN Sports Editor jbrown@civitasmedia.com Not used to getting hit hard — or at all — and knowing Triad’s penchant for coming from behind after its regional semifinal win, Covington’s Casey Yingst didn’t falter. “I felt fine,” she said after the Cardinals piled up seven hits in the final three innings. “We had the lead, and the defense behind me is flawless. “You can’t panic.”

BY ROB KISER Civitas Media rkiser@civitasmedia.com Whether it was hurdles or distance, the Covington boys and girls had it covered Saturday at the Division III regional final at Piqua. Troy Cron and Jackie Siefring combined for three regional titles, while freshman Carly Shell won the girls 3,200 and Tara Snipes was second in the 800 on one of Covington’s most productive days at a regional meet.

PIQUA

TIPP CITY Shortstop Cassidy Cain certainly didn’t. With the tying runs on first and second and two outs in the bottom of the seventh, Jenna Welty hit a slow grounder to short. Cain was forced to take it on an in-between hop and momentarily bobbled the ball — but she recovered quickly and made a heads-up play to toss it to third to get the game-ending force and send the Buccaneers to their third straight state tournament after a 4-2 win in

4 regional titles for Covington

Covington shorstop Cassidy Cain catches a pop fly Saturday dur-

■ See BUCCS on A9 ing the Buccaneers’ win over Triad.

“That was sweet,” Siefring said after watching both Cron and Dalton Bordelon advance to state in the 300 hurdles. “And Ben (Miller) ran a PR in the 110s. It was a great day for our hurdlers.” Cron swept the 110 hurdles (14.85 seconds) and 300 hurdles (38.95). “We push each other in practice all the time,” Cron said. “Actually, Jackie (Siefring) pushes us more than we push her. It’s great having her. I wanted to Dalton (Bordelon and Ben (Miller) to both make it to state. Ben ran a great race, he just missed and Dalton made it. I think having been there (at state) is going to help me.” Bordelon ran a 40.32 in the 300 hurdles, finishing third. “I have Troy (Cron) to push me every day in practice,”

■ See DIVISION III on A10

■ Track and Field

Milton’s Martin 4th, headed to state

Logano wins Nationwide race Joey Logano savors the times he led Joe Gibbs Racing into Victory Lane. Turns out, he enjoys beating JGR so much more. See Page A10.

Staff Reports

DAYTON

It came as no surprise to Milton-Union coach Michael Meredith when junior Wes Martin placed fourth in the shot put at regional Saturday to earn a spot at the Division II state meet. That’s because Martin appeared very confident going in. “Right before he started throwing, he looked over and said ‘I feel good today.’ You could tell Wes was on his game,” Meredith said. Martin, Milton-Union’s last

remaining track and field athlete, placed fourth at the regional meet with a toss of 49-9.25 Saturday at Welcome Stadium in Dayton. Martin was sitting in third for most of the day before Goshen’s Calvin Phillips bumped him to fourth with a final throw of 50-9.25. River Valley’s Quinn Levering won the competition with a toss of 57-7.5. All three athletes ahead of Martin in the standings were seniors. “He was cool today,” Meredith

said. “He didn’t freak out or anything. For a kid who wasn’t going to do track this year to make state is saying something. I mean, he’s going to be a big-time college football player, he’s got full rides everywhere. I don’t know if it was the convincing by all the coaches or if he decided to do it, but he’s the best athlete in the school. “So him making the state meet isn’t a big surprise. Wes was on his game today.” And the scary thing is that Meredith doesn’t even think he has reached his full potential yet.

“Those 49- and 50-foot throws aren’t his potential, those aren’t where he’s at,” Meredith said. “What will be interesting will be watching how far he can go with it, because I don’t think he’s reached his potential yet. It’s just going to take one throw (at state). He had five-foot PR at district, so I’m hoping we see a fivefoot PR at state.” • Division I Todda Norris may have not qualified for the state in the long jump, but she did pick up some key points for her team to push

■ See DIVISION I on A10

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SPORTS

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■ Softball

Sunday, June 2, 2012

A9

■ Major League Baseball

Buccs ■ CONTINUED FROM A8 Saturday’s Division IV regional championship in Tipp City. “I knew (third baseman) Heidi (Snipes) would be there, and I knew the other two girls were too fast to get. I only had the one play,” Cain said. And even in that situation, in such a big game and after a brief bobble, Cain still easily kept her head and made the play. “I was just focused,” Cain said. “You can’t think about it at a time like that. You just have to do it.” “She (Cain) makes those plays all the time,” Yingst said. “I wasn’t worried at all.” And that kind of attitude — to go along with heaps of talent — is exactly how the top-ranked Buccaneers have piled up a 30-0 record this season, and it’s exactly why they’re moving on to Thursday’s state semifinal game, where they will play Strasburg-Franklin, for a third straight season. And while the majority of those wins have been blowouts, including a 17-0 laugher in the district final against Franklin Monroe and a 10-0 win over Marion Local in the regional semifinal — in which Yingst threw a nohitter — every time Covington has been tested this season, it’s aced it. “This is the way it’s supposed to be,” Covington coach Dean Denlinger said. “We always tell the girls that you can’t runrule everybody. The regional final is supposed to be a tough game, and I think this can only help us next week. “And we even had an off-day at the plate today. We had a couple of chances to put extra runs on the board, and we just didn’t execute.” The Buccs only had seven hits in the game — the first time all year they’ve had less than 10. But they made enough of them count early on. Connor Schaffer

STAFF PHOTO/BEN ROBINSON

Covington’s Brittanie Flora slides back into third base Saturday against Triad. reached on an error to lead off the top of the second, but Triad — which finished the year a deceptive 13-17 after being forced to forfeit double digits-worth in games due to using an illegal player earlier in the year — got the lead runner out on a force play. After a pop out for the second out, Brittanie Flora stole second and took third on an errant pickoff attempt. Haley Adams then came through with the game’s first hit, a clutch two-out single to drive in the first run. Adams then kicked off the next rally in the fourth, beating out a two-out infield single, which was followed by a bloop single by Cain. Adams broke for third and made it safely, and Cain took second on the throw. A wild pitch allowed Adams to score, but Cain was caught rounding third to far to end the inning. Still,

■ National Basketball Association

Covington led 2-0. And with Yingst cruising, that two runs seemed like plenty. Yingst struck out three and allowed only one baserunner on an error through the first four innings, and she seemed poised to toss another nohitter. After a leadoff single by Heidi Cron and a walk to Jessie Shilt to start the fifth, the Buccs looked poised to deliver a knockout blow. But the lead runner got caught in a rundown after faking stealing third, and a fielder’s choice that again got the lead runner left the Buccs with a runner on first with two outs. Yingst came through, though, hammering the first pitch she saw off the base of the fence in left for an RBI triple, and two pitches later another passed ball allowed that run to score, as well, giving the Buccs a 4-0 lead.

“It’s about time,” Yingst said of the big hit. Triad chose that time to wake up. Jenna Ober singled up the middle with one out in the fifth for the Cardinals’ first hit, and Chelsea Price followed with another single. But Yingst got one of her eight strikeouts on the day and a flyout to center to end that inning. Maddi Ehrenborg then led off the sixth with a single, Welty singled and Dayna Ober hit an RBI double to the right-center gap to give Triad its first run. Hannah Watkins then grounded out to second to bring home another run, and a flyout to right ended the inning with a runner stranded on third. Yingst got the first two hitters in the seventh out, but nine-hitter Summer Detrick blooped in a single to keep the game going, and Ehrenborg drew Yingst’s only walk of the game — but the Buccs didn’t panic, Cain got the lead runner at third by a step and Covington celebrated. “Three trips to state in three years. That’s impressive,” Denlinger said. “And now we can talk about what we’ll do there now that we’re going. I’m pretty superstitious, so we haven’t talked about that until today. The girls played well today, and they played hard.” And while they’ve been to Akron three straight years, the Buccs still have the perfect mix of excitement — and focus on what comes next. “It’s still awesome,” Yingst said. “Not many teams get to go at all. To do it three times in a row is remarkable. But we’ve still got unfinished business, too.” “It’s exciting, but we want to win it this year,” Cain said. “We want to make this year different.” Cov.........010 120 0 — 4 7 1 Triad......000 002 0 — 2 7 4 Yingst and Shaffer. Watkins and Ehrenborg. WP — Yingst. LP — Watkins. 2B — D. Ober (T). 3B Yingst (C). Records: — Covington 30-0, Triad 13-17.

AP PHOTO

Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Mike Leake throws against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the first inning Saturday in Pittsburgh.

Leake, Reds shut out Pirates, 2-0 PITTSBURGH (AP) — Mike Leake continued his recent run of strong pitching by working six scoreless innings Saturday night as the Cincinnati Reds beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 2-0. Leake (5-2) scattered seven hits as the Pirates stranded seven runners during his six innings. He had five strikeouts and one walk. In his last four starts, Leake has gone 3-0 with a 0.27 ERA, allowing only one run in 33 innings. The Reds shut out Pittsburgh for the second straight night as the Pirates lost back-to-back games for the first time since May 8-9. On Friday, Johnny Cueto pitched eight innings of a one-hitter. Francisco Liriano (3-2) struck out 11 in six innings and allowed only one run but lost his second straight decision. Liriano also struck out seven batters in a row between the first and third innings, tying the club record set by Erik

Bedard on May 3, 2012 at St. Louis. Aroldis Chapman pitched a scoreless ninth, striking out Alex Presley swinging on runners on first and second to end it for 14th save in 16 opportunities. Cincinnati second baseman Brandon Phillips, who entered the day with a National League-leading 44 RBIs, had two hits but left the game in the eighth inning with a bruised left forearm after being hit by a pitch from Tony Watson. X-rays were negative. Indians 5, Rays 0 CLEVELAND — Ubaldo Jimenez pitched eight scoreless innings and the Cleveland Indians defeated the Tampa Bay Rays 5-0 on Saturday. Jason Giambi and Asdrubal Cabrera hit tworun homers in the game that began about 10 hours following the conclusion of Friday night’s contest that ended at 2:53 a.m. on Saturday after nearly five hours of rain delays.

■ Baseball

Pacers force Game Devils 7, blast Heat 91-77

■ CONTINUED FROM A8

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Roy Hibbert had 24 points and 11 rebounds, Paul George finished with 28 points, and the Indiana Pacers forced a deciding game in the Eastern Conference finals with a 91-77 victory over the Miami Heat on Saturday night. LeBron James scored 29 points for the defending NBA champions, who will host Game 7 on Monday. Dwyane Wade was limited to just 10 as he and Chris Bosh struggled again. The Pacers opened the third quarter on a 14-2 run as the Heat went 1 of 11 from the field. Indiana led by 17 late in the third. Miami got within four before the Pacers pulled away again. It was everything one would expect from an elimination game. The teams traded jabs, some-

times literally, counterpunched effectively and ignored the players bumps and bruises of yet another physical game in a tough, compelling series. Both teams attacked the basket with sometimes problematic results. Indiana missed about five dunk attempts in the first half and a series of short jumpers, too, costing them precious points. The Heat struggled, too, starting the game just 3 of 22 from inside the 3-point line. Miami was just 16 of 54 from inside the arc for the game. Indiana’s loud fans chanted “Heat Are Floppers!” sporadically throughout the second half, urging the Pacers to play harder, to defend better and to make another trip home. The only way they can do that is if they reach the NBA Finals for the first time since 2000.

■ National Hockey League

’Hawks top Kings CHICAGO (AP) — Patrick Sharp and Marian Hossa scored in the second period, and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the Los Angeles Kings 2-1 on Saturday in Game 1 of the Western Conference finals. Corey Crawford made 21 saves, and the Blackhawks generated just enough offense to improve to 7-1 at home in the playoffs. Game 2 is scheduled for Sunday. Jonathan Quick stopped 34 shots, and Justin Williams scored for Los Angeles, which has won just one of seven road games in the playoffs. Bruins 3, Penguins 0 PITTSBURGH —

David Krejci scored two more goals during his torrid postseason and the Boston Bruins shut down the Pittsburgh Penguins 3-0 in the opening game of the Eastern Conference finals on Saturday night. Nathan Horton added an insurance goal in the third period and Tuukka Rask stopped 29 shots for the Bruins, who silenced Sidney Crosby and the rest of the NHL’s top-scoring team. Pittsburgh came in averaging a league-high 4.27 goals in the playoffs but couldn’t solve Rask. The Penguins hit the post six times and seemed a little bit off following an eight-day break between rounds.

The Red Devils missed their chances to take control of the game early on, stranding the bases loaded in the top of the first and having a runner gunned down at home plate in the second. Tipp had three hits in the second inning — and none for the rest of the game. Johnson led the top of the first inning with a walk on four straight pitches, then eventually reached third on two sacrifice plays. Carter Langdon was intentionally walked, before Austin Hadden was hit by a pitch. The Red Devils got nothing, though, as B.J. Donathan struck out looking, after being up 31 in the count. In the top of the second, Steven Calhoun led with an infield single, but misread a sign and got caught running while Zach Robbins was at the plate trying to lay down a bunt. Following that, Robbins doubled to put himself in scoring position. Cole Quillen lined a single past the second baseman and Robbins headed home, but was called out on a dart by Alder right fielder Jordy Thomas. Johnson grounded out to end the inning as Alder pitcher Pete Whitmer got out of another jam unscathed. “We had three hits that inning and two outs. That’s crazy,” Tippecanoe coach Bruce Cahill said, referring to what transpired in the second. “And you know you’re trying to be aggressive and make things happen, then you look back and think maybe we should have been conservative in that inning, maybe we should have let the guys hit and

STAFF PHOTOS/MARK DOWD

Tippecanoe’s Ben Hughes fires a pitch against Johnathan Alder Saturday in the Division II regional title game at Athletes in Action Field.

Tippecanoe’s Steven Calhoun is hung up between first and second Saturday against Johnathan Alder.

not do anything else. “But when your only three hits come from the bottom of the order, our

seven-through-nine hitters in just one inning, and we get nothing in the other six innings … I just

can’t understand that either.” Whitmer didn’t allow the Devils to do much after that, recording back-to-back one-twothree innings in the third and fourth. The Red Devils didn’t get a runner into scoring position for the rest of the game. “This is the kind of kid that beat us a couple times this year,” Cahill said. “He’s probably a kid that throws about 78 (MPH) and a curve for strikes. Whatever he was throwing had some kind of a wrinkle — that’s the kind of kid that’s beat us.” Whitmer threw a complete game for the win. Hughes also went the distance, striking out six. The Red Devils finish the year with a record of 28-5.


A10

Sunday, June 2, 2012

SPORTS

■ Track and Field

■ Track and Field

Division I

Division III

■ CONTINUED FROM A8 the Trojans to a fifthplace finish at the Division I regional meet. Norris finished seventh in the long jump with a final leap of 170.25 Saturday at Welcome Stadium in Dayton. “The two points she got pushed us to fifth in the standings (37 points),” Troy girls coach Kurt Snyder said. “In my eight years on the staff, it’s the highest we’ve been.” Norris will still get the chance to compete at state in the 4x100, 4x200 and 4x400 relays, which all qualified in the rainy

conditions Friday night at Welcome Stadium. In other results that were not available late Friday night at press time, Tippecanoe’s Sam Wharton won the 3,200 in 9:20.35 to advance to state. Teammate Rick Andrews was 11th (9:57.78), while Troy’s Nosker Branden (10:10.12) and Jon Osman (10:13.18) were 13th and 14th, respectively. Tippecanoe’s Andy Droesch also advanced to state, finishing third in the high jump (6-2). Troy’s Alex Dalton was 14th in the shot put (45-6.5).

■ Auto Racing

Logano wins Nationwide race DOVER, Del. (AP) — Joey Logano savors the times he led Joe Gibbs Racing into Victory Lane. Turns out, he enjoys beating JGR so much more. Logano changed his team and his car, just not the result, and raced to his third straight Dover victory in the Nationwide Series on Saturday. Unlike the last two, Logano won for Penske Racing. His previous two Dover victories came under the Gibbs banner. This time, Logano held off JGR drivers Brian Vickers, Matt Kenseth and Kyle Busch for the checkered flag. “I wanted to beat them really bad,” Logano said. Busch, who won the Truck Series race Friday, dominated most of the race and led 72 of the 200 laps. But he was 10th off the final restart, couldn’t drive his way to the front of the field and was fifth.

Vickers was second, Kenseth third, and Trevor Bayne fourth. Logano raced to his first Nationwide victory of the season after winning nine times last year. “It is amazing to finally win for the captain, Roger Penske,” Logano said. “It feels good to get back in Victory Lane.” Logano won for the 19th time in 114 career Nationwide starts. Busch was trying to sweep the NASCAR tripleheader at Dover but fell short in trying win all three for the first time since 2010. With the race under caution, Busch took four tires while Logano went with two on the final pit stop. Logano led the field to green and pulled away. “It’s my fault. I’m aggravated with myself,” Busch said. “I made the wrong call there. I just figured more would take four.”

■ Golf

Kuchar leads, Woods stumbles DUBLIN (AP) — Matt Kuchar thrived in tough conditions that sent Tiger Woods to the worst nine holes of his PGA Tour career Saturday. Kuchar survived a nasty combination of swirling wind and fast greens at Muirfield Village for a 2-under 70, giving him a two-shot lead over Kevin Chappell and Kyle Stanley going into the final round. Woods rallied on the front nine to salvage a 79, matching his second-worst score on the PGA Tour. Going for his sixth win at the Memorial and his fourth victory in his last five tournaments, Woods had two double bogeys and a triple bogey on the back nine for a 44, breaking by one shot his highest ninehole total as a pro. Kuchar was at 8-under 208, among 10 players separated by only four shots. Chappell shot 68, and

Stanley had a 73. Bill Haas, the 36-hole leader, ran off three straight bogeys late in his round for a 76, and he wasn’t all that upset about it. Haas was still only three shots back. ShopRite LPGA Classic GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. — Shanshan Feng shot a marvelous 4under 67 before the wind picked up Saturday and grabbed a three-shot lead after two rounds of the ShopRite LPGA Classic. Feng, who last year became the first Chinese player to win an LPGA Tour title and a major event in capturing the LPGA Championship, matched the best score of the day. Using a new set of clubs, she had a 6-under 136 total on the windwhipped Bay Course at the Stockton Hotel and Golf Club.

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Troy Christian’s Zach Garver runs the 1,600 Saturday at the Division III regional meet. ■ CONTINUED FROM A8 Bordelon said. “I thought state was pretty realistic at the beginning of the year, but times really started to drop and I was a little nervous. But, I ran a good race today. I think having Troy over there at state is going to help me a lot.” Siefring put Wednesday’s false start in the 100 hurdles behind her as best she could, cruising to a win in the 300 hurdles in 44.96. She also added a fourth-place finish in the long jump in 16-11 3-4. “You have no idea (how difficult it was),” Siefring said. “I was just trying to make sure I didn’t do anything the officials could disqualify me for. I came out of the blocks like a grandma.” Siefring will be running just one hurdle event at state for the first time in her three-year career. “It is definitely less stressful,” Siefring said. “The 100 is definitely more stressful, because one mistake and you are done. But, I would take that stress. I am not over it (the false start in the 100 hurdles). I probably won’t be over it until I run the race for the first time next year.” Shell continued her amazing year in track. After breaking former Versailles state champion Tammy Berger’s district record a week ago, she nearly matched it in winning the 3,200 in 11:32.71. “I didn’t expect this at the beginning of the year, but once it started happening, I went with it,” Shell said. “My only disappointment was I didn’t get faster this week, but that’s OK. It is pretty amazing to be a regional champion as a freshman.” Tara Snipes was a state placer in the 800 a year ago — and hopes to move up the podium this year. She finished second in 2:16.74, breaking her own school record. “As long as I keep getting faster I am happy,” Snipes said. “I wanted to get 2:15 before I was done and I am only a second away. So, that’s a goal next week. And I want to move up higher on the podium (she was eighth last year).” The Covington boys finished the meet on an upbeat note, taking fourth in the 4x400 relay (Ryan Craft, Brandon Magee, Alex Schilling, Dustin Fickert) in 3:28.58 to advance. The day had started with Craft, in his first year competing in track, taking

CIVITAS MEDIA PHOTOS/MIKE ULLERY

Miami East’s Corrine Melvin and Lehman’s Sarah Titterington compete during the Division III regional finals Saturday at Piqua High School.

Bethel’s Andrew Hurst Covington’s Carly Shell runs the 3,200 Saturday at the crosses the finish line Division III regional meet in Piqua. Saturday. fourth in the high jump, clearing 6-2. “I did track in junior high and I always liked it,” Craft said. “I can’t say I expected that (getting to state), but I thought I could do well. I was nervous on the jump at 6-3. I knew when I cleared 6-2, that was probably going to get me to state.” In the final team scoring, Covington boys were third (51) and the girls were sixth (40). • Return Trips For Lehman junior sprinter Justin Stewart, it was all about the relay. Sarah Sprinter Titterington and thrower Brad Montgomery will both be competing at multiple events for Lehman at state, while Corrine Melvin will do the same for Miami East. Stewart, a four-event qualifier, had his biggest smile after passing several runners near the finish of the 4x200 relay to get Lehman third in 1:32.78 and team with Mitchell Slater, Erick Jackson and Teddy Jackson for a berth in the state meet. “That’s the one I really wanted,” Stewart, who broke into a big smile when he met with the other three in the infield after the race, said. “We have worked really hard and it is great to have that opportunity at state.” Stewart also finished third in the 100 (11.33 seconds), won the 400 (49.08

seconds) and third in the 200 (23.02 seconds) to advance to state in all three. Brad Montgomery followed up qualifying for the discus on Wednesday, by doing the same in the shot put on Saturday, finishing second with a put of 51-2. Titterington, who battled through an injury earlier this spring, is going to state under different circumstances this season. A year ago, she was regional champion in the 100, 200 and 400. And while she didn’t record any firsts Saturday, she will be running at state in all three events. Titterington was fourth in all three events. She ran the 100 in 12.77 seconds, the 400 in 57.36 seconds and the 200 in 26.32 seconds. “I wasn’t really worried about winning today,” Titterington said. “I was just focused on getting to state. You get behind on conditioning when you are injured, but I feel good about where I am at. I think having been to state last year, I won’t be as nervous this year. I think that will help.” Melvin referred to her day, particularly in the 100, as redemption. She finished second in the 100 (12.59 seconds) and third in the 200 (26.27 seconds). “I felt like I had to redeem myself after the 100 on Wednesday,” said Melvin,

who ran 12.98 in the prelims. “I got off to a horrible start in the prelims. People who saw that probably thought I didn’t have a chance today.” Melvin feels like she has something to prove next week as well. “I placed at state before, so nothing less is acceptable,” she said. “Again, I think it is a chance for me to redeem myself.” Bradford’s Shay LaFollette advanced to state in the 100 hurdles for the third straight year. She matched her freshman season, finishing second in 15.44 seconds. “I was really nervous at the start (after seeing a runner DQ’d Wednesday),” LaFollette said. “I felt really good about the race. A lot of top hurdlers graduated last year. I have missed finals by one spot at state the last two years, so definitely, I want to make the finals this year.” LaFollette may well be the first Bradford track athlete to compete in three state meets. Meanwhile, Troy Christian freshman Meredith Haddad will be competing in her first state meet after placing second in the long jump (17-0.5). Another freshman, Miami Valley’s Taylor Middleton, won the event (18-1.5). Bethel’s Andrew Hurst also qualified for the state meet, placing fourth in the 800 (1:56.37).

■ Tennis

Djokovic, Nadal seem vulnerable PARIS (AP) — For the third time in three matches this year in the French Open, Rafael Nadal hardly looked himself for a set. Unlike in the first two rounds, Nadal won his opening set Saturday, albeit barely. The takeaway, even after another victory, was the same: The owner of a record seven titles at Roland Garros is not the dominant force he usually is at the clay-court tournament. “If I want to have any chance,” Nadal acknowledged after beating 27thseeded Fabio Fognini of Italy 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-4, “I really need to play better.” Hours later, the man Nadal beat in last year’s final and could meet in this year’s semifinals, No. 1 Novak Djokovic, seemed vulnerable, too. Walking to his changeover chair at 4-3 in the third set of a 6-2, 6-

2, 6-3 win against No. 26 Grigor Dimitrov, Djokovic stretched his right arm the one he has used to win six Grand Slam titles several times. He then was treated by a trainer, who applied ointment and gave Djokovic a massage near the shoulder. Two games later, the match was done, Djokovic was into the fourth round, and he raised that arm in his typical victory celebration. His mood would shift dramatically soon. When Djokovic left the court and went to the locker room, he was told that his first coach Jelena Gencic, 76, who began working with little Nole when he was 6 had died in Belgrade, Serbia, earlier Saturday. Djokovic issued a statement through the tournament saying that he would not be able to attend a

post-match news conference. “His team kept the news secret from him until after the match,” ATP spokesman Nicola Arzani said. “He just broke down. … He was very, very, very close to her.” As they approach each other in the draw, Nadal now meets No. 13 Kei Nishikori the first Japanese man in the fourth round of the French Open in 75 years while Djokovic faces No. 16 Philipp Kohlschreiber. The other matchups on that half of the bracket after a wild Saturday in Paris: No. 12 Tommy Haas against No. 29 Mikhail Youzhny, and No. 7 Richard Gasquet against No. 9 Stanislas Wawrinka. Haas let a record 12 match points get away from him in the fourth set, then saved one in the fifth.

He eventually pulled out a 7-5, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-7 (10), 10-8 victory over 19thseeded John Isner, the last American man in the field and the player best known for winning a 70-68 fifth set at Wimbledon three years ago. “These long matches seem to follow me,” said Isner, whose last five Grand Slam appearances ended with losses in fivesetters. “In hindsight, probably would have been better to lose in straight sets,” he added, “because I feel terrible right now.” In Nishikori’s victory, his opponent, France’s Benoit Paire, was assessed a point penalty for getting coached. The same thing happened to Marina AP PHOTO Erakovic during her loss to No. 17 Sloane Stephens, Novak Djokovic returns against Grigor Dimitrov in their one of four U.S. women into third round match at the French Open at Roland Garros stadium in Paris Saturday. the fourth round.


