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Vikings’ postseason run ends with 6-0 loss to the Rockets PAGE 15

May 31, 2013 It’s Where You Live! Volume 105, No. 129

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An award-winning Civitas Media Newspaper

INSIDE TROY

Laura man guilty of sex charges

Strike comes despite pledge of transparency The drone attack that killed a Pakistan Taliban deputy leader this week was a clear signal that despite President Barack Obama’s promise last week of new transparency in the drone program, the CIA will still launch secret attacks on militants in north Pakistan and the administration will not have to tell anyone about it.

Sentencing hearing set for July 22

See Page 8.

Staff report

STAFF PHOTOS/ANTHONY WEBER

Effort to recall Arpaio fails A campaign to force a recall election against the polarizing sheriff of metropolitan Phoenix failed on Thursday after recall organizers said they couldn’t collect enough voter signatures to bring the lawman to the ballot again. Organizers of the recall effort against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio needed to turn in more than 335,000 valid voter signatures by 5 p.m. Thursday to force a recall election. See Page 11.

Let’s show our hospitality this summer I don’t know why Southerners were crowned kings of hospitality — us Midwesterners are pretty darn friendly, too, if you ask me. Last weekend I traveled with my good friend Swanky to the Windy City – good ol’ Chicago. I’ve been to California, New York City, Boston and a few other major U.S. cities, but there’s something so warm and welcoming about Chi-town.

See Page 4.

INSIDE TODAY Advice ..........................9 Calendar ......................3 Classified ...................12 Comics.......................10 Deaths .........................5 Eleanor J. Wilhelm Paul D. Wogaman Frank Benham Horoscopes ...............10 Arts ..............................6 Opinion ........................4 Sports ........................15 TV ................................9

OUTLOOK Today Storms likely High: 83° Low: 66° Saturday Storms likely High: 82° Low: 67°

Abigail Slider, 8, left, Evan Loyd, 6, center, Nathan Slider, 6, and Cortney Loyd, background, along with Rebekah Slider and Ella Slider, 2, (not pictured), pick strawberries at Fulton Farms Wednesday in Troy. According to Cortney Loyd, the group likes to come to Fulton Farms every year to pick strawberries, and then they make another trip in the fall for the produce.

Farm experiencing a ‘berry’ good season BY NATALIE KNOTH Staff Writer nknoth@civitasmedia.com hanks to a moderately warm spring, Fulton Farms’ visitors are enjoying the sweet success of a plentiful, timely strawberry crop. Joyce Fulton, owner of Fulton Farms with her husband Bill, said she couldn’t be more pleased with the family farm’s strawberry crop. “It’s so much better than last year in terms of mental spirit,” Fulton said. “We’ve got a smile on our faces.” Berries were ripe about a month early in 2012, recalled field manager John Akins, meaning the best of the batch had already had their time in the sun before the festival. The season can last about four to six weeks. “At the beginning of the season, they’re biggest, and as the season goes on, they get smaller. Most people don’t want to pick the smaller berries,” Akins said. The ideal weather conditions are about 75 to 80 degrees during the day and around 50 degrees at night, he estimated. “If it gets really warm and stays really warm, they ripen really quickly,” he said. “If it’s a hot season, it’ll be short. But if it’s warm days and cool nights, we could have about six

T

Carter Loyd, 4, of Kettering, gets a taste test while picking strawberries with his family Wednesday at Fulton Farms in Troy. buy pre-picked berries to make food for the festival. It isn’t uncommon for patrons to pick several weeks.” buckets worth, Akins Fulton Farms opened noted. its fields to u-pickers on “We had a group of four Monday, May 27, after the gals that picked 17 buckets field workers had already of berries in under an begun picking berries for hour,” he said. the marketplace for a few The u-pick field will be days. Akins has found that closed Friday, Saturday most people keep the and Sunday for the festiberries fresh, freeze them val, but regular season or make freezer jam. Of course, pies and cakes are hours will begin Monday, June 3. Hours Friday common delicacies, and many groups either pick or through Sunday are

TROY

8 a.m. to 5 p.m. U-pick strawberries are $8 for a four-quart bucket, plus an extra dollar to purchase the bucket. Visitors may bring their own container, but it must be the same four-ounce size. In addition to strawberries, major crops for Fulton Farms include sweet corn, asparagus, pumpkins and Christmas trees. For more information and a crop report, call Fulton Farms at (937) 3356983.

A Miami County common pleas court judge found a Laura man guilty this week on 12 counts of pandering child pornography. Lee D. Hodge, 24, will enter a courtroom next on July 22 for his sentencing hearing on the dozen child porn felony convictions. Until then, he was released on his own recognizance. Hodge was found guilty on 12 counts of pandering sexually-oriented material involving a minor, which are all felonies that carry possible prison time for e a c h charge a n d carry s e x offender regis- HODGE tration for a period of 15 years, possibly longer. Authorities say Hodge accessed, downloaded and stored the pornography on a home computer where he used an Internet file-sharing website to download the pictures. Law enforcement began investigating the case after they noticed suspicious Internet activity originating from Hodge’s residence, according to a sheriff’s report. A Miami County grand jury indicted Hodge on the sexual felonies following an Oct. 31 search warrant conducted at his residence that stemmed from “large volumes of child pornography” that was being downloaded from a computer IP address traced back to Hodge, according to the search warrant. Sheriff ’s reports indicate Hodge, arraigned on the charges in February, possessed “thousands of child pornography files” on his personal computer equipment and other media storage devices that were confiscated and forensically examined by authorities.

Troy Public Access to televise festival events

that the parade was coming back, I got a ‘Whoo hoo!’” Dorsten said with a laugh. Complete weather BY MELANIE YINGST Festival Manager Heather Dorsten said this year’s parade phone calls, information on Page 11. Staff Writer Dorsten, more than 130 bands, will boast up to eight local bands, emails and myingst@citivasmedia.com floats and organizations on the most bands in recent festival Home Delivery: public patrol will begin to waltz down history. 335-5634 inquiries The streets of Troy will come the streets beginning at South “There will be lots of music, about the Classified Advertising: alive as the traditional Troy Market Street and Ridge return of the lot of fun,” she said. “We are real (877) 844-8385 Strawberry Festival Parade Avenue, around Public Square hometown parade since last year’s excited about the number of returns at 9 a.m. Saturday to kick and carry on through West Main parade was canceled due to the bands we have coming.” off the festival’s opening in grand Street, ending on Monroe Well before the first float hits Adams Street bridge closing and style. Street. the festival’s move to downtown. Dorsten said she has fielded According to Troy Strawberry • See TELEVISE on Page 2 “Every time I told someone 6 74825 22406 6

Parade set for 9 a.m. Saturday

TROY

For Home Delivery, call 335-5634 • For Classified Advertising, call (877) 844-8385


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LOCAL

Friday, May 31, 2013

LOTTERY CLEVELAND (AP) — Here are the winning numbers drawn Thursday by the Ohio Lottery: • Pick 4 Midday: 2-3-4-6 • Pick 3 Midday: 6-7-6 • Pick 5 Midday: 1-9-4-5-4 • Pick 5 Evening: 3-2-6-3-1 • Pick 3 Evening: 0-5-2 • Pick 4 Evening: 4-0-4-3 • Rolling Cash 5: 03-09-11-13-27 Estimated jackpot: $100,000

BUSINESS ROUNDUP • Stocks of local interest Values reflect closing prices from Thursday. Symbol Price Change AA 8.49 -0.09 CAG 34.39 +0.01 CSCO 24.37 +0.25 EMR 57.81 +0.54 F 15.90 +0.27 FITB 18.53 +0.06 FLS 169.19 +1.52 34.64 +0.59 GM ITW 70.56 +0.39 JCP 17.77 -0.15 KMB 100.31 +0.82 KO 40.77 -0.63 KR 34.39 -0.03 LLTC 38.32 +0.83 97.07 -1.21 MCD MSFG 14.10 +0.27 PEP 81.22 +0.10 9.69 +0.05 SYX TUP 81.90 +0.48 USB 35.53 +0.20 VZ 49.08 -0.49 WEN 6.04 +0.03 WMT 75.63 -0.60

• Cover songs: Homage or irksome marketing ploy? LOS ANGELES (AP) — There are about 600 versions of Adele’s Oscarwinning song “Skyfall” on the Spotify subscription music service. Not one of them features Adele. Adele’s label, XL Recordings, keeps her music off of all-you-can-listen subscription plans until download sales peter out. In the meantime, copycat artists fill the void, racking up royalty revenue, often before customers realize they’ve been listening to someone else. Thousands of cover songs crowd digital music services such as Spotify and Rhapsody and listeners are getting annoyed. The phenomenon threatens the growth of these services which have millions of paying subscribers and could hold back the tepid recovery of a music industry still reeling from the decline of the CD. — Staff and wire reports

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Tornadoes touch down in Oklahoma and Arkansas OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — At least two tornadoes touched down in Oklahoma and another hit Arkansas on Thursday as a powerful storm system moved through the middle of the country. At least nine injuries were reported. The National Weather Service reported two tornadoes on the ground near Perkins and Ripley in north central Oklahoma and another west of Oden, Ark. Seven people were injured in tornadoes in Arkansas. Two other injuries were attributed to lightning strikes in that state. Lightning was also believed to have started a fire at a residential complex in northwestern Indiana. Arkansas Emergency Management spokesman Tommy Jackson said first responders were having trouble reaching a destroyed home where one person was hurt in a tornado because a number of trees were blocking the road. Montgomery County sheriff ’s

spokeswoman Brandy Wingfield said there was property damage, including downed power lines, in the area. Perkins Emergency Management Director Travis Majors said there were no injuries or damage there. Ripley, about 10 miles east of Perkins, did not seem to have significant damage. The Payne County emergency management director did not immediately return a phone call seeking comment. Thursday’s tornadoes were much less dangerous than the EF5 storm that struck Moore, Okla., on May 20 and killed 24 along its 17-mile path. The U.S. averages more than 1,200 tornadoes a year, but topof-the-scale storms like the one in Moore with winds over 200 mph happen only about once per year. The tornado last week was the nation’s first EF5 since 2011. Some strong winds blew through Moore, in suburban Oklahoma City, on Thursday,

but the weather didn’t cause significant problems for crews cleaning up from last week’s tornado. This spring’s tornado season got a late start, with unusually cool weather keeping funnel clouds at bay until mid-May. The season usually starts in March and then ramps up for the next couple of months. The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., warned that there was a moderate risk of severe weather Thursday over much of eastern and central Oklahoma, with storms also possible in the rest of the central United States from Texas to Wisconsin. Flooding is also a concern in parts of Missouri, Iowa and Illinois through Sunday. In addition to tornadoes, the storms were bringing rain and hail. “Right now we’ve been getting a few thunderstorms, but they’re very severe supercell thunderstorms,” said Michael Scotten, a meteorologist with

the National Weather Services. “The whole storm rotates, and they produce on occasion some tornadoes and heavy hail.” The severe weather threat led organizers to postpone the start of the outdoor Wakarusa Music Festival near Ozark, Ark., which will feature Widespread Panic, The Black Crowes and the rapper Snoop Lion (formerly known as Snoop Dogg). An estimated 15,000 sought shelter from lightning and wind Thursday, according to the Times Record newspaper of Fort Smith, Ark. Of the 60 EF5 tornadoes since 1950, Oklahoma and Alabama have been struck the most, seven times each. More than half of these top-of-thescale twisters have occurred in just five states: Alabama, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Fewer than 1 percent of all U.S. tornadoes are this violent only about 10 a year, according to research meteorologist Harold Brooks at the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman.

Televise • CONTINUED FROM A1

2013 TROY STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL SCHEDULE the city’s streets, Mayor Mike Beamish, 2013 Strawberry Festival Queen Rachel Zelnick and Strawberry Festival Chairman Jon Dankworth and other festival organizers will select their personal favorites in the staging area. “The mayor’s choice is always a big deal – it’s always fun to see who catches his eye,” Dorsten said. The parade will be held rain or shine beginning at 9 a.m. and is expected to last more than two hours, Dorsten said. LIVE ACTION Can’t make it to the parade? Or, will you be in the parade and want to see your child or yourself on television? Then set the DVR to Channel 5 for live coverage of this year’s parade. Troy Public Access will provide live Strawberry Festival coverage, not only during the parade, but for tonight’s downtown festivities and bed races, and, tentatively, Saturday night’s concert with McGuffey Lane. Don’t have cable television? That is still not a problem, according to Troy Channel 5’s chief videographer Joe Weaver. The live coverage will be offered online for folks around the world to watch the Strawberry

Today Opening Ceremonies — Market Street/Troy Public Square, 6 p.m. Fountain Changes to Strawberry Red — Market Street/Troy Public Square, 6:15 p.m. Children’s Parade — Franklin Street/Market Street, 6:15 p.m. Food, Crafts and Games — Troy Public Square, 6-9 p.m. Friday Night CruiseIn — 100 Block of East Main Street, 6-9 p.m. Big Wheel Race — North Market Street, 6:30 p.m. Festival online. “We are ecstatic about offering it live this year,” Weaver said. Thanks to the generosity of other local public access cities, namely the city of Piqua, Weaver said he was able to borrow lots of equipment to offer the live coverage of the festival’s events throughout the weekend. Hosts for the parade coverage on Saturday will be Troy Foundation’s Julie Conner and 2012 Strawberry Festival chairwoman Corie Schweser. Weaver said this year the Troy Public Access will “start with the basics” to build upon for years to come.

Bed Races — Troy Public Square, 7 p.m. Saturday, June 1 Festival Site Hours — 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Parade — Downtown Troy, 9 a.m. Softball Tournament — Duke Park, 8 a.m. Berry Special Olympics — Duke Park, 9 a.m. Tennis Shootout — Troy Community Park, 11 a.m. Free Entertainment — Levee (three stages), 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Strawberry Pie Eating Contest Weaver said if anyone would like to share where they are watching the festival, whether from the comfort of their home in Troy, or know a loved one who may watch it overseas, leave a comment on the station’s Facebook page. “It’d be neat to know if a military person overseas was watching the coverage online or if other people who have moved away were watching the coverage,” Weaver said. “Leave us a comment on our Facebook to let us know.” Weaver said a crew of 12 people will be working around the clock to offer live coverage of tonight’s

Registration — Lower Levee, 12:30-1:20 p.m. Strawberry Pie Eating Contest — Lower Levee, 1:30 p.m. Strawberry Kid’s Crawl — Great Miami River Flood Plain, 3:30 p.m. Free Saturday Night Concert — Troy Memorial Stadium, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 2 Festival Site Hours — 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Berry Bike Tour — Parking Lot Behind Troy High School, 7:30 a.m. Classic 10k Run — Troy Memorial Stadium,

7:30 a.m. Shortcake Special Run (2,000 meters) — Troy Memorial Stadium, 7:35 a.m. Car Show — Troy Community Park, 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Awards at 4 p.m. Worship Service — Lower Levee Dining Tent, 8:30 a.m. Free Entertainment — Levee (three stages), 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Softball Tournament (Coed) — Duke Park, 11 a.m. Diaper Derby — Center Stage, noon

downtown activities, the parade as well as Saturday night’s Strawberry Festival concert with McGuffey Lane. “We are really lucky to be able to offer live coverage this year and we’d like to thank everyone who helped us in a short amount of time,” Weaver said. The live coverage will be viewed by local public access channels in the area and will later appear amongst the channel’s programming. “We are really excited and grateful we can do this for everybody,” Weaver said. Live coverage begins tonight at 6 p.m. for the

children’s parade and bed races. The 2013 Strawberry Festival Parade coverage is set to begin at 8:45 a.m. Saturday. Weaver said concert coverage is tentatively set at 7:45 p.m. Saturday evening if permission by the production company would allow the station to provide live coverage. Weaver said the concert would still be taped and be able to view later date. The station can be viewed on Time Warner Cable Channel 5. For customers with satellite, or for those who would like to view the events out of the region, go to www.troy5.com.

WHAT’S

HAPPENING? SATURDAY, JUNE 1 Taco & Wing Night Open Kitchen 6pm Band is "Bootleg" FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Open Kitchen 6 pm

To Advertise Your Local Event on This Page Call

FRIDAY, JUNE 14 Open Kitchen 6 pm FRIDAY, JUNE 21 Open Kitchen 6 pm FRIDAY, JUNE 28 Pizza Night Open Kitchen 6 pm

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May 31, 2013

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

FYI

JUNE 6

• FRIDAY DINNERS: • CHILDREN’S PRODinner will be offered from GRAM: A Boonshoft chil5-8 p.m. at the Covington dren’s program will be from C o m m u n i t y 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the MiltonVFW Post 4235, 173 N. High St., Covington. Union Public Library. Calendar Choices will include a $12 Children up to fifth grade New York strip steak, and their caretakers will CONTACT US broasted chicken, fish, explore the environment of shrimp and sandwiches, the dinosaur and understand all made-to-order. about possible causes for • SEAFOOD DINNER: their extinction. Learn about Call Melody The Pleasant Hill VFW fossils and take home a cast Vallieu at Post No. 6557, 7578 W. of Ohio’s state fossil. 440-5265 to Fenner Road, Ludlow • FRIENDS MEETING: Falls, will offer a threeThe New Friends of the list your free piece fried fish dinner, 21Milton-Union Public Library calendar piece fried shrimp or a will meet at 6:30 p.m. items.You fish/shrimp combo with • SS SIMPLIFIED: As french fries and coleslaw you near retirement, one of can send for $6 from 6-7:30 p.m. the biggest financial deciyour news by e-mail to Frog legs, when available, sions you’ll need to make is mvallieu@civitasmedia.com. when to begin receiving will be $10. • SPAGHETTI SUPyour Social Security retirePER: The American ment benefits. Join Susan Legion Post No. 586, Tipp Swinehart from SagePoint City, will offer spaghetti, salad, garlic Financial at 6:30 p.m. at the Troy-Miami bread and dessert for $7 from 6-7:30 p.m. County Public Library to learn more about how your age and other factors can affect your retirement benefits. For more inforSATURDAY mation, call 339-0502 or visit www.tmcpl.org. • CREATURE FEATURE: Brukner • DISCOVERY WALK: A morning disNature Center will present “Big Brown covery walk for adults will be from 8-9:30 Bat” from 2-3 p.m. Join staff and voluna.m. at Aullwood Audubon Center, 1000 teers as they discuss the importance of Aullwood Road, Dayton. Tom Hissong, bats to humans and how recent populaeducation coordinator, will lead walkers as tion declines indicate they need us as they experience the wonderful seasonal much as we need them. Free with admischanges taking place. Bring binoculars. sion to the center. • STRAWBERRY BREAKFAST: Come to breakfast before the Strawberry Festival parade at First United Church of Christ, corner of South Market and Canal streets, Troy, from 7:30-9 a.m. The breakfast includes french toast, sausage, hash brown casserole, fresh fruit, cereal for children and beverages; coffee, tea, milk and orange juice. Donations will be accepted. Use the Canal Street entrance where the church is handicapped accessible. • FAMILY FUN: Diggin’ Family Fun at the Milton-Union Public Library will be offered from 2-3 p.m. Begin the children’s summer reading program with family fun and adventure. Number bingo game will be held in the multi-purpose room. Refreshments will be provided. • KARAOKE: The American Legion Post No. 586, Tipp City, will host karaoke from 7 p.m. to close.

SUNDAY • BREAKFAST SET: The American Legion Post No. 586, Legion Riders, Tipp City, will offer an all-you-can-eat breakfast from 8-11 a.m. for $6. Items available will be eggs, bacon, sausage, sausage gravy, hash browns, toast, waffles, pancakes, fruit, French toast, biscuits, cinnamon rolls and juices. • WAGON RIDES: Aullwood will offer draft horse wagon rides from 1-2:30 p.m. at 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. Following admission to the farm, rides are $1 per person. Each ride lasts about 30 minutes. • DISCOVERY WALK: A family discovery walk will begin at 2:30 p.m. at Aullwood Audubon Center, 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. An Aullwood naturalist teacher will lead this leisurely walk along Aullwood’s trails to discover the natural delights of summer.

MONDAY • CRAFTY LISTENERS: The Crafty Listeners will meet from 1-2:30 p.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library. Participants listen to an audio book and work on various craft projects. • STORY CORNER: Stories will be read to children from 6:30-7 p.m. in the children’s area of the Milton-Union Public Library. • FINE READING: Children can come to the Milton-Union Public Library and receive $3 off their fines for every half hour of reading.

TUESDAY • LITERACY MEETING: The Troy Literacy Council, an all-volunteer organization, will meet at 7 p.m. at the Hayner Cultural Center in Troy. Adults seeking help with basic literacy or wish to learn English as a second language, and those interested in becoming tutors, are asked to contact the message center at (937) 660-3170 for more information. • TINY TOTS: The Tiny Tots program will be from 1-1:30 p.m. at the MiltonUnion Public Library. The interactive program is for children birth to 3 years old and their parents and caregivers.

WEDNESDAY • PERI MEETING: The Miami County Chapter of the Ohio Public Employee Retirees will meet at 11:30 a.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 248 Wood St., Piqua. Lunch is $10, payable at the door. Call Beth at 335-2771. Speaker will be state representative Richard Adams. The meeting is open to any current or retired Ohio public employee. • STORY HOUR: The Milton-Union Public Library will have a summer story hour at 10:30 a.m. for children kindergarten through second grade and 1:30 p.m. for children third through sixth grade. Programs include puppet shows, stories and crafts. Contact the library at (937) 698-5515 for weekly themes.

JUNE 7-8 • GARDEN SHOW: The 15th annual spring Lost Creek Garden & Antique Show is from 6-8:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1058 Knoop Road, Troy. The event will include purveyors of flowers, native Ohio plants, vintage garden accessories, art, antiques, artisans, landscapers, great food and more. Non-profits participating again this year will include Hospice of Miami County “For All Season Gift Shop” and West Central Ohio Bee Keepers Association. Admission is $5. For more information, call (937) 3351904.

JUNE 7 • FRIDAY DINNERS: Dinner will be offered from 5-8 p.m. at the Covington VFW Post 4235, 173 N. High St., Covington. Choices will include a $12 New York strip steak, broasted chicken, fish, shrimp and sandwiches, all made-to-order. • CHICKEN FRY: The Pleasant Hill VFW Post No. 6557, 7578 W. Fenner Road, Ludlow Falls, will offer a three-piece chicken dinner with french fries and macaroni salad for $7 from 6-8 p.m. Chicken livers also will be available. • PREHISTORIC OHIO: Join anthropologist Andrew Sawyer from the Sunwatch Indian Village at 2 p.m. at the Troy-Miami County Public Library to uncover Ohio’s archaeological history. Learn about the remains and artifacts of Ohio’s first native inhabitants from the end of the last ice age 12,000 years ago to the introduction of the first European explorers that arrived in the late 1600s. For more information, call 339-0502 or visit www.tmcpl.org.

HONOR ROLL

Miami East Junior High

Jacobs, Jarod Lay, Ivy LeMaster, David Maggert, Kathryn Martin, Riley CASSTOWN — Miami McDonald, Maddie Miller, Michael Miller, Samantha East Junior High has announced honor roll stu- Moore, Madi Osborne, dents for the fourth quar- Jacob Qvick, Cole Taylor, ter of the 202-2013 school Lacie Taylor, Ryan Teale, TJ Turner, Samantha year. Urban, Vincent Villella • Sixth grade and Connor Wilson. Principal’s list — Liza • Seventh grade Bair, Carmen Bolinger, Principal’s list— Devin Justin Brown, Marie Cook, Brower, Haley Demmitt, Jessica Copeland, Jessica Macy Fellers, Bronte Flora, Gillum, Kayleigh Gleason, Dylan Hahn, Aelainia Whitley Gross, Morgan Harmon, Stella Hazel, Haney, Caitlyn Harris, Kyndall Hellyer, Erica Parker Heim, Chloe Justice, Austin Kearns, Holicki, Marissa Kearns, Kaitlyn Mack, Christine Abigail Koontz, Maci Marlow, Kami Martin, Krites, Zach Kronenberger, Miranda Rike, Amber Grace McCalister, Ashlyn Robinson, Emily Rowley, Monnin, Braden Redick, John Savini, Cameron Jessica Richard, Kyah Schellhouse, Sydni Scott, Rowley, Marissa Allyson Staten, Emily Schellhouse, Maria Staton, Thimmes, Amanda Wesley Sutherly, Seth Titterington, Gavin Teeters, Emma Vallery, Trabert, Jackson Tucker, Mackenzie Varady, Laci Kaily Wintrow and Wells and Sarah Williams. Lindsey Yingst. Honor roll — Broc Honor roll — Hailey Augustus, Erik Baker, Kathleena Braun, Austerman, Greg Katie Christensen, Emily Austerman, Alivia Bevan, Christian, Leeann Cook, Kylie Blair, Alyssa Taylor Frawley, Jacob Bowman, Blaine Goins, Zachary Gordon, Brokschmidt, Jacob Samantha Hawkins, Logan Calvert, Keagan Carsey, Hayes, Luke Hickman, Sam Chappie, Lydia Racheal Hodge, Abby Conley, Ashley Covault, Horne, Haley Howard, Chelsea Cremeens, Anna Jacomet, Ally Brenden Dalton, Kyle Jordan, Kaytee Macy, Elifritz, Gregory Fisher, Destiny McCourt, Cecelia Samantha Flores, Cerstin Moore, Trevor Oakes, Gross, Gavin Horne, Logan Poston, Meredith William Hudson II, Karli Richters, Jack Runner,

Duncan Schmackers, Jacob Studebaker, Dalton Taynor, Hailey Weaver, Jeffrey Wittman, Bailey Wollertson, Sarah Wren and Emma Younce. • Eighth grade Principal’s list — Maggie Bergman, Abigail Bick, Maria Blocher, Katie Bodenmiller, Mckenna Bollinger, Hannah Carpenter, Brittney Cook, Jordan Crawford, Justin DeWeese, Marie Ewing, Alyssa Francis, Jennica Funderburg, Cari Gump, Emily Hawkins, Alex Heim, Weston Hodge, Sage Hunley, Megan Lawson, Emma Linn, Shelly Lisle, Taylor McCuistion, Max McDonald, Luke Mengos, Danielle Nehring, Keiko Ochoa, Bryce Redick, Lorenza Savini, Kassidee Smith, Katie Smith, Brynne Snodgrass, Jillian Wesco, Logan West, Alyssa Westgerdes, Kari Willenbrink, Kory Yantis and Madison Younce. Honor roll — Alexis Adkins, Nash Augustus, Abigail Bollinger, Dakota Brown, Mackenzie Comer, Gunnar Gearhart, Walker Henley, Abigail Jenkins, Jordan Johnson, Arika McCuistion, Sidney Pelfrey, Amanda Pottorf, Marc Randall, Morgan Rose, Zach Schellhouse, Omar Seleme, Ethan Slack, Liza Starett, Devyn Tennant, Madison Urban and Kyle Webb.

COLLEGE BRIEF

Jack M. DeFord

in mechanical engineering. DeFord made the DAYTON — Jack M. spring 2013 dean’s list and DeFord recently graduated ran for four years on the from Wright State college’s cross-country University with a degree team.

He now is employed at Emerson Climate Technologies, Sidney, as a project engineer. He is the son of Jon and Holly DeFord.

JUNE 8 • FUNDRAISER FOR ANIMALS: The Miami County Humane Society and Troy Rec Center will have a joint fundraiser from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Troy Rec Center in downtown Troy. The event will include the Troy Animal Hospital, D.A.R.E., children’s games for prizes, 50/50 and basket and item raffles, cake walk, face painting, food items and more. Mugs T-shirts, sweatshirts and Animal Friends cards will be for sale. Pop Rocks also will offer a jump rope clinic for a $10 donation, and participants must bring their own rope. Call the Troy Rec at 3391923 to preregister for the clinic. Participants are asked to bring cat or dog food, treats or litter to donate. • FISH FRY: The Pleasant Hill VFW Post No. 6557, 7578 W. Fenner Road, Ludlow Falls, will offer an all-you-can-eat fish fry and smelt dinner with french fries, baked beans and applesauce for $8 from 5-7 p.m. • MOORE REUNION: The Moore family reunion, family of Estille Lucy Moore, will be from 1-4 p.m. at Troy Community Park, Shelter No. 7. Family are asked to bring a covered dish and the meal will be eaten at 2 p.m. • DISCOVERY DAY: Join Brukner staff on the second Saturday of every month this summer from 2-4 p.m. for hands-on fun for all ages, including adults. Staff will bring nets out for catching dragonflies, going to the creek and searching for crayfish and learning to use binoculars as participants search for backyard birds. Each program will include something cool you can take home to remember all you’ve learned. Visit www.bruknernaturecenter.com for more information. Registration is preferred, but not required and is free for BNC members, non-member admission fee is $2.50 per person or $10 per family. • CREATE A PLANTER: A “Create Your Own Concrete Planter” craft program for adults will begin at 11 a.m. at the Milton-Union Public Library. Registration is required. Join staff as they get their hands dirty and make planters and stepping stones out of concrete. A rain date is planned if canceled.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 starting at 11:30 a.m.

40138940

TODAY

991 E Ash St., Piqua, OH 45356


OPINION

Contact us David Fong is the executive editor of the Troy Daily News. You can reach him at 440-5228 or send him e-mail at dfong@civitasmedia.com.

XXXday, 2010 Friday, May 31,XX, 2013 •4

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

ONLINE POLL

AS I SEE IT

Concert will be a good thing for Troy

(WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM)

Question: Do you plan on attending this year’s Troy Strawberry Festival?