SCOREBOARD

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Scores

BASEBALL Baseball Expanded Standings All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB WCGB Boston 34 23 .596 — — New York 31 24 .564 2 — 31 25 .554 2½ ½ Baltimore 30 25 .545 3 1 Tampa Bay 23 32 .418 10 8 Toronto Central Division L Pct GB WCGB W Detroit 30 24 .556 — — Cleveland 30 25 .545 ½ 1 24 29 .453 5½ 6 Chicago 24 29 .453 5½ 6 Minnesota 23 30 .434 6½ 7 Kansas City West Division L Pct GB WCGB W Texas 34 21 .618 — — Oakland 33 24 .579 2 — Los Angeles 25 30 .455 9 6 24 32 .429 10½ 7½ Seattle 18 37 .327 16 13 Houston NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB WCGB Atlanta 33 22 .600 — — Washington 28 28 .500 5½ 6 26 30 .464 7½ 8 Philadelphia 22 31 .415 10 10½ New York 15 41 .268 18½ 19 Miami Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB St. Louis 37 18 .673 — — Cincinnati 35 21 .625 2½ — Pittsburgh 34 22 .607 3½ — 23 30 .434 13 9½ Chicago 21 33 .389 15½ 12 Milwaukee West Division L Pct GB WCGB W Arizona 30 24 .556 — — Colorado 29 27 .518 2 5 San Francisco 29 27 .518 2 5 25 29 .463 5 8 San Diego 23 31 .426 7 10 Los Angeles AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 1 Baltimore 7, Detroit 5 Tampa Bay 9, Cleveland 2 Texas 7, Kansas City 2 Seattle 3, Minnesota 0 Oakland 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Houston 6, L.A. Angels 3 San Diego 4, Toronto 3, 17 innings Saturday's Games Cleveland 5, Tampa Bay 0 Minnesota 5, Seattle 4 Oakland 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings Detroit 10, Baltimore 3 Kansas City 4, Texas 1, 10 innings Boston 11, N.Y. Yankees 1 Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Tampa Bay (Hellickson 2-2) at Cleveland (McAllister 4-4), 1:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 2-2) at Baltimore (Gausman 0-2), 1:35 p.m. Seattle (Bonderman 0-0) at Minnesota (Diamond 3-4), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 3-5) at Texas (Darvish 7-2), 3:05 p.m. Houston (Lyles 2-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 4-3), 3:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-2) at Oakland (Parker 3-6), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Buchholz 7-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 6-3), 8:05 p.m. Toronto (R.Ortiz 1-2) at San Diego (Volquez 4-5), 10:10 p.m. Monday's Games Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Oakland at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Friday's Games Chicago Cubs 7, Arizona 2 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 0 Milwaukee 8, Philadelphia 5 Miami 5, N.Y. Mets 1 Washington 3, Atlanta 2 San Francisco at St. Louis, ppd., rain L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 5, 10 innings San Diego 4, Toronto 3, 17 innings Saturday's Games St. Louis 8, San Francisco 0, 1st game Milwaukee 4, Philadelphia 3 Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 6, 10 innings Miami 8, N.Y. Mets 1 Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 7, San Francisco 1, 2nd game Atlanta 2, Washington 1, 10 innings Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 7:15 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games N.Y. Mets (Harvey 5-0) at Miami (Slowey 1-5), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 5-0) at Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0), 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 1-3) at Philadelphia (Lee 6-2), 1:35 p.m. Washington (Karns 0-0) at Atlanta (Maholm 6-4), 1:35 p.m. San Francisco (Gaudin 0-1) at St. Louis (Lyons 2-0), 2:15 p.m. Arizona (Corbin 8-0) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 1-7), 2:20 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 6-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-3), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (R.Ortiz 1-2) at San Diego (Volquez 4-5), 10:10 p.m. Monday's Games Miami at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. Reds 2, Pirates 0 Cincinnati ab r h bi Choo cf 5 1 1 0 Cozart ss 3 1 1 0 Votto 1b 4 0 1 1 Phillips 2b 3 0 2 1 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 3 0 2 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 DRonsn lf 4 0 1 0 Leake p 2 0 0 0 Hannhn ph1 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 CIzturs 2b 1 0 0 0

Pittsburgh ab r h bi Presley lf 5 0 3 0 Walker 2b 4 0 1 0 McCtch cf 4 0 0 0 GJones 1b 4 0 2 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 RMartn c 4 0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 2 0 0 0 SMarte ph 1 0 1 0 Snider rf 3 0 0 0 GSnchz ph1 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 1 0 McKnr ph 1 0 0 0 Liriano p 1 0 1 0 Mazzar p 0 0 0 0 Inge ph 1 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 0 Mercer 1b 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 34 010 0 Cincinnati .................000 100 010—2 Pittsburgh.................000 000 000—0 DP_Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB_Cincinnati 8, Pittsburgh 10. CS_R.Martin (2). S_Cozart, Liriano. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Leake W,5-2 . . . . . . . .6 7 0 0 1 5 LeCure H,9 . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 0 0 Broxton H,10 . . . . . . .1 2 0 0 0 0 Chapman S,14-16 . . .1 1 0 0 1 2 Pittsburgh Liriano L,3-2 . . . . . . . .6 4 1 1 1 11

L10 6-4 3-7 6-4 6-4 5-5

Str W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 L-2

Home 17-12 16-12 14-13 17-10 14-16

Away 17-11 15-12 17-12 13-15 9-16

L10 5-5 4-6 4-6 6-4 2-8

Str W-1 W-1 L-5 W-1 W-1

Home 17-9 18-11 13-11 12-14 10-14

Away 13-15 12-14 11-18 12-15 13-16

L10 5-5 8-2 7-3 4-6 5-5

Str L-1 W-2 L-1 L-1 W-3

Home 17-8 17-10 14-14 13-12 9-21

Away 17-13 16-14 11-16 11-20 9-16

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str W-1 L-1 L-3 L-2 W-2

Home 17-7 15-11 12-15 12-17 9-20

Away 16-15 13-17 14-15 10-14 6-21

L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 5-5 3-7

Str W-2 W-2 L-2 W-5 W-2

Home 17-9 20-7 20-11 13-14 12-17

Away 20-9 15-14 14-11 10-16 9-16

L10 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6 5-5

Str L-2 W-1 L-2 W-1 L-1

Home 16-12 17-12 20-10 15-13 14-15

Away 14-12 12-15 9-17 10-16 9-16

Mazzaro . . . . . . . . . . .1 2 0 0 0 0 Watson . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2 1 1 0 0 Ju.Wilson . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP_by Watson (Phillips, Frazier). Umpires_Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Bob Davidson; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, James Hoye. T_3:14. A_33,912 (38,362). Indians 5, Rays 0 Tampa Bay Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Joyce rf 3 0 0 0 Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 KJhnsn lf 4 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 2 2 0 Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 ACarer ss 4 1 1 2 Loney 1b 3 0 0 0 Swisher 1b 2 1 1 0 DJnngs cf 4 0 1 0 Giambi dh 4 1 2 3 Scott dh 3 0 1 0 CSantn c 4 0 0 0 RRorts 2b 3 0 0 0 Brantly lf 3 0 0 0 JMolin c 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 3 0 2 0 YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Stubbs rf 4 0 0 0 Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 32 5 8 5 Tampa Bay................000 000 000—0 Cleveland..................021 020 00x—5 E_Kipnis (4). DP_Cleveland 1. LOB_Tampa Bay 5, Cleveland 7. 2B_De.Jennings (14), Kipnis (11), Aviles (6). HR_A.Cabrera (5), Giambi (5). SB_Aviles (4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Archer L,0-1 . . . . . . . .4 7 5 5 3 4 Al.Torres . . . . . . . . . . .4 1 0 0 1 6 Cleveland U.Jimenez W,4-3 . . . .8 4 0 0 1 7 Pestano . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 1 1 Archer pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Umpires_Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Bill Welke. T_2:49. A_22,748 (42,241). Detroit . . . .200 111 000—5 8 0 Saturday's Major League Linescores AMERICAN LEAGUE Seattle . . . .200 000 200—4 10 2 Minnesota .010 001 003—5 7 1 Harang, O.Perez (7), Capps (7), Furbush (8), Wilhelmsen (9) and Shoppach; Correia, Duensing (7), Fien (8), Thielbar (9) and Doumit. W_Thielbar 1-0. L_Wilhelmsen 0-1. HRs_Seattle, Bay 2 (8), Seager (7). Detroit . . . .010 801000—10 12 0 Baltimore . .001 110 000—3 9 0 Verlander, Smyly (8) and Avila; Hammel, McFarland (4), Patton (7), Tom.Hunter (9) and Wieters. W_Verlander 7-4. L_Hammel 7-3. HRs_Detroit, V.Martinez (3), Jh.Peralta (6), Avila (5), Mi.Cabrera (17), Fielder (10). Baltimore, Hardy 2 (12). KC . . . . . . .000010000 3—4 11 1 Texas . . . . .000100000 0—1 6 1 (10 innings) Shields, Collins (8), Crow (8), G.Holland (10) and A.Moore, Kottaras; Tepesch, Cotts (7), Scheppers (8), Nathan (9), R.Ross (10) and Pierzynski. W_Crow 1-1. L_R.Ross 2-1. Sv_G.Holland (9). Chicago . . .001000200 0—3 10 0 Oakland . . .110010000 1—4 16 0 (10 innings) Quintana, Lindstrom (6), Crain (8), N.Jones (9), H.Santiago (9) and Gimenez; Straily, Doolittle (7), Cook (8), Balfour (9), Neshek (10), Blevins (10) and D.Norris. W_Blevins 4-0. L_H.Santiago 1-4. Boston . . . .005 000033—11 18 0 New York . .000 100 000—1 6 0 Doubront, Tazawa (7), Breslow (8), Uehara (9) and Saltalamacchia; P.Hughes, Claiborne (5), Warren (7) and C.Stewart, Au.Romine. W_Doubront 4-2. L_P.Hughes 2-4. HRs_Boston, Napoli (9), Nava (8), Drew (4). NATIONAL LEAGUE First Game San Francisco000000000—0 7 0 St. Louis . .007 000 01x—8 10 0 M.Cain, Mijares (7), Kontos (8) and Posey, Quiroz; S.Miller, V.Marte (8), K.Butler (9) and T.Cruz. W_S.Miller 6-3. L_M.Cain 4-3. Milwaukee .020 010 010—4 9 1 Philadelphia000 101 001—3 11 1 W.Peralta, Gorzelanny (8), Kintzler (8), Fr.Rodriguez (9) and Lucroy; Cloyd, Mi.Adams (8), Bastardo (9) and Kratz. W_W.Peralta 4-6. L_Cloyd 1-2. Sv_Fr.Rodriguez (3). HRs_Milwaukee, Lucroy (6). Philadelphia, Galvis (4). LA . . . . . . .003002100 0—6 11 2 Colorado .010030200 1—7 14 1 (10 innings) Greinke, P.Rodriguez (6), Belisario (7), Howell (8), Guerrier (10) and Federowicz; Chacin, Outman (7), Escalona (7), Brothers (9), Belisle (10) and Torrealba. W_Belisle 3-2. L_Guerrier 1-2. HRs_Los Angeles, Federowicz (1). Colorado, C.Gonzalez (14), Cuddyer (9). New York . .000 000 010—1 5 2 Miami . . . . .110 200 40x—8 12 0 McHugh, Carson (5), Burke (7), Lyon (8) and Buck; Fernandez, Da.Jennings (8), Webb (9) and Mathis. W_Fernandez 3-3. L_McHugh 0-1. Washington000100000 0—1 5 0 Atlanta . . . .001000000 1—2 5 1 (10 innings)

AND SCHEDULES

SPORTS ON TV TODAY AUTO RACING 1 p.m. FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, FedEx 400, at Dover, Del. 3:30 p.m. ABC — IRL, IndyCar, Indy Dual in Detroit, race 2 4:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, Summernationals, at Englishtown, N.J. (same-day tape) COLLEGE RUGBY 4 p.m. NBC — Collegiate Championship, semifinals and championship, teams TBD, at Philadelphia COLLEGE SOFTBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — World Series, game 11, teams TBD, at Oklahoma City 3 p.m. ESPN — World Series, game 12, teams TBD, at Oklahoma City GOLF 8 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nordea Masters, final round, at Stockholm Noon TGC — PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, final round, at Dublin, Ohio 2 p.m. TGC — LPGA, ShopRite Classic, final round, at Galloway, N.J. 2:30 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, final round, at Dublin, Ohio 7 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic, final round, at Des Moines, Iowa (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. FSN — Cincinnati at Pittsburgh 2 p.m. TBS — San Francisco at St. Louis 2:10 p.m. WGN — Arizona at Chicago Cubs 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Boston at N.Y. Yankees MOTORSPORTS 7:30 a.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Italian Grand Prix, at Mugello, Italy 5 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, Italian Grand Prix, at Mugello, Italy (same-day tape) NBA BASKETBALL 9 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, conference finals, game 7, Memphis at San Antonio (if necessary) SOCCER 2 p.m. ESPN2 — Men's national teams, exhibition, United States vs. Germany, at Washington 4:30 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Los Angeles at New England TENNIS 1 p.m. NBC — French Open, round of 16, at Paris 5 a.m. ESPN2 — French Open, round of 16, at Paris G.Gonzalez, Storen (8), Abad (9), H.Rodriguez (10) and K.Suzuki; T.Hudson, Avilan (8), Kimbrel (9), Walden (10) and Gattis. W_Walden 2-1. L_H.Rodriguez 0-1. Second Game San Francisco000000100—1 8 0 St. Louis . .003 002 20x—7 9 0 Bumgarner, R.Ramirez (7), Kontos (8) and Quiroz; Wainwright and W_Wainwright 8-3. Y.Molina. L_Bumgarner 4-4. Midwest League At A Glance Eastern Division South Bend (D’Backs) Fort Wayne (Padres) Bowling Green (Rays) West Michigan (Tigers) Lansing (Blue Jays) Dayton (Reds) Lake County (Indians) Great Lakes (Dodgers) Western Division

W 36 31 30 27 23 23 19 18

L 17 23 25 26 29 32 33 37

Pct. GB .679 — .574 5½ .545 7 .509 9 .44212½ .418 14 .36516½ .327 19

W L Pct. GB Cedar Rapids (Twins) 34 19 .642 — 31 23 .574 3½ Beloit (Athletics) Quad Cities (Astros) 30 23 .566 4 28 24 .538 5½ Peoria (Cardinals) 26 29 .473 9 Clinton (Mariners) Kane County (Cubs) 24 28 .462 9½ Wisconsin (Brewers) 23 27 .460 9½ Burlington (Angels) 21 29 .42011½ Saturday's Games Fort Wayne 8, West Michigan 7, 11 innings, comp. of susp. game Lake County 7, Dayton 3 Burlington 7, Clinton 4, 10 innings Lansing 7, Great Lakes 6 West Michigan 3, Fort Wayne 1 Cedar Rapids at Kane County, 7:30 p.m. Peoria at Wisconsin, 7:35 p.m. Quad Cities at Beloit, 8 p.m. South Bend 7, Bowling Green 0 Sunday's Games Lake County at Dayton, 2 p.m. Cedar Rapids at Kane County, 2 p.m. Peoria at Wisconsin, 2:05 p.m. Burlington at Clinton, 3 p.m. Quad Cities at Beloit, 3 p.m. Lansing at Great Lakes, 3:05 p.m. West Michigan at Fort Wayne, 3:05 p.m. South Bend at Bowling Green, 6:05 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1 Tuesday, May 14: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1 Friday, May 17: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3 Sunday, May 19: Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh 1, 2OT Wednesday, May 22: Pittsburgh 7, Ottawa 3 Friday, May 24: Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 2 Boston 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Thursday, May 16: Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 19: Boston 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, May 21: Boston 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Thursday, May 23: N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT Saturday, May 25: Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Detroit 3 Wednesday, May 15: Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Saturday, May 18: Detroit 4, Chicago 1 Monday, May 20: Detroit 3, Chicago 1 Thursday, May 23: Detroit 2, Chicago 0 Saturday, May 25: Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Monday, May 27: Chicago 4, Detroit 3 Wednesday, May 29: Chicago 2, Detroit 1, OT, Chicago wins series 4-3 Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, San Jose 0 Thursday, May 16: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Saturday, May 18: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1, OT Tuesday, May 21: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 Thursday, May 23: Los Angeles 3, San

Jose 0 Sunday, May 26: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 Tuesday, May 28: San Jose at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Saturday, June 1: Boston 3, Pittsburgh 0, Boston leads series 1-0 Monday, June 3: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 5: Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m. Friday, June 7: Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, June 9: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 11: Pittsburgh at Boston, TBD x-Wednesday, June 12: Boston at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles vs. Chicago Saturday, June 1: Chicago 2, Los Angeles 1, Chicago leads series 1-0 Sunday, June 2: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 4: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 6: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, June 8: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 10: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 12: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBD

BASKETBALL NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami vs. Indiana Wednesday, May 22: Miami 103, Indiana 102 OT Friday, May 24: Indiana 97, Miami 93 Sunday, May 26: Miami 114, Indiana 96 Tuesday, May 28: Indiana 99, Miami 92 Thursday, May 30: Miami 90, Indiana 79 Saturday, June 1: Indiana 91, Miami 77, series tied 3-3 Monday, June 3: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Memphis 0 Sunday, May 19: San Antonio 105, Memphis 83 Tuesday, May 21: San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT Saturday, May 25: San Antonio 104, Memphis 93, OT Monday, May 27: San Antonio 93, Memphis 86

AUTO RACING NASCAR Nationwide-5-hour ENERGY 200 Results Saturday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (6) Joey Logano, Ford, 200 laps, 138.9 rating, 0 points, $43,630. 2. (11) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 112.1, 42, $38,190. 3. (9) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 110.6, 0, $23,565. 4. (12) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 104.1, 41, $27,490. 5. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 133.7, 0, $22,715. 6. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 200, 114.1, 0, $17,465. 7. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 103.8, 37, $22,050. 8. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 113.4, 37, $27,210. 9. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 96.1, 35, $21,415. 10. (15) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200, 85.6, 34, $23,240. 11. (14) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200, 84.6, 33, $20,765. 12. (13) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 89.8, 32, $20,640. 13. (19) Michael Annett, Ford, 200, 80.5, 31, $20,540. 14. (10) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 200, 82.7, 30, $20,415. 15. (16) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200,

Sunday, June 2, 2013 77.1, 29, $21,515. 16. (20) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 70.6, 28, $20,265. 17. (4) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 200, 81.8, 27, $20,190. 18. (17) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 200, 71.3, 26, $20,140. 19. (21) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 200, 67.3, 25, $20,090. 20. (22) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 65.2, 24, $20,715. 21. (33) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, 199, 58.3, 23, $19,985. 22. (30) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 198, 48.4, 22, $19,885. 23. (8) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 198, 81.9, 0, $19,810. 24. (32) Eric McClure, Toyota, 195, 45.6, 20, $19,760. 25. (27) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 195, 51.5, 19, $20,185. 26. (34) Harrison Rhodes, Ford, 195, 42.8, 18, $19,660. 27. (36) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 192, 37.5, 17, $19,610. 28. (18) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 191, 64, 16, $20,535. 29. (25) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 190, 52.8, 15, $19,460. 30. (40) Tony Raines, Toyota, fuel pump, 111, 34.2, 14, $19,710. 31. (24) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, accident, 109, 46.4, 13, $19,360. 32. (37) Jason White, Toyota, engine, 62, 40.2, 12, $19,315. 33. (26) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 43, 53, 11, $19,245. 34. (35) Joey Gase, Toyota, electrical, 33, 37.3, 10, $19,200. 35. (29) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 18, 43.7, 9, $13,155. 36. (38) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, engine, 14, 34.1, 8, $12,260. 37. (28) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, overheating, 11, 38, 0, $12,240. 38. (23) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 9, 34.5, 6, $12,176. 39. (31) Matt DiBenedetto, Dodge, handling, 6, 31.3, 0, $12,075. 40. (39) Blake Koch, Toyota, brakes, 4, 29.2, 4, $12,020. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 111.145 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 47 minutes, 58 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.576 seconds. Caution Flags: 5 for 28 laps. Lead Changes: 9 among 5 drivers. Top 10 in Points: 1. R.Smith, 411; 2. S.Hornish Jr., 384; 3. B.Vickers, 369; 4. J.Allgaier, 368; 5. A.Dillon, 358; 6. P.Kligerman, 355; 7. E.Sadler, 347; 8. B.Scott, 343; 9. K.Larson, 322; 10. T.Bayne, 321. NASCAR-Sprint Cup-FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 157.978. 2. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 157.798. 3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 157.756. 4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 157.736. 5. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 157.715. 6. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 157.604. 7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 157.549. 8. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 157.48. 9. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 157.46. 10. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 157.405. 11. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 157.35. 12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 157.24. 13. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 157.054. 14. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 156.713. 15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 156.556. 16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 156.175. 17. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 156.169. 18. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 156.054. 19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 155.952. 20. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 155.696. 21. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 155.44. 22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 155.407. 23. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 155.239. 24. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 155.206. 25. (51) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 155.146. 26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 155.086. 27. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 155.059. 28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 154.972. 29. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 154.679. 30. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 154.619. 31. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 154.573. 32. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 154.5. 33. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 154.48. 34. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 154.295. 35. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 153.984. 36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 153.636. 37. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 38. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points. 39. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 40. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 41. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.

GOLF Memorial Scores Saturday At Muirfield Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,352; Par: 72 Third Round Matt Kuchar...................68-70-70—208 Kevin Chappell..............71-71-68—210 Kyle Stanley ..................67-70-73—210 Matt Jones ....................69-72-70—211 Justin Rose ...................70-70-71—211 Bill Haas........................68-67-76—211 J.J. Henry ......................72-72-68—212 Adam Scott ...................73-70-69—212 Scott Piercy...................66-75-71—212 Charl Schwartzel ..........65-71-76—212 Gary Woodland.............70-73-70—213 Pat Perez.......................72-69-72—213 Bubba Watson ..............71-67-75—213 Russell Henley..............67-77-70—214

A11

Jim Furyk ......................75-70-69—214 Brian Davis....................75-70-69—214 Davis Love III ................73-69-72—214 Charley Hoffman ..........73-69-72—214 Bo Van Pelt....................73-69-72—214 Fred Couples ................70-75-70—215 Michael Thompson.......69-76-70—215 Carl Pettersson.............71-71-73—215 Charles Howell III .........72-70-73—215 Ryan Moore ..................70-72-73—215 Chris Stroud..................69-77-69—215 Scott Stallings...............70-70-75—215 Richard H. Lee..............73-71-72—216 Ken Duke ......................75-69-72—216 Ben Curtis.....................73-70-73—216 Cameron Tringale .........71-71-74—216 Graham DeLaet............70-72-74—216 George McNeill.............74-71-71—216 David Hearn..................71-71-74—216 Trevor Immelman..........70-72-74—216 K.J. Choi........................72-74-70—216 Hunter Mahan...............73-68-75—216 Roberto Castro.............71-70-75—216 Robert Karlsson ...........69-71-76—216 Ernie Els........................73-70-74—217 George Coetzee...........70-75-72—217 David Lingmerth ...........75-70-72—217 William McGirt ..............73-73-71—217 Martin Laird...................71-75-71—217 Luke Donald..................73-73-71—217 Tom Gillis.......................73-70-75—218 Stewart Cink .................70-72-76—218 James Driscoll ..............70-75-73—218 Charlie Wi......................67-74-77—218 Luke Guthrie .................72-74-72—218 Henrik Stenson.............71-73-75—219 John Senden ................71-72-76—219 Camilo Villegas.............72-71-76—219 Rickie Fowler.................72-71-76—219 Justin Leonard ..............70-76-73—219 Robert Allenby..............74-73-72—219 Jason Day.....................72-75-72—219 Bud Cauley ...................71-73-76—220 Keegan Bradley ............71-74-75—220 Derek Ernst...................70-73-78—221 Fabian Gomez..............76-68-77—221 Billy Horschel................70-75-76—221 Josh Teater....................67-79-75—221 Ryo Ishikawa.................74-73-74—221 Mike Weir ......................75-72-75—222 Rory McIlroy..................78-69-75—222 Brandt Jobe ..................70-75-78—223 Fernandez-Castano .....72-74-77—223 Marc Leishman.............74-72-77—223 Tiger Woods..................71-74-79—224 Jimmy Walker................72-75-77—224 Zach Johnson...............73-72-81—226 Jordan Spieth ...............72-73-82—227 Justin Hicks...................73-73-81—227 Principal Charity Classic Scores Saturday At Wakonda Club Des Moines, Iowa Purse: $1.75 million Yardage: 6,910; Par: 72 Second Round Duffy Waldorf......................69-67—136 Bart Bryant .........................73-64—137 Jay Don Blake....................71-66—137 Russ Cochran ....................71-67—138 Peter Senior........................74-65—139 Michael Allen......................72-67—139 David Eger..........................71-68—139 Loren Roberts....................70-69—139 Tom Lehman ......................69-70—139 Kirk Triplett ..........................72-68—140 Mark Calcavecchia ............70-70—140 Gene Sauers......................71-70—141 Jay Haas.............................71-70—141 Larry Nelson.......................71-70—141 Barry Lane..........................71-70—141 Corey Pavin........................70-71—141 Doug Garwood...................70-71—141 Hale Irwin............................70-71—141 Scott Hoch..........................69-72—141 Roger Chapman ................74-68—142 Jim Gallagher, Jr. ...............74-68—142 Mark O'Meara ....................74-68—142 Ian Woosnam.....................73-69—142 Dick Mast............................72-70—142 Steve Lowery......................72-70—142 Kirk Hanefeld......................72-70—142 Bobby Wadkins ..................71-71—142 Mark McNulty.....................71-71—142 Jeff Sluman ........................70-72—142 Rocco Mediate...................72-71—143 Joel Edwards......................71-72—143 Brian Henninger.................71-72—143 Bobby Clampett .................70-73—143 Steve Pate ..........................75-69—144 Sandy Lyle..........................75-69—144 John Cook..........................74-70—144 Neal Lancaster...................72-72—144 Bill Glasson ........................72-72—144 Tom Pernice Jr. ..................71-73—144 Dan Forsman .....................69-75—144 Gary Hallberg.....................75-70—145 Jim Rutledge ......................74-71—145 Tom Jenkins .......................73-72—145 Steve Elkington ..................72-73—145 Larry Mize...........................72-73—145 Gil Morgan..........................71-74—145 David Frost .........................77-69—146 John Inman ........................77-69—146 Tommy Armour III ..............73-73—146 Chien Soon Lu...................73-73—146 Tom Purtzer........................73-73—146 Esteban Toledo...................70-76—146 Trevor Dodds ......................77-70—147 Mike Goodes......................76-71—147 Scott Simpson....................75-72—147 Mark Mouland....................75-72—147 Andrew Magee...................73-74—147 Bernhard Langer................72-75—147 Rod Spittle..........................72-75—147 Jeff Hart..............................74-74—148 Bob Gilder ..........................78-71—149 Chie-Hsiang Lin .................80-69—149 Tom Kite..............................77-72—149 Jim Thorpe .........................77-72—149 Blaine McCallister ..............76-73—149 Gene Jones........................76-73—149 Andy Bean..........................75-74—149 Dana Quigley .....................76-73—149 Willie Wood.........................74-75—149 LPGA-Shoprite Classic Scores Saturday At Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club, Bay Course Galloway Township, N.J. Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,155; Par: 71 Second Round Shanshan Feng..................69-67—136 Haeji Kang..........................70-69—139 Moriya Jutanugarn.............66-73—139 Chie Arimura ......................73-67—140 Anna Nordqvist ..................72-68—140 Karine Icher........................74-67—141 Karrie Webb........................72-69—141 Hee Young Park..................69-72—141 Michelle Wie.......................68-73—141 Amanda Blumenherst........66-75—141 Jennie Lee..........................73-69—142 I.K. Kim ...............................72-70—142 Mika Miyazato ....................72-70—142 Beatriz Recari.....................69-73—142 So Yeon Ryu.......................74-69—143 Yani Tseng..........................74-69—143 Jill McGill.............................73-70—143 Jenny Shin..........................70-73—143 Ayako Uehara.....................75-69—144 Christel Boeljon..................73-71—144 Jeong Jang.........................73-71—144 Alena Sharp .......................72-72—144 Julieta Granada..................71-73—144 Ai Miyazato.........................70-74—144 Pornanong Phatlum...........69-75—144 Na Yeon Choi......................74-71—145 Lisa McCloskey..................74-71—145 Caroline Hedwall................73-72—145 Meena Lee .........................73-72—145 Becky Morgan....................72-73—145 Christina Kim......................71-74—145


A12

WEATHER & BUSINESS

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Today

Tonight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Thursday

0, $0,  &2817< 9L VL W  8V 2QO L QH $W ZZZ W U R\GDL O \QHZV FRP

3&-* "#-& "/% "$$63"5& 4&7&3& 4503.  $07&3"(&

Scattered afternoon shower High: 76°

Partly cloudy Low: 64°

Partly cloudy, cooler High: 70° Low: 50°

Mostly sunny High: 76° Low: 53°

Chance of showers High: 80° Low: 60°

TODAY’S STATEWIDE FORECAST Sunday, June 2, 2013 AccuWeather.com forecast for daytime conditions, low/high temperatures

MICH.

NATIONAL FORECAST

SUN AND MOON Sunrise Monday 6:08 a.m. ........................... Sunset tonight 8:59 p.m. ........................... Moonrise today 2:35 a.m. ........................... Moonset today 3:30 p.m. ........................... Full

Sunny and nice High: 73° Low: 50°

New

First

June 8

June 16 June 23 June 30

National forecast

Forecast highs for Sunday, June 2

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Cloudy

Youngstown 82° | 66°

Last

TROY • 76° 64°

8 Fronts Cold

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+ Moderate

Very High

High

-10s

Air Quality Index Moderate

Harmful

272

250

500

Peak group: Trees

Mold Summary 4,269

12,500

25,000

Top Mold: Cladosporium Source: Regional Air Pollution Control Agency

GLOBAL City Athens Bangkok Calgary Jerusalem Kabul Kuwait City Mexico City Montreal Moscow Sydney Tokyo

Hi 82 93 60 87 91 108 82 88 77 77 75

10s

20s 30s 40s

Temperatures indicate Saturday’s high and overnight low to 8 p.m.

Pollen Summary

0

0s

50s 60s

Warm Stationary

70s

80s

Pressure Low

High

Cincinnati 84° | 70°

90s 100s 110s

Portsmouth 86° | 70°

Low: 23 Stanley, Idaho

NATIONAL CITIES

Main Pollutant: Particulate

0

-0s

Yesterday’s Extremes: High: 110 Death Valley, Calif.

53

Good

Columbus 84° | 68°

Dayton 77° | 68°

Today’s UV factor.

Low

PA.

Mansfield 86° | 66°

ENVIRONMENT

Minimal

Cleveland 82° | 70°

Toledo 84° | 70°

Lo Otlk 59 clr 80 rn 47 rn 69 clr 55 clr 73 clr 55 clr 66 pc 55 pc 53 clr 64 rn

Hi Albany,N.Y. 92 88 Albuquerque Amarillo 94 Anchorage 58 Asheville 80 Atlanta 86 Atlantic City 90 Baltimore 90 Boise 70 Boston 94 Brownsville 93 Buffalo 86 Burlington,Vt. 91 Casper 59 Charleston,S.C. 87 Charleston,W.Va.91 Charlotte,N.C. 87 Chicago 77 Cincinnati 82 Cleveland 88 Columbia,S.C. 89 Columbus,Ohio 89 Concord,N.H. 94 Dallas-Ft Worth 90 73 Denver Detroit 84

Lo PrcOtlk 66 Cldy 52 Clr 56 Clr 48 Cldy 64 PCldy 68 PCldy 66 Clr 69 PCldy 49 Clr 70 Clr 78 PCldy 65 .04 Cldy 64 Cldy 44 .02PCldy 68 PCldy 66 Cldy 66 PCldy 66 Cldy 70 .41 Rain 67 .49 Rain 68 PCldy 68 .10 Rain 60 Clr 78 Cldy 42 Cldy 64 .55 Rain

Hi El Paso 97 Fargo 64 Flagstaff 80 Grand Rapids 79 Greensboro,N.C. 85 Honolulu 84 93 Houston Indianapolis 75 Jackson,Miss. 90 Jacksonville 85 Juneau 51 86 Key West Las Vegas 97 Los Angeles 78 Miami Beach 85 Milwaukee 80 Nashville 86 New Orleans 88 New York City 90 Norfolk,Va. 90 Oklahoma City 88 80 Omaha Orlando 87 Philadelphia 93 Pittsburgh 87 Portland,Maine 92 Providence 92 Raleigh-Durham 87

W.VA.