\Watch for final poll results in Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

Watch for a new poll question in Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

PERSPECTIVE

KEVIN J. ELLIOTT Columbus I found out early the morning of Feb. 4 that Mumford & Sons had chosen my hometown of Troy as one of the stops on their “Gentleman of the Road Tour.” I was privy to this information because these days I write quite a bit about music and the band's enthusiastic publicist was blowing up my email with the information before it leaked to the world the next day. Don't worry, I’m not bragging. My job as a freelance journalist in Columbus, where I’ve settled since college, is not all that glamorous and it rarely pays any bills (save a couple of drinks and cheeseburgers on the weekend). But I do think it gives me some insight on just how intriguing this is for Troy. Yeah, I don't live in Troy anymore. But I visit at least once a month and I would say without a second thought that my soul’s anchor is still lodged at the corner of Peters Avenue and Archer Road — or on South Walnut Street or Ridge Avenue. I got excited when the Adams Street bridge re-opened, made my dad take me to see the shiny new gym at the high school over Christmas and still am in disbelief we are now home to a Marion's Piazza (though I'd still take an Ording's deluxe any day of the week). I pine to one day work alongAs I side the teacher who inspired me to be a See It teacher in the halls of THS, to take my future ■ The Troy son/daughter to his/her first baseball game out Daily News at the complex, to someday write a column welcomes about off-the-beaten-path diners for the TDN columns from — so there's definitely civic pride coursing our readers. To through my veins, especially knowing one of submit an “As I the biggest bands in the world was combing See It” send over pictures of myriad American small towns, your type-writlooking for the perfect spot to pitch their tent of ten column to: bohemia. ■ “As I See It” They obviously perked up at the prospect of c/o Troy Daily our square and its simple two-block route leadNews, 224 S. ing to our picturesque levee, perfectly adjacent Market St., to a stadium that could contain, what will no Troy, OH 45373 doubt be throngs of kids from across the coun■ You can also e-mail us at try (scratch that, the world). editorial@tdnpu This is huge. The size of Troy is likely to blishing.com. triple for one weekend in August. I'll have to be ■ Please completely honest though, and it may come include your full across as curmudgeon, but I have no attraction name and teleto Mumford & Sons and can't for the life of me phone number. understand the universal fascination with their brand of weepy, faux-American mumble-folk. I loathe their Dust Bowl aesthetics and can't find a worthwhile melody in any of their "hits." How this softie, milquetoast ilk connected with our youth is beyond me. A night with Styx at the Strawberry Festival bodes better ... but I digress, and admit that this move on Mumford & Sons behalf is honorable. They aren't playing up a hokum — they're British, have won Grammys and date models and film stars. This is sincere. It's the only instance I can remember when any sort of youthdriven counterculture descending upon our city — that is unless you count my scant memory of bikers and punks occupying the Square after the cops shot that teen back in the ‘80s, or what may or may not have occurred when Elvis played Hobart Arena. There are no such things as hippies now, or at least ones who travel as unwashed masses to follow their favorite jam band. If those people still exist, they likely aren't fans of Mumford and Sons and they won't be camping out in our city park or Riverside Cemetery. I imagine the average Mumford fan is well-educated, clean and proper — and won't give the cops too much of a hard time. They're not looking for a revolution, so no riot gear needed. There will be a longer line at the olive oil shop than at our multitude of drive-thrus. Yes, there will be drinking in public and (gasp) a fog of marijuana smoke obscuring views of the courthouse, but for at least a weekend, you'll need to let it ride (I'm looking at you, Troy Police Department). Remember, you once were young. What will occur over the weekend of Aug. 30 is good for Troy, it's good for Mumford & Sons and it's good for K's Hamburger shop. It's the circle of life. Embrace it. Turn your Southwest Historical District Home into a make-shift bed and breakfast. Start an artisanal popsicle truck in Prouty Plaza. Do something. Just don't discourage. I can't think of a better opportunity for Troy to display its "civic pride, city-wide." And to those like Mr. James Marshall who believe this concert will "be the end of Troy as we know it," it is your intolerant minds that stifle progress in small towns like Troy. Don't blame it on the youth. I applaud the city council and community members who have made this a reality — and the city of Troy helps in making this weekend a success.

LETTERS

Letter should not have been printed

you? Your sensationalism and actions have tainted our city's reputation throughout the region by portraying Troy as To the Editor: some sort of intolerant city of As a downtown resident and zealots. Troy stakeholder, I am There is not a town in ashamed of the Troy Daily America that would have News for publishing a letter turned down this opportunity. equating a folk music festival I applaud the city of Troy, the with the Nazi invasion of Troy City School District, the France and the end of times County, the Miami (Concert Will Destroy Troy). Conservancy District and Troy Main Street for tirelessly What kind of publication are

devoting countless hours to bring this sought-after music festival to Troy. The "army of darkness" referenced in the letter should have been an indication of the author's instability. Does the TDN have no standards? Are you looking to lose all of your readers, advertisers and local support? You have lost mine.

WRITETO US: The Troy Daily News welcomes signed letters to the editor. Letters must contain your home address and a telephone number where you can be reached during the day. Letters must be shorter than 500 words as a courtesy to other writers. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. MAIL: 224 S. Market, Troy, Ohio, 45373; E-MAIL: editorial@tdnpublishing.com; FAX (937) 440-5286; ONLINE: www.troydailynews.com (“Letters To The Editor” link on left side).

DOONESBURY

Let’s show visitors our hospitality this summer I don’t know why Southerners were crowned kings of hospitality — us Midwesterners are pretty darn friendly, too, if you ask me. Last weekend I traveled with my good friend Swanky to the Windy City – good ol’ Chicago. I’ve been to California, New York City, Boston and a few other major U.S. cities, but there’s something so warm and welcoming about Chi-town. Chicago is just chill. Not snobby, arrogant or uppity – just chill. Anyway, Chicago is by far one of my favorite cities to visit because of the huge welcome mat on the Magnificent Mile and beyond. (This column is not being subsidized by the Chicago Travel and Tourism Board. All glowing remarks are the writer’s own.) Swanky had invited me to tag along with him to the big city for his cousin Amanda’s wedding and for his birthday. It was an adventure from the beginning seeing as the country boy doesn’t travel much beyond the truck pulling circuits. As a country bumpkin myself, I feel like I stand out when I rub elbows with sophisticated city folks. Heck, once we arrived at our

Melanie Yingst Troy Daily News Columnist hotel in downtown Chicago by Trump Towers, two women approached Swanky’s brother Dustin and I on the street begging for directions with their maps unfolded. Uh, awesome! Trust me, we were both excited to be mistaken for natives of Chicago. We quickly assured them that we were straight from the fields of Miami County, Ohio, and ushered them to the hotel’s valet, who helped them find their way. Before we headed out to take in a slice of Chicago-style pizza with the wedding party, we met Swanky’s family members in the lounge across from our hotel room. And folks, I have never met a group of nicer people.

— Richard Harris Troy

When you are immediately greeted by a bubbly blonde aunt with a big hug — aptly announcing she is one of those “huggers” — I couldn’t help but feel immediately at home amongst strangers. Truth be known, I’m a hugger, too. While I met countless cousins, friends and others, some who are local to Miami County and some were scattered about the country, I couldn’t help but think that the Midwest does hospitality best. While we may not hand you a glass of sweet tea, we’ll certainly grab you a Coke from the fridge and offer to chauffeur you to the buffet line to check out the excellent selection of hors d’oeuvres (Side note: fried macaroni and cheese should be illegal, it’s so good.) This weekend, our city plays host to our annual Strawberry Festival. It’s our town’s unofficial homecoming as family and friends come back for the doughnuts, the parade and to see how the festival’s traditions have changed over the years. The city of Troy will play host for many large gatherings this

summer. The Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure will soon be here in a matter of weeks and of course, the Gentlemen of the Road Tour will be here on Labor Day weekend. While this music festival and its thousands of out of town guests may not be as welcome to all Trojans, let’s face it: they are coming. It is happening whether we like it or not. Let’s practice our Trojan hospitality this weekend and keep it fresh in our minds throughout all of our summer events. If the thousands of visitors see how much we love and care about our city and how well the Midwest treats its guests, we can feel as we did — respected and appreciated — just like a warm hug from a bubbly aunt. Because when you are an out of town guest, in a strange place, among unfamiliar people, receiving a warm welcome is truly one of the best feelings one can experience. Cheers!

Troy Troy Daily News

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Troy, Ohio 45373 www.TDN-NET.com 335-5634


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LOCAL & WORLD

Friday, May 31, 2013

5

OBITUARIES

ELEANOR JEAN WILHELM BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Eleanor Jean Wilhelm of Bloomington, Ind., a resident of Golden Living Center, passed away peacefully on Monday, May 27, 2013, at the Bloomington Hospice House at the age of 87. Eleanor was born in Casstown, Ohio, on April 6, 1926, into the home of Harry C. and Ellen La Tourrette. She graduated from Lost Creek Township School and Wooster College. Upon graduation, she moved to Bloomington to study sciences at Indiana University. She worked as a lab assistant in the Bacteriology Department for Dr. Mc Clung. She was employed by MCCSC as both a substitute teacher and a Title I AP reading assistant at Clear Indian film director Gautam Ghosh speaks as he arrives to pay homage to late director Rituparno Ghosh in Creek and Broadview Kolkata, India, Thursday. Ghosh, whose work includes award-winning films in the Bengali language, died Elementary schools. Eleanor and her husband Thursday of cardiac arrest at age 49, news reports said. also delivered newspapers for the Herald Times in Bloomington. She was a member of Business and Professional Women’s Club and a member of United Methodist

Acclaimed Indian film director Rituparno Ghosh dies at age 49 ern city of Kolkata. Ghosh directed about 20 feature films overall, earning critical acclaim at international film festivals including in Locarno, Switzerland, and in London. His 2007 creation, “The Last Lear,” was in English and centered on a retired actor who is persuaded to return to cinema to reprise the lead role in a production of Shakespeare’s “King Lear.” Bollywood superstar Amitabh Bachchan starred in the film that premiered at the Toronto Film Festival.

Bachchan tweeted remembrances of Ghosh early Friday, calling him a “brilliant director” and a “sensitive artistic mind.” Shekhar Kapur, director of the 1998 Academy Award-winning period film “Elizabeth,” tweeted that he was “shocked by the passing of Rituparno Ghosh.” He described Ghosh as a “hugely creative explorer on film.” Indian character actress Kiran Kher said Ghosh was a marvelous director and that his death was a “huge loss for Indian cinema.”

Outspoken Rev. Greeley dies CHICAGO (AP) — The Rev. Andrew Greeley was, it seems, always writing. At home on a typewriter, later on a computer, then on a plane with a laptop and even in his car dictating into a tape recorder as he drove. By the time he finished, the outspoken Roman Catholic priest and Chicago newspaper columnist had written more than 100 non-fiction books and some 50 novels, many international mystery thrillers that routinely climbed onto best-seller lists. They were translated into a dozen languages. And he also often spoke out about various religious topics, even criticizing the hierarchy of his own church over the child sex abuse scandal. “His mind was never idle,” said Tom Smith, Greeley’s longtime colleague at the University of Chicago, where Greeley spent years as a sociology researcher. “He was the kind of person who could be writing a column and get an idea for a novel, have a conversation he would use in a novel, use his novels to inspire his academic work and his academic work to inspire his novels,” Smith said Thursday, shortly after learning about his friend’s death. On Wednesday night, nearly five years after he suffered a brain injury during a fall that put him in a coma for weeks, Greeley died in his home in downtown Chicago. He was 85. “He served the church all those years with a prophetic voice and with unfailing dedication,” his niece, Elizabeth Durkin, said in a statement. She also praised Greeley as a loving uncle who “tremendously

AP

The undated photo provided by the University of Chicago shows Andrew Greeley. Greeley, an outspoken Roman Catholic priest, best-selling author and longtime Chicago newspaper columnist who even criticized the hierarchy of his own church over the child sex abuse scandal, died Wednesday at his home in Chicago. He was 85. enriched” his family’s lives. Greeley, who was ordained in 1954, wrote a weekly column that appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times and other newspapers on the relationship between religion and politics. An internationally recognized scholar, he also was a contributor to the New York Times, National Catholic Reporter and other publications. His final book, “Chicago Catholics and the Struggles Within Their Church,” was published in 2010, exploring a topic that he had written about for years, sometimes giving him a reputation for generating controversy in the church. “Sometimes I think that we as priests and bishops have done every-

thing we possibly could to drive away the laity during the last 20 years,” Greeley wrote in his book “Catholic Contributions: Sociology and Policy,” published in 1987. Greeley also had said that neither the church nor the government was willing to do much about priests who sexually abused children, telling a lay Catholic group in 1992: “The sexually maladjusted priest has been able to abuse the children of the laity and thus far be reasonably secure from punishment.” And during a news conference in 1987, Greeley said that if he were heading a church fundraising campaign, he would admit to church members that “we’ve really goofed. People are resentful over

what they take to be the insensitivity of church leaders particularly on matters relating to sex.” Greeley was born in the Chicago suburb of Oak Park in 1928, and he spent much of his life close to home. He worked as a sociology professor at the University of Arizona and a researcher at the University of Chicago’s NORC, formerly known as the National Opinion Research Center. He earned post-graduate degrees from the University of Chicago in the 1960s. The priest became often quoted and interviewed in the media. In a biography published on his website, Greeley described himself as having “unflinchingly urged his beloved church to become more responsive to evolving concerns of Catholics everywhere.” The same biography noted he was a Chicago sports fan and cheered for the Bulls, Bears and the Cubs, “while praying for them to improve.” Former President Bill Clinton listed Greeley among those who had stayed the night at the White House. Clinton’s deputy White House press secretary said Greeley’s novel “Irish Lace” was one of the books the then-president had on a vacation reading list in July 1997. In 1986, Greeley offered the Archdiocese of Chicago $1 million to create a foundation to help inner-city Catholic students. The archdiocese refused the money but wouldn’t say why. So, Greeley set up his own Catholic Inner-City School Fund to distribute money to the 80 Catholic schools in the city with student enrollments that are more than 50 percent black or Hispanic.

PAUL DAVID WOGAMAN HOUSTON — Paul David then for the Shelby County Garage until he retired at Wogaman, 92, of 3619 60 years old. After retireState Route 66, Houston, ment he helped out at passed away at noon Wednesday, May 29, 2013, Houston Elevator and Michael’s Mowers. at the Kindred Center at Paul was proud that he St. Rita’s Hospital in Lima, helped start the surrounded by volunteer fire his family. and rescue He was born departments in Aug. 8, 1920, in Houston. Darke County, He was a Ohio, the son of member of the the late David Houston and Elizabeth Community (Didier) Center and a Wogaman. member of the On April 10, Oran Christian 1943, he was WOGAMAN Church. married to He also was a Glenna Russell, his member of the wife of 70 years, American Legion who survives along and VFW in Fort with their three chilLoramie, Ohio. dren, Larry Paul enjoyed Wogaman and wife playing cards, camping Terri of Houston, Ohio, Donna Jean Weaver of St. and boating with friends Marys, Ohio, and Darlene and family. He loved his old wheel horse tractor. Mummey and husband He also loved to square Dave of Houston, Ohio; dance and go to flea marseven grandchildren; 11 kets where he would sell great-grandchildren; and his wood crafts. six great-great-grandchilPaul will be greatly dren. missed by his family and Paul was preceded in friends. death by one brother, Funeral services will be Robert Wogaman; and at 10 a.m. Monday, June 3, son-in-law, Doug Weaver. 2013, at Cromes Funeral Mr. Wogaman was a World War II veteran of the Home, 302 S. Main Ave., United States Army, where with the Rev. Dale Ritts officiating. Burial with full he served in the 99th military honors will be at Division — 371st Field Houston Cemetery in Artillery. Houston, Ohio. The family Paul was stationed in Germany in the area of the will receive friends from 14 p.m. Sunday. Rhine River and in Memorial contributions Belgium. He was a heavy machine gun operator and may be made to either Houston Fire Department in the course of his three years he was also posted or Oran Christian Church in memory of Paul David in several parts of the U.S., including Mississippi, Wogaman. Envelopes will be availTexas and Oklahoma. able at the funeral home. After the war Paul Guestbook condolences worked full-time on a farm. In 1954, he took on a job and expressions of sympathy may be made to the as custodian at the Houston School until 1966. Wogaman family at the funeral home’s website, He worked at LeRoi Dresser for two years, and www.cromesfh.com.