KY

Lo Prc Otlk 76 Clr 49 .04 Clr 48 Clr 67 .03 Rain 69 PCldy 75 PCldy 79 Cldy 621.16 Rain 72 Cldy 68 Cldy 441.13 Rain 80 Rain 76 Clr 63 PCldy 741.49 Rain 62 Cldy 72 .01 Rain 76 .02 Cldy 73 Clr 71 Clr 191.96 Cldy 58 Cldy 72 .03 Cldy 71 Clr 67 .05 Cldy 63 Clr 63 Clr 67 PCldy

©

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

REGIONAL ALMANAC Temperature High Yesterday .............................79 at 3:34 p.m. Low Yesterday..............................68 at 6:32 a.m. Normal High .....................................................76 Normal Low ......................................................57 Record High ........................................97 in 1895 Record Low.........................................41 in 2003

Precipitation 24 hours ending at 5 p.m...................................T Month to date .....................................................T Normal month to date .....................................XX Year to date .................................................14.30 Normal year to date ....................................17.19 Snowfall yesterday ........................................0.00

TODAY IN HISTORY (AP) — Today is Sunday, June 2, the 153rd day of 2013. There are 212 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight: On June 2, 1953, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place in London’s Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI; it was the first such ceremony to be broadcast on television. On this date: In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances

born within U.S. territorial limits. In 1966, the U.S. space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar surface. In 1979, Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the first visit by a pope to a communist country. In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convicted of murder and conspiracy in the Oklahoma City bombing. (He was executed in June 2001.)

Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion.) In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that “the report of my death was an exaggeration.” In 1924, Congress passed a measure that was then signed by President Calvin Coolidge guaranteeing full American citizenship for all Native Americans

Are nutritional labels coming on alcoholic drinks? WASHINGTON (AP) — Alcoholic beverages soon could have nutritional labels like those on food packaging, but only if the producers want to put them there. The Treasury Department, which regulates alcohol, said this past week that beer, wine and spirits companies can use labels that include serving size, servings per container, calories, carbohydrates, protein and fat per serving. Such package labels have never before been approved. The labels are voluntary, so it will be up to beverage companies to decide whether to use them on their products. The decision is a temporary, first step while the Alcohol and Tobacco Trade and Tax Bureau, or TTB, continues to consider final rules on alcohol labels. Rules proposed in 2007 would have made labels mandatory, but the agency never made the rules final. The labeling regulation, issued May 28, comes after a decade of lobbying by hard liquor companies and consumer groups, with clearly different goals. The liquor companies want to advertise low calories and low carbohydrates in their products.

Diageo asked the bureau in 2003 to allow the company to add that information to its products as low-carbohydrate diets were gaining in popularity. Almost 10 years later, Smith said he expects Diageo gradually to put the new labels on all of its products, which include a small number of beer and wine companies. “It’s something consumers have come to expect,” Smith said. “In time, it’s going to be, why isn’t it there?” Not all alcohol companies are expected to use labels. Among those that may take a pass are beer companies, which don’t want consumers counting calories, and winemakers, which don’t want to ruin the sleek look of their bottles. The Wine Institute, which represents more than a thousand California wineries, said in a statement that it supports the ruling but “experience suggests that such information is not a key factor in consumer purchase decisions about wine.” Spokeswoman Gladys Horiuchi said the group knows of no wine companies that plan to use the new labels.

AP PHOTO

Lance Goede of Riverton examines one of the bottles of Wyoming Whiskey he purchased while waiting in line for a signing by the master distiller during the new distilled spirit’s debut on Dec. 7, 2012, in Kirby, Wyo. Alcoholic beverages soon could have nutritional labels like those on food packaging, but only if the producers want to put them there. Consumer groups want alcoholic drinks to have the same transparency as packaged foods, which are required to be labeled. “This is actually bringing alcoholic beverages into the modern

era,” says Guy Smith, an executive vice president at Diageo, the world’s largest distiller and maker of such well-known brands as Johnnie Walker, Smirnoff, Jose Cuervo and Tanqueray.

The beer industry praised the agency for acknowledging that labels should take into account variations in the concentration of alcohol content in different products. The industry has opposed the idea of defining serving size by fluid ounces of pure alcohol or as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor on the grounds that you may get more than 1.5 ounces of liquor in a cocktail depending on what else is in the drink and the accuracy of the bartender. The ruling would allow the labels to declare alcohol content as a percentage of alcohol by volume, the approach favored by the beer industry. “We applaud the TTB’s conclusion that rules be based on how drinks are actually served and consumed,” said Joe McClain, president of the Beer Institute. McClain said the beer industry is pleased that the ruling provides “substantial flexibility” in terms of the format and placement of the disclosure on packaging. It is unclear whether beer companies will actually use the labels, however.

WEEKLY REVIEW

d

NYSE

WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS

9,302.27 -139.95

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last KrispKrm 17.32 Lentuo 4.36 SmithfF 32.94 HltMgmt 13.79 CSVInvNG 11.02 Caplease 8.62 DxGldBll rs 11.16 SibanyeG n 3.62 NV Energy 23.44 DrxRsaBear 21.57

Chg +4.14 +.94 +7.03 +2.75 +2.02 +1.52 +1.93 +.61 +3.72 +3.42

%Chg +31.4 +27.5 +27.1 +24.9 +22.4 +21.4 +20.9 +20.3 +18.9 +18.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg NBGrce rs 7.22 -4.98 -40.8 DirDGldBr 79.12 -23.18 -22.7 CSVLgNGs 26.90 -6.42 -19.3 DrxBrzBull 30.50 -6.85 -18.3 DxRssaBull 21.15 -4.34 -17.0 Mechel 3.00 -.58 -16.2 GlbGeophy 3.57 -.63 -15.0 DxREBull s 48.21 -8.37 -14.8 DoleFood 9.47 -1.59 -14.4 GolLinhas 4.46 -.70 -13.6

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 5549582 13.66 +.42 S&P500ETF5229664163.45-1.86 iShEMkts2766781 41.20 -1.07 iShJapn 2667411 10.84 -.57 FordM 2344592 15.68 +.89 Pfizer 2068622 27.23 -1.81 SPDR Fncl2041049 19.84 +.11 SprintNex1918733 7.30 -.03 GenElec 1596603 23.32 -.21 BariPVix rs1530637 19.14 +.41 Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

925 2,250 389 224 3,228 53 14,046,103,778

d

NYSE MKT

2,364.99 -37.44

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg GldFld 2.61 +.49 +23.1 TanzRy g 3.24 +.52 +19.1 DocuSec 2.94 +.44 +17.6 GrahamCp 28.00 +4.18 +17.5 TherapMD 2.79 +.39 +16.3 NDynMn g 2.62 +.32 +13.9 InvCapHld 4.14 +.47 +12.9 Barnwell 3.78 +.40 +11.8 eMagin 3.89 +.41 +11.8 NovaGld g 2.52 +.25 +11.0

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg Flanign 9.91 -2.46 -19.9 Oragenics 2.84 -.51 -15.2 Gastar grs 2.48 -.35 -12.4 MGT Cap 4.53 -.54 -10.7 OrchidIsl n 12.01 -1.43 -10.6 Lannett 11.47 -1.27 -10.0 PowrREIT 9.41 -.99 -9.5 NuvREst 11.94 -1.11 -8.5 Univ Insur 6.67 -.62 -8.5 PfdAptCm 8.50 -.73 -7.9 MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg CheniereEn186914 29.35 -.12 NwGold g 162976 6.81 +.17 Rentech 139601 2.20 -.02 AlldNevG 111755 7.72 +.31 NovaGld g110645 2.52 +.25 AbdAsPac110579 6.70 -.49 PhrmAth 92345 1.78 +.18 Aurizon g 87683 3.85 -.32 VantageDrl 74583 1.92 +.01 NA Pall g 73481 1.09 -.07 Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

187 264 24 64 469 18 365,560,821

d

NASDAQ

3,455.91

WEEKLY DOW JONES Dow Jones industrials -3.23

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Omthera n Affymax NatlReshB VestinRMII Sonus StewEnt Vermillion Clearwire OmniVisn OrchardSH

Last Chg 13.13 +6.36 2.08 +.69 34.12 +11.32 2.24 +.63 3.21 +.81 13.00 +3.19 4.04 +.96 4.48 +1.06 18.47 +4.07 2.37 +.51

%Chg +93.9 +49.6 +49.6 +39.1 +33.8 +32.5 +31.2 +31.0 +28.3 +27.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Name Last Chg %Chg UniPixel 15.21 -8.73 -36.5 RealGSolar 2.70 -1.31 -32.7 RetOpp wt 2.05 -.96 -31.8 EnerNOC 13.38 -4.46 -25.0 Kingtne rs 2.25 -.51 -18.5 NatResh A 16.35 -3.65 -18.3 AMAG Ph 18.50 -3.75 -16.9 Ziopharm 2.18 -.44 -16.8 JamesRiv 2.59 -.52 -16.7 OxygnB rsh 3.73 -.75 -16.7 MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name Vol (00) Last Chg SiriusXM 2231755 3.49 -.10 Facebook2054258 24.35 +.04 Microsoft 1824141 34.90 +.63 Cisco 1597118 24.12 +.59 Intel 1331635 24.28 +.36 Clearwire1310509 4.48 +1.06 PwShs QQQ125933473.25 -.16 Celsion 1223378 1.69 +.65 MicronT 992130 11.68 +.09 RschMotn 820611 13.96 -.53 Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows Total issues Unchanged Volume

DIARY

1,329 1,263 381 50 2,658 66 7,202,249,397

CLOSED 106.29 -106.59

Close: 15,115.57 1-week change: -187.53 (-1.2%)

MON

16,000

TUES

WED

21.73

52-Week High Low

-208.96

THUR

15,542.40 6,568.41 537.86 9,695.46 2,509.57 3,532.04 1,687.18 17,799.15 1,008.23 4,780.12

FRI

15,000 14,000 13,000 12,000

D

J

Last

F

M

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

Name

Ex

Div

AT&T Inc BkofAm BariPVix rs Cisco Clearwire CocaCola s Disney EnPro Facebook FifthThird Flowserve FordM GenElec HewlettP iShJapn iShEMkts iShR2K ITW Intel JPMorgCh

NY NY NY Nasd Nasd NY NY NY Nasd Nasd NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY

1.80 34.99 -1.76 -4.8 +3.8 .04 13.66 +.42 +3.2 +17.7 ... 19.14 +.41 +2.2 -39.8 .68 24.12 +.59 +2.5 +22.7 ... 4.48 +1.06 +31.0 +55.0 1.12 39.99 -2.25 -5.3 +10.3 .75 63.08 -2.41 -3.7 +26.7 ... 50.37 -.13 -0.3 +23.2 ... 24.35 +.04 +0.1 -8.5 .44 18.20 -.05 -0.3 +19.7 1.68 168.13 +1.29 +0.8 +14.5 .40 15.68 +.89 +6.0 +21.1 .76 23.32 -.21 -0.9 +11.1 .58 24.42 +.21 +0.9 +71.4 .19 10.84 -.57 -5.0 +11.2 .74 41.20 -1.07 -2.5 -7.1 1.70 97.80 -.08 -0.1 +16.0 1.52 70.13 -.10 -0.1 +15.3 .90 24.28 +.36 +1.5 +17.7 1.52 54.59 +.93 +1.7 +25.0

Name

Ex

KimbClk NY Kroger NY McDnlds NY MeadWvco NY Microsoft Nasd Penney NY PepsiCo NY Pfizer NY ProctGam NY Questar NY S&P500ETF NY SearsHldgs Nasd SiriusXM Nasd SprintNex NY SPDR Fncl NY Tuppwre NY US Bancrp NY VerizonCm NY WalMart NY Wendys Co Nasd

Div

A

M

Last

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg %Chg

3.24 96.83 -6.68 .60 33.67 -.56 3.08 96.57 -2.95 1.00 35.00 ... .92 34.90 +.63 ... 17.58 -1.40 2.27 80.77 -1.81 .96 27.23 -1.81 2.41 76.76 -5.12 .72 24.31 -.34 3.18 163.45 -1.86 ... 48.83 -1.42 .05 3.49 -.10 ... 7.30 -.03 .27 19.84 +.11 2.48 80.98 -1.74 .78 35.06 -.35 2.06 48.48 -2.91 1.88 74.84 -2.47 .16 5.95 -.09

-6.5 -1.6 -3.0 ... +1.8 -7.4 -2.2 -6.2 -6.3 -1.4 -1.1 -2.8 -2.7 -0.4 +0.6 -2.1 -1.0 -5.7 -3.2 -1.5

+14.7 +29.4 +9.5 +9.8 +30.7 -10.8 +18.0 +8.6 +13.1 +23.0 +14.8 +18.1 +20.6 +28.7 +21.0 +26.3 +9.8 +12.0 +9.7 +26.6

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day’s net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

12,035.09 4,795.28 435.57 7,222.88 2,164.87 2,726.68 1,266.74 13,248.92 729.75 3,656.42

STOCK MARKET INDEXES Last

Wk Chg

Wk %Chg

YTD %Chg

12-mo %Chg

Dow Jones Industrials 15,115.57 Dow Jones Transportation 6,290.18 Dow Jones Utilities 482.16 NYSE Composite 9,302.27 NYSE MKT Composite 2,364.99 Nasdaq Composite 3,455.91 S&P 500 1,630.74 Wilshire 5000 17,212.40 Russell 2000 984.14 Lipper Growth Index 4,688.29

-187.53 -105.52 -17.05 -139.95 -37.44 -3.23 -18.86 -180.44 -.14 -27.99

-1.23 -1.65 -3.42 -1.48 -1.56 -.09 -1.14 -1.04 -.01 -.59

+15.35 +18.53 +6.42 +10.17 +.40 +14.45 +14.34 +14.79 +15.87 +14.49

+24.73 +28.06 +3.84 +27.56 +8.69 +25.78 +27.60 +28.61 +33.46 +28.22

Name

MONEY RATES

Prime Rate Discount Rate Federal Funds Rate Treasuries 3-month 6-month 5-year 10-year 30-year

Last 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

Pvs Week 3.25 0.75 .00-.25

0.04 0.07 1.05 2.13 3.28

0.05 0.08 0.89 2.01 3.17

Name Obj American Funds CapIncBuA m IH American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS American Funds GrthAmA m LG American Funds IncAmerA m MA American Funds InvCoAmA m LB Fidelity Contra LG Fidelity Magellan LG Fidelity Advisor HiIncAdvT m HY FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m CA Janus GlbRsrchT WS Janus RsrchT LG PIMCO TotRetIs CI Putnam GrowIncA m LV Putnam MultiCapGrA m LG Vanguard 500Adml LB Vanguard InstIdxI LB Vanguard InstPlus LB Vanguard TotStIAdm LB Vanguard TotStIIns LB Vanguard TotStIdx LB

Australia Britain Canada Euro Japan Mexico Switzerlnd

CURRENCIES Last

Pvs Day

1.0444 1.5181 1.0368 .7704 100.69 12.8405 .9596

1.0342 1.5217 1.0302 .7667 100.96 12.7790 .9538

British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All others show dollar in foreign currency.

MUTUAL FUNDS

Total Assets ($Mlns) NAV 63,587 55.83 50,546 40.70 60,603 39.01 63,319 19.51 49,009 34.28 64,295 87.14 12,295 83.25 553 10.72 46,945 2.34 946 53.27 1,337 37.46 182,816 11.07 4,665 17.40 3,000 63.24 67,851 150.83 76,879 149.87 58,245 149.88 69,516 41.01 46,939 41.01 92,413 40.99

Total Return/Rank 4-wk 12-mo 5-year -2.6 +17.3/B +2.9/C -0.4 +28.7/B +1.6/C +2.8 +28.6/A +3.7/D -0.7 +20.2/B +5.8/A +1.1 +26.7/C +4.4/C +2.0 +21.6/C +5.3/B +3.6 +26.2/A -0.1/E -0.3 +16.9/A +8.5/C -0.8 +19.6/A +5.8/B +2.6 +22.4 +2.7 +4.1 +26.4 +4.8 -2.2 +4.4/B +7.6/A +3.3 +35.4/A +5.4/B +3.4 +23.6/B +4.5/C +2.3 +27.2/C +5.4/B +2.3 +27.2/C +5.5/B +2.3 +27.3/C +5.5/B +2.3 +27.8/C +5.9/A +2.3 +27.8/C +5.9/A +2.3 +27.7/C +5.8/A

Pct Min Init Load Invt 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 4.00 2,500 4.25 1,000 NL 2,500 NL 2,500 NL 1,000,000 5.75 0 5.75 0 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL200,000,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 3,000

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar.


VALLEY A sure bet

B1 June 2, 2013

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Nancy Deal cuts fresh strawberries for a strawberry recipe Thursday.

Strawberry Cream Cheese Cobbler impresses contest winner’s guests BY MELODY VALLIEU Staff Writer mvallieu@civitasmedia.com

he doesn’t like to cook — but loves to bake. Though Nancy Deal had only one strawberry recipe — Strawberry Cream Cheese Cobbler — to enter into the Troy Daily News’ annual strawberry recipe contest, it was enough. Deal said she got the recipe from North Pole Savings on Facebook, where she has found several other good recipes. “I tried it out on my husband’s poker club a couple weeks ago,” said Deal, who retired after 35 years with Vandalia schools as a kindergarten teacher. “They loved it. It’s really good with a dollop of ice cream on it.” The Tipp City resident, who is a vegetarian, said cooking for herself and her husband of 44 years, Dan, who is not, is not necessarily fun with their different diets. But baking they agree on. While she likes to bake cakes and even sometimes make candies, cookies are a favorite, according to Deal. She said she enjoys making chocolate chip cookies most and makes several kinds during the Christmas season. When she’s not baking up some sweet treats, Deal enjoys playing mahjongg — an ancient Chinese tile game — weekly with a group of friends. She also gardens, both flowers and vegetables, and said she and her husband grill and eat a lot of the vegetables they grow. A new gardening hobby she recently has taken up is fairy gardening, which is miniature container gardening complete with items such as miniature furniture and other structures and live plants. She said she recently took some classes with a friend to learn more about the new gardening craze. The couple, who have one son, Nancy Deal gathers ingredients for her strawberry cream cheese cobbler Thursday at her home in Josh, and their first grandbaby, a Tipp City. boy, on the way, also enjoy traveling, with their favorite state to glass baking dish visit being Colorado. They also In a small bowl, mix together frequent their condominium in the egg, milk, flour, sugar, baking Kentucky. powder and salt. Pour the mixFor her prize, Troy ture directly over the butter in Strawberry Festival Manager baking dish, but do not stir. Heather Dorsten awarded Deal Add strawberries, arranging in with a gift pack full of a single layer as much as possiStrawberry Festival items. ble. Sprinkle cream cheese Deal’s recipe and some of the pieces over strawberries. other strawberry recipes entered Place in preheated oven and in the annual contest include the bake for 45 minutes or until the following: top is golden brown and the edges are bubbling. Strawberry Cream Cheese — Nancy Deal Tipp City Cobbler 1 cup milk Coconut Strawberry 1 stick butter 1 cup sugar Napoleon 1 cup all purpose flour 1 sheet frozen puff pastry 1 egg lightly beaten (such as Pepperidge Farms), 2 teaspoons baking powder thawed 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 2.75 ounce package cook2 quarts whole strawberries, and-serve vanilla pudding capped and washed 1 13.5 ounce can light coconut 4-ounce cream cheese, cut milk into small pieces 1/4 teaspoon coconut extract Preheat oven to 350 Nancy Deal cuts a piece of her strawberry cream cheese cobbler 1/2 cup shredded coconut Melt butter and pour into 9x13 Thursday at her home in Tipp City. 1 pound strawberries, cored

S

and sliced, plus more for garnish Confectioners’ sugar for dusting Preheat oven to 400. Coat a baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. On a lightly floured surface, unroll pastry sheet. Cut into three equal pieces along folds. Transfer to baking sheet and bake at 400 for 14 minutes or until golden brown. Remove pastry to wire rack. Cool completely. Prepare pudding, following package directions, replacing milk with coconut milk; allow to cool. Stir in coconut extract and shredded coconut. Slice each pastry in half horizontally for a total of 6 pieces. Spread a quarter of the pudding over cut side of each of the two bottom pieces and fan a quarter of the strawberries on each. Repeat layering once more. Top each stack with remaining two pieces of pastry. Chill until serving. With a serrated knife, cut each pastry into four equal pieces using a sawing motion. Dust tops with confectioners’ sugar and garnish with additional sliced strawberries. — Linda Elliott Troy

Strawberry Salsa 1 seedless cucumber, finely chopped 1 red onion, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped 2-4 tablespoons raspberry vinegar 1 red pepper, chopped into small pieces 2 cups fresh strawberries, hulled and diced small Mix all ingredients, except strawberries. Cover and chill at least one hour. Just before serving, add strawberries. Dip and enjoy! — Becky Pappas Troy

Strawberry Iced Tea 1 pound strawberries 3/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup water 8 cups unsweetened iced tea In large pitcher, stir together strawberries, hulled and sliced, sugar, and water. Let stand 20 minutes and add iced tea, stirring to combine. Refrigerate until cold. Serve over ice. Makes about 10 cups. — Linda Elliott Troy

Jell-O Strawberries 3 boxes strawberry Jell-O 1 cup ground walnuts 1 7 ounce package coconut 1 cup sweetened condensed milk Red granulated sugar 1 can green cake decorating frosting Green toothpicks Mix first four ingredients; chill two hours. Form into “strawberries,” using one teaspoon mixture for each strawberry. Roll in red sugar, make a stem and two leaves with cake frosting. Store in covered container. Insert toothpicks for easy heralding. Serve with assortment of homemade cookies. — Manti Bartile

AMISH COOK Everyone’s favorite, Lovina Eicher, known at the Amish Cook, also has some tasty strawberry recipes for readers. The following are some of her favorite strawberry summer treats.

Strawberry Pie 4 cups strawberries 1 /2 cup confectioners sugar 1 1 /2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 cup water 3 /4 cup sugar Take 3 cups of whole berries, add confections sugar and let stand 1 hour. Crush 1 cup berries and cook with water about 20 minutes.

Sieve. Mix cornstarch with sugar and stir into berry juice. Cook until clear,stirring constantly. Fill cooled baked pie shell with 3 cups berries. Pour partially cooled sauce over berries. Refrigerate. Spoon whipped cream around the edge of pie before serving.

Strawberry Jell-O Cake 1 package frozen strawberries 1 box strawberry Jell-O 1 container topping like Cool Whip Bake cake according to directions. Mix Jell-o with 1 cup warm

water. Make several holes in top of cake without going through and then pour Jell-o over cake. Thaw strawberries and pour onto the cake. Add Cool Whip over all and refrigerate until chilled. Serve.

Homemade Strawberry Cream Puffs 1 cup water 1/2 cup butter, cubed 1 teaspoon sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup all-purpose flour 4 eggs Cream filling: 3 cups sliced strawberries

1/2 cup sugar divided 16 oz cream cheese, softened 2 cups heavy whipping cream Confectioners’ sugar Additional sliced strawberries Directions In a large saucepan, bring water, butter, sugar and salt to a boil. Add flour all at once and stir until a smooth ball forms. Remove from the heat and let cool for 5 minutes. Beat in eggs, one at a time. Continue beating until mixture is smooth and shiny. Drop by 1/3 cup (I use an ice cream scoop) 2 inches apart on a large lightly greased baking sheet (make 10). Bake at 400

degrees for about 35 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on a wire rack. In a medium bowl, beat cream cheese and 1/4 cup sugar until fluffy In another large bowl, beat cream and remaining sugar until stiff. Fold in cream cheese and strawberries. Mix well. Chill until ready to serve. Just before serving, cut tops off puffs. Fill cream puffs and replace tops. Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and serve with additional berries and mint leaves. Yield: 10 cream puffs. • See AMISH COOK on B2


B2

VALLEY

Sunday, June 2, 2013

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Counterfeit drugs pose risks Wardrobe staple BY CRISTIN SEVERANCE KGTV-TV SAN DIEGO — The prescription medicine you get online or from your pharmacy could be fake — and harmful. The World Health Organization estimates that 25 percent of drugs consumed in poor countries are counterfeit or substandard. Some international watchdog groups say up to 50 percent of treatments sold in the developing world are fraudulent. Counterfeit estimates for the U.S. are much lower — 1 to 2 percent of drugs are fake, according to the Food and Drug Administration and the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. Industry experts assume that federal and state authorities’ tighter controls over manufacturing, distribution and retail sale of prescription and overthe-counter drugs reduce the incidence of fraud. But with more than 4

billion prescriptions filled in the United States each year — worth an estimated $310 billion — even 1 percent translates to 4 million packages that lack an active ingredient or have an insufficient amount, or that contain useless or even toxic fillers. It’s easy to trade in counterfeit drugs, a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego, demonstrated by setting up a fake pharmacy online. Called “No prescription drugs,” it has a domain name, Facebook page, Twitter account and plenty of customers seeking counterfeit prescriptions. “We were up and running in an hour,” said Dr. Bryan Liang, a professor of anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego, and director of the San Diego Center for Patient Safety. “We had an average of 100 hits a month … from 12 countries.” Liang’s graduate student set up the fake online

site to gauge how easy it might be to push fake meds online. The site couldn’t actually sell drugs; instead, it tracked the number of hits. Liang, an expert on counterfeiting, said hundreds of sites sell fake drugs. The Scripps Howard News Service recently reported that a 2009 crackdown by the Food and Drug Administration on unauthorized online pharmacies led to the seizure of more than 800 packages that included Viagra, the pain reliever Vicodin and antihistamines. Some of the fake drugs had three times the level of active ingredient they should have, others none. Fillers included drywall, antifreeze and yellow highway line paint. FBI Liang, former agents and drug experts met in San Diego in April at an annual conference focusing on counterfeit drugs. Such drugs are potentially lethal, several indus-

try experts told KGTV-TV. Some counterfeit copies of drugs are impossible to detect without a laboratory test. But the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy offers several red flags for consumers concerned that the drug they’ve been given is not legitimate. Watch out for: • Packaging that appears to have been opened or labels that appear different from those seen in the past. • Medicines that are cracked or chipped or have a different color or shape than you’re used to. • A medicine that has a different taste or texture than you’ve previously experienced. • Adverse effects after taking the medicine — side effects that you have not had before or that are not mentioned on warning labels. If you suspect you have a fake drug, contact the FDA’s Medwatch program (800-332-1088) or your state pharmacy board.

The T-shirt turns 100 BY SARA BAUKNECHT Pittsburgh Post-Gazette The T-shirt, one of fashion’s most basic yet most versatile staples, is marking its 100th birthday this year. Want to brush up on your T-shirt trivia in honor of the occasion? CustomInk, which allows people to customize their own T-shirts online, has created a birthday website, complete with photos of the most popular tees and a timeline of key moments from the shirt’s life. According to www.tshirtbirthday.com, the Tshirt had humble beginnings as an undershirt. In 1913, the U.S. Navy issued crewneck tees to be worn under uniforms. The Merriam-Webster dictionary first recognized the term in 1920, defining it as “a collarless short-sleeved or sleeveless usually cotton undershirt (or) an outer shirt of similar design.” In the decades to come, T-shirts turned more stylish with prints and slogans. They got political in the 1940s, when New York Gov. Thomas E. Dewey’s campaign designed ones with the phrase “Dew it with Dewey” printed on them when he ran for president. Even Hollywood contributed to the T-shirt’s popularity when Marlon Brando sported one in the 1951 film “A Streetcar Named Desire.” The top 10 T-shirt designs: 1. I (Heart) NY 2. Vote for Pedro (“Napoleon Dynamite”) 3. College (inspired by sweatshirt from “Animal House”) 4. Rolling Stones’ “Sticky Fingers” albumcover logo 5. Superman symbol 6. Batman symbol 7. Hard Rock Cafe London 8. Tuxedo style 9. D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education logo) 10. Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon”

Amish Cook ■ CONTINUED FROM B1

Homemade Strawberry Glaze

Put on medium heat, stirring constantly. Bring to a boil and boil 2 minutes. Stir occasionally while cooling. When spreading consistency spread on cake, the glaze will thicken as it cools.

1 1/2 tablespoons butter Heat oven to 425. Mix sugar and cornstarch. Mix lightly through strawberries and rhubarb. Pour into pie crust and dot with butter. Cover with a top crust and cut slits in crust. Sprinkle with additional sugar. Seal and flute edges and bake at 40-50 minutes or until crust is nicely browned and juice begins to bubble through slits and best if served slightly warm.