FUNERAL DIRECTORY • Frank “Richard” Benham TIPP CITY — Frank “Richard” Benham, 65, of Tipp City, Ohio, passed

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Former Giants player, coach Bill Austin dies EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — Bill Austin, a Pro Bowl lineman for the New York Giants and a member of their 1956 NFL championship team, has died at his home in Las Vegas. He was 84. Austin’s playing and coaching career included stints with eight teams and spanned almost four decades. A 13th-round draft choice for the Giants in 1949 out of Oregon State, Austin played for the team from 1949-

50 and from 1953-57. He played in 75 games in his seven seasons and was a Pro Bowl guard in 1954. In 1958, he started his coaching career at Wichita State. The following year, he became the Green Bay Packers’ offensive line coach under Vince Lombardi. He held that position for six years before becoming the Los Angeles Rams’ line coach in 1966. Austin was the head coach in Pittsburgh from 1966-68. The Steelers

were 11-28-3 during his tenure and he was replaced in 1969 by Chuck Noll, a Hall of Fame coach who held the job for 23 years and won four Super Bowls. In 1969, Austin joined Lombardi’s Washington Redskins as the offensive line coach. When Lombardi was diagnosed with cancer and had to relinquish his duties, Austin was promoted to head coach. The Redskins were 6-8 in 1970 and Austin was let go following the season.

away Wednesday evening, May 29, 2013, at Upper Valley Medical Center, Troy. Services are pending at Baird Funeral Home, Troy. 40037919

NEW DELHI (AP) — Rituparno Ghosh, who directed award-winning films mostly dealing with the dilemmas of India’s urban middle class, has died of cardiac arrest at age 49. Ghosh shot to fame with his first film, “Hirer Angti” or “The Diamond Ring,” in 1994. Then followed a string of Bengali-language movies that earned him 12 national film awards, including for best director. Press Trust of India quoted his family as saying Ghosh died Thursday at his home in the east-

Women. She was a member of Bloomington-First United Methodist Church. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Harold O. Wilhelm; and sister, Margaret E. Wilhelm. Eleanor is survived by her three children, Christine and son-in-law Larry Robinson, Catherine Al Hamad and Ronald Wilhelm; and two grandchildren, Charles Swinehart and Karima Al Hamad. Funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Friday, May 31, 2013, at Casstown United Methodist Church in Casstown. Burial will be at Miami Memorial Park in Covington, Ohio. Chandler Funeral Home in Ellettsville is assisting with the arrangements. Visit www.chandlerfh.com to view Eleanor’s tribute page and share condolences, memories, photos and more with the family. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to either Hospice House or to First United Methodist Church.

40037974

FISHER - CHENEY Funeral Home & Cremation Services S. Howard Cheney, Owner-Director • Pre-arranged funeral plans available

1124 W. Main St • Call 335-6161 • Troy, Ohio www.fisher-cheneyfuneralhome.com


Arts

CONTACT US

AND ENTERTAINMENT

■ Send your news to Natalie Knoth, (937) 440-5243, or e-mail nknoth@civitasmedia.com.

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

‘The East’ is satisfying eco-terrorism film LOS ANGELES (AP) — A social-conscience espionage film that has actually thought about its “ecoterrorism” themes beyond figuring out how to mine them for suspense, “The East” sends a straightlaced overachiever undercover with a violent ecovigilante group. Zal Batmanglij and cowriter/star Brit Marling deliver a consistently tense, morally alert story that has plenty of boxoffice appeal. Marling plays Sarah, a former FBI agent now seeking her fortune in the private sector. Her first assignment for Hiller/Brood, a secretive company providing undercover risk assessments for multinational corporations, requires her to infiltrate a new anarchist group, The East, which has targeted polluters in a series of let-the-punishment-fit-the-crime “jams.” Telling her patient boyfriend (Jason Ritter) she’s off to Dubai for business, Sarah actually hits the streets not far from her Washington, D.C. home getting grubby with freegans and hobos while watching for someone whose political rants sound likely to produce action. After an enjoyable bit of improvised role-playing, she winds up at the burned-up mansion The East calls home. The group looks a bit

AP PHOTO

This film publicity image released by Fox Searchlight Pictures shows Brit Marling, right, and Alexander Skarsgard in a scene from “The East.” like a cult, especially given the shaggy, Jesus-like appearance of head strategist Benji (Alexander Skarsgard), but is more of a democracy than it seems. Members like Doc (Toby Kebbell) and Izzy (Ellen Page) offer villains from their own pasts a reckless drug manufacturer, say, whose wares injured loved ones and together they decide how to get close enough to do that company well-publicized harm. The tidy paybacks will appeal to many viewers: Who hasn’t thought execs who knowingly pollute waterways should have to bathe in their own slurry?

But putting a secret agent in the middle of their execution allows us to live the fantasy and question its justice simultaneously. Sarah will inevitably be changed by this group. But will it be in the expected, manageable way as her shark-like boss (Patricia Clarkson) warns, some sympathy is inevitable when you devote every waking moment to earning someone’s trust or will she go rogue? The actors bringing this band of anarchists to life project enough wounded, uncertain self-righteousness to distance them from the generic zealots

more often seen in this kind of tale, and Marling, working behind a couple of layers of role-playing, keeps audiences guessing about what Sarah actually believes. Batmanglij balances emotional tension with practical danger nicely, a must in a story whose activist protagonists can make no distinction between the personal and the political. “The East,” a Fox Searchlight release, is rated PG-13 for thematic elements, violence, some disturbing images, sexual content and partial nudity. Running time: 116 minutes.

ARTS BRIEFS

Ragtime, patriotic music slated TIPP CITY — The Tipp Roller Mill Theater presents the Ragtime River Boat Rats at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 8. The band will perform a program reminiscent of the showboat era with good old ragtime music, some Jolson, Americana and a strong flavor of patriotism. The Ragtime River Boat Rats have been performing since the early 1980s and feature fourstring banjos. The theater is located at 225 East Main Street in Tipp City. Admission is $8 for adults and $4 for students K-12. For more information call (937) 6673696.

Great Flood exhibit opens

40052992

TROY — The Hayner Center will host the exhibit “The Great Flood 1913Troy” today and a reception for the public from 67:30 p.m. June 7. This exhibit is in partnership with the Troy Historical Society. It has been a hundred years since the Great Flood devastated the Miami Valley. The story of how Troy was affected by the flood will be told through vintage and contemporary photographs, timelines, maps, oral histories and quotes. The photographs are from the Troy Historical Society’s collection. Judy Deeter, Rick Jackson and Jo Ann Gamblee provided the information for the timelines and Doug Christian researched map sites. The Troy Historical

SCHEDULE FRIDAY 5/31 ONLY

AFTER EARTH (PG-13) 11:45 2:20 4:55 7:30 10:25 NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13) 11:00 1:45 4:30 7:15 10:10 HANGOVER PART 3 (R) 11:20 1:50 4:20 7:00 10:00 FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG-13) 1:00 2:45 4:40 6:10 7:45 9:15 10:45 EPIC 2-D ONLY (PG) 11:05 4:15 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS 2-D ONLY (PG-13) 12:00 9:40

EPIC 3-D ONLY (PG) 1:40 6:50 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 3:15 6:25 THE GREAT GATSBY 2-D ONLY (PG-13) 11:30 THE GREAT GATSBY 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 9:25 IRON MAN 3 2-D ONLY (PG-13) 3:30 9:50 IRON MAN 3 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 12:15 6:35

Society’s book “Troy and maintaining their own The Great Flood” will be unique style. available for purchase. The exhibit will run through Art teacher to July 28.

instruct camps

Annual festival to bring bluegrass

TROY — Forest and Kyle elementary schools art teacher Gabbie Braun will be teaching art camps BRADFORD — The this summer for ages 5-9 Bluegrass Music Festival in Bradford is slated for 5- and 10-14 at the 11 p.m. June 28 at Iddings Mayflower Arts Center, 11 W. Main St. The camps are Park, sponsored by the imagination-driven with Bradford Public Library. fine arts exploration. This is the 12th year the For more information, library has sponsored this free event for the commu- visit mayflowerartscenter.com. nity. Bands playing this year include Rum River Blend, Big-band music Leisa Hinkle and Willowcoming to Tipp Creek, Berachah Valley, Rock Island Plow Co and TIPP CITY — The Tipp Nightflyer. There will be a Roller Mill Theater will raffle and food available to host Hal Harris’ Little Big purchase. Chairs and blan- Band at 7:30 p.m. kets may be brought into Saturday, June 1. the park. Though made up of only six members, the Little Big Band has the big-band sound that rivals larger groups. Since 1958, director TROY — The TroyHal Harris has been using Hayner Cultural Center the best available musiwill host the new Lucky cians in the Dayton and Lemonade Music series Tuesdays in July this sum- Springfield areas to entermer. Concerts will begin at tain at all types of engagements, from dance parties 7:30 p.m. with regional and receptions to industrimusicians playing a varial shows and any sort of ety of music from jazz to special events. folk. Acts include the Harris’ background breezy harmonies of Sweet includes playing with such Betsy July 9, the warm country sounds of Higgins orchestras as Ray McKinley, Tex Benke and Madewell July 16, the folksy sounds of Anna and Ralph Marterie, as well as Milovan and jazz guitarist the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra. Jimmy Felts. The theater is located at 225 E. Main St. in Tipp Original, hit City. Admission is $8 for music set adults and $4 for students K-12. For more informaTROY — Coming straight from Manhattan, tion or to make a reservathe Doyle Brothers will be tion, call (937) 667-3696. kicking around the stage Rock, blues, at the Downtown Troy Summer Music series at pop music set 7:30 p.m. June 28. Ryan and Todd Doyle bring their for concert beat-box style with a TIPP CITY — The hybrid of original music as Community Night well as some great recognizable traditions such as Summer Concert Series kicks off its 22nd season Run Around Sue and in downtown Tipp City on Earth Angel. The Doyle Friday, June 7. The conBrothers’ sound has been cert will be held on North compared to Jamie Second Street in the same Cullum, Michael Buble location as always (this and Bruno Mars while

New concert series to begin

area remains unaffected by the Main Street construction project). The evening of free music will begin at 6:15 p.m. with the McCrazies followed by the Termites at 7:30 p.m. The McCrazies started at Tippecanoe High School with a few teachers and students jamming for school events. The band has now grown and branched out to take their show to various venues in the Dayton area. The McCrazies mainly play covers that include rock, pop and blues. For 25 years the Termites have kept the classic rock music of the ’60s and ’70s beating strong. In 1988 two brothers from the Centerville/Kettering area got together to form the core of the band. The band blends male and female vocals to create an infectious sound from a 200plus repertoire of rock-nroll hits. Community Night is a hometown tradition and is held the first Friday of the month June through September. In case of bad weather, the concert will be cancelled. For more information call (937) 667-3696.

Participants sought for art show WEST MILTON — Hoffman United Methodist Church is looking for applicants to take part in the seventh annual art show to be hosted July 12-14 in the activity center at 201 S. Main St., West Milton. The deadline for entering is June 24. Application forms may be picked up at the church office and Really Cool Stuff in Milton; Art Vault Gallery in Troy; The Hotel Gallery and Studio 14 (Benkin’s Antiques) in Tipp City; and Cannery Art and Design in Dayton. Forms are also available for download from the church website at www.hoffmanumc.org to be mailed to the church office.

6 May 31, 2013

AP MOVIE REVIEWS • “Before Midnight” — The final scene of 2004’s “Before Sunset” was so romantic it drove moviegoers crazy happily crazy especially because it was so tantalizingly ambiguous. Jesse and Celine, that appealing (and extremely talkative) couple played by Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, who had fallen in love in the 1995 “Before Sunrise,” had reunited at last. In the gorgeous afternoon light of Paris, no less. But we didn’t know what would happen next. Nine years later, we have our answer, and it was sure worth the wait. “Before Midnight,” the third movie in the Richard Linklater series, is not only as good as the first two, it’s arguably better, tackling weightier, trickier issues with wit, humor and breathtaking directness. The setting is still gorgeous it’s a summer vacation in Greece. (Will these two ever venture to an ugly locale?) But the rest is different. Delpy gives Celine a new hardness here, an edge that we saw only a bit in the previous film. And Hawke is extremely effective as a man who adores his partner but is increasingly frustrated with her. It all comes to a head in a humdinger of a fight just Jesse and Celine in a hotel room, plus a bottle of wine that doesn’t get drunk. It gets poured, though, and you’ll be so frazzled, you’ll want to reach through the screen and chug it down yourself. Rated R for sexual content/nudity and language. 109 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four. • “Fast & Furious 6” — Clearly, nobody ever told the makers of the “Fast & Furious” franchise that less is more. More is ALWAYS more and so regular fans will be delighted with this latest installment, which again ups the ante with the cars, the crazy stunts, the crashes and the fights. Vin Diesel’s Dom, now wealthy and living the good life, is lured back into action by his erstwhile nemesis, the federal agent Hobbs (the absurdly buff Dwayne Johnson). It seems a villain named Shaw has amassed a huge military arsenal including a big tank and a cargo jet and is one component short of wreaking total havoc. Even more important for Dom, he has Letty working for him she’s Dom’s former paramour, and seems to be suffering from amnesia. A welcome indeed, crucial element of all this is the film’s sense of humor. Especially funny are Tyrese Gibson as Roman and Chris “Ludacris” Bridges as Tej, Dom’s partners in crime. Not everyone gets out alive. As for the lucrative franchise, though, it’s clearly alive and kicking; there’s even a post-credits teaser here for the seventh film. PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action and mayhem throughout, some sexuality and language. 130 minutes. Two stars out of four. • “The Hangover Part III” — “Daring” isn’t a word you would use very much to describe 2011’s “The Hangover Part II,” the disappointingly lazy, beat-for-beat rehash of the wild and wildly successful original “Hangover” from 2009. And yet, here we are with part three, which runs a different sort of risk by going to darker and more dangerous places than its predecessors. It dares to alienate the very audience that made “The Hangover” the highestgrossing R-rated comedy of all time because, well, it isn’t exactly a comedy. Sure, there are some outrageous lines and sight gags, mostly courtesy of Zach Galifianakis and Ken Jeong, who function as central figures this time when, previously, a little bit of them went a long way. But director and co-writer Todd Phillips signals early and often that he’s much more interested than ever before in exploring matters of real consequence rather than simply mining them for brash laughs. This time, Galifianakis’ insufferable, inappropriate man-child Alan has gone off his meds and is out of control. His family and friends including fellow “Wolfpack” members Phil (Bradley Cooper), Stu (Ed Helms) and Doug (Justin Bartha) stage an intervention and offer to drive him to a treatment center in Arizona. Clearly, this won’t be an innocuous trek through the desert. R for pervasive language including sexual references, some violence and drug content, and brief graphic nudity. 100 minutes. Three stars out of four. • “Star Trek Into Darkness” — Like fan-boy fiction on a $185 million budget, director J.J. Abrams’ film is reverential, faithful and steeped in “Trek” mythology. It’s also an excessively derivative what-if rehash of themes and interactions that came before, most of the characters lesser copies and even caricatures of the originals. The scenario’s been hijacked and rejiggered from better “Trek” plots of decades ago, the best verbal exchanges lifted nearly verbatim from past adventures. In short, the new chiefs of Starfleet aren’t coming up with much to call their own. But they pile on the spectacle in a way that’s never been seen before in “Star Trek”; the action in “Into Darkness” is top-notch, the visuals grand, though the movie’s needless conversion to 3-D muddies the images. Abrams was most definitely not a fan-boy for this franchise when he made 2009’s “Star Trek,” which reintroduced Kirk, Spock and the rest of the starship Enterprise gang with a time-travel twist that allowed the William Shatner-Leonard Nimoy original to coexist with an entirely different destiny for the new players. Abrams grew up a fan of “Star Wars,” the next space saga he’ll be reviving with the launch of a third trilogy. But his key collaborators, Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman and Damon Lindelof, are “Trek” fan-boys to their marrow. They know this world, they love this world, and like many fans, they have a particular fixation on 1982’s “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” the best that the franchise has ever had to offer, on the big-screen or TV. Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, John Cho and Zoe Saldana are among the returning ensemble cast. PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence. 132 minutes. Two stars out of four. • “Stories We Tell” — A documentary about Sarah Polley’s family: her father and mother, sister and brother, and the sister and brother she has from her mother’s first marriage. It’s about moments they’ve shared that are seemingly prosaic and universally relatable, as well as the betrayals and losses that shaped and strengthened them. But while it’s incredibly specific in its detail and makes you feel as if you’ve known these people forever after spending less than two hours with them, “Stories We Tell” is also about every family. It reveals that we’re all unreliable narrators of our own histories, especially after years and even decades have gone by. And it reminds us that the truth is a fleeting thing, constantly changing in the slightest of ways depending on who’s telling it. Polley, the Toronto-based actress-turnedfilmmaker, has shown astonishing emotional depth and technical maturity at a young age in just two previous features: “Away From Her” and “Take This Waltz.” Like those earlier films, “Stories We Tell” focuses on how a long-term relationship evolves over time. Now 34 and tackling a subject that’s so close to her heart, she reveals a whole new level of artistic mastery. Her meta-, multilayered exploration of her own past combines interviews, archival footage and meticulous reenactments so seamlessly, it’s hard to tell what’s real and what’s mythologized. And that’s the point. PG-13 for thematic elements involving sexuality, brief strong language and smoking. 108 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.


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This May 5 file photo shows Ohio State president E. Gordon Gee gesturing as he speaks during the Ohio State University spring commencement in Columbus. Gee told a university committee last December that Notre Dame wasn’t invited to join the Big Ten because they’re not good partners while also jokingly saying that “those (darn) Catholics” can’t be trusted. nation's pre-eminent Roman Catholic university. Ohio State, with about 56,000 students on its main campus, is among the country's biggest universities, and it has its own long football tradition. A message was left with Smith, the Ohio State athletic director who attended the December meeting and who also is a 1977 Notre Dame graduate. NCAA President Mark Emmert declined to comment, saying he hadn't heard the remarks. Ohio State's Athletic Council meets monthly during the fall, winter and spring and makes recommendations on athletic policy including ticket prices. December's meeting was at Ohio Stadium. Gee was introduced by Athletic Council then-chairman Charlie Wilson, and Gee's name and introduction are included in written minutes of the meeting. His comments drew laughter, at times loud, occasionally nervous, but no rebukes, according to the audio. Ohio State trustees learned of Gee's "offensive statements" in January, met with the president at length and created the remediation plan for Gee to "address his behavior," board president Robert Schottenstein said in a statement. Comments by a university leader about "particular groups, classes of people or individuals are wholly unacceptable," Schottenstein said. "These statements were inappropriate, were not presidential in nature and do not comport with the core values of the university." Gee has gotten in trouble before for offhand remarks, most recently during a memorabilia-for-cash and tattoos scandal under football coach Jim Tressel's watch. Gee was asked in March 2011 whether he had considered firing Tressel. He responded: "No, are you kidding? Let me just be very clear: I'm just hopeful the coach doesn't dismiss me." Tressel stepped down three months later. In November 2010, Gee boasted that Ohio State's football schedule didn't include teams on par with the "Little Sisters of the Poor." An apologetic Gee later sent a personal check to the real Little Sisters of the Poor in northwest Ohio and followed up with a visit to the nuns months later. Last year, Gee apologized for comparing the

Entered at the post office in Troy, Ohio 45373 as “Periodical,” postage paid at Troy, Ohio. The Troy Daily News is published Monday-Friday afternoons, and Saturday morning; and Sunday morning as the Miami Valley Sunday News, 224 S. Market St., Troy, OH. USPS 642-080. Postmaster, please send changes to: 224 S. Market St., Troy, OH 45373.

problem of coordinating the school's many divisions to the Polish army, a remark that a Polish-American group called bigoted and ignorant. In 1992, in a moment of frustration over higher-education funding, Gee told a student newspaper reporter, "the governor's a damn dummy." Then-Gov. George Voinovich laughed it off, and the two became allies. Gee was named the country's best college president in 2010 by Time magazine, and he has one of the highest-profile resumes of any college leader in recent history. He has held the top job at West Virginia University, the University of Colorado, Brown University and Vanderbilt University. He was Ohio State president from 1990 to 1997 and returned in 2007. Gee earns about $1.9 million annually in base pay, deferred and performance compensation and retirement benefits. He is a prolific fundraiser and is leading a $2.5 billion campaign at Ohio State. He is omnipresent on campus, attending everything from faculty awards events to dormitory pizza parties. He is known for his bow ties — he has hundreds — and his horn-rimmed glasses. During his comments to the Athletic Council, Gee also questioned the academic integrity of schools in the Southeastern Conference and the University of Louisville. The top goal of Big Ten presidents is to "make certain that we have institutions of like-minded academic integrity," Gee said. "So you won't see us adding Louisville," which is also joining the ACC. After a pause followed by laughter from the audience, Gee added that the Big Ten wouldn't add the University of Kentucky, either. Louisville spokesman Mark Hebert said the university accepted Gee's apology but planned to forward Gee information about the

upward trajectory of its academic and athletic programs. Kentucky president Eli Capilouto declined to comment. During the meeting, Gee also said he thought it was a mistake not to include Missouri and Kansas in earlier Big Ten expansion plans. Missouri has since joined the SEC. "You tell the SEC when they can learn to read and write, then they can figure out what we're doing," Gee said when asked by a questioner how to respond to SEC fans who say the Big Ten can't count because it now has 14 members. Gee noted he was chairman of the SEC during his time as Vanderbilt University chancellor. He also told the audience that speculation about the SEC "remains right here," according to the recording. Gee took a swipe at Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany, one of the most powerful leaders in college athletics, when he answered a question about preserving Ohio State's financial interests in light of Big Ten revenue-sharing plans. "No one admires Jim Delany more than I do. I chaired the committee that brought him here," Gee said. "Jim is very aggressive, and we need to make certain he keeps his hands out of our pockets while we support him." Gee's comments "were inappropriate and in no way represent the opinions of the conference," Delany said in a statement, adding he had apologized to Notre Dame and the SEC. SEC Commissioner Mike Slive said Gee called to apologize for the comments about a week ago, saying they might become public. Delany called after that, also to apologize. Both apologies were accepted, Slive said. "Our focus is on the SEC," he said Thursday. "Our goal is to make us better, and we've been very successful and we're comfortable here. There really isn't much more to add to that."

CINCINNATI (AP) — A new consultant’s report isn’t good news for the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden. The report handed to a county tax levy review committee on Wednesday says revenues aren’t keeping up with expenses. Although attendance is up, the report said the situation could result with the zoo going into the red as early as 2015. But zoo executive director Thane Maynard said the facility is thriving and disagreed with the assessment that the zoo could face budget woes. “We are thriving and have been six years well in the black,” Maynard said. “We certainly have a sustainable model, and frankly are a role model to other zoos of how to get it done.” The report said rising attendance led to about a $4 million increase in annual operating revenues between 2007 and 2011. But during the same period, annual operating expenses increased by $5.1

million, much of it due to increases in wages and benefits and the hiring of 14 more full-time employees. The zoo wants the renewal of its property tax levy to be put on the November ballot. The levy brought in about $6.5 million this year. The Cincinnati Enquirer says the 112-page report was developed for the Hamilton County Tax Levy Review Committee, which advises county commissioners on whether a levy should appear on the ballot, how much revenue it should generate and its duration. Zoo attendance has increased from 950,000 in 2007 to 1.4 million last year. The report said that if attendance drops to 1.2 million, the zoo would begin operating in the red by 2015. But even if it stays steady at 1.4 million, revenue is not expected to keep up with expenses. ___ Information from: The Cincinnati Enquirer, http://www.enquirer.com

Corpse flower creates fans for Ohio botanist COLUMBUS (AP) — Joan Leonard describes herself as a roadie, an anonymous technician who helps set up and tear down the stages for rock concerts. She is Ohio State University’s greenhouse coordinator and oversees and nurtures thousands of plants, many of which figure prominently in research projects and biology lectures. A day in Leonard’s life is filled with planting, repotting and routine checks on the health and growth of more than 740 tropical, temperate and desert plant species. It’s a role she has held and cherished for 26 years. “I’m the behind-thescenes person who makes it happen,” Leonard said. But the 49-year-old botanist is far from anonymous these days, thanks to a rare, endangered Sumatran flower that grows to ridiculous proportions and smells like rotting flesh. Her affinity for raising Titan arum has

made her a rock legend in botany circles, attracting thousands of fans online and in person, waiting to see the fruits of her labor. The plant, commonly called the corpse flower, can take as long as 10 years before it spreads its first titanic bloom, which lasts a few days. After it flowers, a plant can take as long as three years to build up the energy to bloom again. Some never bloom at all, instead simply making a leaf. Getting one plant to bloom is a big deal. Two is huge. But four in three years, and two within a week of each other? That’s incredible. The bloom of Maudine on Friday night will closely follow that of Woody, which bloomed on May 14 its second bloom in three years. Jesse bloomed last year. “She is wonderful. She has such a green thumb,” said Mo Fayyaz, a University of Wisconsin botanist and director of the school’s greenhouse.

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OSU’s Gee jabs at Catholics COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The president of Ohio State University said Notre Dame was never invited to join the Big Ten conference because the university's priests are not good partners, joking that "those damn Catholics" can't be trusted, according to a recording of a meeting he attended late last year. Gordon Gee also took shots at schools in the Southeastern Conference and the University of Louisville, according to the recording of the December meeting of the school's Athletic Council that The Associated Press obtained under a public records request. The university called the statements inappropriate and said Gee is undergoing a "remediation plan" because of the remarks. Gee was on a longplanned family vacation and unavailable for comment, Ohio State spokeswoman Gayle Saunders said. He apologized in a statement released to the AP. "The comments I made were just plain wrong, and in no way do they reflect what the university stands for," he said in the statement. "They were a poor attempt at humor and entirely inappropriate. There is no excuse for this and I am deeply sorry." Gee, who has taken heat before for uncouth remarks, told members of the council that he negotiated with Notre Dame officials during his first term at Ohio State, which began more than two decades ago. "The fathers are holy on Sunday, and they're holy hell on the rest of the week," Gee said to laughter at the Dec. 5 meeting by Athletic attended Director Gene Smith, several other athletic department members, professors and students. "You just can't trust those (darn) Catholics on a Thursday or a Friday, and so, literally, I can say that," said Gee, a Mormon. The Big Ten had for years courted Notre Dame, but the school resisted as it sought to retain its independent status in college football. In September, the school announced that it would join the Atlantic Coast Conference in all sports except football and hockey but would play five football games each year against ACC teams. In the recording, Gee referred specifically to dealing with the Rev. Ned Joyce, Notre Dame's longtime executive vice president, who died in 2004. "Father Joyce was one of those people who ran the university for many, many years," Gee said. Gee said the Atlantic Coast Conference added Notre Dame at a time when it was feeling vulnerable. "Notre Dame wanted to have its cake and eat it, too," Gee said, according to the recording and a copy of the meeting's minutes. Notre Dame spokesman Dennis Brown called the remarks regrettable, especially the reference to Joyce, "who served Notre Dame and collegiate athletics so well and for so long." Gee contacted Notre Dame's president, the Rev. John Jenkins, to offer an apology, which was accepted, Brown said Thursday in an email, declining to say when the apology was made. Notre Dame has a storied collegiate football history and is perhaps the

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TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Drone strike comes despite transparency pledge WASHINGTON (AP) — The drone attack that killed a Pakistan Taliban deputy leader this week was a clear signal that despite President Barack Obama’s promise last week of new transparency in the drone program, the CIA will still launch secret attacks on militants in north Pakistan and the administration will not have to tell anyone about it. The CIA drone took off from Afghanistan on Wednesday and struck a compound in Pakistan’s remote tribal areas where the agency believed Waliur Rehman was staying. The Pakistani Taliban later confirmed the death of Rehman, believed to be one of the key planners behind the deadly suicide bombing against a CIA base in 2009. But White House officials would not even confirm that the strike occurred, much less confirming Rehman’s death, although the president pledged in a national security speech only last week that he would be more transparent about U.S. counterterrorism actions. White House spokesman Josh Earnest on Thursday would only say broadly that Obama feels a responsibility to protect U.S. forces in the “Afghan war theater” it includes Pakistan and would use a “range of abilities” to provide those forces as much protection as possible. Obama announced new “presidential policy guidelines” last week on the standards his administration has been using when deciding to launch lethal strikes, including a guideline to strike a target only if it presents an “imminent threat” to U.S. national security and only