Glaze: 3 tablespoons clear gel 1/4 cup sugar (heaping) 1/2 cup strawberry gelatin (heaping) Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups cold water 1 1/2 cups sugar Mix the first four ingredients 1/3 cup cornstarch together well. Stir the cold water in the 2 cups whole strawberries thoroughly. 2 cups cut up rhubarb

— Source: CustomInk/www.tshirtbirthday.com

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MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

FIFTY PLUS

Sunday, June 2, 2013

B3

Remodeling to fit your aging needs BY FRED W. WRIGHT JR. Tampa Bay Times For many elder Americans, growing older often means uncomfortable changes in the ability to do day-to-day tasks and even basic mobility. One aspect of aging that millions of seniors are clear on is that they do not want to move out of familiar surroundings and into a nursing home. One alternative that is becoming increasingly more popular is to adapt the home to make it more user-friendly as we age. There are now even experts in the aging-in-place concept who can assist in these modifications. The National Association of Home Builders, one of the largest organizations for contractors, engineers and home designers, offers a certification for licensed builders who want to concentrate and expand their skills for the aging population. The Certified Aging-inPlace (CAPS) designation is earned after a three-day workshop, with testing each day, and must be maintained with regular continuing education. More than 170 such workshops were offered by the NAHB in 2012 to nearly 2,000 people. The 5,000th certification was awarded to an Ohio builder last March. The first day of training starts with several sensitivity exercises, explains Theresa Crahan, NAHB executive director for remodelers. Students are asked to wear sunglasses smeared with Vaseline, to simulate aging eyesight. They are told to sit in a wheelchair and then maneuver in and out of rooms, opening and closing doors. Perhaps the most telling exercise, Crahan notes, is when students are told to place a tennis ball in their non-handwriting hand, cover it with a sock and then write a check — to simulate arthritis. “That’s an aha moment” for many, she says. Occupational therapists often are involved when an

SHNS PHOTO COURTESY DIY NETWORK

Before you upgrade your bathroom, find a reliable “licensed and insured” contractor to work with. Special need contracting is serious business, and professional assistance with the permit and remodeling process is key. older person transits from the hospital or rehab center to home, so many take the course to be better informed, Crahan says. “The majority of people age 55 and older say they want to remain in their homes for as long as possible,” according to Joseph Irons, chair of the CAPS board of governors. “We want to help consumers make their homes their homes for a lifetime,” he said, “even when their needs and abilities change.” Glenn J. Gullo, who has been a general contractor for a dozen years, says his Tampa, Fla.-based company, Home Safe, focuses almost full-time on remodeling homes, townhouses and condos for aging consumers and customers with disabilities. “That’s our core business,” he says. Gullo, who took the CAPS course about five years ago, says there are three categories of people who need help making

their homes safer and more ready to support an aging resident. The first category includes items they can do themselves. “They don’t cost anything,” he says. Like picking up throw rugs. “Throw rugs are dangerous.” Put night lights along the path from your bed to your bathroom. Stub your toes a lot on the foot of the bed, on the feet posts and footboard? Put foam rubber around them. The second category of changes are ones a neighbor or relative might be able to help with. Electrical plugs, for example, “are never in the right place,” Gullo says. “They’re behind couches and under tables, hard to reach without bending over.” He suggests buying a surge protector that can be mounted to the wall so the plugs are easy to reach. And the third category is where Gullo and his fellow remodelers come in. A professional is required, someone who has the tools

and skills to make significant additions or modifications without damaging the home. There are more modifications that Gullo recommends consumers consider, according to their specific needs and budgets: • Grab bars in the bathroom over the tub and/or in the shower. Gullo, 57, says he has grab bars in his shower. “They’re great to hold onto when you wash your face and your eyes are closed.” • For people in wheelchairs or using a walker, consider a ramp over the stairs. This would apply even for an apartment or condo with a low threshold. • Reduce the step-up on stairs from the traditional 7 inches to 4 inches. • Take out the tub and put in a shower — with the proper safeguards. Gullo says 65,000 serious injuries happen in showers each year. A roll-in shower for people in wheelchairs can be built, with no lip or

step and a drain slightly below floor level. • Keep the tub and turn it into a walk-in. There are replacement walk-in tubs that can be expensive, Gullo notes, or a lessexpensive kit can be used to create a door that can be cut into the side of a tub and the edges smoothed. • Standard bathroom doors are 24 inches wide; the doorway can be widened to 30 or 32 inches by using off-set hinges. • Replace round door knobs with levers. “Can you pass the closed-fist test?” Gullo asks. “Can you open the door or turn on the faucet with a closed fist?” If not, then a lever door knob is much more practical and paddle levers for faucets. • Tables and kitchen counters can be made to accommodate residents in wheelchairs. These are custom-made jobs, Gullo notes. Exact measurements are made with the customer in his or her wheelchair.

• Kitchen ranges can be installed with controls in the front. Microwaves can be mounted lower for easier access. • For residents with walkers or wheelchairs, “carpets aren’t all that great,” he says. Vinyl or wooden floors are clearly better. • Dead-bolt locks can be installed with a remote button, similar to what is used on many new cars, along with the traditional key. Every home is different,” Gullo says, with different designs, ages, layouts and challenges. Some homes cannot be remodeled for an aging-in-place resident. “I’ve seen so many people who moved to Florida when they were 50 years old and now they are 70 or 75 years old. If they live in a townhouse, there’s very little we can do.” To find a CAPS remodeler, architect, contractor, home designer or engineer in your area, go to NAHB.org/capsdirectory.

Home-monitoring systems can make aging residents feel secure One of the elements that can make someone feel more secure, especially an aging resident who may be feeling more vulnerable, is a home-monitoring system. These systems offer a range of services, from standard fire-, smoke- and carbon-monoxide-monitoring to intrusion alerts mounted on doors and windows. All such systems are monitored 24/7.

For residents wanting more security regarding health emergencies such as falls or heart attacks, these systems also provide “alert” buttons. These buttons can be worn as a pendant, clipped on a belt or worn on the wrist. Push the alert button and a signal goes out from a monitor to telemetry centers. Most alert buttons work outside a house, up to a radius of 300 or

more feet. Calls will then be made, depending on the system, to a neighbor, nearby relative, caregiver or 911. Monitoring personnel, often trained in medical emergency responses, will call the customer as well in an attempt to confirm the emergency alert and the details. Many monitors need to be installed by a service technician for a base fee.

Some systems can be bought online and installed by the resident. All systems then require a monthly fee for monitoring; most require a contract of a year or more. Nearly all monitoring systems come with a battery backup in case of loss of electricity, up to 30 or more hours. In case an emergency response is required, a key can be placed with a neigh-

‘Care guides’ help patients follow orders BY MAURA LERNER Scripps Howard News Service Dr. Richard Adair insisted that they spell it out clearly when the jobs were first posted: No experience required. The idea was to hire people with no medical background, give them two weeks of training, and send them off to clinics to start seeing patients. Five years later, these socalled “care guides” are fixtures at more than two dozen Allina Health clinics in Minnesota’s Twin Cities, and groups around the country are calling to find out how the concept works. The guides are part of a fast-growing, and hotly debated, trend in medicine: Putting people with minimal (if any) medical expertise on the front lines — with titles like patient navigator or coach — to help improve care, and rein in the costs, of patients with chronic illnesses. The Allina program, which began as a pilot project in 2008, may raise some eyebrows: Most of the care guides are in their early 20s, some in their first jobs out of college.

But new research, which Adair and a colleague will present this week, shows that the care guides have been able to influence patients in ways that doctors alone could not — helping people to quit smoking, get their blood sugar under control, and make other small victories in the daily battle with chronic illness. One of the frustrations with traditional office visits, Adair said, is that the doctor’s message often evaporates when the patient gets home. “You can just tell sometimes that you’re not getting through to the patient,” he said. “They’ll give you the old bobblehead response, but they’re not going to do it.” For people with chronic illness, such as diabetes or heart failure, skipping a medication or ignoring their diet can be particularly dangerous. But it happens all the time, he said. “I thought, ‘what could we do differently?’?” Hiring more doctors or nurses, he knew, would be prohibitively expensive. The care guides were his answer. With a $6 million grant from the Robina

Foundation in Minneapolis, Allina hired a dozen of them, at the rate of $16 an hour, and set them up in cubicles in clinic waiting rooms. Their job: Meet with struggling patients, go over their doctors’ instructions in detail, and see whether they could help them make progress. Betsy Snyder, 23, never wears a white coat on the job. She wouldn’t want her patients to get the wrong idea. “I try to explain that I’m a different type of clinic employee,” said Snyder, who’s been a care guide at the Abbott Northwestern General Medicine clinic in Minneapolis since December. When she started, Snyder, who graduated from Macalester College in St. Paul last May, went through a two-week medical boot camp. That included three days of classwork (in “disease basics” and electronic medical records) and shadowing doctors, nurses and others around the clinic. There’s even a one-page “scope of practice” that spells out what they can and can’t do. It’s OK to give educational handouts, talk about con-

trolling blood pressure and help people shop for medications. But “no medical advice.” If a clinical question comes up, they have to check with a nurse or doctor. “That part, of not overstepping their boundaries, is important,” Adair said. “We just hammer them on that one.” One day recently, Snyder met with Bob Bourke, 80, who has diabetes and kidney disease. “So let’s go over how you’re doing with your goals here,” she said. Checking his electronic medical record, she noted that a recent diabetes test was outside the normal range (“It’s a little bit high”). How was he doing with his medications? At one point, Bourke wondered aloud whether a new drug might interact with his old one, and she deflected the question. “Yeah, I don’t know so much about the interactions,” she said. “But if you had a problem, we could certainly talk to [the] doctor.” Bourke says working with Snyder has given him a better grasp on his condition. “You know, the doctor is always busy, the nurse is always busy,” he said.

bor or nearby relative. Also, a lockbox similar to those used by Realtors can be placed nearby with a key inside and an access code registered with the monitoring system. Just a few of the major monitoring systems available: • Link Medical Alert, toll-free 1-888-227-3301, or linkmedicalalert.com • Protect Your Home, toll free 1-800-580-1342, or

protectyourhome.com • Medic Alert, toll-free 1-877-451-7138, or medicalert.com • Great Call, toll-free 1800-650-3977, or greatcall.com • MobileHelpNow, tollfree 1-800-800-1710, or mobilehelpnow.com Fred W. Wright Jr. is a freelance writer living in Seminole, Fla.

Great Flood exhibit at Hayner TROY — The Troy-Hayner Cultural Center is hosting the exhibit “The Great Flood 1913-Troy,” and a reception for the public will be from 6-7:30 p.m. Friday. This exhibit is in partnership with the Troy Historical Society, and the photographs are from the society’s collection. The exhibit will run through July 28.

INFORMATION Regional Group Publisher – Frank Beeson 440-5231 Executive Editor – David Fong 440-5228 Advertising Manager – Leiann Stewart 440-5252  Mailing Address: Troy Daily News, 224 S. Market St., Troy. Postmaster should send changes to the Troy Daily News, 224 S. Market St., Troy, Ohio 45373. Second class postage on the (USPS 642-080) is paid at Troy, Ohio. E-mail address: editorial@tdnpublishing.com  Subscription Rates as of May 1, 2013: Single Copy Newsstand rate $1.00 daily and $1.75 Sunday. EZ Pay $14.50 per month. $44.00 – 13 weeks. $82.00 – 26 weeks. $160.00 – 52 weeks. $21.00 – 13 weeks Weekend Only Rate (F-S-Su). $40.00 – 26 weeks Weekend Only Rate. $75.00 – 52 weeks Weekend Only Rate. Regular subscriptions are transferrable and/or refundable. Refund checks under $10 will not be issued. An administrative fee of $10 for all balances under $50 will be applied. Remaining balances of $50 or more will be charged a 20% administrative fee. A division of Civitas Media

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TRAVEL

Sunday, June 2, 2013 • B4

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

AP PHOTO/WETËNÍWILD

This undated photo supplied by WetëníWild Las Vegas shows a view of the water park before it opened Memorial Day weekend from atop the Desert Racers slides with the Las Vegas Strip in the distance. The water park is one of a number of new attractions opening around the country this year.

New thrills

This will be a great summer for a theme park vacation ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — If there’s ever been a summer to visit a theme park or two, or three this is it. High speed wooden roller coasters? Thrilling, sense-assaulting rides? Penguins? Yes, yes and most definitely. In Orlando alone, four of the area’s big parks Disney, Universal, Legoland and SeaWorld have opened, or are about to open, new attractions. Cedar Point in Ohio unveiled a new roller coaster a few weeks ago and in Las Vegas, a $50 million water park debuted on Memorial Day weekend. In California, visitors to Disneyland can meet all of the Disney Princesses in one place. Elsewhere in the Golden State, four different parks boast new roller coasters. “Wherever you live, that park is likely to have something new,” said Jeremy Schoolfield, the senior editor of Funworld Magazine, the trade publication for the International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA). “There’s lots of innovations, what we call immersive experiences.” There’s been an onslaught of new attractions in Orlando in recent months. Back in December, Disney World opened a newly expanded Fantasyland, the largest project in the park’s 41-year history. There are two sections: Enchanted Forest, where visitors will find Belle from “Beauty and the Beast” and Ariel from “The Little Mermaid,” and Storybook Circus, which is inspired by the Disney film “Dumbo.” A new ride called Under the Sea-Journey of the Little Mermaid and Enchanted Tales With Belle, a walk-through experience that features a magical mirror and costumed characters, will impress movie lovers. And the popular Dumbo attraction is now a little less crowded, because Disney built a second, identical ride. The new spaces are built on what was once the site of the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea experience, and the expansion doubles the size of the original Fantasyland. George Kalogridis, president of the Walt Disney World Resort, said that if he were bringing his family to the park on a summer day, he would begin with the Enchanted Tales with Belle experience, then check out the new Doc McStuffins segment at Disney JuniorLive on Stage at Hollywood Studios. Hollywood Studios is

also the place to find costumed characters from the Disney-Pixar movie Monsters University. “Something new in every park makes it easy to satisfy everybody in the family,” he said. Over at Universal Orlando, a 3-D theme park ride based on the Transformers toy and film brand will open June 20; a similar ride is already open at Universal’s parks in California and Singapore. The park describes the ride as an interactive, “larger than life battle” between the Autobots and Decepticons. It uses flight simulator technology, along with wind, heat and smoke to make the riders feel immersed in the experience. At SeaWorld Orlando, the Antarctica Empire of the Penguin attraction opened on May 24. With a ride, restaurants and the penguin habitat, it’s the largest expansion in the park’s history. The ride takes visitors through a queue, themed around a fictional penguin named Puck. As visitors make their way through the queue and ride, the temperature keeps dropping until visitors are in 30-degree temperatures. The ride ends at the penguin habitat, where more than 250 birds live. Visitors can watch the birds frolic on shore or underwater. Park executive said that in doing research for a new attraction, penguins are a big draw at parks. “As we developed this attraction, we found that adults like penguins just as much as kids, and we’ve seen adults act just like kids when they’re around them,” said Terry Prather, the vice president of park operations at SeaWorld Orlando. Busch Gardens in Tampa has two new offerings: the Madagascar Live show and three just-born rare Malayan tiger cubs. Over at Legoland Florida, the park is expanding to include a new ride and interactive play area based on the company’s popular Legends of Chima product line. The section, which is scheduled to open July 3, will include an interactive water ride called The Quest for Chi, a Lego-building challenge, a 4-D movie and a meet-and-greet with costumed characters. Legoland also has a Carlsbad, Calif., outpost and in April, opened a 250room Legoland hotel there. Visitors are greeted by a fire-breathing dragon made of 400,000 Lego bricks. Guest rooms are decorated in pirate, adventure or

kingdom themes, and most items in the rooms appear as if they are built of Legos. Not to be outdone by Florida, California’s theme parks also have new offerings mostly in the form of thrill rides. AP PHOTO/CEDAR POINT

ABOVE: This April 4 photo provided by Cedar Point shows an empty train during a test run above a new main entrance area on Cedar Point’s new GateKeeper roller coaster in Sandusky. The coaster will turn riders upside down six times and soar above a new main entrance on seats that extend sideways from the track, with nothing above or below them. LEFT: This rendering supplied by California’s Great America theme park depicts Gold Striker, a roller coaster opening at the Santa Clara, Calif., park this summer. The wooden coaster will be 108 feet tall and will go more than 50 mph. AP PHOTO/ GREAT AMERICA

AP PHOTO/SEAWORLD PARKS & ENTERTAINMENT VIA PRNEWSWIRE

This image released by Seaworld Orlando shows guests visiting the new attraction, Antarctica: Empire of the Penguin, at SeaWorld Orlando in Orlando, Fla., on May 24. With a ride, restaurants and the penguin habitat, it's the largest expansion in the park's history. The ride takes visitors through a queue, themed around a fictional penguin named Puck. At Disneyland, the new Fantasy Faire offers all of the Disney Princesses in one place the intricately detailed Royal Hall. Also at Disneyland, “Mickey and the Magical Map” is the new show at the Fantasyland Theater this summer. Great America in Santa Clara will have the Gold Striker, a wooden coaster that soars to 108 feet at 54 mph, opening this summer. The Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk’s new Undertow roller coaster will replace

the Hurricane coaster in June; it’s described a spinning roller coaster. At Six Flags Magic Mountain, the Full Throttle is billed as “the world’s tallest vertical loop” at 160 feet; that coaster will open later in the summer. Knotts Berry Farm debuts the Coast Rider this summer with 1,339 feet of track, the company says it “gives guests the feeling of riding the California coast.” Non-coastal residents also have new offerings at regional parks.

Dollywood in Tennessee has opened RiverRush in the Splash Country part of the park. In the Nevada desert, a water park called Wet ‘n’ Wild has opened in Las Vegas. And in Ohio at Cedar Point, thrill-seekers will be treated to a new, $30 million roller coaster. Called The GateKeeper, the 4,164foot track soars over the park’s entrance and winds through the park. It’s the longest winged coaster in the world, industry analysts

say which means that riders sit on either side of the track, with nothing above their heads or below their feet. The two-minute, 40-second ride features rolling flyover maneuvers, 360-degree flips, drops, spirals and a gut-churning 170-foot drop. Each vehicle has four riders and each one can move independently and snake through elements,” said Schoolfield. “What’s exciting about this coaster is that it’s very maneuverable.”


ENTERTAINMENT

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Sunday, June 2, 2013

B5

Fame part of family business for Smiths TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, N.M. (AP) — Will Smith has a new outlook on teenagers: Parents do indeed understand. The rapper-turned-actor says he’s “grown a lot” since writing the Grammy-winning 1988 hit that humorously declared they didn’t. All three of his children now at least dabble in music and acting, most notably 14-year-old Jaden, who stars with his father in the new sci-fi film “After Earth,” opening Friday. Even in the midst of a globe-hopping promotional tour for the movie, Smith recognizes the downside to making stardom a family affair. “I think that the major risk of this particular business is strictly emotional,” he said in a recent interview. “The business has almost a narcotic quality. So it’s almost as if you’re introducing a narcotic into your kid’s life. “So for (wife) Jada (Pinkett Smith) and I, the most important thing is that they have to stay focused and grounded on the fact that they are giving. You don’t make movies for your ego. You make movies to transfer information, to bring joy, to add value to the world.” At an “After Earth” promotional event at the under-construction Virgin Galactic spaceport in the New Mexico desert,

AP PHOTO/SONY, COLUMBIA PICTURES

This film publicity image released by Sony-Columbia Pictures shows Will Smith, left, and Jaden Smith in a scene from “After Earth.” Smith does everything he can to playfully poke at his son’s ego. When Jaden loudly drops a water bottle during a TV interview, he’s quickly reprimanded: “You’re kidding, right? You’re kidding. That’s the most unprofessional thing I’ve seen you do.” Smith reaches over to shield his son’s face from bright camera lights, taunting the teen as a “super mega movie star, towering over you like a shadow over you. And you’re living in his shadow. And you’ve got to do interviews in his shadow.” Jaden, obviously accustomed to the teasing, responds with

calm confidence and some of dad’s hammy humor, saying he lives “naturally” in the spotlight. “You have to try to put your shadow on me,” said Jaden, who rode his skateboard through a hall between interviews. “But eventually your arm gets tired and it falls away and you let me go back to my natural state.” His father nods in mock sincerity. “Oh that’s deep. You are a deep being,” he says. Their film is set in a future where nature has turned on humans and survivors were forced to start a new civilization on another planet. Jaden plays a

trainee trying to follow in the footsteps of his father, a famous military leader played by Smith. When the two crash-land on an inhospitable Earth, Jaden’s character must prove his own abilities to survive, and save his father. “It is very allegorical in a way, right?” said screenwriter Gary Whitta, who developed the story with Smith and co-wrote the film director M. Night with Shyamalan. “Jaden I’m sure looks up to Will and is like ‘Wow, my dad is like the biggest movie star in the world. How can I ever live up to that?’ But he’s trying.”

Smith, 44, and Jaden first costarred together in 2006’s “The Pursuit of Happyness.” Smith produced his son’s hit 2010 remake of “The Karate Kid” with Jackie Chan, which made more than $350 million worldwide. (Smith’s last movie, last summer’s “Men In Black 3,” earned more than $600 million globally.) Smith said he wants his family to be successful in the entertainment industry across generations, and has searched Hollywood history for models. “I’ve looked for a lot of years. The Barrymores got really close to what I see in my head for my family,” Smith said, referring to the clan of theatre and film actors famed in the 1930s and now represented by Drew Barrymore. Smith’s daughter Willow, now 12, appeared in two movies but has focused on music. After causing a stir with the pop smash “Whip My Hair” three years ago, she’s backed away from the spotlight but continued to release songs online. Smith’s other son, 20-year-old Trey, has taken up DJ work and posts electronic dance songs and mixes online. Jada Pinkett Smith is an actress, author, singer-songwriter and businesswoman. She and Smith started Overbrook Entertainment, which has produced many of Smith’s films, including “After Earth.”

FILM REVIEW

FILM REVIEW

‘See Me’ isn’t magical despite a great cast

AP PHOTO/SONY, COLUMBIA PICTURES

This film publicity image released by Sony-Columbia Pictures shows Jaden Smith in a scene from “After Earth.”

‘After Earth’ disappointing Sci-fi tale will leave audiences pining for more BY JOHN DEFORE AP Film Reviewer LOS ANGELES (AP) — Humanity’s home planet hardly merits the namecheck in “After Earth,” M. Night Shyamalan’s sci-fi survival tale whose shipwreck action could (with the exception of a scene where our hero scrawls a crude map over Lascauxlike cave paintings) take place on any old life-supporting globe in the cosmos. The disappointingly generic film, which strands a father and son (Will and Jaden Smith) on Earth a thousand years after a planet-wide evacuation, will leave genre audiences pining for the more Terra-centric conceits of “Oblivion,” not to mention countless other future-set films that find novelty in making familiar surroundings threatening. Will Smith’s presence, not just as co-star but as originator of the story, seems likely to carry box office receipts beyond the benchmark of Shyamalan’s previous picture, the wretched “The Last Airbender,” but those hoping for a franchise should navigate elsewhere. Plans for such a franchise seem to be afoot, with filmmakers reportedly having written “1,000 years of back story” for these two characters and their society. They must be saving an awful lot for comic-book and videogame spinoffs, though, as the film squeezes its millennium-long setup into a few short moments of voiceover introduction. We learn that, having

ruined our environment, humans decamped en masse to Nova Prime, which would have been a nice place if not for the monsters that had been bred to kill humans. (By whom? Buy the comic book, kid.) Those beasts, Ursa, are blind, but can smell the pheromones humans release when afraid. When a member of the United Ranger Corps, the elder Smith’s Cypher Raige, found himself able to suppress his fear, he was suddenly invisible to the monsters. Harnessing this “ghosting” technique, he became a hero in the still-raging war. What we don’t learn in the too-quick intro is how all humankind came to speak in the same accent, most reminiscent perhaps of New Zealand’s — one that suits none of the cast very well, and makes Jaden Smith’s voiceover hard to follow. The script also fails to explain why future warriors, whose technology allows for a “cutlass” whose two ends morph into any type of blade the user requires, choose not to use guns or lasers against the mighty Ursa. One assumes it’s because somebody saw Darth Maul and thought his double-trouble light saber looked cool. In any event, Cypher Raige comes home between long campaigns to find his son Kitai unsettled, struggling to live up to his legacy. He decides to take the boy along on an interstellar voyage, but the ship is thrown off course by a gravitational storm and must land on the nearest planet. A crash

landing on Earth leaves three survivors: the Raiges and the Ursa specimen they’d been transporting for use in training aspiring ghost-ers. With both legs badly broken, Cypher must coach Kitai via cameraphone as he makes a 100-kilometer trek, dodging the freed Ursa and Earth’s own predators, to find the chunk of wreckage that can save their lives. This is the first Shyamalan-directed film on which he’s not the sole screenwriter, and in fact it takes a while to discern any trace of the filmmaker’s personality in a screenplay credited to him and “Book of Eli” scribe Gary Whitta. The script hits its action beats competently as Kitai copes with marauding animals and dwindling supplies, and works best when the teen is in motion. But Shyamalan is of little help to the actor when Kitai faces internal challenges: Smith’s performance, all furrowed brow and worried eyes, gives us no reason to believe Kitai is made of the same tough stuff as his father. Will Smith, meanwhile, is as hobbled as his character: Forced to sit in a chair, slowly bleeding to death as he impotently observes his son’s various perils, Cypher is a man of action who can’t act; Smith is a charisma-powered performer made to hide his charm behind a stern military demeanor. (When Kitai enters his first dangerous standoff, faraway Dad offers a stoic non sequitur: “Recognize your power: This will be your creation.”)

Shyamalan would have to try hard to make another film as bad as “Airbender”; “After Earth’s” missteps in conception and execution are more akin to the headscratching choices that kept “The Happening” from fulfilling its doomsday-flick potential. Who let that herd of fake-looking bison roam Earth’s grasslands, and who lit the critical scene, set on a tree stump amid roaring waterfalls, that was obviously shot on a soundstage? On a planet that now freezes every night, how do the flora of tropical rainforests survive? What seasoned soldier would send his son on a deadly four-day mission with a backpack the size of a bicycle seat? The film’s resolution, predictable to any viewer, feels oddly impersonal for a father/son bonding tale both dreamed up and enacted by a father for the son following in his footsteps. Whatever the faults of 2006’s “The Pursuit of Happiness,” that film employed the bond between the two Smiths much more effectively. One wonders if it might be wise to wait a while before the next pairing letting Jaden Smith, like Kitai Raige, come into his own before asking him to share a screen meaningfully with one of Hollywood’s biggest personalities. “After Earth,” a Sony/Columbia release, is rated PG-13 for sci-fi action violence and some disturbing images. Running time: 100 minutes.