AP

In this July 28, 2011 file photo, Taliban No 2 commander Waliur Rehman talks to the Associated Press during an interview in Shawal area of South Waziristan along the Afghanistan border in Pakistan. Pakistani intelligence officials say a U.S. drone strike has killed the commander of the Pakistani Taliban. sarily at odds with this week’s covert strike, according to Shamila Chaudhary, a former National Security Council staffer who worked on Pakistan. “He’s codifying it, trying to set down in legal language” the counterterrorism program built during Obama’s first term, said Chaudhary, now at the New America Foundation. “But Pakistan is still an exception,” she said. The fact that the American drone took out one of Pakistan’s enemies also probably helped mute Islamabad’s reaction, she added. U.S. officials briefed on the drone program say the administration’s intent in the speech was to take the heat off the controversial drone strikes by promising future action would be done by the military when

if the target cannot be captured. He also stated his preference for using the military, not the CIA, to carry out such strikes. But he also indicated that the CIA would continue to control and run its secret drone programs in places like Pakistan and Yemen. While the CIA has permission from the Yemeni government to take strikes, it operates without permission from the Pakistani government, and the newly elected administration of Nawaz Sharif has demanded an end to the program that has killed more than 3,000 people since 2004. The program has also eliminated dozens of key militants, including al-Qaida’s second-incommand, Abu Yahya al-Libi, last year. Obama’s speech promising more transparency is not neces-

possible. The suggestion was that military strikes are more subject to publicly accessible congressional oversight. In fact, Congress is briefed on drone strikes by both the military and CIA but in closed, classified hearings. But U.S. officials say they will continue to carry out drone strikes, launched from bases in neighboring Afghanistan or anywhere else al-Qaida and its affiliates operate and local governments can’t or won’t act. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to discuss the classified program publicly. Guidelines for lethal force issued by the White House after the speech would seem to fit the Rehman case, stating that lethal action would only be taken against “a target that poses a continuing, imminent threat to U.S. persons,” where there is “near certainty that non-combatants will not be injured or killed.” White House spokesman Jay Carney on Wednesday said Rehman was responsible for cross-border attacks in Afghanistan against NATO troops and as well as deadly attacks against Pakistani troops and civilians. Rehman was also thought to be a key player in the 2009 suicide attack on a U.S. base in Afghanistan that killed seven Americans working for the CIA. Pakistani officials said the other three killed in the drone strike also were militants. The White House guidelines also state that lethal strikes would only be taken after “an assessment that the relevant governmental authorities in the country where action is contem-

plated cannot or will not effectively address the threat to U.S. persons.” Sharif had indicated willingness to open peace talks with Rehman, which could have meant the man who helped carry out one of the deadliest attacks on the CIA would get away with it. The drone strike also highlights the closing window of opportunity for the CIA to target high-level Taliban and alQaida-related militants while the agency still has tens of thousands of U.S. and NATO troops to protect its dozen-plus major bases around neighboring Afghanistan. U.S. intelligence and military officers are also drawing down, and will be relying more on Afghan agencies and intelligence agents. That complicates the mission Obama says will not end with U.S. troop withdrawal: hunting the al-Qaida remnants responsible for the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, on New York and Washington, and keeping them from launching new attacks. “They’re still trying to come back,” said a senior coalition intelligence officer in an interview Wednesday from Afghanistan, describing the remote stronghold of al-Qaida in the Afghan provinces of Kunar and Nuristan, just across the Pakistan border. He said al-Qaida continues to support both Pakistan and Afghan branches of the Taliban with financial backing, and training in bomb-building and military tactics. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to be identified.

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ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Step back and let husband take care of his mother Dear Annie: I have been married to a wonderful man for 35 years and have terrific children and beautiful grandchildren. Our marriage has been great, except for my manipulative and emotionally blackmailing mother-in-law. Our only fights have stemmed from lies and made-up stories this woman tells. She has destroyed relationships with other family members and blames me for it even when we live miles away. I support my husband in any decision he makes regarding her, and I have never badmouthed her. She recently pulled the ultimate scheme. Knowing that I had never met my son's fiancee, my motherin-law took it upon herself to tell her the "truth" about me. After a three-hour visit with my soon-tobe daughter-in-law and her parents, the poor girl was in tears when our son came home from work. Our son said if he hadn't known the truth, he would have believed his grandmother. She was very convincing and even brought on fake tears. Our children are now so upset with their grandmother that they do not want her near their kids, planting lies in their minds. I have tried to be the better person over the years, welcoming my mother-in-law into our home, giving her birthday presents and even planning anniversary parties when none of her other children could or would. But I'm done. My husband has confronted his mother many times regarding her destructive behavior, but she says he doesn't see the "real" me. Now I worry that she is trying to come between my husband and his father, who is ill. My mother-in-law doesn't return our phone calls or tell us when Dad is in the hospital. We hear everything through a third party, sometimes days after it happens. How do I handle this? — Daughter-Out-Law Dear Daughter: Perhaps if your husband had set stricter boundaries with more dire consequences years ago, this situation would be better now, but there are no guarantees. Some people are beyond reasoning with. It's time to step back and let your husband handle his mother. As long as she believes she can control him, she will do so. Your husband should try to get his information about Dad through other sources and bypass Mom whenever possible. It's terribly sad, but you cannot force her to be a better person. (She sounds mentally ill.) Dear Annie: I am a skinny woman with large breasts. I know there is a crazy stereotype that women like me are wild party girls. I'm actually quite conservative. But other women seem to think it's OK to poke my breasts or lift them, probably to check whether they are real. Last week at a party, some insufferable girl I just met turned the entire conversation to my breasts. I walked away to cool off, but someone overheard me say that the girl was obnoxious. So "poking girl" started shouting at me, and you can guess how the rest of the night went. Annie, please tell your readers that just because a woman has large breasts doesn't mean she wants to be poked and prodded in public. Where have basic social graces gone? — Staying Classy Dear Classy: You hang around with some inappropriate, rather creepy women. Your body, all of it, belongs to you. If someone touches your breasts, gasp in horror and perhaps yell loudly for the police. What nerve. Dear Annie: Thank you for recommending the NAMI Family-toFamily class to "Parents at Wits' End." When I took that 12-week class, I learned so much about mental illness, as well as finding support and hope from other parents. I have no doubt my son is doing better because of it. — Grateful Mother Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

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9 PM

9:30

TROY TV-5 Saturday: 9 a.m.: Donkie Ollie 11:30 a.m.: Legislative Update 3:30 p.m.: Serve and Protect

MAY 31, 2013 10 PM

10:30

11 PM

11:30

12 AM

12:30

BROADCAST STATIONS 2 News News NBC News Inside Ed. Jeopardy! Dateline NBC Rock Center 2 News (:35) Tonight Show (:35) LateN (2) (WDTN) 2 News To Be Announced Miami Valley Events (5) (TROY) Miami Valley Events Calendar News News News Wheel ET Undercover Boss (R) Hawaii Five-0 (R) Blue Bloods (R) News (:35) David Letterman LateShow (7) (WHIO) News News News Jeopardy! Wheel Undercover Boss (R) Hawaii Five-0 (R) Blue Bloods (R) News News (:05) David Letterman (10) (WBNS) 10TV News HD at 5 Business As Time (R) W.Week NeedKnow Death in Paradise Dalziel and Pascoe (R) Moyers and Company Charlie Rose (16) (WPTD) Company Fetch! (R) PBS NewsHour T. Smiley As Time (R) PBS NewsHour O.House House (R) Antiques Roadshow (R) Independent Lens "Detropia" Cars (R) PBS NewsHour (16.2) (THINK) Charlie Rose (N) Around (R) (16.3) (LIFE) Steves' (R) Heartl. (R) A.Smith (R) Around (R) 2.Opinion RoughC (R) Steves' (R) Heartl. (R) J. Weir (R) Cooking (R) Cuisine (R) A.Smith (R) 2.Opinion RoughC (R) Taste LA World News ET Access H. Operation Smile You Do? (SP) (N) 20/20 News (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:35) News (21) (WPTA) 21 Alive News at 5 p.m. News You Do? (SP) (N) 20/20 ABCNews (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:35) News (22) (WKEF) Judge Judy Judge Judy ABC News World News Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Shark Tank (R) Queens (R) Mother (R) 2½Men (R) Mother (R) 2½Men (R) Nikita "Aftermath" Supernatural (R) News Rules (R) FamilyG (R) FamilyG (R) Dish Nation TMZ (26) (WBDT) Ray (R) News NBC News Wheel Jeopardy! Dateline NBC Rock Center News (:35) Tonight Show (:35) LateN (35) (WLIO) Inside Ed. ET BeScenes Hal Lindsey Harvest MannaFest Praise the Lord Faith Israel (43) (WKOI) Spring Praise-A-Thon John Hagee J. Meyer Griffith (R) PartFam Word Pictures Sport Rep. TBA Wretched J. Prince Gaither Homecoming (44) (WTLW) Little House Prairie (R) The 700 Club BBang (R) 45 News BBang (R) Simps. (R) Bones The Following Fox 45 :45 4th Qua. Office (R) (:35) Sein. The Steve Wilkos Show (45) (WRGT) Maury

Music From Another Room (‘98) Jennifer Tilly, Jude Law. Movie Monk (R) Monk (R) (45.2) (MNT) 4:

The Perez Family

Impromptu (‘90) Judy Davis. The Following Wfft News Locker TMZ Office (R) OMG! (R) Extra (R) (55) (WFFT) Mother (R) Mother (R) 2½Men (R) 2½Men (R) BBang (R) BBang (R) Bones CABLE STATIONS Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) Storage (R) (A&E) The First 48 (R)

Pride and Glory (‘08,Cri) Colin Farrell, Jon Voight, Edward Norton.

Con Air (‘97) John Cusack, Nicolas Cage. Breaking Bad (R) (AMC) (4:00)

High Crimes Tanked! (R) Ultimate Treehouses Tanked! (R) Treehouse Masters Treehouses (R) Treehouse Masters (ANPL) To Be Announced Basketball NCAA Mich./Wisc. (R) Basketball NCAA Indiana vs. Michigan (R) Basketball NCAA Indiana vs. Illinois (R) Basketball NCAA (R) (B10) (4:30) Basketball NCAA (R)

Doing Hard Time (‘04) Boris Kodjoe.

Civil Brand (‘02) Mos Def, Lisa Raye. Wendy Williams Show (BET) 4:

Beverly Hills C... 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live (N) The First 48 (R) The First 48 The First 48 (R) The First 48 (R) The First 48 (R) Hi-Tech "Killing Spree" The First 48 (R) (BIO) Notorious Beverly Hills (R) Beverly Hills (R) Real Housewives (R) To Be Announced To Be Announced (BRAVO) Beverly Hills (R) On the Hunt (R) Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops (CMT) 3:

Mrs. Doubtfire

Miss Congeniality (‘00) Michael Caine, Sandra Bullock. On the Hunt (R) Money Mad Money The Kudlow Report CNBC Special CNBC Special CNBC Special Mad Money CNBC Special (R) (CNBC) Options OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Live Anderson Cooper Anthony Bourdain Piers Morgan Live (CNN) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer J. Logan Lawrence (COM) (:25) Sunny :55 SouthPk (:25) Tosh.O (:55) Colbert Report (R) (:25) Daily (:55) Tosh.O (:25) Tosh.O :55 Schumer Work (R) Tosh.O (R) Comedy...Roast "Flavor Flav" (R) Politics & Public Policy Today Key Capitol (CSPAN) (1:00) Politics & Public Policy Today Sons of Guns (R) Guns "Cutbacks" (R) Sons of Guns (N) Sons of Guns (R) Wild West Alaska (R) Sons of Guns (R) Wild West Alaska (R) (DISC) Sons of Guns (R)

Air Bud 2: Golden Receiver Kevin Zegers. Family Game Night

Air Bud 2: Golden... (DISK) Superman Batman (R) Batman (R) Batman (R) Beast (R) Beast (N) Family Game Night (DIY) Bryan (R) Bryan (R) Bryan (R) Bryan (R) Bryan (R) Bryan (R) Holmes Inspection (R) Caves (R) Caves (R) XYardage XYardage Good... (R) Good... (R) Caves (R) Caves (R) (DSNY) A.N.T. (R) A.N.T. (R) GoodLk (R) Jessie (R) A.N.T. (R) A.N.T. (R) A.N.T. "trANTsferred" (N) Jessie (R) Gravity (R) Dog Blog GoodLk (R) A.N.T. (R) GoodLk (R) A.N.T. (R) Austin (R) Ninja ZekeLut. ZekeLut. ZekeLut. ZekeLut. ZekeLut. Slug (R) ZekeLut. Phineas (R) SuiteL. (R) FishH (R) FishH (R) (DSNYXD) LEGO: The Adventures of Clutch Powers (4:00)

Eat Pray Love (‘10) Julia Roberts. E! News Celebrity Feuds (R) Wanted (R) Married (R) Fashion Police Chelsea (R) E! News Chelsea (R) (E!) Interrupt SportsCenter NBA Countdown (L) Basketball NBA Playoffs (L) SportsCenter (ESPN) Horn (N) Horn (N) Interrupt Softball NCAA Division I Tournament (L) College (R) Softball NCAA Division I Tournament (L) Top Ten (R) Baseball Tonight (L) (ESPN2) NFL 32 (L) Friday Night Lights (R) Friday Night Lights (R) Kassim the Dream (R) (:45) Kassim the Dream (R) (ESPNC) Bask. Classics NBA ‘83 Playoffs Phi./L.A. L. (R) Boxing Classics (R) '70s (R) Home Videos (R) Home Videos (R) Fools (R) Daddy (R) America's Funniest Home Videos (R) The 700 Club Fresh P. (R) Fresh P. (R) (FAM) '70s (R) Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (FNC) The Five (FOOD) Food Network Star (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Giving You Business (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (N) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R) Access (R) Pre-game Baseball MLB Cincinnati Reds vs. Pittsburgh Pirates Site: PNC Park (L) Postgame Weekly (R) Poker WPT (R) Baseball MLB (R) (FOXSP) Car Warriors (R)

Menace II Society (‘93) Tyrin Turner. (FUSE) 4:30 No. 1s Top 100 Number Ones Top 100 Number Ones Trending Fuse News Essntial (R)

Menace II Society (‘93) Tyrin Turner. 2½Men (R) 2½Men (R)

Step Brothers (‘08) Will Ferrell.

Vampires Suck (‘10) Jenn Proske.

Vampires Suck (‘10) Jenn Proske. Justified (R) (FX) Golf Cent. Golf CHAMPS Principal Charity Classic Golf PGA The Memorial Tournament Round 2 Site: Muirfield Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio (R) (GOLF) (2:30) Golf PGA Feud (R) Feud (R) Feud (R) Minute to Win It (R) Baggage Baggage Baggage Baggage Minute to Win It (R) Feud (R) Feud (R) Baggage Baggage (GSN) Feud (R) Frasier (R) Frasier (R) Frasier (R) Frasier (R) G. Girls (R) G. Girls (R) (HALL) BradyB. (R) BradyB. (R)

A Smile as Big as the Moon John Corbett. Space Warriors (‘13) Dermot Mulroney. House (R) House (R) FleaFlip (R) FleaFlip (R) (HGTV) Buying and Selling (R) House (R) House (R) House (R) House (R) You Live in What? (R) FleaFlip (N) FleaFlip (R) HouseH (R) House Ancient Aliens (R) Ancient Aliens (R) American Pickers (R) American Pickers (R) American Pickers (R) American Pickers (R) American Pickers (R) (HIST) Ancient Aliens (R) Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders (LIFE) Hoarders Fatal Honeymoon (‘12) Billy Miller, Harvey Keitel. Bond of Silence (‘10) Greg Grunberg, Kim Raver. Fatal Honeymoon (LMN) (4:00) Shadow of Fear

Living With the Enemy Bianca Bellange. CookThin Mom Cook Intimate Portrait (R) VanishedHolloway (R) Coming Home (R) Intimate Portrait (R) VanishedHolloway (R) (LRW) ModRun. Road (R) The Conversation (R) PoliticsNation Hardball All in With Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary MSNBC Documentary (MSNBC) Hardball '70s (R) '70s (R) '70s (R) To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced (MTV) '70s (R) Crossover Crossover NHL Live! Hockey NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs (L) NHL Live! Crossover Pro FB Talk Motocross (R) (NBCSN) Pro Football Talk WhaleThat Exploded (R) Inside World War II (N) Inside World War II (R) Inside World War II (R) Hitler's USA Attack (N) Inside World War II (R) Inside World War II (R) (NGEO) Whale Ate Jaws (R) Friends (:40) Friends (NICK) Sponge (R) Sponge (R) Sponge (R) Sponge (R) Ninja (R) Ninja (R) Ninja (R) SanjayCr F.House (R) F.House (R) Nanny (R) Nanny (R) Friends (R) Friends

It's Complicated (‘09) Steve Martin, Meryl Streep.