Come to think of it, Hollywood films and magic shows have something in common: You pay your money, and you want to believe. Even if it’s exceedingly hard to do. At the start of “Now You See Me,” a magic-themed heist movie with a highpowered cast including Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Mark Ruffalo, Jesse Eisenberg and Woody Harrelson, you really want to believe. The idea is fresh, the introductory scenes enticing. Plus, the actual magic performances that anchor the film, directed by Louis Leterrier, are fun and for a while you almost forget that you’re merely watching other people watch a magic show. But then the dialogue turns formulaic, the plot gets increasingly hard to follow even a film about magic needs an underlying logic and character development seems to come to an utter halt, with interesting possibilities left unexplored. It all builds up to a dramatic reveal at the end, one that, like the traditional rabbit in the hat, you weren’t expecting. But by then, it’s a bit too late. You’ve already disengaged. It’s too bad, because the film has a great premise. Four professional illusionists are called together by a mysterious leader. Eisenberg is the cocky sleight-of-hand wizard who likes to run things and take all the credit. (Stop thinking about Mark Zuckerberg wrong movie!) Isla Fisher is his former assistant, and an escape artist. Harrelson is an expert hypnotist, and Dave Franco is the talented street magician. Soon they’re a formidable team: The Four Horsemen. They thrill a magic-show crowd in Las Vegas with a tantalizing heist that involves robbing a bank in Paris by “teleporting” a man from the audience across the pond, then rewarding the crowd with stolen euro notes. Enter Ruffalo’s roughedged FBI agent, Dylan Rhodes, who swigs liquor and coffee and AlkaSeltzer, partnered by a winsome French Interpol agent with the odd name of Alma Dray, played by Melanie Laurent. She’s not all that believable, though

it’s great fun to witness her comeback at one point to Dylan’s brutish order to “Stay in the car.” (You go, Alma!) In his pursuit of the Horsemen, Dylan will run up against Thaddeus Bradley Freeman, having a good time in the role of a former magician who’s now a reality host, exposing current magicians. He shows Dylan how the Paris heist was likely achieved, but the harder job is figuring out who’s in charge, and what they’re up to next. Because, as characters tend to say in this film, the key thing is to be a step ahead of everyone else. Freeman is fun to watch, as is Caine, as a presumed benefactor of the magicians. Ruffalo offers the most fully fleshed-out character, and he can be very funny. Other actors are somewhat wasted in this script by Boaz Yakin, Ed Solomon, and Edward Ricourt. Harrelson’s Merritt McKinney is wise-cracking, Fisher’s Henley Reeves is feisty, and Eisenberg’s J. Daniel Atlas is high-strung and fast-talking, but beyond that we know little. A romantic past is hinted at between Fisher and Eisenberg’s characters, then pretty much dropped. As for Ruffalo and Laurent, they get their moment, but it would have been nice to see some meaty dialogue between them. And you know it’s getting formulaic when, at a climactic moment, the 10year-old boy watching the film next to you mutters: “That always happens.” You’ll smile at the enjoyable final reveal, patently absurd as it is. But you won’t be feeling much magic. “Now You See Me,” a Lionsgate/Summit release, is rated PG-13 for language, some action and sexual content. Running time: 116 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four. 40138447

BY JOCELYN NOVECK AP Film Reviewer

SCHEDULE SUNDAY 6/2 ONLY

AFTER EARTH (PG-13) 11:45 2:20 4:55 7:30 10:25 NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13) 11:00 1:45 4:30 7:15 10:10 HANGOVER PART 3 (R) 11:20 1:50 4:20 7:00 10:00 FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG-13) 1:00 2:45 4:40 6:10 7:45 9:15 10:45 EPIC 2-D ONLY (PG) 11:05 4:15 EPIC 3-D ONLY (PG) 1:40 6:50

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS 2-D ONLY (PG-13) 12:00 9:40 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 3:15 6:25 THE GREAT GATSBY 2-D ONLY (PG-13) 11:30 THE GREAT GATSBY 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 9:25 IRON MAN 3 2-D ONLY (PG-13) 3:30 9:50 IRON MAN 3 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 12:15 6:35


B6

VALLEY

Sunday, June 2, 2013

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

DATES TO REMEMBER TODAY • DivorceCare seminar and support group will meet from 6:30-8 p.m. at Piqua Assembly of God Church, 8440 King Arthur Drive, Piqua. Child care provided through the sixth-grade. • AA, Piqua Breakfast Group will meet at 8:30 a.m. at Westminter Presbyterian Church, corner of Ash and Caldwell streets, Piqua. The discussion meeting is open. • AA, Troy Trinity Group meets at 7 p.m. for open discussion in the 12 Step Room at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 1550 Henley Road, Troy. • AA, open meeting, 6 p.m., Westminster Presbyterian Church, corner of Ash and Caldwell streets, Piqua. Alley entrance, upstairs. • AA, Living Sober meeting, open to all who have an interest in a sober lifestyle, 7:30 p.m., Westminster Presbyterian Church, corner of Ash and Caldwell streets, Piqua. • Narcotics Anonymous, Winner’s Group, will meet at 5 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Ave., Troy. Open discussion . • Narcotics Anonymous, Poison Free, 7 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 202 W. Fourth St., third floor, Greenville. • Narcotics Anonymous, Never Alone, Never Again, 6:30 p.m., First Christian Church, 212 N. Main St., Sidney • Teen Talk, where teens share their everyday issues through communication, will meet at 6 p.m. at the Troy View Church of God, 1879 Staunton Road, Troy. • Singles Night at The Avenue will be from 6-10 p.m. at the Main Campus Avenue, Ginghamsburg Church, 6759 S. County Road 25-A, Troy. Each week, cards, noncompetitive volleyball, free line dances and free ballroom dance lessons. Child care for children birth through fifth grade is offered from 5:457:45 p.m. each night in the Main Campus building. For more information, call 6671069, Ext. 21. • Baseball bingo will be offered from 7 p.m. until games are complete at Sunset Bingo, 1710 W. High St., Piqua. Refreshments will be available. Proceeds help the youth baseball organization, a nonprofit.

nonviolently with stress and anger issues. • Mind Over Weight Total Fitness, 6-7 p.m., 213 E. Franklin St., Troy. Other days and times available. For more information, call 339-2699. • TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m., Zion Lutheran Church, 11 N. Third St., Tipp City. New members welcome. For more information, call 335-9721. • Troy Noon Optimist Club will meet at noon at the Tin Roof restaurant. Guests welcome. For more information, call 478-1401. • Weight Watchers, Westminster Presbyterian, Piqua, weigh-in is at 5 and meeting at 5:30 p.m. • Parenting Education Groups will meet from 6-8 p.m. at the Family Abuse Shelter of Miami County, 16 E. Franklin St., Troy. Learn new and age-appropriate ways to parent children. Call 339-6761 for more information. There is no charge for this program. • Narcotics Anonymous, Hug A Miracle, will meet at 7 p.m. at the Church of the Brethren, 1431 W. Main St., Troy, use back door. • Narcotics Anonymous, Inspiring Hope, 12:30 p.m., Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Road, Troy. • Sanctuary, for women who have been affected by sexual abuse, location not made public. Must currently be in therapy. For more information, call Amy Johns at 667-1069, Ext. 430 • Miami Valley Women’s Center, 7049-A Taylorsville Road, Huber Heights, offers free pregnancy testing, noon to 4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. For more information, call 2362273. • Pilates for Beginners, 8:30-9:30 a.m. and 5:30-6:30 p.m. at 27 1/2 E. Main St., Tipp City. For more information, call Tipp-Monroe Community Services at 6678631 or Celeste at 669-2441. • Next Step at Noon, noon to 1 p.m. at Ginghamsburg South Campus, ARK, 7695 S. County Road 25-A, one mile south of the main campus.

TUESDAY

• Deep water aerobics will be offered from 6-7 p.m. at Lincoln Community Center, 110 Ash St., Troy. Call 3352715 or visit www.lcctroy.com for more information and programs. • Hospice of Miami County “Growing Through Grief” meetings are at 11 a.m. on MONDAY the first, third and fifth Tuesdays of each month, and • Dollar menu night will be 7 p.m. the second and fourth from 6-8 p.m. at Troy Eagles, Tuesdays and are designed to 225 N. Elm St. Dollar menu provide a safe and supportive items include hamburger slid- environment for the expresers, sloppy joe, hot dog, sion of thoughts and feelings grilled cheese, french fries, associated with the grief onion straws, cup of soup, ice process. All sessions are cream and more for $1 each. available to the community • Christian 12 step meetand at the Hospice ings, “Walking in Freedom,” Generations of Life Center, are offered at 7 p.m. at Open 550 Summit Ave., second Arms Church, 4075 Tipp floor, Troy, with light refreshCowlesville Road, Tipp City. ments provided. No reserva• An arthritis aquatic class tions are required. For more will be offered from 8-9 or 9information, call Susan 10 a.m. at Lincoln Community Cottrell at Hospice of Miami Center, Troy. Call 335-2715 or County, 335-5191. visit www.lcctroy.com for more • A daytime grief support information and programs. group meets on the first, third • AA, Big Book discussion and fifth Tuesdays at 11 a.m. meeting will be at 11 a.m. at at the Generations of Life Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 Center,, second floor, 550 S. Dorset Road, Troy, in the Summit Ave., Troy. The sup12 Step Room. The discusport group is open to any sion is open to the public. grieving adults in the greater • AA, Green & Growing Miami County area and there will meet at 8 p.m. The closed is no participation fee. discussion meeting (attenSessions are facilitated by dees must have a desire to trained bereavement staff. stop drinking) will be at Troy Call 573-2100 for details or View Church of God, 1879 visit the website at homc.org. Old Staunton Road, Troy. • A children’s support • AA, There Is A Solution group for any grieving chilGroup will meet at 8 p.m. in dren ages 6-11 years in the Ginghamsburg United greater Miami County area Methodist Church, County will meet from 6-7:30 p.m. on Road 25-A, Ginghamsburg. the first and third Tuesday The discussion group is evenings at the Generations closed (participants must of Life Center, second floor, have a desire to stop drink550 Summit Ave., Troy. There ing). is no participation fee. • AA, West Milton open Sessions are facilitated by discussion, 7:30 p.m., Good trained bereavement staff and Shepherd Lutheran Church, volunteers. Crafts, sharing rear entrance, 1209 S. Miami time and other grief support St. Non-smoking, handicap activities are preceded by a accessible. light meal. • Al-Anon, Serenity • Quilting and crafts is Seekers will meet at 8 p.m. in offered from 9 a.m. to noon the 12 Step Room at Trinity every Tuesday at the Tipp City Episcopal Church, 60 S. Seniors, 320 S. First St., Tipp Dorset Road, Troy. The disCity. Call 667-8865 for more cussion meeting is open. A information. beginner’s meeting begins at • A Fibromyalgia Support 7:30 p.m. group will meet from 6:30-8 • Alternatives: Anger/Rage p.m. the first Tuesday at the Control Group for adult males, Troy First United Methodist 7-9 p.m., Miami County Church, 110 W. Franklin St., Shelter, 16 E. Franklin St., Troy, in Room 313. Enter from Troy. Issues addressed are south parking lot. The support physical, verbal and emotion- group is free. For more inforal violence toward family mation, contact Aimee members and other persons, Shannon at 552-7634. how to express feelings, how • The Concord Township to communicate instead of Trustees will meet at 10 a.m. on the first and third Tuesday confronting and how to act

at the township building, 2678 W. State Route 718. • The Miami Shelby Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. at Greene Street United Methodist Church, 415 W. Greene St., Piqua. All men interested in singing are welcome and visitors always are welcome. For more information, call 778-1586 or visit the group’s Web site at www.melodymenchorus.org. • Divorce Care, 7 p.m. at Richards Chapel, 831 McKaig Ave., Troy. Video/small group class designed to help separated or divorced people. For more information, call 3358814. • An adoption support group for adoptees and birthmothers will meet on the first Tuesday of each month. Call Pam at 335-6641 for time and location. • The Mental Health Association of Miami County will meet at 4 p.m. on the first Tuesday in the conference room of the Tri-County Board of Recovery & Mental Health, Stouder Center, 1100 Wayne St., Troy. Use the west entrance to the fourth floor. • AA, women’s meeting, 89 p.m., Dettmer’s Daniel Dining Room. • AA Tuesday night meeting, 7 p.m., Troy Church of the Brethren, 1431 W. Main St., Troy. • AA, The Best Is Yet To Come Group will meet at 11 a.m. in the 12 Step Room at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Road, Troy. The discussion is open. • AA, Tipp City Group, Zion Lutheran Church, Main and Third streets at 8 p.m. This is a closed discussion (participants must have a desire to stop drinking). • Al-Anon, 8:30 p.m. Sidney Group, Presbyterian Church, corner North and Miami streets, Sidney. • AA, 7 p.m. at Troy Church of the Brethren, 1431 W. Main St., Troy. Open discussion. • An Intermediate Pilates class will be from 9-10 a.m. and 6-7 p.m. at 27 1/2 E. Main St., Tipp City. For more information, call Tipp-Monroe Community Services at 6678631 or Celeste at 669-2441. • Women’s Anger/Rage Group will meet from 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays at the Family Abuse Shelter of Miami County, 16 E. Franklin St., Troy. Issues addressed are physical, verbal and emotional violence toward family members and other persons, how to express feelings, how to communicate instead of confronting and how to act nonviolently with stress and anger issues. Call 339-6761 for more information. • Narcotics Anonymous, Just For Tuesday, will meet at 7 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Ave., Troy. This is an open discussion. • Narcotics Anonymous, Unity Group, 7 p.m., Freedom Life Ministries Church, 9101 N. County Road 25-A, Piqua. Open discussion. • Public bingo, license No. 0105-28, will begin with early birds at 7 p.m. and regular bingo at 7:30 p.m. at the Elks Lodge No. 833, 17 W. Franklin St., Troy. Use the Cherry Street entrance. Doors open at 5 p.m. Instant tickets also will be available. • Public bingo — paper and computer — will be offered by the Tipp City Lumber Baseball organization from 7-10 p.m. at the West Milton Eagles, 2270 S. Miami St., West Milton. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and concessions will be available. Proceeds will benefit the sponsorship of five Little League baseball teams. For more information, call 5439959. • DivorceCare will be every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Troy Church of the Nazarene, State Route 55 and Barnhart Road, Troy. The group is open to men and women. For more information, call Patty at 440-1269 or Debbie at 335-8397. • Christian 12-Step, 7-8:30 p.m. at Ginghamsburg South Campus, ARK, 7695 S. County Road 25-A, one mile south of the main campus.

WEDNESDAY • The Miami Valley Veterans Museum will have free coffee and doughnuts for all veterans and guests from 9-11 a.m. on the first Wednesday at the museum, located in the Masonic Lodge, 107 W. Main St., Troy, on the second floor. • Skyview Wesleyan Church, 6995 Peters Road, Tipp City, will offer a free din-

ner at 6:15 p.m. Bible study will begin at 7 p.m. • An arthritis aquatic class will be offered from 8-9 or 910 a.m. at Lincoln Community Center, Troy. Call 335-2715 or visit www.lcctroy.com for more information and programs. • The “Sit and Knit” group meets from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Tippecanoe Weaver and Fibers Too, 17 N. 2nd St., Tipp City. All knitters are invited to attend. For more information, call 667-5358. • Grandma’s Kitchen, a homecooked meal prepared by volunteers, is offered every Wednesday from 56:30 p.m. in the activity center of Hoffman United Methodist Church, 201 S. Main St., West Milton, one block west of State Route 48. The meal, which includes a main course, salad, dessert and drink, for a suggested donation of $7 per person, or $3 for a children’s meal. The meal is not provided on the weeks of Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year’s. • An Alzheimer’s Support Group will meet from 4-5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesday of every month at the Church of the Nazarene, 1200 Barnhart Road, Troy. The group is for anyone dealing with dementia of a loved one. For more information, call the Alzheimer’s Association at (937) 2913332. • The Kiwanis Club will meet at noon at the Troy Country Club, 1830 Peters Road, Troy. Non-members of Kiwanis are invited to come meet friends and have lunch. For more information, contact Bobby Phillips, vice president, at 335-6989. • The Troy American Legion Post No. 43 euchre parties will begin at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 339-1564. • AA, Pioneer Group open discussion will meet at 9:30 a.m. Enter down the basement steps on the north side of The United Church Of Christ on North Pearl Street in Covington. The group also meets at 8:30 p.m. Monday night and is wheelchair accessible. • AA, Serenity Island Group will meet at 8 p.m. in the Westminster Presbyterian Church, corner of Ash and Caldwell streets, Piqua. The discussion is open. • AA, 12 & 12 will meet at 8 p.m. for closed discussion, Step and Tradition meeting, in the 12 Step Room, Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Road, Troy. • AA, open discussion, 8 p.m., Westminster Presbyterian Church, corner of Ash and Caldwell streets, Piqua. Use the alley entrance, upstairs. • Al-Anon, Trinity Group will meet at 11 a.m. in the 12 Step Room at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Road, Troy. • Men’s Anger/Rage Group will meet from 6-8 p.m. at the Family Abuse Shelter of Miami County, 16 E. Franklin St., Troy. Issues addressed are physical, verbal and emotional violence toward family members and other persons, how to express feelings, how to communicate instead of confronting and how to act nonviolently with stress and anger issues. Call 339-6761 for more information. • A Domestic Violence Support Group for Women will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Family Abuse Shelter of Miami County, 16. E. Franklin St., Troy. Support for battered women who want to break free from partner violence is offered. There is no charge for the program. For more information, call 3396761. • Narcotics Anonymous, Inspiring Hope, 12:30 p.m., Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Road, Troy. • Children’s Creative Play Group will be from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Family Abuse Shelter of Miami County, 16 E. Franklin St., Troy. Schoolage children will learn appropriate social interactions and free expression through unique play therapy. There is no charge for this program. More information is available by calling 339-6761. • Narcotics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., Spirit of Recovery, Church of the Brethren, 1431 W. Main St., Troy. • Overeaters Anonymous will meet at 7:30 p.m. at Mount Calvary Lutheran Church, 9100 N. Main St., State Route 48, between Meijer and Samaritan North. For other meetings or information, call 252-6766 or (800) 589-6262, or visit the

Web site at www.region5oa.org. • Miami Valley Women’s Center, 7049-A Taylorsville Road, Huber Heights, offers free pregnancy testing, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call 236-2273. • A Pilates Beginners group matwork class will be from 5:30-6:30 p.m. at 27 1/2 E. Main St., Tipp City. For more information, call TippMonroe Community Services at 667-8631 or Celeste at 669-2441. • Safe People, 7-8:30 p.m., Ginghamsburg Church, SC/DC 104. Find guidance for making safe choices in relationships, from friendships to co-workers, family or romance. Learn to identify nurturing people as well as those who should be avoided. Call Roberta Bogle at 6674678 for more information. • Boundaries, 7-8:30 p.m., Ginghamsburg Church, ARK 200. A 12-week video series using Boundaries by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend. Offers practical help and encouragement to all who seek a healthy, balanced life and practice in being able to say no. For more information, call Linda Richards at 667-4678. • The Temple of Praise Ministries will serve hot lunches from noon to 2 p.m. on the first and third Wednesday at 235 S. Third St., Tipp City. • A free employment networking group will be offered from 8-9 a.m. each Wednesday at Job and Family Services, 2040 N. County Road 25-A, Troy. The group will offer tools to tap into unadvertised jobs, assistance to improve personal presentation skills and resume writing. For more information, call Steven Kiefer at 570-2688 or Justin Sommer at 440-3465. • The Tipp City Seniors offer line dancing at 10 a.m. every Wednesday at 320 S. First St., Tipp City.

THURSDAY • The Upper Valley Medical Center Mom and Baby Get Together group will meet from 9:30-11 a.m. on Thursdays at the Farm House, located northwest of the main hospital entrance and next to the red barn on the UVMC campus. The meeting is facilitated by the lactation department. The group offers the opportunity to meet with other moms, share about being a new mother and to learn more about breastfeeding and the baby. For more information, call (937) 440-4906. • Deep water aerobics will be offered from 6-7 p.m. at Lincoln Community Center, 110 Ash St., Troy. Call 3352715 or visit www.lcctroy.com for more information and programs. • An open parent-support group will be at 7 p.m. at Corinn’s Way Inc., 306 S. Dorset Road, Troy. • Tipp City Seniors gather to play cards prior to lunch every Thursday at 10 a.m. at 320 S. First St., Tipp City. At noon will be a carry-in lunch and participants should bring a covered dish and table service. On the third Thursday, Senior Independence offers blood pressure and blood sugar testing before lunch. For more information, call 667-8865. • Best is Yet to Come open AA meeting, 11 a.m., Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 S. Dorset Road, Troy. • AA, Tri-City Group meeting will take place 8:30-9:30 p.m. in the cafeteria of the former Dettmer Hospital. The lead meeting is open. For more information, call 3359079. • AA, Spirituality Group will meet at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Troy. The discussion is open. • Health Partners Free Clinic will offer a free clinic on Thursday night at the clinic, 1300 N. County Road 25-A, Troy. Registration will be from 5:30-7 p.m. No appointment is necessary. The clinic does not accept medical emergencies, but can refer patients to other doctors and can prescribe medication. Call 332-0894 for more information. • Narcotics Anonymous, NAIOU, 7:30 p.m., Church of the Brethren, 1431 W. Main St., Troy. • Preschool story hours will be from 10-11 a.m. and again at 6:30 p.m. at the Bradford Public Library, 138 E. Main St., Bradford. • Weight Watchers, 6 p.m., Zion Lutheran Church, Tipp City. For more information, call 552-7082.

FRIDAY • An arthritis aquatic class will be offered from 8-9 or 910 a.m. at Lincoln Community Center, Troy. Call 335-2715 or visit www.lcctroy.com for more information and programs. • A “Late Night Knit” meeting will be from 7-10 p.m. on the first and third Friday at Tippecanoe Weaver and Fibers Too, 17 N. 2nd St., Tipp City. All knitters are invited to attend. For more information, call 667-5358. • AA, Troy Friday Morning Group will meet at 11 a.m. in the 12 Step Room at Trinity Episcopal Church, 1550 Henley Road, Troy. The discussion is open. • AA, open discussion, 8 p.m. in the Salvation Army, 129 S. Wayne St., Piqua. Use parking lot entrance, held in gym. • Narcotics Anonymous, Clean and Free, 8 p.m., Dettmer Hospital, 3130 N. County Road 25-A, Troy. Open discussion. Fellowship from 7-8 p.m. • A Pilates Intermediate group matwork class will be held from 9-10 a.m. at 27 1/2 E. Main St., Tipp City. For more information, call TippMonroe Community Services at 667-8631 or Celeste at 667-2441. • Weight Watchers, 1431 W. Main St., Church of the Brethren, Troy, at 10 a.m. For more information, call (800) 374-9191. • A singles dance is offered every Friday from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. at Christopher Club, Dixie Highway, Kettering, sponsored by Group Interaction. The dance is $6. For more information, call 640-3015 or visit www.groupia.org. • Christian Worship Center, 3537 S. Elm Tree Road, Christiansburg, hosts a Friday Night Bluegrass Jam beginning at 7 p.m. each Friday. Homemade meals are available beginning at 6:30 p.m. Participants may bring instruments and join in. A small donation is requested at the door. For more information or directions, call 857-9090 or 631-2624.

SATURDAY • The Miami County Farmers Market will be offered from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. behind Friendly’s restaurant. • Weight Watchers, 1431 W. Main St., Church of the Bretheren, Troy, at 10 a.m. For more information, call (800) 374-9191. • Recovery Too Al-Anon meetings are offered at 8:30 p.m. at Ginghamsburg Church, main campus, Room 117, S. County Road 25-A, Tipp City. • AA, Men’s Meeting will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the new First Lutheran Church, corner of Washington Road and State Route 41. The meeting is closed (members must have a desire to stop drinking). • AA, Troy Winners Group will meet at 8:30 p.m. in the 12 Step Room at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 1550 Henley Road, Troy for discussion. The meeting is open. • AA, Troy Beginners Group meets at 7 p.m. in the 12 Step Room at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 1550 Henley Road, Troy. This is an open discussion meeting. • Weight Watchers, Westminster Presbyterian, Piqua, meeting at 9 a.m., weigh-in at 9:30 a.m. • Pilates for Beginners (Introduction), 9:15-10:15 a.m. at 27 1/2 E. Main St., Tipp City. For more information, call Tipp-Monroe Community Services at 667-8631 or Celeste at 669-2441. • Narcotics Anonymous, Saturday Night Live, 8 p.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 120 W. Water St., Sidney. • Relapse Prevention Group, 5:30-6:45 p.m. at The Avenue, Room 504, at Ginghamsburg Main Campus, 6759 S. County Road 25-A. • The Next Step, a worship celebration for people on the road to recovery, 7 p.m. at Ginghamsburg Main Campus Sanctuary, 6759 S. County Road 25-A. • Baseball bingo will be offered from 7 p.m. until games are complete at Sunset Bingo, 1710 W. High St., Piqua. Refreshments will be available. Proceeds help the youth baseball organization, a nonprofit. • The Tipp City Seniors eat out at area restaurants (sign up at the center) at 4:30 p.m. Card cames will be offered at the center for a $2 donation.


ENTERTAINMENT

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

What will it be in kid books: cupcakes or carrots? NEW YORK (AP) — Leslie Patricelli didn’t keep junk food in the house when her three kids were toddlers, but the goofy, bald baby in her board book “Yummy Yucky” grins from ear to ear over chocolate sauce and cookies. The prolific picture book writer also included pepperoni pizza as a positive, acknowledging in a recent interview that some of her empty calorie imagery for kids too young to seek out sugary and fatty foods on their own have earned her a kvetch or two from parents. “If I were to do it again I would probably make a few different choices, but I don’t think I would leave everything out,” said Patricelli, in Hailey, Idaho. “All you have to do is watch a kid eat a piece of cake to know that they’re in heaven.” Heaven, indeed, especially when it comes to an abundance of frothy pink cupcakes, chocolate chip cookies and candy in books aimed squarely at babies, toddlers and preschoolers who may not be intimate with the meaning of moderation. But some authors and publishers are focused on creating alternatives to c-isfor-cupcake picture books for parents struggling to promote broccoli. Even Cookie Monster sometimes eats smarter, chowing down on celery and demonstrating smaller portions of his namesake treats in “Ding Dong, Elmo’s Here!” and other books from the folks on Sesame Street. “Food is everywhere kids turn,” said Betsy Loredo, executive editor for Sesame Workshop’s publishing group. “So it’s natural for us to want to think of ways we can integrate that and make choices that are healthier. We try to go for at least equity.” Sesame Street, with an appearance by obesity fighter and first lady Michelle Obama, took on nutrition and exercise as an initiative back in 2004. The effort expanded to other divisions and special projects that included distribution of kits to six million families and child care centers offering ways to eat healthy on a budget and educate parents on the difference between “sometime food” and “anytime food.” With the childhood obesity rate tripling in the past 30 years to 1 in 3 children in the United States overweight or obese, books with healthy eating pictures and messages may not be everything, but they’re something, advocates said. Sesame Workshop, for instance, concluded in a 2010 study that when children are shown fruits and vegetables linked with favorite characters from the show they choose those foods at a much higher rate and eat more of them, according to Sesame researcher Jennifer Kotler. Even broccoli, she said with a laugh. “Something happens between 3 and 5 where there’s a growing awareness of what healthy means. Where 3-year-olds like the foods they like, 5-year-olds know things they might choose might not always be the healthiest,” Kotler said. David Goldbeck in Woodstock, N.Y., isn’t an absolutist, but he does care about what kids see in their books when it comes to food. He wants more of them to eat fruits and vegetables, so he co-wrote an alphabet book that puts broccoli and yams in equally healthy company. The Michigan Fitness Foundation, which is home to that state’s Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports, uses Goldbeck’s “The ABC’s of Fruits and Vegetables and Beyond” in take-home book bags that are part of a health literacy program.

Sunday, June 2, 2013

SUNDAY CROSSWORD

WHAT’S COOKING

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Sex-advice ace Dan Savage on the loose NEW YORK (AP) — It’s been quite a run for Dan Savage, what with all the podcasting and tweeting and in-your-face defending of marriage equality. Between speaking gigs, radio and TV appearances and the syndicated sexadvice column he writes from a desk that belonged to Ann Landers, Savage managed another book, “American Savage,” out this week from Dutton. Savage, 48, looks back on his mom, who died in 2008, takes us into his rationale for why cheating may just save your marriage and offers a glimpse of life at home with husband Terry Miller and their 15-year-old son. He says he wanted to write the book in part because “you know, I’m kind of gay and kind of prominent and I’ve been slugging away at the marriage equality issue for a long time.” But the book is about more than that. Savage talked to the AP about upsetting social

conservatives, trashing the Bible and being among the first same-sex couples to legally marry in Washington state. AP: How has becoming a father and watching your child grow changed you as a sexadvice columnist? Savage: It has changed me a little bit. I’ve been getting letters from teenagers who are 14, 15 and 16 years old, and sexually active, and with questions or problems, and I would give them advice, and now when I get a letter from a 15-year-old I look at my son, who’s 15, and I think, ‘You’re too young to be reading my column, you’re too young to be in this situation.’ It’s that getting older and becoming a parent and sort of drifting into that hypocrisy and the great forgetting of what being 15 is like, because I was sexually active at 15 and I’m fine, but when it comes to your own kid, you look at your own kid and go, ‘No, no you have to

wait at least 10 more years.’ There’s a surprising conservatism that parenting can unearth in your soul. AP: Do you have any regrets about your speech last year at the high school journalism conference in which you said there was bull—- in the Bible and called a walkout by a small number of participants “a pansy-assed move?” Savage: Yeah, I do. When you screw up you want to apologize and I did apologize for ‘pansy-assed.’ That was name-calling and that was hypocritical of me. I didn’t apologize for ‘bull— —’ in the Bible because there is, indeed, bull—— in the Bible. … I don’t pull punches when it comes to religion and I cannot avoid religion talking about the abuse of (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) kids because so much has a religious motivation or rationalization. AP: How does your late mother, who was a

lay minister, influence your work? Savage: My mother was really compassionate. There are three women I credit for sort of stumbling onto this gig and it being the right gig for me, and that was always Ann Landers, Xavier Hollander, who wrote the ‘Happy Hooker’ column in Penthouse magazine, and my mother. My mom was Dr. Phil for the neighborhood. I was a weird sort of sensitive mama’s boy and I would be in the kitchen, you know, hanging out doing nothing, sitting under the table while my mother sat there and hashed out problems with neighbor ladies and gave them advice. It was really listening to my mother give advice, and talk things out and listen to people and pick up on what they wanted, what they didn’t want. My mother used to say, ‘That’s the way the world works. You make a living doing what I did as a woman for free.’

AP: Amid the backlash from religious conservatives over your speech to the high school journalism students, you invited Brian Brown of the National Organization for Marriage for dinner and a tense dinner-table debate, which has been viewed more than 200,000 times on YouTube. How was it offcamera, behind the scenes? Savage: I didn’t run it by Terry, that I was going to invite a very prominent anti-gay bigot into our house for dinner, so I had to come home and say, ‘Oh honey, guess who’s coming to dinner?’ That did not go over well. The debate itself was really tense. I think I overprepared. It felt like all the pressure of Christmas and then none of the delight. You know, all the preparation for a big Christmas dinner and instead of it being Santa Claus and chocolates and presents showing up it’s a bigot.

by John Green (Dutton Books) 10. “The 5th Wave” by Rick Yancey (Putnam Publishing Group) NONFICTION 1. “Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander” by Phil Robertson and Mark Schlabach (Howard Books) 2. “Eleven Rings” by Phil Jackson (Penguin Press) 3. “Lean In” by Sheryl Sandberg (Knopf) 4. “Jesus Calling: Enjoy Peace in His Presence” by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson Publishers) 5. “The Duck Commander Family” by Willie Robertson (Howard Books) 6. “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” by David Sedaris

(Little, Brown) 7. “Keep it Pithy: Useful Observations in a Tough World” by Bill O’Reilly (CrownArchetype) 8. “The Guns at Last Light” by Rick Atkinson (Henry Holt & Co.) 9. “The 100” by Jorge Cruise (William Morrow) 10. “My Greek Drama” by Gianna Angelopoulos (Greenleaf Book Group) FICTION E-BOOKS 1. “Inferno” by Dan Brown (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 2. “And the Mountains Echoed” by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead) 3. “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Scribner) 4. “The Hit” by David Baldacci (Grand Central

Publishing) 5. “Don’t Say a Word” by Barbara Freethy (Barbara Freethy) 6. “12th of Never” by James Patterson, Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown) 7. “Binding Agreement” Just One Night” by Kyra Davis (Pocket Star) 8. “Silken Prey” by John Sandford (Putnam) 9. “Whiskey Beach” by Nora Roberts (Putnam) 10. “Ricochet” by Sandra Brown (Simon & Schuster) NONFICTION E-BOOKS 1. “I’ll See You Again” by Jackie Hance and Janice Kaplan (Gallery Books) 2. “Eleven Rings” by Phil Jackson, Hugh Delehanty (Penguin Group) 3. “Let’s Explore Diabetes

with Owls” by David Sedaris (Little, Brown) 4. “Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander” by Phil Robertson and Mark Schlabach (Howard Books) 5. “Lean In” by Sheryl Sandberg (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group) 6. “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee” by Dee Alexander Brown (Open Road Media) 7. “S—- My Dad Says” by Justin Halpern (HarperCollins) 8. “Bossypants” by Tina Fey (Little, Brown) 9. “The Eighty-Dollar Champion” by Elizabeth Letts (Random House) 10. “The 100” by Jorge Cruise (Harper Collins)

BESTSELLERS FICTION 1. “Inferno” by Dan Brown (Doubleday) 2. “And the Mountains Echoed” by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead) 3. “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!” by Dr. Seuss (Random House Children’s Books) 4. “12th of Never” by James Patterson, Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown) 5. “Dead Ever After: A Sookie Stackhouse Novel” by Charlaine Harris (Ace) 6. “Silken Prey” by John Sandford (Putnam) 7. “The Hit” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing) 8. “Theodore Boone: The Activist” by John Grisham (Dutton Books) 9. “The Fault in Our Stars”


B8

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Sunday, June 2, 2013

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Free airport therapy comes with four legs, cold nose, wagging tail LOS ANGELES (AP) There’s a new breed of airport dog. They aren’t looking for drugs or bombs they are looking for people who need a buddy, a belly to rub or a paw to shake. “His job is to be touched,” volunteer Kyra Hubis said about Henry James, her 5-year-old golden retriever that works a few hours a week at the San Jose airport. “I am just standing there with him. They are talking to him. If I need to answer for him, I do. But I am at the end of his leash, he’s not at the end of mine.” Mineta San Jose International Airport is widely credited with introducing the first airport therapy dog in the days after Sept. 11, 2001, when flights were grounded, passengers were stranded and reaching friends and relatives in the East was nearly impossible. Passengers were anxious and afraid. Enter Orion, owned by a volunteer airport chaplain who got permission to bring the dog to work. He made such a difference that San Jose formalized the program and now has nine dogs. Miami International Airport got onboard the program with one and Los Angeles International Airport has 30 and is hoping to expand its program. The dogs are intended to take the stress out of travel the crowds, long lines and terrorism concerns. You never know why people are flying, said Heidi Huebner, director of volunteers at LAX, which launched Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUPs) in April. Travelers might be in town for a vacation, a funeral, to visit a sick family member or to attend a business meeting. “You can literally feel the stress levels drop, people start smiling, strangers start talking to each other and everybody walks away feeling really, really good,” Huebner said. Dogs have to be healthy, skilled, stable, well-mannered and able to work on a slack 4-foot leash, said Billie Smith, executive director of Wyoming-based Therapy Dogs, Inc., which certifies the LAX animals. They have to be comfortable with crowds, sounds, smells and they need to pass through security like all airport workers. Handlers are taught to watch for people who fear

AP PHOTOS/DAMIAN DOVARGANES

Travelers pet airport therapy dogs as volunteers with Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUPs) walk around the Los Angeles International Airport terminal May 21. The Los Angeles International Airport has 30 therapy dogs and is hoping to expand its program. The dogs are intended to take the stress out of travel: the crowds, long lines and terrorism concerns. or dislike dogs or those who might have allergies. In most cases, people approach the dogs, identifiable by the vests or bandannas they wear. Los Angeles’ dogs, which are featured on trading cards, are as varied as its airport passengers. There’s a long-haired Dalmatian, a Lab-pointer mix, a field spaniel, a poodle, three Australian Labradoodles, a Doberman and a 150pound Irish wolfhound named Finn who has two tricks. “He looks you in the eye and lays down on the job,” said owner Brian Valente. “When I’m around Finn, it makes me feel like things are OK. When Finn’s around other people, they are OK. It’s almost instant, even if just for a moment,” Valente said. Miami’s sole dog, Casey, a 4-year-old golden retriever, is a star. She has her own website, fan mail, business cards and a role on “Airport 24/7: Miami,” a weekly reality show on the Travel Channel. “Casey is so pure and genuine,” explained Dickie Davis, director of terminal operations and customer service. “She’s not asking for anything or selling anything. She is just a love magnet.” When Claudia McCaskill’s family recently flew home from vacation

In this photo taken May 21, Pets Unstressing Passengers (PUPs) volunteer Brian Valente, left, with his dog, Finn, greet the Bloom family with their 13-month-old son, Jacob, at the Los Angeles International Airport terminal. in Brazil she requested Casey meet the plane to greet her 5-year-old daughter, Carina, who is autistic. She knew Carina would be low on energy and patience and they still had a 2.5-hour drive home to St. Lucie. Casey and handler Liz Miller were there with a gift basket and Carina fell in love with the dog. “Thank you for visiting

us at the airport so I would be happy,” Carina said in a video the family made for Casey. Now Carina wants to go back and see Casey again. “I can’t say how much we appreciate what they did for us. It not only helped our daughter, but us too,” McCaskill said. Despite all the smiles, there are also hard moments.

Before departing from San Jose, a soldier kneeled down and told Henry James: “OK, buddy, you take care of the house while I am gone,” Hubis said. A woman who said her husband of 40 years told her he wanted a divorce that morning wept on Henry’s shoulder. “He just sat there,” Hubis said. “He knew. He can feel.”

Crossword Answers (Today) 140 Street 140 Shawnee Shawnee Street Greenville, OH 45331 45331 Greenville, OH (937) 548-0755 (937) 548-0755 1930 Court 1930 Prime Court Troy, 45373 Troy, OH 45373 (937) (937) 339-1013 339-1013

Crossword Answers (5/26/13)

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Two in 5 women would consider parenting alone (AP) — As Christy Everson was nearing age 40, she made a decision: She wanted to have a child, even though she was single and it meant doing it all alone. Her daughter, conceived via a sperm donor, is now 2 1/2 years old, and Everson hopes to have a second child. “Was it worthwhile? Well, I’m thinking of doing it again, aren’t I?” she says. Everson and women like her are part of a shift in American society. An Associated Press-WE tv poll of people under 50 found that more than 2 in 5 unmarried women without children or 42 percent would consider having a child on their own without a partner, including more than a third, or 37 percent, who would consider adopting solo. The poll, which addressed a broad range of issues on America’s changing family structures, dovetails with a recent report by the U.S. Census Bureau that single motherhood is on the rise: It found that of 4.1 million women who’d given birth in 2011, 36 percent were unmarried at the time of the survey, an increase from 31 percent in 2005. And among mothers 20-24, the percentage was 62 percent, or six in 10 mothers. The AP-WE tv poll also found that few Americans think the growing variety of family arrangements is bad for society. However, many have some qualms about single mothers, with some two-thirds or 64 percent saying single women having children without a partner is a bad thing for society. More men 68 percent felt that way, compared to 59 percent of women. The survey found broad gender gaps in opinion on many issues related to how and when to have children. One example: At a time when the can-you-have-it-all debate rages for working mothers, women were more apt than men to say having children has negatively impacted their career. And this was true especially among mothers who waited until age 30 or older to have children. Fully 47 percent of those mothers said having a child had a negative impact on their careers. Of women overall, 32 percent of mothers reported a negative effect, compared with 10 percent of men. For Everson, who lives in a suburb of Minneapolis and is now 44, being the only parent means daily responsibilities that naturally suck up some of the time she used to spend on her career as a financial consultant. “To be honest about it, it’s hard to be a rock star” when parenting a baby, she says. But she sees it as more of a temporary career setback, and feels she’s already getting back on track with her toddler now over age 2. Soon, she says, “I’ll be getting back on my A-game.” For Joyce Chen, a hospital occupational therapist in San Francisco, it’s a question of what kind of career she wants to have. Chen, 41 and also a single mother, is happy to have work that she not only enjoys, but that she can balance easily with caring for her 10-year-old daughter. “I’ve been blessed,” she says. “I have a decent income. I don’t feel like I need to climb the ladder. I enjoy what I do, but I can leave it at the end of the day and not think about it.”


To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • 9

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

Auctions Yard Sale TROY, 1890 Old Staunton Road, Saturday, June 1, 8-4 & Sunday, June 2, 8-1. Lots of miscellaneous items to benefit escue animals of Lost and Found K9 Rescue. Child / Elderly Care Teacher with Masters in Education looking to stay home and interested in offering childcare services. Will provide a safe and caring environment for your child. Please call Jesica regarding prices. (937)479-4056 Creative/Design

NEWSPAPER PAGINATION Civitas Media, a growing leader in local news, is looking for full time experienced paginators with copy editing backgrounds for its Miamisburg, Ohio hub. Paginators will be expected to design pages for a variety of newspapers and special sections in InDesign while copy editing editorial content and writing headlines. Evening and weekend hours. Wages based on experience. Health, vision, dental, vacation.

Help Wanted General

Help Wanted General

INDUSTRIAL CONTRACTOR HIRING LABORERS AND CDL TRUCK DRIVERS for hard hat environment. Training provided. APPLY AT: 15 INDUSTRY PARK CT TIPP CITY

LOCAL DRIVERS Drivers needed for LOCAL tractor trailer driving positions. Various shifts and routes. Can make up to $850/ week. Must have CDLA, at least 1 year recent experience and be extremely dependable. Call Dave during the week at (800)497-2100 or on the weekend/ evenings at (937)726-3994 or apply in person at: Continental Express 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH www.ceioh.com

PLUMBING/ HVAC PROJECT MGR. ESTIMATOR Description/Requirements: *Min. of 5 yrs. Exp. *Commercial & Industrial HVAC/Plumbing/Piping Exp. *Familiar with Local & State Codes *Able to read Blueprints & Schematic Drawings *Turn a concept, rough or detailed drawing into a detailed estimate. *Prepare proposals and aid in the sale as needed. *Understand basic control sequences and system operation. *Exp. in construction practices, project scheduling & planning. *Basic AutoCAD knowledge preferred. *Continuous communication with supervisors & job foremen to coordinate needs. *Willing to travel, work overtime, weekends & holidays if needed *Drug testing & background check.

PIPE WELDERS/ FABRICATION

Email a resume, clips and references to: jmullen@civitasmedia.com

Skills/Qualifications: *2+yrs experience *Welding Mig, Tig, Stick and Fabrication *Pipe welding carbon steel pipe, stainless steel pipe, schedule 10&40 pipe and stainless sanitary tubing *Rigging expierence *Welding Cert. D1-1 & B31-1

Drivers & Delivery DRIVER Dancer Logistics is looking for Class A CDL driver with at least 2 years experience for home daily runs, over the road and regional. Great Benefits and great home time and your weekends off. Also looking for Teams to run West coast.

Requirements: * Willing to travel, work overtime, weekends and holidays if needed. *HS diploma or GED *Drug testing & background check

Please apply at: 900 Gressel Dr Delphos, Oh or call (419)692-1435

Email resumes to: amyj@wellsbrothers.com Fax to: 937-394-2375 Or mail to:

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105 Shue Dr. Anna OH 45302 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE EOE Medical/Health

Food Services

Landing a Job in a Digital Era W

ith people updating their social networking pages from their PDAs and downloading favorite tunes from their mobile phones, it should come as no surprise society has grown increasingly reliant on technology. Individuals about to dive into the job-seeking market may have to rethink their search skills to maximize the potential of reaching employers and companies that likely embrace a digital mind set. As of June 2009, the U.S. unemployment rate reached 9.7 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.This means there are a great deal of people — from the recently laid off to the newly graduated — who are all vying for the same jobs. Thinking creatively and exploring numerous ways of advertising oneself can help land a job in today’s market. Newspaper: The newspaper has long been a respected and effective means to find work. It is still a viable way to find jobs that are local without having to search through hundreds and hundreds of positions, which is common with online job posting sites. However, why not turn the tables and use the newspaper — and its respective online site — to advertise yourself? For a relatively low investment of time and money, you can place a classified ad that you are seeking work and briefly explain your credentials. Create a separate, free e-mail address with your favorite mail provider specifically for receiving inquiries to this advertisement. Personal Web site: Employers are short on time and many want to exert the least amount of energy possible when seeking job candidates. A personal Web page can put your information in the hands of employers in a concise and eye-catching way.The Web page can feature a brief description of yourself and also include a digital resume. Simply provide a link to your site when applying for a job. Remember, a personal Web site should be all business. Now is not the time for a pretty picture or stories about your pets. Employers are looking for skills. Be bold with buzzwords: Turn your experience into a list of buzzwords, keywords and important phrases when writing a resume. It used to be that verbs were the key to landing a job. Using strong action words should relay your experience. However, today resumes are frequently reviewed by a digital eye, rather than a human eye. This digital eye is programmed to recognize certain words and phrases that will sort your resume out from the others. Including the right keywords ensures your resume has a better chance of being picked. Use as many words as you can that were included in the original job posting — they’re likely to be programmed keywords. Most of these words are nouns that signal job titles, technical skills and levels of education or experience. Use social networking sites to your advantage: Employers and recruiters have admitted they frequently go to social networking sites, such as MySpace, Facebook and LinkedIn to “check up” on potential hires — or even employees they already have on staff. Many a person has compromised his or her chances for hire by questionable material posted on their pages. Instead of being a victim of the pitfalls of social networking, use it to your advantage. Seed your pages with information that may be interesting to a potential employer by doing a little research. For example, if you know a certain company to which you’d like to apply places significant emphasis on the environment, list the “green” functions you’ve attended and the groups to which you

For more resources on how to land that dream job or to just get back to work, log onto:

DIETARY ASSISTANT We are looking for experienced people. Come in and fill out an application and speak with Jeanine Colgrove, Dietary Director. Koester Pavilion 3232 North Co Rd 25A Troy, Ohio (I-75 at exit 78) (937)440-7663 Phone (937)335-0095 Fax Located on the Upper Valley Medical Center Campus

belong on your page. Know a hiring manager is an avid golfer? Talk about your passion for the game. It’s these little things that may get you in the door to an interview. Think differently: There are some people who want to take their job search to another level.With the market saturated by job seekers, sometimes it’s the person who has the nerve to stand out from the crowd that will land the job.Today it’s not uncommon to find door-todoor solicitation of jobs, people posting job requests on YouTube or similar sites, or even standing in a busy downtown area with a sign that says, “Looking for Work.” Others turn to popular blogs to get the word out. The more people who know you’re looking for work, the better chance you will find a position. Technology is technology: There are certain tips you should keep in mind when applying for jobs: - Scanners that look at resumes work well with these typefaces: Helvetica, Courier, Futura, Optima, Palatino, New Century Schoolbook, and Times. And they work best with type sizes in the 10to 14-point range. - Don’t send your resume as an attachment, or include any attachments, unless specified. There are always concerns about computer viruses and attachments can even get lost. Paste everything into the body of your e-mail. - Use the subject line of an e-mail as a theater marquee and sell yourself. - Use the proofreading/spell-check functions of your word processing software, but also print out your materials and read them over. There’s no excuse to be excluded from a job because of a silly typo. - Follow-up with all job applications. It could move your resume to the top of the pile.

JobSourceOhio.com

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

EOE

Has a great opportunity for an individual wanting to start their own delivery business by becoming an owner/ operator of a

Help Wanted General 84 LUMBER COMPANY MANAGER TRAINEES We are seeking careerminded individuals for our TROY store who are looking for a career that includes customer service, hands-on work, growing sales, and management. College preferred. No construction knowledge necessary. Through our paid training, you will become an industry professional! We offer excellent benefits in a great work environment.

Keeping up with the digital world could be the key to landing your next job.

Other

Apply in person MondayFriday, 8am-5pm at: 84 LUMBER COMPANY 845 ARTHUR DRIVE TROY, OH 45373 You may also apply online at: www.84lumber.com/ careers 84 Lumber Company is an equal employment opportunity & affirmative action employer. Drug Free Environment.

CARRIERS NEEDED In Piqua, Tipp City Laura, Fletcher & Troy to deliver the Dayton Daily News. Must be available 7 days a week between 2:00 am to 6:00 am weekdays and 8:00 am weekends. Reliable transportation and proof of insurance necessary. Leave message with area of interest along with phone number where you can be reached. Cox Media Group, (937)603-9178 GENERAL SHOP help wanted. Mechanical experience helpful. Own transportation, clean driving record record required. 3040 hours per week. Apply in person, Monday thru Thursday: Dennys Carb Shop, 8620 Casstown-Fletcher Road, Fletcher. SALES/ SUPPORT, Nationwide Agent in Piqua seeking licensed support staff and liensed agents. Forward resume to jppp1@sbcglobal.net.

DELIVERY TRUCK! This GREAT opportunity comes with SUPER SECURITY and UNLIMITED Earning Potential. This is YOUR opportunity to work with the #1 Home Improvement Center!!

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Continental Express Inc., a full service transportation company that specializes in hauling refrigerated food products is recruiting for the following positions:

FLEET MECHANIC SUPERVISOR Primary responsibility will be overseeing work being done by Mechanics on semi trailers including; preventative maintenance, DOT inspections, general repairs and new trailer preparation. This will be a hands-on, working supervisor position. Person must have working knowledge and experience on tractor trailers. Strongly prefer someone with prior supervisory or leadership experience.

REFRIGERATION TECHNICIAN Person will be responsible for maintenance and repairs to semi trailer refrigeration units. Must have ability to diagnose and repair units, perform preventative maintenance and install new units. Prior experience on Thermo King and/or Carrier units required with a preference on having certification. Both positions are on day shift and must have own tools. We offer a very clean work environment and newer model equipment. Excellent compensation and benefit package. Benefits include health/dental/vision insurance, short term disability, 401K with match, uniforms, direct deposit, paid time off.

Apply at:

For Sale By Owner Apartments /Townhouses 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms Call for availability attached garages Easy access to I-75 (937)335-6690 www.hawkapartments.net 1,2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS Troy ranches and townhomes. Different floor plans to choose from. Garages, fireplaces, appliances including washer and dryers. Corporate apartments available. Visit www.firsttroy.com Call us first! (937)335-5223 DODD RENTALS Tipp-Troy: 2 bedroom AC, appliances $550/$450 plus deposit No pets (937)667-4349 for appt. EVERS REALTY TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $725

Continental Express Inc.

3 Bedroom, 1 bath, Double, $675

10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH 45365 800-497-2100 Or email resume to: mgoubeaux@ceioh.com

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ADVERTISING

FRONT DESK/ DENTAL ASSISTANT Seeking self-starter with organizational, patient communication/computer skills to handle activities in high quality, restorative dental practice. Prior dental/ medical experience a plus but not required. Training supplied. 30-40 hrs. E-mail resume: dentistryresume@hotmail.com

TROY TOWNHOUSE, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath. Bunkerhill $495 monthly, (937)216-4233


APARTMENTS • AUCTIONS • HOMEPAGE FINDER • NEW LISTINGS • OPEN HOUSES

REALESTATE

C1

TODAY

June 2, 2013

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Ingredients for an instant party

Discover the

BY MARY CAROL GARRITY Scripps Howard News Service

Advantage

Do you have the basic entertaining pieces you need to throw an impromptu party with friends or a spur-of-the-moment dinner gathering? Just as you www.keystonehomesintroy.com keep your pantry stocked with basics like flour, sugar 937-332-8669 40080264 and oil, here are six ingredients you need on hand to MORTGAGE WATCH throw a great party in a pinch: 1. Vases for a Centerpiece in a Snap When you entertain, it’s always about the table. So it’s important to have a few WASHINGTON (AP) — Average U.S. rates on fixed vases on hand you can pull mortgages jumped this week to their highest levels in a year, out to create a killer censignaling slightly higher costs for homebuyers. But rates still terpiece in seconds. You remain low by historical standards. can’t beat thin-mouthed Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the vases for their ability to average rate for the 30-year loan rose to 3.81 percent, up deliver a high-impact look from 3.59 percent last week. That’s still not far from the 3.31 with minimal effort. percent rate reached in November, the lowest on records Arranging a bouquet in a dating to 1971. normal vase requires lots The average on the 15-year loan rose to 2.98 percent, up of flowers and some flowerfrom 2.77 percent last week. The record low of 2.56 percent arranging skills (which I do was reached in early May. not possess). But when you Mortgage rates are rising because they tend to follow the use vases that only hold yield on the 10-year Treasury note. The yield rose to 2.17 one or two flowers, you just percent on Tuesday, its highest level in 13 months. It has stick in a bloom and you since fallen slightly to 2.11 percent in early trading Thursday. Still, that’s up from 1.63 percent at the start of the month. Yields on the benchmark note are rising because investors are selling government bonds. That’s largely because minutes of the Federal Reserve’s last meeting showed several policymakers favored slowing the Fed’s bond purchases, perhaps as early as this summer. The Fed’s $85-billion-a-month in Treasury and mortgage bond purchases have pushed down long-term interest rates. When it slows the bond purchases, interest rates are likely to tick up. That would decrease the value of bonds with lower yields.

“Custom Built Quality At An Affordable Price.”

Rate on 30-year mortgage rises to 3.81 percent

SHNS PHOTO COURTESY NELL HILL'S

You can serve guests chilled tap water and it will seem • See PARTY on C2 luxurious if you put it in lovely glass goblets.

Financing to make you feel at home

REAL ESTATE WATCH

Work out details with a home contractor first BY DEBORAH ABRAMS ly renovated her fixerupper. KAPLAN “The contractor we bankrate.com chose came with strong word-of-mouth recommenWhen you hire a contractor for your home ren- dations,” says Moldofsky, ovation, should you really who documented her have to worry whether the home’s overhaul at ReluctantRenovator.com. new refrigerator will fit? “No major renovations go Whether the outlets are off without some problems, wired to current stanso having someone you can dards? And who will be responsible for paying the trust, who is keeping your best interests at heart, plumber? Choosing the right contractor and know- goes a long way toward ing how best to work with making the process easier.” him or her can make an There are other ways to expensive and stressful ensure you have the best project run better. relationship with your conThe first question to tractor as well. ask, says Ryan Teicher, At the start, underpresident of HIT stand your style and budgConstruction Group in et, so the contractor can Scotch Plains, N.J., is properly price the project. whether the contractor is licensed and insured. And “I need to know if they he or she should be some- want a Cadillac, a Yugo or a Mercedes,” says Teicher. one you trust, says Kim Moldofsky, a Chicago-area • See WATCH on C3 homeowner who extensive-

The personal rewards of owning a home are many. And you want to be sure your home financing works for you and your life, for today and tomorrow. So, whether you’re buying your first home, a second home or refinancing your current one, a Wells Fargo Home Mortgage consultant will listen to your homeowernship goals and provide you with the information you need to help you choose the home financing that’s right for you. Count on one of the nation’s leading retail mortgage lenders for the exclusive programs and personal service you need to help meet your homeownership goals.

Contact your Wells Fargo Home Mortgage consultant for details. Teresa A. Tubbs Sales Manager Office: 937-440-1014 Cell: 937-760-2073 Teresa.A.Tubbs@wellsfargo.com NMLSR ID 525388 Janet Bretland Home Mortgage Consultant Office: 937-440-1015 Cell: 937-875-0645 Janet.Bretland@wellsfargo.com NMLSR ID 408748 Beth Peters Home Mortgage Consultant Office: 937-440-1016 Cell: 937-371-3985 Beth.E.Peters@wellsfargo.com NMLSR ID 418700

COVINGTON - ST. RT. 185 Great Opportunity!

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Approximately 1.5 acres, Suited for a basement, Covington school district. Priced at only $19,900

Information is accurate as of date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. © 2013 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801 AS982001 4/13-7/13

NottingSubdivision hill 937-335-0110

are done — no skill required. They have saved my hide on many occasions. When you are at the market getting food for the party, pick up a cash-andcarry bouquet. Then stick one or two into three, five or seven vases in a variety of shapes and sizes marching down the center of the table. High-impact look, done! Another great instant centerpiece tool is a set of small pedestal bowls. Your simple centerpiece could be a line of succulent-filled bowls going down your table’s center, or you could mix them with little vases. 2. Interesting Chargers to Set the Stage The key to creating place settings that wow is to build them up from the bottom, beautiful layer by beautiful layer. It sounds complicated, but it’s supersimple to do. Start with a charger to ground the pyramid of dishes. I have three styles of chargers I keep at home to pull out in a pinch:

40046700

Troy’s newest private cul-de-sac developement.

Surrounded by a beautiful wooded area off of Troy Sidney Road, across from Duke Park.

Quality Homes Built By

9 Lots Available Contact Tony Scott for more information 937-332-8669 www.troylanddevelopment.com

anthony.scott@keystonehomesintroy.com

40080242

For Home Delivery, call 335-5634 • For Classified Advertising, call (877) 844-8385


C2

REAL ESTATE TODAY

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Party ■ CONTINUED FROM C1 apple green with a ruffled edge, plain white and wicker. I picked these three very different kinds of chargers so I could achieve a variety of looks on my table, depending upon which dishes and linens I use with them. I also opted for chargers that were simple in design so they would go with just about anything. 3. Linens to Add Luxury to the Table Some things I will scrimp on when I set my table for company. But not when it comes to napkins. You won’t find paper napkins on my table because I feel that cloth napkins do so much to make a table feel more luxurious and layered. I have four sets of napkins I keep at the ready for entertaining — each set offering me the opportunity to take my table in a completely different direction. One set is

only have one set of dishes, I would pick plain white because these babies give and give and give. They work with absolutely every color, style and season. If you want a bright, clean look on your table, stick with white dishes and use table linens and a floral centerpiece to bring in pops of color. Or mix the white dishes in with other dish patterns. Top a white dinner plate with a majolica salad plate shaped like a leaf. Or sandwich a white salad plate between a blueand-white transferware dinner plate and bread plate. 5. Goblets Take Dinner Drinks to the Next Level “Presentation over preparation” is my mantra when it comes to entertaining. You can serve guests chilled tap water and it will seem luxurious if you put it in lovely glass goblets. If you’re limited on storage, like I am, and can only fit one set of glass-

OPEN SUN. 2-4

COVINGTON

40146699

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Realtors

OPEN SUN. 1-3

TROY

and use a complementary color in the other. How do the tiles in the bathroom look? Are they in need of repair? Do they look dirty no matter how much you scrub them? If so, you should bite the bullet and spend money to repair or replace them. Dirty, messy bathroom tiles make the entire room look dirty no matter how clean it is. Because we are replacing things, how about the faucets? Are they in good condition? Do they look good? Faucets can be expensive, but they also can be inexpensive yet attractive. Go shopping at your local hardware store, and you will see a variety of faucets at reasonable prices. How is the storage in your master bathroom? Never enough, right? If wall space permits, attach shelves to the wall for storage.

PROFESSIONALS

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HERITAGE

TROY

The master bathroom is usually a haven for refreshing and relaxing yourself in the privacy and comfort of your own personal space. Of all the bathrooms in the house, the master bath is the most important and should be the most elaborate as far as comfort is concerned. Here are some tips for decorating that room. Color is important; it should flow from the master bedroom so there is continuity and a seamless transition from the comfort of the bedroom to the refreshment of the bathroom. If wallpaper is your preference, one pattern for the master bedroom with a complementary one for the bath is ideal. But it is not necessary to have paper in the bedroom and the bath. If you don’t like that much paper, select a room in which to use wallpaper,

10 ACRES you will fall in love with!! Charming 2-story brick farmhouse with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths. Sitting on 10+ acres in Covington, with corn crib and 73x40 bank barn, set up with 5 horse stalls. Country kitchen with newer cherry cabinetry. Updates include new doors, windows, modern full baths, and newer modern 200amp electric. Stop by for your tour of this outstanding country property. Located 5 miles north of the intersection of Route 48 and US Route 36. #5740

657-4184 665-1800

Comfy & cozy describes this bedroom ranch. When you walk in the front door you feel at home. Fenced back yard, 2 car garage & updates! $89,900. Dir: N. Market to R on Stonyridge, R on Lee.

By Scripps Howard

9700 STATE ROUTE 48

OPEN SUN.1-3

Laurie Johnson

1370 LEE RD.

ware in your cabinet, go with clear glass. It goes with everything and looks so elegant. If you have space for one more set, pick a color that mixes well with your dishes. Have fun mixing up the glassware on your table, pairing clear and colored goblets. I use blue wine glasses with my clear water goblets all the time. Don’t have a set big enough for all your guests? Use different patterns for the sides and the ends of the table. 6. Flatware Finishes a Place Setting in Style Once you decide on the direction you want to go with your table, flatware can play a major role in helping you get there. Are you pulling together a formal occasion in a flash? Reach for the tried-andtrue silver or silver plate. You can’t beat it for sophistication. If your table is going to be awash with color, pick flatware that joins in the fun.