The Devil Wears Prada (‘06) Meryl Streep. (OXY)

Pride & Prejudice (‘05) Matthew MacFayden, Keira Knightley. (:35)

The Cowboy Way Woody Harrelson. (:25) Hercules in the Underworld

The Fifth Element (‘97) Bruce Willis. (:10)

Steal Big, Steal Little Andy Garcia. (PLEX) Movie Veronica Mars (R) Young & Restless Days of Our Lives General Hospital Young & Restless Days of Our Lives General Hospital (SOAP) Veronica Mars (R)

Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope (‘77) Mark Hamill. Tattoo (R) Tattoo (R) Bar Rescue (R) (SPIKE)

Hulk (2003,Action) Nick Nolte, Jennifer Connelly, Eric Bana. Behemoth (‘10) William B. Davis, Ed Quinn. WWE Smackdown! (N) Merlin (F) (N) Defiance (R) Merlin (R) (SYFY) (4:00) Iron Invader (TBS) Friends (R) Queens (R) Queens (R) Seinf. (R) Seinf. (R) Seinf. (R) FamilyG (R) FamilyG (R)

Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby ThereYet ThereYet ThereYet ThereYet Fonda on Fonda (R)

A New Leaf (‘71) Walter Matthau.

1941 (‘79) Ned Beatty, Dan Aykroyd. :15

Those Lips,... (TCM)

Any Wednesday (‘66) Jane Fonda. I Found (N) I Found (N) Randy/ Rescue (R) I Found (R) I Found (R) (TLC) Say Yes (R) Say Yes (R) Say Yes (R) Say Yes (R) Say Yes (R) Say Yes (R) Borrowed Borrowed Randy/ Rescue (N) Ned (R) Degrassi Degrassi Degrassi Degrassi TeenNick Top 10 Like You Like You Arnold (R) Rugrats (R) (TNICK) (4:00) To Be Announced Jackson (R) Jackson (R) Ned (R) The Mentalist (R) Mentalist "18-5-4" (R)

Sherlock Holmes (‘09) Jude Law, Robert Downey Jr.. (:45)

Wild, Wild West (‘99) Kevin Kline, Will Smith. (TNT) The Mentalist (R) Advent. (R) Advent. (R) Regular Regular (R) TeenTita Cartoon Planet KingH (R) KingH (R) AmerD (R) AmerD (R) FamilyG (R) FamilyG (R) Robot AquaT. (TOON) Gumball Man/Fd BIzarre "Hungary" (R) Man/Fd Man/Fd Ghost Adventures (R) Ghost Adventures (R) The Dead Files The Dead Files (R) Ghost Adventures (R) (TRAV) Man/Fd Wipeout (R) Wipeout World's Dumbest... (R) World's Dumbest... (R) World's Dumbest... (R) (TRU) World's Dumbest... (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Wipeout (R) Ray (R) Ray (R) Ray (R) Queens (R) Queens (R) Queens (R) Queens (R) (TVL) MASH (R) MASH (R) G. Girls (R) G. Girls (R) G. Girls (R) G. Girls (R) G. Girls (R) G. Girls (R) Ray (R) Law&O.:SVU "Fight" (R) SVU "Snitch" (R) Law & Order: S.V.U. (R) Law & Order: S.V.U. (R) Law & Order: S.V.U. (R) The Moment (R) CSI: Crime Scene (R) (USA) SVU "Blinded" (R)

The Nutty Professor (‘96) Eddie Murphy. SteveTV (N) I'm Married to a... (R) SteveTV (R)

The Nutty Professor (VH1) Atlanta "Baggage" (R) Love and Hip-Hop (R) Hit the Floor (R) Bridezillas (R) Bridezillas (R) Bridezillas (R) Bridezillas (SP) (N) Boot Camp (P) (N) Pregnant "Secrets" (N) Boot Camp (R) Bridezillas (R) (WE) Mother (R) Mother (R) Mother (R) Mother (R) Baseball MLB Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland Athletics (L) (WGN) Law & Order: C.I. (R) Chris (R) Chris (R) Home Videos (R) PREMIUM STATIONS (:15) Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted Moonrise Kingdom Edward Norton. :45 Making Bill Maher (N) Vice (N) Bill Maher (R) Vice (R) (HBO) (4:30) The Big Year

Casino (‘95,Crime Story) Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci, Robert De Niro. Banshee (R) Jump Off StrikeBk :20 Quickies Spring (R) (MAX) (4:40)

The Five-Year Engagement

Reindeer Games Ben Affleck. (:15)

Man on a Ledge Sam Worthington. Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic (‘13) Sommore: Chandelier Status Richard Pryor: Omit th... (SHOW) Movie (:05)

Elizabeth: The Golden Age From Time to Time (TMC) 3:30

For Love of...

Lost in Translation (‘03) Scarlett Johansson.

Elizabeth (‘98) Cate Blanchett.

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

NY Legislature OKs naming road for Levon Helm ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — The New York state Legislature has given final approval to a measure that would name an upstate road after the late Grammy-winning drummer and singer Levon Helm. The Daily Freeman of Kingston reports that the Senate has approved legislation to designate Route 375 “Levon Helm Memorial Boulevard.” The bill calls for naming the entire 3-mile length of the Ulster County road in memory of Helm, who died in April 2012 after battling throat cancer. The road runs from Hurley to Woodstock, where Helm lived and where he hosted his “Midnight Ramble” concerts at his home and studio. The Assembly approved the bill last month. The measure needs Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s signature to take effect. Helm gained fame in the

SUDOKU PUZZLE

1960s and 1970s as drummer and singer in The Band.

Aldrin: ‘After Earth’ noisier than space really is NEW YORK — While Buzz Aldrin enjoys movies about space, he doesn’t always think the filmmakers get it right. A day after attending the New York premiere of the post-apocalyptic thriller “After Earth,” he says the film was a great family drama, but the space scenes were not realistic. His main point of contention: “There was a lot of noise. … You don’t get that much noise.” Aldrin, who followed Neil Armstrong onto the surface of the moon during the historic Apollo 11 landing in 1969, says that “noise doesn’t propagate in a vacuum. We talked over headsets.” The 83-year old astronaut was the guest of honor at a party for a new camera from Hasselblad. The Swedish company supplied the camera used to take pictures of the lunar landing.

HOW TO PLAY: Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. Find answers to today’s puzzle in tomorrow’s Troy Daily News. YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION:

HINTS FROM HELOISE

‘ICE’ is the right call for emergency situations Dear Heloise: Can you please reprint your hints on programming ICE (In Case of Emergency) numbers into your cell phone? — Hal in Tennessee I sure can! There are two ways that are recommended by experts to list emergency numbers on your phone. First, you can put a period (.) or the letter “A” before the emergency contacts so that they are listed at the top of your contacts list. Second, you should list the contact as “ICE-Mom,” or “ICE- Husband,” etc. Most emergency technicians and hospital personnel will look under the letter “I” for contact numbers. Hopefully, this information will never be needed, but it’s better to

Hints from Heloise Columnist be safe than sorry. — Heloise TRAVEL HINT Dear Heloise: I tend to overpack when traveling, and my clean and dirty clothes were getting mixed together. I would get home and not remember which clothes were clean and which were dirty, and I ended up having to wash them all. I now fold up a plastic garbage bag and take it

with me. I place the dirty clothes in the bag once worn. Now they stay separate in my luggage, and I know which are clean. — Debbie in Florida Good hint, and if you forget the plastic trash bag, you can use the plastic laundry bag provided by the hotel. — Heloise PAPERLESS STATEMENTS Dear Heloise: Many people use online banking and receive paperless billing statements. Here is a hint for them. Before closing out any account, go online and print out or save statements to your computer. Once you close the account, you may no longer have access to those statements, and you may need them for future reference.

This also could be helpful for retirement accounts, etc. — A Reader in Kentucky DYED RICE Dear Heloise: I was looking for an activity for my son. I wanted something like a sandbox that he could dig in and play inside. I mixed dry, raw white rice with food coloring of my choice and added a tablespoon of vinegar for each cup of rice. I placed it on a foil-lined baking sheet in a thin layer and baked it in the oven on 150 F for a while to dry. I then put all the rice in a large, flat, plastic tub with a lid and added a couple of beach toys. My son loves it, and he can even play with it inside on a rainy day. — Crafty, via email


10

COMICS

Friday, May 31, 2013

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Saturday, June 1, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You have the mind of a genius today, because you're brimming with original ideas! Not only that, you'll love meeting interesting, fascinating new people today. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Some of you will have the courage to consider self-employment or making money independently. You also want freedom to spend your money the way you want. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might feel rebellious today. You certainly don't want to be hemmed in by routine or repetitive patterns. You want the freedom to go after what you want. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You feel restless today, because you don't want life to pass you by. You know you have to make an effort to be in the swing of things and know what's really happening. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) You'll enjoy making new friends today, especially in group situations. In particular, you'll be attracted to people who are different, innovative and unusual. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) You make a great impression on bosses and people in authority today, because they see you as innovative and not afraid to be different. Furthermore, your ideas can improve things in your circle or community. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Fresh ideas about travel possibilities might excite you today. Others will be just as excited to explore avenues in publishing, the media, medicine, the law and higher education. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Surprise gifts and favors from others might fall in your lap today. Possibly, you are the donor, giving gifts to others. Either way, something will be mutually beneficial. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Conversations with others are fascinating today. Mostly, it's your own mind that is opening up to see new ideas, new possibilities and new ways of looking at life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) The introduction of something hightech might put a fascinating spin on your day at work. Surprises definitely will interrupt your routine, but you will welcome it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Love at first sight might happen for some of you today. This is an exciting day in terms of movies, the theater, the arts, parties, schmoozing with others and playful activities with children. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Stock the fridge, because surprise company might knock on your door today. Something unusual will happen at home or within your family dynamic. Be prepared. YOU BORN TODAY You're fun-loving and playful. Despite your lighthearted, jocular appearance, you are philosophically serious and often gifted with languages. You have an extroverted mask that hides your personal feelings. You also have a good sense of what things are worth. Make sure to take time in the coming year to study or learn something valuable. (You'll be glad you did.) Birthdate of: Heidi Klum, model/actress; Morgan Freeman, actor; Marilyn Monroe, actress. (c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM


WEATHER & WORLD

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Today

Tonight

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

11

Friday, May 31, 2013

Tuesday

0, $0,  &2817< 9L VL W  8V 2QO L QH $W W U R\GDL O \QHZV FRP ZZZ

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Chance of storms High: 83°

Rain possible Low: 66°

SUN AND MOON

Showers and storms likely High: 82° Low: 67°

Showers and storms High: 77° Low: 66°

Partly cloudy High: 73° Low: 55°

Mostly sunny High: 75° Low: 53°

First

Full

Friday, May 31, 2013 AccuWeather.com forecast for daytime conditions, low/high temperatures

MICH.

NATIONAL FORECAST

Cleveland 81° | 68°

Toledo 84° | 70°

Sunrise Saturday 6:09 a.m. ........................... Sunset tonight 8:59 p.m. ........................... Moonrise today 1:33 a.m. ........................... Moonset today 1:25 p.m. ........................... New

TODAY’S STATEWIDE FORECAST

Youngstown 86° | 64°

Mansfield 84° | 66°

Last

TROY •

PA.

83° 66° June 8

June 16 June 23

Today

ENVIRONMENT Today’s UV factor. 8

Fronts Cold

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+ Minimal

Low

Moderate

High

Very High

Air Quality Index Good

Moderate

Harmful

Main Pollutant: Particulate

Pollen Summary 262

0

250

500

Peak group: Trees

Mold Summary 1,780

0

12,500

25,000

Top Mold: Undifferentiated Source: Regional Air Pollution Control Agency

GLOBAL City Athens Berlin Calgary Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem London Montreal Moscow Paris Tokyo

Lo 66 48 47 47 84 63 45 44 57 44 68

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

Yesterday’s Extremes: High: 107 at Ocotillo Wells, Calif.

77

Hi Otlk 82 pc 68 rn 61 rn 65 rn 89 rn 95 clr 55 rn 64 rn 66 rn 60 rn 75 rn

Columbus 86° | 68°

Dayton 84° | 66° Warm Stationary

70s

80s

Pressure Low

High

90s 100s 110s

Low: 25 at Bryce Canyon, Utah

Portsmouth 86° | 68°

KY.

NATIONAL CITIES Temperatures indicate Wednesday’s high and overnight low to 8 a.m. Eastern Time. Hi Lo Prc Otlk Albany,N.Y. 79 59 .85 Clr Albuquerque 82 59 Clr 76 54 Clr Anchorage Atlanta 84 68 Cldy Atlantic City 89 68 Clr Austin 88 76 Cldy Baltimore 89 69 Clr Birmingham 88 74 Cldy Bismarck 76 59 1.55 Rain Boise 66 45 .17 Cldy 70 60 .47PCldy Boston Buffalo 76 62 Clr Burlington,Vt. 69 63 .28 Clr Charleston,S.C. 85 65 PCldy Charleston,W.Va. 86 61 Clr Charlotte,N.C. 84 62 Clr Chicago 84 71 Clr Cincinnati 85 67 Cldy Cleveland 87 68 .07PCldy Columbia,S.C. 87 60 PCldy 89 67 Cldy Columbus,Ohio Dallas-Ft Worth 85 72 .23 Cldy Dayton 86 70 Cldy Denver 65 49 .09 Clr Des Moines 82 67 .09 Rain Detroit 86 66 PCldy

Cincinnati 84° | 75°

Greensboro,N.C. Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson,Miss. Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh St Louis Salt Lake City San Francisco San Juan,P.R. Seattle Washington,D.C.