Update master bathroom to create relaxing haven

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1895 Lakeshore Dr., TROY I-75 to W. on St. Rt. 55, south on Barnhart - straight thru at the 1st bend! Beautiful home with TONS of newer updates, including gorgeous new kitchen, 2.5 baths, Family room w/FP, covered patio. Wonderful serene setting with view of and access to small private lake. 8010 E. Mill Rd., TROY (Alcony)- East on St. Rt. 41 in Troy (Main St.) to S. on Alcony-Conover Rd. to East on Mill. Beautiful home!! Custom built in 2006. HUGE open Great room/ Dining Area/Kitchen, for entertaining. Split bedrooms. Big unfinished Bonus room with plumbing for bath.

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40147012

TROY

white linen and features our monogram. The other three feature cute prints in blue and white, green and white, and yellow and white —three color treatments I use a lot. I also like to use 53inch-square table cloths turned on the diagonal at the center of my rectangular dining table. Gigantic table cloths can be expensive and a pain to launder and iron. But these little cheater pieces can be created in a jiff out of a yard of fabric. Pick a pattern that complements your napkins and dishes. Another favorite? Bright place mats! 4. Versatile White Dishes Save the Day I’m a “dish-aholic” and would fill cupboard after cupboard with different patterns if I had the room. Thankfully, my old home is short on spots to stash dishware, so my penchant for excess is kept in check. If I were stranded on a desert island and could

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

OPEN SUN. 2-4

Call

Shari Stover

40135427

Brick ranch, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage, no rear neighbors, central air and an enclosed porch. $99,900. Dir: W. Main to S on Dorset.

Richard Pierce 524-6077

GARDEN GATE REALTY GardenGateRealty.com • 937-335-2522 • Troy

OFFICE OPEN 12-3:00 1026 W. Main St., Troy

Mary Couser

15 W. RACE ST.

216-0922 339-0508

Outstanding Office! Beautiful interior, restoration, wiring includes CATS cable & RJ45 outlets! 928 sq. ft. & garage! $74,900. Dir: S. Market to W on Race. Visit this property at: www.MaryCouser.com/341765

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40139176

438 S. DORSET

www.GalbreathRealtors.com

TROY

Today to place your Real Estate Ad

OPEN SUN. 2-4

440-5214 sstover@civitasmedia.com TROY

OPEN SUN. 2-4

WHAT MAKES US BETTER

1411 LEE RD. Run don’t walk to this redone ranch! Everything is new. Only one look & you’ll fall in love. Great buy! $92,900. Dir: N. Market to R on Stonyridge, R on Lee.

40139117

40139168

www.GalbreathRealtors.com

TROY

OPEN SUN. 1-3 1427 MICHAEL DR.

Donna Mergler 760-1389 339-0508

Home has a desirable floor plan that affords maximum privacy, features 3 beds, 2 full baths & kitchen complete with range, refrigerator, microwave, new dishwasher, abundant storage & work space. Many extras: Beautiful windows, new whole house generator, 2 year old Whirlpool washer & dryer, newer flooring throughout, patio with new retractable awning, storage building with loft. Perfectly manicured lawn (lawn service paid through the end of the year), 2 car garage with abundant storage, 2 ceiling fans, key pad entry, garage door opener. A real gem, move in ready! $149,900. Dir: Troy Urbana Rd., R on Saratoga, R on Michael. Visit this home at: www.MelindaSillman.com/347931

TIPP CITY

OPEN SUN. 1-3

www.GalbreathRealtors.com

TROY

OPEN SUN. 1-3

1500 BROOKPARK Attractive 3 bed, brick home on a corner lot. Nice living room with natural light, gallery kitchen, formal dining room & a 2 car garage. $119,900. Dir: W. Main to N on Dorset to L on Brookpark.

418-2432 339-0508 ®

40139212

40139208

www.GalbreathRealtors.com

552-5818 339-0508

www.GalbreathRealtors.com

TROY

Melinda Sillman

®

Corinna Adams ®

Realtors

OPEN SUN. 2-4 TROY 1108 S. MULBERRY

Be drawn into this 2 bedroom, 1 bath bungalow from the 1st step on the large welcoming porch. Large living room that can be a formal dining area combo. Remodeled bath, hardwood flooring has been redone, built-in linen drawers & nice size guest closet in hallway. Beds have extended large closets. Newer vinyl windows! Full unfinished basement. Newly built 2.5 car garage with vinyl siding, service door, overhead storage, opener & work bench. Seller Wants Offer! $84,500. Dir: Co Rd 25A to Mulberry. Visit this home at: www.DonnaMergler.com/323304

657-4184 665-1800

HERITAGE

®

22 TERRACE Southwest Historic Charmer! 3 beds, full basement. Wonderful deck & pool! Major updates! $122,900. Dir: S. Market to W on Terrace Pl. Visit this home at: www.GalbreathRealtors.com/346613 40139170

Snap the QR Code with your smart phone. Don’t have the App? You can download one free!

Laurie Johnson

40135342

SMART PHONE APP

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Greg McGillvary 214-0110

GARDEN GATE REALTY GardenGateRealty.com • 937-335-2522 • Troy

OPEN SUNDAY 2-4

TROY

OPEN SUN. 2-4

558 TALLOW TREE WAY

100 N. CHILDRENS HOME RD.

Lisa Willis 212-4459

573-6917

1600 W. Main St. • TROY “Rock” Solid in Real Estate! 339-2222 An Independently Owned & Operated Member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

212-4459 “FROM THE GROUND UP”

1172 SKYLARK Cute ranch offering 3 bedrooms, 1 bath & family room with wood burning fireplace. Many updates, take a look! $104,900. Dir: N. Market to R on Staunton, L on Skylark, house on L.

40139126

Greg Greenwald

Brick Ranch with a full semi finished basement (over 2000 sq ft per owner). Home has 3 beds with hardwood flooring. The bonus room over the garage has a sliding door out to a deck overlooking the wooded lot. The walk out basement is semi finished with a WB fireplace with insert. There is a 1/2 bath that could be finished to make a full. The 2nd side is unfinished for storage. Miami East School District. This home needs your personal touches and some TLC. Priced at $141,500. Dir: St. Rt. 41 to N. Childrens Home Rd.

40139160

40138676

Fabulous Tipp Value! Are you looking for an immaculate 3 bed, 2.5 bath brick home with 2,444 SF of Spacious Luxury Living nestled in the Quiet & Desirable Cottonwood Creek subdivision? Full of Architectural Richness & Beautiful Woodworking throughout. Your Home features a formal living room with Glass French Doors, Cathedral Ceiling & double window with half dome top that lets in an Abundance Of Natural Light. Classic Study features more striking woodwork including an entire wall of gorgeous bookshelves. It’s made for entertaining. Kitchen emphasizes 26 feet of countertop & distinctive cabinetry. Magnificent living room with cathedral ceiling & fireplace. Relax on the Peaceful & Private deck with awning.

Laurie Johnson

HERITAGE Realtors

657-4184 665-1800


MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

REAL ESTATE TODAY

C3

Sunday, June 2, 2013

It’s possible to buy a home with little money in hand It really is true — it’s a great time to buy and this story is the perfect example of that. Joe (name changed to protect privacy) came to me as a referral from an associate of mine. He was pre-qualified for a loan of up to $85,000. Joe did not have much cash to put down, but he did have a credit score of 640 and a full-time job. The mortgage banker suggested he would be a perfect candidate for the USDA loan program. In qualifying areas — right here in the Miami Valley — buyers can qualify for this zero money down program. But, there are lots of fees associated with buying a home, right? Well, yes … and no. Joe

little less. In the offer, I asked the seller to cover my buyer’s closing costs, points and/or prepaid items. (These are costs associated with the loan and differ based on circumstances). In this case, my buyer asked for assistance in the amount of $3,500 from the seller. After a little countering back and forth on the purchase price, Robin Banas my buyer and the seller came to Real Estate Today Columnist terms. Once an accepted offer is reached, the banker will require and I searched high and low for money from the buyer for the the perfect home to meet his appraisal. In this case, that needs. Once we found it, I wrote amount was $350. Joe also the offer. This home had been opted to have home inspections listed for a little while and com- for which he paid $320. So far, parable homes were selling for a Joe is out $670.

“We wanted to make this process as painless as possible for Joe,” said Kurt Eberhardt of American Mortgage Service Company. “At closing we rebated the entire $350 appraisal fee, so he received that back at closing. Additionally, there was a reduction in the mortgage amount of $225.20.” Thus, they balanced his outof-pocket expenses versus his rebates and reductions to $94.80. That, to me, seems like a happy ending to a lovely story, but it gets even better. Joe’s mortgage payment is $125 less per month than his cost of rent and that amount includes his taxes and insurance costs. He is now a home-

owner, with more square feet than his two-bedroom rental, and has a two-car garage along with a fenced-in yard for his puppy to play in. If you think owning a home is out of your reach you may want to think again. For more information on financing you can contact your local, hometown banker. To begin your home search, you may contact your local real estate professional. For a free sheet with 10 points on how to prepare for home ownership you may contact Robin Banas at Bruns Realty Group at 332-8537 or email me at rbanas@brunsrealty.com.

Interior designers can be priceless if you find perfect fit the cosmetic to-go-withs that are part of designing the interior of a home. And, yes, that is all true, but good designers will go way beyond that. A good professional designer is worth her weight in gold. Most states have a certification process for interior designers, helping ensure that they are trained, wellversed and continually learning the latest and the best there is to offer for your home, since maintaining a design license requires continuing-education hours. So let’s see what exactly a designer does. He envisions plans

and dresses spaces in ways that make them attractive and functional. A client’s lifestyle is incorporated into the home with items that complement the architecture. If the designer is brought into the project early enough, she can ensure that the details, like electrical outlets, doorway widths and heights and even air vents, fit into the scheme and design. Is it going to cost much? Well, not really. There are two ways to go about hiring a designer. One is to pay an hourly fee, and this fee ranges anywhere from $100 to $500 per hour. If just help in

arranging a room or selecting colors is what you are looking for, then an hourly fee is the way to go. Another choice, particularly if you are hiring the designer to help you from beginning to end, is to purchase the furnishings through him. The fee is included in the price of the furniture and, in this case, you really won’t feel any more pain of payment. How do you find your perfect designer? There are several ways. You can browse through design magazines and find pictures of rooms that attract you, then search for the designer’s names in

the credits. Hiring that designer works well if he is in your city, but could get expensive if from out of town because you would also be responsible for travel and lodging expenses. Another way is to interview designers in your area. After a bit of conversation and discussion about your needs and what the designer’s thoughts are, you and the designer will know if the fit is good — or not. A third way is to call your local chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for suggestions.

tect the homeowner. Showing that the upgrades were permitted can help when you refinance Once the process starts, it’s or sell a home. “You can show easy to ask for additional upgrades or improvements that the work was done to code,” says Goldstein. will cost more, says Moldofsky. It may be cheaper to hire an “It was rare that a contractor unlicensed or uninsured electripresented us with an idea that raised our price — it was usual- cian or plumber, but “it’s against the law,” Teicher says. “If the ly us. We were the ones who guy gets hurt or does something drove up the cost, not our conwrong, he doesn’t have insurtractor.” Permits are required for any ance to back it up. It’s a state structural, mechanical, electrical requirement to be licensed.” In addition, improper plumbor plumbing residential changes, ing is a health hazard. “It can says Devra Goldstein, senior result in the introduction of building inspector for New pathogenic organisms into Orleans. That said, not everyone pulls drinking water and the escape of toxic gases into the environpermits. “There are contractors ment,” says Melaney Arnold, a who will say they don’t need manager at the Illinois permits, and they’ll offer a betDepartment of Public Health, ter price,” says Moldofsky. But the reason there are per- which regulates and licenses the state’s plumbers. Arnold adds mits and inspections is to pro-

that homeowners and contractors can be fined for using an unlicensed person. One thing to hammer out is who buys and pays for supplies, whether it’s paint and drywall or tile and countertops. “On bigger jobs I try to supply everything,” says Teicher. “My philosophy is that this work should be relatively stress-free for the customer. If they’re paying me to build something, they shouldn’t have to worry about anything. I also don’t want to have to run out to the hardware store during the day. I will have all the necessary parts on hand. That makes the job move smoother and quicker.” Teicher says that with online shopping, clients sometimes want to buy materials, though it’s more challenging for him. One of his clients saw a $300

farm sink on eBay that typically sells for $1,500. “I refused to install it because I don’t know its quality. I don’t know what I’m in for when it arrives. Will it be the right size? The right product? Will I need extra parts?” To a homeowner, it may not seem like changing your mind on a lighting fixture is a problem. But it can be, and it may cost you extra. “If someone wants recessed lights, we have to know that in advance,” Teicher says. For bathrooms, a large vanity might have one long fixture with eight bulbs, or two smaller fixtures instead. That means placing different electrical boxes in different places. Teicher prefers that the plumbing, lighting fixtures and appliances are picked out

toward the beginning of the job. “I don’t like doing things on the fly,” he says. “There are too many moving parts. The wiring and plumbing roughs have to be in the right place.” Get a contract and make sure you agree with everything in it. Teicher provides his clients with a detailed estimate, including a scope of work, payment schedule and list of who supplies which materials. Permitting fees are excluded. Setting up clear expectations at the start will help your project move forward with ease, as will choosing a contractor with personal and technical skills. Keeping your initial vision and budget in mind keeps things streamlined, making a smooth project for your contractor and, ultimately, you.

BY ROSEMARY SADEZ FRIEDMANN Scripps Howard News Service Interior designers … what good are they? Well, that is a good question. Interior designers can be priceless if you find the perfect fit. They make a home more than pretty. Yes, the first thing that comes to mind when considering hiring an interior designer is that she or he will make your home harmonious, aesthetically pleasing, with just the right color combinations, the right window treatments and all

Watch ■ CONTINUED FROM C1

We don't just build homes...WE BUILD LIFESTYLES

MODEL HOME OPEN SUNDAY 1-3 202 NOTTINGHILL LANE NOTTINGHILL SUBDIVISION Location….Location….Location! 202 Nottinghill Lane is situated at the entrance of a new subdivision across from Duke Park. This spacious triple-crown home hosts 3 bedrooms, 3 baths and 3-car garage! This 1710+ sq ft home also features a finished family/recreation room, flex room and full bath in the basement. The master suite with lit tray-ceiling occupies one whole end of the home while the other two bedrooms are nicely situated at other end. The open floor plan of the kitchen with granite & stainless appliances, formal dining and great room with stone fireplace & cathedral ceiling make up the heart of the home. Nature-inspired briarwood siding, stone façade & black batten shutters provides a brilliant exterior to this dream home. Other features include Anderson windows, 95% efficiency furnace & energy-saving Frigidaire appliances.

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40139320


C4

REAL ESTATE TODAY

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Too much house is too much of a headache BY DAN DEWITT Tampa Bay Times I wasn’t a total sucker. I didn’t lock myself into a crazy mortgage or buy a bunch of spec homes I couldn’t flip. But it was the boom and my wife and I got caught up in it in our own way: We bought too much house. Don’t do it, I’d like to tell anyone who might be about to make the same mistake — and, amazingly, a lot of people are. They — we, really — haven’t learned that size has little to do with happiness. We haven’t learned this no matter what you might have read about the passing of the era of monster SUVs and McMansions. The average new home in the United States is bigger than ever — bigger than during the height of the boom and more than 50 percent bigger than in the 1970s. There are some complicated reasons for this — tight credit, for example, has squeezed people out of the bottom end of the market — but very simple reasons, too. People just want more space. They still think size equals luxury. Maybe so. Maybe these buyers will convert spare rooms to offices and man caves. Maybe extra elbow room will give them extra peace and privacy. But here’s one thing I’ve learned in the 11 years since we bought our own four-bedroom, four-bathroom house that the county says covers 2,700 square feet but that feels much bigger when you’re working a carpet cleaner or a pressure washer: Space is a burden.

I know. I shouldn’t complain. And I won’t deny that in many ways I love our house — loved the ego boost when we bought it, love the history we’ve built as a family, love the wide, open views from our big back deck. But when I’m out there I can’t help but remember that I once painted the cozy little front porch of our old house in an hour before heading to work. Painting this deck fills a weekend so full that by Sunday I don’t feel as though I’ve even had a weekend. Big houses often come with big properties, which means homeowners either have to spend too much time on a mower or too much money for someone else do it. As well as spending time and money on other maintenance. But make no mistake, prospective homeowners, those costs will fall on you, and need to be included if you are looking at your big house as an investment. That was our thinking — everyone’s thinking back in 2002 — that you couldn’t go wrong putting as much money as possible into Florida real estate. I probably don’t have to tell you that it hasn’t worked out, that our house is worth less, at least according to county appraisers, than it was when we bought it. Which was about the only upside to finding out that, against all evidence, people still think bigger is better: When the time comes to sell, I should be able to find another sucker like me.

MIAMI VALLEY SUNDAY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

CANDICE TELLS ALL

Bathroom-lighting design is crucial BY CANDICE OLSON Scripps Howard News Service As any designer will tell you, lighting is crucial to good design. This is particularly true when lighting a bathroom. It’s the one room in a home that’s often overlooked, but improper bathroom lighting can make the bravest among us refuse to look in the mirror. My clients, Tertia and Jason, know all about that. The couple and their two sons live in a house built in 1987, and while most of the home was updated, their master bathroom remained oblivious to the passage of time. With floorto-ceiling black wall tiles, a cramped shower and no storage, the ’80s bathroom was really showing its age. And don’t get me started on the lighting. The room had one bleak overhead fixture that made showering a nightmare, while the vanity lighting was so unflattering it’s a wonder Tertia managed to put on lipstick in the morning. They wanted a bathroom that was functional — and had a warm, contemporary vibe. So, putting the principle of bathroomlighting design into play, I got set to create a modern, spalike retreat for Tertia and Jason. I started by gutting the entire space — walls came down, counters came out, tiles were scrapped. Then I painted the ceiling white, bathed the walls in soft beige and installed charcoal porcelain floor tiles with a nonslip surface.

SHNS FILE PHOTO COURTESY HGTV

This bathroom illustrates how layers of lighting can transform a space. From there, I laid out the fixtures and finishes. I created a gorgeous vanity by the room’s window, which was a good source of natural light. I put a soft chiffon blind on the window and flanked it with two mirrors. I then installed a counter constructed out of butterscotch polished quartz, a perfect foundation for “his and hers” cast glass sinks. These deep sinks sit on top of, and besides, new dark wood cabinetry that provides a ton of storage. Adjacent to the vanity, I created a spectacular feature wall comprised of small wooden square tiles of different depths. Against this wall, I selected a beautiful freestanding tub and a modern toilet. On the wall facing the

tub I designed a large shower out of tempered glass, more quartz, a stunning mosaic-tiled backsplash and small porcelain tiles that match the floor. Modern bathrooms can often feel cold and sterile, but the wood wall, dark cabinetry and warm quartz in Tertia and Jason’s bathroom work to offset the cooler fixtures and finishes. The best part of this project was shopping for, and installing, some amazing lights. I installed recessed lights in the ceiling and worked in spotlights above the feature wall to accentuate the wood tiles. I chose waterproof, infloor lighting to highlight the sculpted tub and lights for underneath the sinks. I also selected incandescent

silver sconces for the vanity — soft lighting that is good for when she applies makeup. But the real showstopper is the fixture above the tub — a laser-cut steel globe that allows light to be cast around the room. This bathroom is a perfect example of how good design that includes layers of light can transform a space. By using techniques such as spotlighting a feature wall and up-lighting a tub, I gave Tertia and Jason a bathroom that is ideal for their morning routine — or their evening reprieve. As I always say: “If you light everything, you light nothing.” Interior decorator Candice Olson is host of HGTV’s ”Candice Tells All.”

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS sor trustee, Magoteaux Family Revocable Living Trust to Lydia Callison, Richard Callison, one Keystone Land Development lot, $25,000. Inc. to Denlinger Construction Gale Denning to Benazer Services Inc., one lot, $44,900. Development III Ltd., one lot, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to $21,000. Secretary of Housing and Urban Eric Burkholder, Terri Development, one lot, $0. Burkholder a.k.a. Terri Kaeck to Secretary of Housing and Eric Burkholder, Terri Burkholder, Urban Development to Zachary one lot, $0. Forner McCuistion, one lot, $0. Donna McCoy, Paul McCoy to Rim Alsaman, Ebaa Rajab to Mark Richard, Peggi Richard, a Angela Rammel, Craig Rammel, part lot, $37,000. one lot, $279,900. Shane Davis, Susan Davis to Brandi Embs a.k.a. Brandi Dustin Davis, Kara Davis, 1.344 Frank, Timothy Frank to Brandi acres, $225,000. Frank, Timothy Frank, one lot, $0. Muzetta Allgyer to Sandra Merlin Collins to Julie Dura, Francis, one lot, $45,000. Lowell Dura, one lot, $272,500. Estate of Joyce Black to Joanne Rosenberg, William Timothy Neal, one lot, $0. Rosenberg to Constance Burgei, JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A. Kenneth Burgei, one lot, $259,900. to Secretary of Housing and United Distribution Services Inc. Urban Development, one lot, $0. to Ornatus Urg Real Estate LLC, Mary Bolin, Robert Bolin to 86.099 acres, 54.890 acres, RASC 2006-EMX8, U.S. Bank, $3,500,000. N.A., trustee, one lot, $52,000. Anthony Cooper, Erin Cooper Chad A. Nill to CP-SMOF a.k.a. Erin Gray to Tiffany Frazier, 112012-A-Trust, U.S. Bank, N.A., one lot, $79,900. trustee, one lot, $42,000. Gary Maynard, Patricia Bank of America, N.A. succesMaynard to Franco Asoro, Ruby sor, Bank of New York Mellon, Asoro, one lot, $212,900. trustee, Certificateholders of Michael Ballinger, Susan CWABS Inc., Countrywide Home Ballinger to Dawn Palser, Paul Loans servicing LP, attorney in Palser, two lots, two part lots, fact, CWABS, Inc. to Douglas $65,000. Liette, one lot, $23,3000. estate of Carol millhouse, Security Lending Ltd., SL Man Connie Ratliff, executor, to Ann Inc. to Michael Haines, a part lot, Moeller, Robert Moeller, one lot, $6,200. $110,000. Martha Hampton to Bank of Thomas Miller, Tonya Miller to America, N.A., a part lot, $30,000. Jennifer Creech, Nicholas Creech, Marion Shellabarger, Sylvia one lot, $212,500. SHellabarger to Marion Fannie Mae a.k.a. Federal Shellabarger, Sylvia Shellabarger, National Mortgage Association, one lot, $0. Weltman, Weinberg & Reis, LPA, Debra Stengel, Timothy attorney in fact to Diana Davis Stengel to Jimmy Compton, one Miller, one lot, $154,900. lot, $62,500. Barbara Brower, Robert Brower Joan Liddy to Joyce Stewart, II to David Lindsay, Colleen Rose, one lot, $127,500. two part lots, $177,500. Courtney Snow to Meghann Thomas Reynolds to Della Oen, Robert Oen, one lot, Kroger, one lot, one part lot, $79,900. $95,500. Bible Missionary Church of Troy, TIPP CITY Ohio Inc. to Woodland Bible Church INc., one lot, $118,300. Estate of Henry Spicer, Bible Missionary Church of Troy, Charles Spicer, co-administrator, Ohio Inc. to Woodland Bible Cherry Spicer, co-administrator to Church INc., one lot, $78,400. Scott Kaster, one lot, $80,000. David Herrmann, Dianne Brian Jergens to Betty Seale, Herrmann, attorney in fact to one lot, $156,000. Abdelaziz Aboulkassim, Michelle Mark Ares, Wendy Ares to Aboulkassim, one lot, $347,500. Mark Ares, Wendy Ares, two lots, Everbank to Secretary of $0. Housing and Urban Development, Thomas Persing, Gretchen one lot, $0. Roose to Erica Pennington, Betty Shoup, Marvin Shoup to James Pennington, one lot, Marvin Shoup and Betty Shoup $229,900. Revocable Living Trust, Betty Lisa Burrowes, Robert Shoup, trustee, Marvin Shoup, Burrowes to Federal Home Loan trustee, a part lot, $0. Mortgage Corp., one lot, $60,000.

TROY

PIQUA Stephen Magoteaux, succes-

Jennifer Graham to Jennifer Slanker, two part lots, $82,900. Roselyn Lovett, trustee to George Lovett, trustee, one lot,

$0. Rosewood Creek LLC to Denlinger & Sons Builders Inc., one lot, $55,900. Thomas Matthew, Karen McGraw to Woodlawn Rentals LLC, eight lots, $0.

COVINGTON Dane Crowell, Karen Crowell, Marilyn Helman, Betty Powell, David Powell to Retta Thomas, one lot, $0. Bac Home Loans Servicing L.P., bank of America, N.A. successor, Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP to Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, one lot, $0.

Trust, one lot, $0. Bac Home Loans Servicing LP, Bank of America, N.A. successor, Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP to Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, one lot, $0. Lorraine Jackson, Ronald Jackson to Keith Zimmerman, Lucinda Zimmerman, two part lots, $42,000.

WEST MILTON

Patrick Siler to Julie Siler, one lot, $0. Kimberlie Cerney to Jack H. Randall and Karen S. Randall Revocable Living Trust, Jack Randall, Karen Randall, two part lots, $143,000. Carlisle, McNellie, Rini, Kramer LAURA & Ulrich Co. LPA, attorney in fact, Marcia Smith, Richard Smith to Fannie Mae a.k.a. Federal National Mortgage Association to Dawn Moore, Marcia Smith, Lisa Lauber, one lot, $70,000. Richard Smith, three lots, $0.

POTSDAM

BETHEL TWP.

Barbara Burrowes, Thomas Earl Burrowes to Barbara Burrowes, trustee, Thomas Earl Burrowes, trustee, Thomas E. and HUBER HEIGHTS Barbara Burrowes Trust, 11.65 acres, 30 acres, $0. Gregory Schieman, Teresa Carriage Trails at the Heights Scheiman to Andrea Vest, Bryan LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to NVR Vest, 9.3327 acres, 0.7177 acres, Inc., one lot, $30,500. $74,500. NVR Inc. to Jeni Waites, Jesse Greg Rowelison, Sandy Waites, one lot, $193,200. Rowlison to Christopher Slattery, NVR Inc. to Ed Woods, Jill Lauren Slattery, one lot, Woods, one lot, $249,200. $126,000. Carriage Trails at the Heights LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to CONCORD TWP. Inverness Group, Inc., one lot, $34,000. HSBC Mortgage Services Inc. Carriage Trails at the Heights to Joel Hart, Lauren Hart, one lot, LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to $169,000. Inverness Group, Inc., one lot, Douglas Amlin, Wanda Amlin $34,000. to AA Property Management LLC, Carriage Trails at the Heights one lot, $0. LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to Christopher Monnin, Heather Inverness Group, Inc., one lot, Monnin to Danielle Dillon, $35,000. Matthew Dillon, one lot, Carriage Trails at the Heights $222,5000. LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to M1 Carol Lightner, Charles Homes of Cincinnati LLC., one lot, Lightner, Deanne Lightner, G. $44,000. Eugene Lightner, George Michael Platfoot, Nancy Lightner, Janet Lightner, John Platfoot to American Homes 4 Lightner, Teresa Lightner to Anne Rent Properties Four LLC, one Kress, David Kress, 40.0027 lot, $171,400. acres, $336,000. NVR Inc. to James Dalton, Mandi Dalton, one lot, $203,200. Carriage Trails at the Heights MONROE TWP. LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to NVR Inc., one lot, $30,500. Bank of America N.A to Carriage Trails at the Heights Secretary of Housing and Urban LLC, Dec Land Co. I LLC to NVR Development, $0. Inc., one lot, $30,500. Janice Pearson, Thomas Pearson to Pearson Family PLEASANT HILL Preservation Trust, Trancy Poeppelman, trustee, 2.110 acres, Carol Bailey to Carol S. Bailey, $0. Glenn LeRoy Rohr, Margaret trustee, Carol S. Bailey Living Angela Ditmer, Michael Ditmer to Angela Ditmer, Michael Ditmer, three lots, $0.

Ann Rohr to Linda Demmer, William Deemer, one lot, $25,000. UpNorth Homes Inc. to UpNorth Homes Inc., 15.5495 acres, $0. UpNorth Homes Inc. to UpNorth Homes Inc., 2.1090 acres, $0. Bac Home Loans Servicing LP, Bank of America, N.A. successor, Countrywide Home Loans servicing LP to secretary of Housing and Urban Development, one lot, $0. Barbara Sizemore, attorney in fact, Woodson Sizemore to Barbara Sizemore, one lot, $0.

NEWBERRY TWP. Daniel White, Kami White to Gregory Fraley, Heather Fraley, 1.0 acre, 0.194 acre, 0.750 acre, 0.194 acre, $231,500. Gary T. Green and Jennifer L. Green Trust, Gary Green, trustee, Jennifer Green, trustee to Michael Stueve, Sara Stueve, 4.220 acres, $35,000. Springleaf Financial Services of Ohio Inc. to Kimberly Morgan, 2.059 acres, $13,000.

NEWTON TWP. Bonnie Lou Powell, Douglas Powell, Kimberly Powell, Larry Powell to Jordan Stull, Kaitlyn Stull, 0.021 acre, $1,000. Betty J. Smith Irrevocable Trust of July 27,2012, Stephen Smith, trustee to Olma George, Rhonda George, 0.863 acres, $75,000.

SPRINGCREEK TWP. Anita Spain, Gary Spain to Kristy Osting, Philip M. Osting Jr., one lot, $143,000. Unity National Bank, Park National bank to Scott Investments of Troy LLC, one lot, $13,00. Angela Baldridge, Wesley Baldridge to Abigail Silvers, Joshua Silvers, one lot, $147,000.

STAUNTON TWP. Annette Silvers to Barbara Brower, Robert Brower II, one lot, $131,500.

UNION TWP. Bryan Davis, Amie Pearson to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., 2.165 acres, $97,900. Katherine Francen to Dennis Chatterton, 30.00 acres, $0. Dan Baisden, Jessica Baisden a.k.a. Jessica Ford to Lisa Naff, Matthew Naff, 1.00 acre, $119,000.


To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • C5

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

Auctions Yard Sale TROY, 1890 Old Staunton Road, Saturday, June 1, 8-4 & Sunday, June 2, 8-1. Lots of miscellaneous items to benefit escue animals of Lost and Found K9 Rescue. Child / Elderly Care Teacher with Masters in Education looking to stay home and interested in offering childcare services. Will provide a safe and caring environment for your child. Please call Jesica regarding prices. (937)479-4056 Creative/Design

NEWSPAPER PAGINATION Civitas Media, a growing leader in local news, is looking for full time experienced paginators with copy editing backgrounds for its Miamisburg, Ohio hub. Paginators will be expected to design pages for a variety of newspapers and special sections in InDesign while copy editing editorial content and writing headlines. Evening and weekend hours. Wages based on experience. Health, vision, dental, vacation.

Help Wanted General

Help Wanted General

INDUSTRIAL CONTRACTOR HIRING LABORERS AND CDL TRUCK DRIVERS for hard hat environment. Training provided. APPLY AT: 15 INDUSTRY PARK CT TIPP CITY

LOCAL DRIVERS Drivers needed for LOCAL tractor trailer driving positions. Various shifts and routes. Can make up to $850/ week. Must have CDLA, at least 1 year recent experience and be extremely dependable. Call Dave during the week at (800)497-2100 or on the weekend/ evenings at (937)726-3994 or apply in person at: Continental Express 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH www.ceioh.com

PLUMBING/ HVAC PROJECT MGR. ESTIMATOR Description/Requirements: *Min. of 5 yrs. Exp. *Commercial & Industrial HVAC/Plumbing/Piping Exp. *Familiar with Local & State Codes *Able to read Blueprints & Schematic Drawings *Turn a concept, rough or detailed drawing into a detailed estimate. *Prepare proposals and aid in the sale as needed. *Understand basic control sequences and system operation. *Exp. in construction practices, project scheduling & planning. *Basic AutoCAD knowledge preferred. *Continuous communication with supervisors & job foremen to coordinate needs. *Willing to travel, work overtime, weekends & holidays if needed *Drug testing & background check.

PIPE WELDERS/ FABRICATION

Email a resume, clips and references to: jmullen@civitasmedia.com

Skills/Qualifications: *2+yrs experience *Welding Mig, Tig, Stick and Fabrication *Pipe welding carbon steel pipe, stainless steel pipe, schedule 10&40 pipe and stainless sanitary tubing *Rigging expierence *Welding Cert. D1-1 & B31-1

Drivers & Delivery DRIVER Dancer Logistics is looking for Class A CDL driver with at least 2 years experience for home daily runs, over the road and regional. Great Benefits and great home time and your weekends off. Also looking for Teams to run West coast.

Requirements: * Willing to travel, work overtime, weekends and holidays if needed. *HS diploma or GED *Drug testing & background check

Please apply at: 900 Gressel Dr Delphos, Oh or call (419)692-1435

Email resumes to: amyj@wellsbrothers.com Fax to: 937-394-2375 Or mail to:

40073811

105 Shue Dr. Anna OH 45302 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE EOE Medical/Health

Food Services

Landing a Job in a Digital Era W

ith people updating their social networking pages from their PDAs and downloading favorite tunes from their mobile phones, it should come as no surprise society has grown increasingly reliant on technology. Individuals about to dive into the job-seeking market may have to rethink their search skills to maximize the potential of reaching employers and companies that likely embrace a digital mind set. As of June 2009, the U.S. unemployment rate reached 9.7 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.This means there are a great deal of people — from the recently laid off to the newly graduated — who are all vying for the same jobs. Thinking creatively and exploring numerous ways of advertising oneself can help land a job in today’s market. Newspaper: The newspaper has long been a respected and effective means to find work. It is still a viable way to find jobs that are local without having to search through hundreds and hundreds of positions, which is common with online job posting sites. However, why not turn the tables and use the newspaper — and its respective online site — to advertise yourself? For a relatively low investment of time and money, you can place a classified ad that you are seeking work and briefly explain your credentials. Create a separate, free e-mail address with your favorite mail provider specifically for receiving inquiries to this advertisement. Personal Web site: Employers are short on time and many want to exert the least amount of energy possible when seeking job candidates. A personal Web page can put your information in the hands of employers in a concise and eye-catching way.The Web page can feature a brief description of yourself and also include a digital resume. Simply provide a link to your site when applying for a job. Remember, a personal Web site should be all business. Now is not the time for a pretty picture or stories about your pets. Employers are looking for skills. Be bold with buzzwords: Turn your experience into a list of buzzwords, keywords and important phrases when writing a resume. It used to be that verbs were the key to landing a job. Using strong action words should relay your experience. However, today resumes are frequently reviewed by a digital eye, rather than a human eye. This digital eye is programmed to recognize certain words and phrases that will sort your resume out from the others. Including the right keywords ensures your resume has a better chance of being picked. Use as many words as you can that were included in the original job posting — they’re likely to be programmed keywords. Most of these words are nouns that signal job titles, technical skills and levels of education or experience. Use social networking sites to your advantage: Employers and recruiters have admitted they frequently go to social networking sites, such as MySpace, Facebook and LinkedIn to “check up” on potential hires — or even employees they already have on staff. Many a person has compromised his or her chances for hire by questionable material posted on their pages. Instead of being a victim of the pitfalls of social networking, use it to your advantage. Seed your pages with information that may be interesting to a potential employer by doing a little research. For example, if you know a certain company to which you’d like to apply places significant emphasis on the environment, list the “green” functions you’ve attended and the groups to which you

For more resources on how to land that dream job or to just get back to work, log onto:

DIETARY ASSISTANT We are looking for experienced people. Come in and fill out an application and speak with Jeanine Colgrove, Dietary Director. Koester Pavilion 3232 North Co Rd 25A Troy, Ohio (I-75 at exit 78) (937)440-7663 Phone (937)335-0095 Fax Located on the Upper Valley Medical Center Campus

belong on your page. Know a hiring manager is an avid golfer? Talk about your passion for the game. It’s these little things that may get you in the door to an interview. Think differently: There are some people who want to take their job search to another level.With the market saturated by job seekers, sometimes it’s the person who has the nerve to stand out from the crowd that will land the job.Today it’s not uncommon to find door-todoor solicitation of jobs, people posting job requests on YouTube or similar sites, or even standing in a busy downtown area with a sign that says, “Looking for Work.” Others turn to popular blogs to get the word out. The more people who know you’re looking for work, the better chance you will find a position. Technology is technology: There are certain tips you should keep in mind when applying for jobs: - Scanners that look at resumes work well with these typefaces: Helvetica, Courier, Futura, Optima, Palatino, New Century Schoolbook, and Times. And they work best with type sizes in the 10to 14-point range. - Don’t send your resume as an attachment, or include any attachments, unless specified. There are always concerns about computer viruses and attachments can even get lost. Paste everything into the body of your e-mail. - Use the subject line of an e-mail as a theater marquee and sell yourself. - Use the proofreading/spell-check functions of your word processing software, but also print out your materials and read them over. There’s no excuse to be excluded from a job because of a silly typo. - Follow-up with all job applications. It could move your resume to the top of the pile.

JobSourceOhio.com

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

EOE

Has a great opportunity for an individual wanting to start their own delivery business by becoming an owner/ operator of a

Help Wanted General 84 LUMBER COMPANY MANAGER TRAINEES We are seeking careerminded individuals for our TROY store who are looking for a career that includes customer service, hands-on work, growing sales, and management. College preferred. No construction knowledge necessary. Through our paid training, you will become an industry professional! We offer excellent benefits in a great work environment.

Keeping up with the digital world could be the key to landing your next job.

Other

Apply in person MondayFriday, 8am-5pm at: 84 LUMBER COMPANY 845 ARTHUR DRIVE TROY, OH 45373 You may also apply online at: www.84lumber.com/ careers 84 Lumber Company is an equal employment opportunity & affirmative action employer. Drug Free Environment.

CARRIERS NEEDED In Piqua, Tipp City Laura, Fletcher & Troy to deliver the Dayton Daily News. Must be available 7 days a week between 2:00 am to 6:00 am weekdays and 8:00 am weekends. Reliable transportation and proof of insurance necessary. Leave message with area of interest along with phone number where you can be reached. Cox Media Group, (937)603-9178 GENERAL SHOP help wanted. Mechanical experience helpful. Own transportation, clean driving record record required. 3040 hours per week. Apply in person, Monday thru Thursday: Dennys Carb Shop, 8620 Casstown-Fletcher Road, Fletcher. SALES/ SUPPORT, Nationwide Agent in Piqua seeking licensed support staff and liensed agents. Forward resume to jppp1@sbcglobal.net.

DELIVERY TRUCK! This GREAT opportunity comes with SUPER SECURITY and UNLIMITED Earning Potential. This is YOUR opportunity to work with the #1 Home Improvement Center!!

40147176

Call: 715-876-4000

Continental Express Inc., a full service transportation company that specializes in hauling refrigerated food products is recruiting for the following positions:

FLEET MECHANIC SUPERVISOR Primary responsibility will be overseeing work being done by Mechanics on semi trailers including; preventative maintenance, DOT inspections, general repairs and new trailer preparation. This will be a hands-on, working supervisor position. Person must have working knowledge and experience on tractor trailers. Strongly prefer someone with prior supervisory or leadership experience.

REFRIGERATION TECHNICIAN Person will be responsible for maintenance and repairs to semi trailer refrigeration units. Must have ability to diagnose and repair units, perform preventative maintenance and install new units. Prior experience on Thermo King and/or Carrier units required with a preference on having certification. Both positions are on day shift and must have own tools. We offer a very clean work environment and newer model equipment. Excellent compensation and benefit package. Benefits include health/dental/vision insurance, short term disability, 401K with match, uniforms, direct deposit, paid time off.

Apply at:

For Sale By Owner Apartments /Townhouses 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms Call for availability attached garages Easy access to I-75 (937)335-6690 www.hawkapartments.net 1,2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS Troy ranches and townhomes. Different floor plans to choose from. Garages, fireplaces, appliances including washer and dryers. Corporate apartments available. Visit www.firsttroy.com Call us first! (937)335-5223 DODD RENTALS Tipp-Troy: 2 bedroom AC, appliances $550/$450 plus deposit No pets (937)667-4349 for appt. EVERS REALTY TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $725

Continental Express Inc.

3 Bedroom, 1 bath, Double, $675

10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH 45365 800-497-2100 Or email resume to: mgoubeaux@ceioh.com

(937)216-5806 EversRealty.net

40147176

ADVERTISING

FRONT DESK/ DENTAL ASSISTANT Seeking self-starter with organizational, patient communication/computer skills to handle activities in high quality, restorative dental practice. Prior dental/ medical experience a plus but not required. Training supplied. 30-40 hrs. E-mail resume: dentistryresume@hotmail.com

TROY TOWNHOUSE, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath. Bunkerhill $495 monthly, (937)216-4233


B10 • Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Sunday, June 2, 2013

COOPER’S

GRAVEL & STONE 40044472 BLACKTOP

Gutter Repair & Cleaning

DC SEAMLESS 40110227 1002 N. Main St. Sidney, Ohio 45365

Need new kitchen cabinets, new bathroom fixtures, basement turned into a rec room? Give me a call for any of your home remodeling & repair needs, even if it’s just hanging some curtains or blinds. Call Bill Niswonger

Shredded Topsoil Topsoil 40043994 Shredded

Driveways •• Excavating Excavating Driveways Demolition Demolition

Call today for FREE estimate

WE DELIVER

2376886

1-937-492-8897

Cleaning & Maintenance

Land Care

Handyman

MATT & SHAWN’S

LAWN CARE & 40072136 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Hauling & Trucking

Sparkle Clean Cleaning Service 40082326

COOPER’S GRAVEL

Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured

40072242 Gravel Hauled,

Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

875-0153 698-6135

Tammy Welty (937)857-4222

Lawn Mowing starting at $15 Landscaping •Trim Shrubs Pavers & Fence Installation Tree Removal • Wood Patios Install & Clean Spoutings • Siding Power Washing Nuisance Wild Animal Removal FREE Estimates 15 Years Lawn Care Experience

• Lawn care 40053412 • Landscaping • Gardens Tilled • Mulching

STRAWBERRIES, Fresh picked strawberries, Burns' Market, Monday thru Saturday, 4865 Myers Road, Covington (Turn East off 41 onto Myers watch for signs)

Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

Remodeling & Repairs

20 YEARS IN BUSINESS

2 8 Y e a rs E x p e ri e nc e Fr ee Est i mates

• Room Additions • Interior/Exterior • Drywall • Texturing • Kitchens • Baths • Decks • Doors

J.T.’s Painting & Drywall

Call Jim at

Auctions

Garden & Produce

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992

TOTAL HOME REMODELING 40099214 LICENSED • INSURED

40053412

PUPPIES, Shih Tzu, Yorkiepoos, Multi-poos, Miniature Poodles, $250 and up, (419)925-4339

40110426

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

www. tdn-net.com

Pets

Pet Grooming

Call Matt 937-477-5260

Houses For Rent TROY, updated 2 bedroom ranch in Westbrook, 1 year lease, possible land contract, $775 (937)308-0679

937-875-0153 937-698-6135

937-606-1122

Fully Insured Repairs • Cleaning • Gutter Guard

335-6321

PAVING, REPAIR & SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

Fill Dirt Dirt Fill

Gutter & Service

Free Estimates / Insured

40082895

Paving & Excavating Landscaping

B.E.D. PROGRAM

BILL’S HOME REMODELING 40045872 & REPAIR

40082326

BICYCLE, Boys 16 inch, excellent condition, $25, (937)3392800 BICYCLE, Girls, 16 inch, excellent condition, $25, (937)339-2800

493-9978

CALL RICK

937-726-2780

40044472

installed

Rest easy while you’re away 937-573-9098 Cell 937-552-9797

FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

40110426

CEMETERY LOTS, Riverside Cemetery in Troy, 2 lots together, northwest of the Mausoleum in older section, $500 each (937)962-2389

4995

40042552

2385753

$

Homes and Decks Cleaning Gutters Commercial, Industrial, Residential

* Security Checks * Mail Pickup *Light Housekeeping *Yard Maintenance * Errand Running * Flexible Hours *Other Services Available

As low as

(937)

Miscellaneous

TROY, 1/2 double, 2 bedroom ranch, attached garage, , 1.5 baths, appliances, new carpet, very clean! No pets, 934 North Dorset, $695 + deposit. (937)339-6736, (937)2861199.

from BED BUGS

• Devices installed in all rooms • Easy Early find if Bed Bugs enter

Painting - Interior - Exterior 40082895 Pressure Washing

40099214

Cemetery Plots /Lots

40042552

40072136

Boats & Marinas

Baby Items

(937)673-1822

MAKE YOUR HOME LOOK NEW AGAIN

Building & Remodeling

TODDLER BED, changing table, crib, blankets, high-chair. HANDICAP ITEMS, regular and seated walkers, commode, shower chairs, glider rocker, more! (937)339-4233

$200 Deposit Special!

TMA Land Limited

937-773-4552

(937)286-8893 (937)286-3319 2002 POLARIS, Jet Ski,750 engine, 3 seater with trailer and cover, excellent condition, (937)492-3567 after 5pm

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedrooms, appliances, CA, Water, Trash Paid, $425 & $525 Monthly.

House Sitting Services

“Peace of Mind” knowing your Free 40053415

40053415

TIPP/ TROY, new everything and super clean! 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, no pets, no prior evictions, $550 month, $550 deposit, 1 year lease, (937)5454513

Sport package, 2 door hatchback, auto, AC, power, silver, excellent condition, 50,000 miles, $8800

BED BUG DETECTORS

TERRY’S

•Refrigerators •Stoves •Washers & Dryers •Dishwashers • Repair & Install Air Conditioning

2007 FORD FOCUS SE

Painting & Wallpaper

Exterminating

APPLIANCE 40065658 REPAIR

40045872

TIPP CITY, 1/2 double, newly decorated, 2 bedroom, appliances, off street parking, trash paid, $450 month + deposit, NO PETS! (937)667-3568.

House Sitting

Appliances

40110227

Autos For Sale

2385772

Apartments /Townhouses TIPP CITY townhouse, newly decorated, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, appliances, W/D hookup, trash paid, $475 month + deposit, NO PETS! (937)6673568.

To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

937-694-2454

Building & Remodeling

40053399

40072200

#Repairs Large and #Room Additions #Kitchens/Baths #Windows #Garages

Autos For Sale

Small #Basements #Siding #Doors #Barns

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts (937) 339-1902 2385779

or (937) 238-HOME Free Estimates • Fully Insured • 17 Years of Home Excellence

2005 KIA SEDONA LX

For Sale By Owner

new tires, extra clean, cold air, only 129k miles, good gas mileage, $5100

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4 40135557

call (937)684-0555

1891 Hunters Ridge, Troy Former model home, 1500 sq. ft. 3/2/2 Split plan. Gas fireplace, all appliance except Amana front load W/D (negotiable.) Full unfinished basement plumbed for 1/2 bath. Reduced $174,900. (419) 305-6233

2007 ACURA TL 66k miles, loaded! Black, leather, all power, heated seats, MP3 multi CD changer, sunroof, new battery, newer tires, very good condition! $14,850. Call (937)726-2791

40135557

Auctions

Dick & Barb Adams Collection 40135017

Clean Glassware and Collectible Auction

Auctions

For your home improvement needs

Welding Equipment - Custom Bike - Tools Allis Chalmers “B” - Hit Miss Engine - Lathe 40135031 80 Ton Press Anvil

40082989

Friday, June 7th 1:00PM 615 Gronlund Place, Sidney, Ohio

“Ed Cox” ESTATE AUCTION

Located in Dorothy Love Community off Cisco Rd.

Saturday June 8th 9:00 a.m. 13277 Sharp Rd., Sidney, Ohio

• Painting • Dr y wall • Decks • Carpentr y • Home Repair • Kitchen/Bath 2387996

937-974-0987 Email: UncleAlyen@aol.com

40058910

AUCTIONEERS 937-538-6231 auctions@woh.rr.com

VondenhuevelAuctioneers.com 937-573-4702

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

• • • •

Roofing Windows Kitchens Sunrooms

• • • •

Spouting Metal Roofing Siding Doors

• • • •

Auctions

Baths Awnings Concrete Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

Very Good

Antiques & Collectibles Crockery – Vintage Kitchen Items Farm Memorabilia – Tools & More! TROY, OHIO At the Merchant’s Bldg, Miami Co Fairgrounds, south entrance, 650 N. Co Rd 25A.

PUBLIC 40139148 AUCTION

40058910

Auctions

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 • 9:30 AM

to the Miami County Fairgrounds at 650 N. County Road 25-A Troy, Ohio 45373. (Held inside the newer Duke building with plenty of seating and parking.)

TROY, OHIO FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Fenton items; collectible glasswares; crocks; country primitives; old tools; cast iron items; 75+ pocket knives; antique furniture & furnishings; 3 cut cadet lawn tractors; lawn & garden needs; 3’ machine lathe; a lot of hand tools & shop machinery; 1949 Farmall H tractor w/hyd. loader; 1978 Honda “Hondamatic” motorcycle w/ only 38,380 miles; tilting trailer; 13’ open boat w/30 h.p. engine & trolling motor (only an overview.)

BETTY J. SMITH IRREVOCABLE TRUST STEPHEN SMITH, TRUSTEE

40138839

Terms: Cash,VISA/MC/DISCOVER, or check Out of State checks-2 forms of ID required. Auctioneer’s Note: This is a clean quality auction from start to finish. Possible 2 rings.Times: starting on misc. smalls - furniture approx. 1:30 p.m. - followed by tractors - motorcycle - boat Sale day phone - 937/545/4416. Visit our website to view photos at WWW.JWCAUCTIONS.COM.

SALE CONDUCTED BY: JON W. CARR “I sell the earth and everything on it” AUCTIONEER & REALTOR BROOKVILLE, OHIO (937) 833-6692

From the Home of CLARENCE & FREDA KOELLER, Owners: ANTIQUES: Cherry dough box; lift top ice box; round & square meat blocks; copper dbl tub washer; copper wash boiler; laundry stove; coal buckets; wooden stomp churn; wooden bowl & butter paddles; sugar bucket; wooden caddy; misc flatware; older kitchen utensils; granite ware; Amber Lightning jars, 4 qts & 1 pt; Wagner Colonial & CI anniversary tea kettles; sausage press; 20” camp skillet; Conservo; “Dayton” painted tin tackle box; brass & nickel fly reel & 2 other; lobster trap; 2 glass float balls; scrub top; drop leaf & depression era tables; sled; license plates; DuPont Explosives box & other w/ advertising; Merry Christmas flask; Borden’s & St. John’s milk bottles; Advertising tins incl tobacco; cigar mold; bracket lamp; ladles; ; dog boot scraper; Doty vacuum; quilting frame; bird houses; child’s side oven range; school slates; Mammy string holder; wall mtd coffee grinder; match holders; CI comb case w/ mirror; collar bag & collars; neat old shoes; celluloid mirrors; hat form; str razors; stereopticon & cards; Few Toys: Tin litho power boat, Santa w/ sleigh & reindeer, tops; ice box, dominoes & more! Over 20 crocks & jugs incl stoneware w/ blue decoration; sealing wax jars; blue 3 gal bee sting & more! Wheat cradle; mowing scythe; tobacco basket, lath & spears; push plow; corn jobber, knife, fodder cutter & box mtd sheller; buggy jack; hames; horseshoes; chicken crate, egg carrier & qt jar waterer; 2 sets of wooden chicken nests; lg cow bell w/ strap; calf weaner; hog scraper; bee smoker; cider press in the rough; bushel baskets; barn lanterns; buck saws; wagon wheels; hay fork & hooks; sheep shears; leather worker’s bench & vise; stone grinder w/ seat; primitive wooden tool box; kegs; meat hook boards; apple butter stirrers & peeler; slaw cutter; washboards; very large ice tongs; steelyard scale & others, plus a wire cage mouse trap! VINTAGE HOME FURNISHINGS: Copper tone dbl bed; cedar chest; lg leather covered trunk; stool like swivel chair; student chr; oak library file; rocker; child’s chair; hoop end cradle; inlaid wooden waste basket; several boxes of yarn; fabric; castor set; 6 Iris & Herringbone water glasses; other glassware; green beater jar; crock bowls; HH goods. GARAGE ITEMS: Delta Homecraft drill press; small table saw; Craftsman lathe; older hand tools; drawn knife; brass trimmed squares; Stanley 68 folding rule; wrenches; etc; lawn-garden tools; boring machine; Agri-Fab Mow-N-Vac; wheelbarrow; block & tackle; chain hoist; ladders; GI shovel; canvas bucket; RR spike hammer; small anvil; platform scale; old hardware & supplies. Jane Tillman Estate Additions Miami Co Probate Case 85666 Empire round oak table; 6 oak plank btm chairs; oak dresser w/ mirror; quilts; oak commode stand; 2 sgl beds; early Am bedroom suite; cedar chest; Duncan Phyfe round lamp table; corner table; child’s roll top desk; tier stand; knick-knacks; Pyrex bowls; household goods & garage items; 10 gal milk can; Meijer mower; Gilson snow blower & more! NOTE: As always, there is quite a variety w/ many items make attendance at this event worthwhile. Check the website at www.stichterauctions.com for further details, but above all, Please Plan to Attend!

JERRY STICHTER AUCTIONEER,

INC.

AUCTIONS & APPRAISALS 40139148

SMITH AUCTION

Location/Directions: For more convenience, we have moved this nice auction 40138839

A fantastic offering we have not seen in a long time. Plan to attend this great afternoon auction!

VONDENHUEVEL AUCTIONEERS 937-538-6231 auctions@woh.rr.com

VondenhuevelAuctioneers.com

VONDENHUEVEL

40135031

Remodeling & Repairs

Auctioneers Note: Mr. Cox was an Inventor,Welder, Fabricator and old school engineer that could build or fix anything.This is a great opportunity to purchase some of his creations.There is a large amount of shop tools to numerous to mention. Plan to attend this unique auction. Estate of Edward L. Cox Probate # 2013-EST-059 Cheryl A. Cisco Executor Harry N. Faulkner Attorney FGKS A Legal Professional Association 937-492-1271 Directions: Count Rd. 25A North of Sidney to West on Sharp Rd. Terms: All items to be sold to the highest bidder. Cash or Check. Credit Cards accepted with 3% buyer’s premium.Titled vehicles will be paid for day of the auction and will remain on premises until title is transferred by Probate Court. Auctioneers: Justin Vondenhuevel CAI,Tom Roll and David Shields. Apprentice Auctioneers Rick Reichenbacher DeLynn Cox

40135017

FREE ESTIMATES

Jerry Stichter Broker Associate of Garden Gate Realty (937)335-6758 www.stichterauctions.com

Auctions

LARGE HOUSEHOLD PUBLIC AUCTION

40080403

336 Shaftsbury Rd, Troy, Ohio

From Main St (St Rt 41) go north at Hobart Brothers on Adams St and turn left on Shaftsbury Rd. Sale site on left.

SUNDAY, JUNE 9, 2013 • 11AM FURNITURE: Tell City maple hutch; dinette table and 6 chairs; dresser and mirror; queen size bed complete; 2 leather recliner chairs; Grandfather clock; lamps; couch and loveseat; end tables; coffee tables; wicker plant stands; shelving; chairs; typewriter stand; TV cabinet; TV; maple book shelves; gold framed mirror; small table; VCR; microwave; pictures; regulator desk clock; 4 tier stand; chalk board; maple table and chairs; maple foot stool; brown wicker 2 shelf; stools; washer/ dryer; square shelf on legs; stackable tables; dressers; full size beds – complete; mirrors; night stands; brass lamps; plus other furniture to be decided upon! HOUSEHOLD ITEMS: Candle holders; brass bowls; wall hangings; painted copper broiler; books; angel figurines; trivets; silverware; music box; bedding; linens; dishes; dried flowers; ash trays; China; baskets; small appliances; glass shots; crackle glass; salt/peppers; Disney pitchers; quilt pcs; Pyrex; fondue pot; Anchor Hocking glassware; pie plates; bowls; pots/pans; Riverware; pottery; spoon holder; double broiler; George Foreman grill; Kitchen Aid mixer; canister set; glassware; Corningware; Germany pcs; crystal; bells; stainless steel pcs; Universal chopper; yellow, green, white depression glass; kitchen utensils; alum trays; tea pots; coffee pots; blenders; toasters; Pepsi Cola tray; trays; Rod Iron Amish set; glasses; wine decanters; 5 glass salt dishes; egg plates; pitchers; napkin holders; Christmas items; sugar creamers; stoneware; Superior Hall dinnerware; crystal; pottery; picture frames; hand crafted items; figurines; Norman Rockwell pictures; glass lantern lights; stein; 3 wooden monkeys; glass candy dishes; vases; paper shredder; goblets; Weller pottery vase; sm jug; iron skillets; Wagnerware; red jar w/lid – Rodgers England; book ends; hat box; Tupperware; recipes; placemats; crocheted items; tablecloths; dollies; hand towels; dish towels; flower sifter; coffee mill; alum griddle; blankets; shot glasses; meat grinders; ceramics; 8 beer glasses; measuring cups; luggage; Phalzcraft dishes and sets; apple coasters; 3 pc wrought iron set; magazine holder; cups; glasses; meat platters; salt & peppers; containers; butter dishes; dinner plates; soup bowls; salad bowls; silver cigarette snuffer; electric skillet; warmers; lawn & garden tools; clock radio; steak knives; hard back and paper back books – several; old tools; punch bowl; purses; Glen Miller records; pocket watch in globe; wood wheel barrow; lots of costume jewelry. AUTOGRAPHED LEGENDS:Signed baseballs; pictures; plaques of older baseball players; comics; sets of ball cards; Emit Kelley clown; boxers; etc. TERMS: Cash or check with proper ID. $50 bank charges and $19 auctioneer fees charged on any returned checks plus subject to prosecution. Go to www.auctionzip.com under Larry L Lavender for photos and details.

OWNER: TED MURRAY AUCTIONEER

Larry L. Lavender 937-845-0047 H • 937-875-0475 Cell llavenderauctioneer@msn.com • www.lavenderauctions.com Licensed in Favor of the State of Ohio • Clerks: Lavender Family Not responsible for accidents, thefts or typographical mistakes. Any statements made by Auctioneer on sale, may, supercede statements herein, believed to be correct, availability are NOT GUARANTEED BY AUCTIONEER. May I be of Service to You? Please Call ME!

40080403

Handyman

Tdn 06022013  

Cloudy skies, sunny outlook