Hi Lo Prc Otlk 85 63 Clr 82 72 .19PCldy 86 77 Cldy 85 71 Cldy 88 71 Cldy 80 62 .11 Rain 81 75 1.50 Rain 93 73 Clr 87 73 Cldy 78 63 PCldy 89 71 Cldy 89 75 Cldy 80 76 .19 Rain 79 67 Rain 89 70 Cldy 87 75 2.91 Rain 82 72 Clr 81 68 .95 Clr 84 71 .51 Clr 90 70 Clr 98 78 Clr 85 63 PCldy 88 75 Rain 68 48 .03PCldy 65 51 Clr 87 77 .19PCldy 61 49 .12 Rain 90 70 Clr

W.VA. © 2013 Wunderground.com

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

REGIONAL ALMANAC Temperature High Yesterday .............................87 at 3:14 p.m. Low Yesterday..............................70 at 4:43 a.m. Normal High .....................................................76 Normal Low ......................................................56 Record High ........................................95 in 1895 Record Low.........................................37 in 1984

Precipitation 24 hours ending at 5 p.m................................0.0 Month to date ................................................2.32 Normal month to date ...................................4.51 Year to date .................................................13.63 Normal year to date ....................................16.89 Snowfall yesterday ........................................0.00

TODAY IN HISTORY (AP) — Today is Friday, May 31, the 151st day of 2013. There are 214 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On May 31, 1669, English diarist Samuel Pepys (peeps) wrote the final entry of his journal, blaming his failing eyesight for his inability to continue. On this date: • In 1859, the Big Ben clock tower in London went into operation, chiming for the first time. • In 1941, “Tobacco Road,” a play about an impoverished Southern family based on the novel by Erskine Caldwell, closed on Broadway after a run of 3,182 performances.

• In 1961, South Africa became an independent republic as it withdrew from the British Commonwealth. • In 1962, former Nazi official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel a few minutes before midnight for his role in the Holocaust. • In 1970, a magnitude 7.9 earthquake in Peru claimed an estimated 67,000 lives. • In 1977, the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. • In 1985, at least 88 people were killed, more than 1,000 injured, as over 40 tornadoes swept through parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York

and Ontario, Canada, during an 8hour period. • In 1994, the United States announced it was no longer aiming long-range nuclear missiles at targets in the former Soviet Union. • Today’s Birthdays: Actor-director Clint Eastwood is 83. Former Anglican Church envoy Terry Waite is 74. Actress Sharon Gless is 70. Football Hall-of-Famer Joe Namath is 70. Actor Tom Berenger is 63. Actress Roma Maffia is 55. Comedian Chris Elliott is 53. Actress Lea Thompson is 52. Singer Corey Hart is 51. Rapper DMC is 49. Actress Brooke Shields is 48. Actor Colin Farrell is 37.

Khmer Rouge leaders apologize to victims’ families

AP

Simon Lopez, left, and Hiliaro Islas hold signs while trying to collect signatures in an effort to recall Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Wednesday in downtown Phoenix.

Group fails in bid to recall Arpaio PHOENIX (AP) — A campaign to force a recall election against the polarizing sheriff of metropolitan Phoenix failed on Thursday after recall organizers said they couldn’t collect enough voter signatures to bring the lawman to the ballot again. Organizers of the recall effort against Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio needed to turn in more than 335,000 valid voter signatures by 5 p.m. Thursday to force a recall election. “It is a sad day,” said recall campaign manager Lilia Alvarez. “It is a disappointment.” Recall organizers won’t reveal the number of signatures they gathered. That said, the last update they gave on their numbers five weeks ago was that they gathered 200,000 signatures. “The count at this point doesn’t matter,” Alvarez said in deciding not to reveal the number of signatures gathered. Arpaio issued a statement suggesting that recall organizers aren’t revealing the number of signatures they gathered because they are embarrassed by the level of their failure. “This effort failed because the good people of Maricopa County, whom I’m honored to serve, rejected the wrong-headed idea of overturning an election,” Arpaio said. Arpaio supporters say the sheriff

won re-election in November fair and square and that recall organizers shouldn’t have been allowed to contest the election simply because they didn’t like the outcome. The recall effort began just weeks after the 80-year-old Republican sheriff started his sixth term in January. His November re-election race marked the second closest contest in his 20-year political career. He beat the closest candidate by 6 percentage points. Joshua Spivak, a recall expert and senior fellow at Wagner College in New York, said the Arpaio recall effort suffered from too little fundraising, having to collect an unusually high number of voter signatures for a county race and not having an alternative candidate lined up to run against Arpaio. “They are running against Joe Arpaio,” Spivak said. “But who are they electing?” Arpaio critics had argued that the sheriff should be booted because his office has failed to adequately investigate more than 400 sex-crimes cases, has cost the county $25 million in legal settlements over treatment in county jails and his office was found by a federal judge to have systematically racially profiled Latinos in his signature immigration patrols. Critics say the sheriff is more focused on getting publicity for himself than protecting the people.

Recall organizers had hoped that last week’s racial profiling ruling would pump new life into their cause. Supporters were camped outside a county building for more than four days in their final push. “I wish from the bottom of my heart that this ruling would have come out a month earlier. Had this ruling come out a month earlier, who knows how many signatures we would have gotten,” Democratic state Rep. Martin Quezada of Avondale, a supporter of the Arpaio recall effort, said. In the hours before the recall petitions were due, a trickle of people dropped by three tents set up by recall organizers outside the county building to sign petitions. Clipboardwielding volunteers hit up people walking on the sidewalk for signatures and wore T-shirts that said, “Petition Posse,” a play on Arpaio’s posses whose volunteer members assist sheriff’s deputies in some of their duties. In the past, the sheriff has apologized for the bungled sex-crimes investigations and said his office has moved to clear up the cases and taken steps to prevent a repeat of the problem. He also has vigorously denied allegations that his deputies racially profiled people in traffic patrols targeting immigrants who aren’t authorized to be in the country.

PENH, PHNOM Cambodia (AP) — Former leaders of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge being tried by a U.N.-backed genocide tribunal apologized to families of victims of the regime’s atrocities, bringing a rare emotional note to an extended criminal trial dominated by the detailed recounting of names and old dates. Khieu Samphan, the head of state of the 1970s communist regime, and Nuon Chea, the group’s main ideologist, were responding to questions posed by the so-called civil parties, who are representing the victims’ families at the trial. The radical policies of the Khmer Rouge, who ruled Cambodia from 197579, are generally blamed for the deaths of 1.7 million people from forced labor, starvation, medical neglect and executions. Both men have issued expressions of regret before for the killings, but they have denied legal responsibility and insisted they served with the best interests of their country and its people in mind. They have also not hesitated to cast blame on their former colleagues and other parties. The two men are charged with crimes against humanity, genocide, religious persecution, homicide and torture, though their current trial focuses on the forced evacuation of Phnom Penh, the capital, when the Khmer Rouge took power in 1975. Their statements Thursday were notable chiefly for the context they were responding directly to the family members who had testified in emotional detail to the manner in which they lost their loved ones to Khmer Rouge brutality. Because prosecutors must try to prove the defendants bore responsibility for the actions, much of the tes-

timony has sought to draw a legalistic line showing their knowledge through a of command. chain Thursday’s testimony touched on the moral implications of one of the most shocking historical episodes of the 20th century. “I feel extremely sorry for the disappearance and extremely brutal killing of your father,” Khieu Samphan told Yim Roum Doul, claiming, however, that he did not know at the time about “the atrocities committed by the military commanders and leaders.” “I did not know the great suffering of our people,” he said, adding that the perpetrators “must be brought to justice.” He said he joined the Khmer Rouge not to kill fellow Cambodians but with the “determination to protect our country and to develop our country.” “But unfortunately it turned out to be a complete disaster,” he said, describing those responsible as “the most stupid persons on earth.” In testimony earlier this week, Khieu Samphan did not neglect to point the finger at other parties whom he believed contributed to the Cambodian holocaust. He spoke to one civil party about the American B-52 bombing during Cambodia’s 1970-75 civil war, and the resultant death and destruction. Some scholars suggest that the bombing polarized and radicalized Cambodian society, contributing to the hash policies implemented when the Khmer Rouge took power. He also reminded people that Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen once served with the Khmer Rouge before defecting in 1977 and said he should be considered more responsible than him because as a junior commander he would have been more aware of what was going on.


12

Friday, May 31, 2013

WORLD

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Astronauts face radiation threat on long Mars trip LOS ANGELES (AP) — Astronauts traveling to and from Mars would be bombarded with as much radiation as they’d get from a full-body CT scan about once a week for a year, researchers reported Thursday. That dose would, in some cases, exceed NASA’s standards and is enough to raise an astronaut’s cancer risk by 3 percent. As plans for deep space exploration ramp up, radiation is a big concern from high-energy galactic cosmic rays spewed by distant supernova explosions to sporadic bursts of charged particles hurled by the sun. Earth’s magnetic field helps to deflect much of that harmful radiation. NASA aims to send a crew to orbit the red planet by the mid-2030s. Private outfits like Inspiration Mars backed by NASA engineer-turnedspace tourist Dennis Tito are seeking volunteers for a Mars flight. There have been previous efforts to gauge the radiation risk for future Mars travelers, but the best estimate is coming from NASA’s Curiosity mission. Tucked inside the rover when it launched in 2011 was a radiation sensor that took readings during the 8 1/2-month cruise to Mars. From those figures, scientists calculated a spacefarer’s radiation exposure for a quicker six-month voyage in a similarly shielded spacecraft. Roundtrip: about 662 millisieverts. That’s a sizable chunk of an astronaut’s career cap of 1,000 millisieverts, which many international space agencies use to limit the accumulated radiation dosage in space. NASA’s threshold depends on age and gender. The career dose limit for 30-to-60-year-old male astronauts who never smoked ranges from 800 to 1,200 millisieverts. For female astronauts, the limit ranges from 600 to 1,000 millisieverts. The radiation exposure from a Mars journey is similar to getting a full-body CT scan every five or six days, said lead researcher Cary Zeitlin of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo. The estimate is just for zipping there and back; it doesn’t include time spent on the Martian surface, which would add to an astronaut’s exposure. How much more would depend on length of stay and available shelter. “You’d like the radiation exposure to be lower, but it is what it is,” said

AP

This December 2006 image provided by NASA shows European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang working outside the International Space Station. A new study published in the journal Science found that astronauts traveling to Mars and back would be exposed to a high dose of radiation. NASA wants to send a crew to orbit the red planet by the mid2030s. Dr. Norm Thagard, the first American to fly on the Russian space station Mir, who had no role in the research. “Given the importance of such a mission, the mission should be done.” The analysis appears in today’s issue of the journal Science. The amount of radiation likely won’t change unless there’s a rocket engine developed that can speed up the interplanetary ride, researchers said. “You want to get there as quickly as possible” to reduce radiation exposure, said Don Hassler, scientist in charge of the radiation instrument aboard Curiosity. Radiation on a Mars trek would be higher than what crew members cocooned inside the International Space Station typically face about 200 millisieverts per year. By contrast, people on Earth are typically exposed to about 3 millisieverts a year. Curiosity flew to Mars during a period of low to moderate solar activity. A manned mission that launches during a solar flare or storm would encounter more radiation. NASA engineers are testing propulsion systems and researching ways to reduce radiation exposure on a Mars flight. Among the possibilities: Have astronauts wear a deployable shield resembling a heavy win-

CLASSIFIEDS LEGALS

COVINGTON 2847 Harshbarger Road Friday and Saturday 8am-2pm Butcher block table with 4 chairs, larger window A/C, home decor, some collectibles, 2X womens clothes all excellent condition

cation looking to stay home and interested in offering childcare services. Will provide a safe and caring environment for your child. Please call Jess i c a r e g a r d i n g p r i c e s. (937)479-4056

COVINGTON 407 East Bridge Street Friday 9am-6pm and Saturday 9am-2pm Moved combined 2 households, name brand kids clothes 3T-juniors, Thirty-One items, Home Interiors, household items, Harley Davidson ladies boots, shoes, clothes, and helmet, and lots of miscellaneous items

Creative/Design

COVINGTON 9100 Klinger Road Thursday, Friday 9am5pm and Saturday 9am-12pm Huge 5 family, clothing, kitchenware, wood burning stove and 36" TV COVINGTON, 6920 McMaken Road, Thursday, Friday 9am6pm, Saturday 9am-4pm, Large Multi family sale!! Recliner, twin bed, old lamps, desk, router/ table, weed-eater, tree climber (deer), bicycles, sand box, kids clothes 12m-8jr, womens 12-2X, household items,miscellaneous

ter coat or have them hunker down in a storm shelter aboard the spacecraft during periods of high solar PIQUA, 2020 Indian Ridge Drive (Across from Grace activity. Church), Thursday, Friday & “Before we can send astronauts Saturday, 9-? HUGE Multi there, we need to understand the Family! Little bit of everything! environments and hazards that they would face” said Chris Moore, deputy PIQUA, 343 East Main Street, director of advanced exploration sys- Saturday only, 8-3. Smooth top stove, washer, kid's twin bed, tems at NASA headquarters. Now, cancer-related risk esti- kid's clothes and toys. mates are “no more than a rough PIQUA, 4895 West State guesstimate,” David Brenner, an Route 36, Thursday & Friday, 9-4. Transfer pump 3.5HP, old expert on radiation-induced cancer Tonka trucks, junior clothes at Columbia University, said in an size small, soft top car luggage carrier, lots of miscelemail. Thagard, the former NASA astro- laneous. naut, said he was exposed to 120 mil- PIQUA, 510 E Snyder Road lisieverts during his 115 days in low- ( o f f T r o y S i d n e y b e h i n d schools), Thursday, Friday, Earth orbit aboard Mir. Despite the Saturday 9am-?, outdoor lightpotential health risks, Thagard said house, tools, Makita Miter saw, there likely won’t be a shortage of TV's, knitting/ crochet books & astronauts willing to hop on a Mars supplies, weight watcher items, trading cards, toys, appliances, flight. glider, lounger, metal desks, Since landing near the Martian large file cabinet, M&M collectequator last summer, Curiosity has ibles, Lots more! continued to track radiation as it rolls across the dusty surface toward its eventual mountain destination. The rover has turned up the best evidence yet of an ancient watery Mars. A separate study published in Science detailed the existence of PIQUA, 6785 North Troy Sidmore than 500 rounded pebbles near n e y R o a d & 5 5 W e y m e r, its crater landing site the result of Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 8-? Table and chairs, being shaped by long-ago flowing outboard motor, bikes, riding water. mower, tools, postage stamps, clocks, antiques, toys, models, mowers, crocks, Fenton, Hot Wheels, drill press, lots of miscellaneous!

PIQUA, 755 East Statler (east of Troy Sidney Road), Friday & Saturday, 9-6. Multi Family! Double bedroom suite, antique cedar chest, clothing up to 3X, coolors & pool tools, glassware, bar stools, computer desk, Little Tykes kitchen, toys, miscellaneous. PIQUA, 809 North Sunset Drive, Thursday & Friday, 9-4, Saturday, 9-1. Three Family! Dixson mower, push mower, Troybilt rear tine tiller, weed trimmer, chain saw, air conditioners, carpet cleaner, NASCAR items, travel dog cages, golf cart, miscellaneous household items. Something for everyone! Clean sale, don't miss this one!! TIPP CITY 16 Kiowa Court Thursday and Friday 9am5pm. Couch, love seat and chair, bookshelf, end tables, cedar chest, rocker, and miscellaneous TIPP CITY Windmere Subdivision 25+ families, Thursday and Friday 9am-4pm and Saturday 9am-12pm. I75 to exist 69 south on County Road 25A, west Kessler-Cowlesville . Enter on Winston, Chevington Chase, or Stonehenge. TROY 1101 South Walnut Street Friday and Saturday 9am-6pm Baby crib/day bed, changing table, rocking chair, car seats, baby clothes birth24 months, Avon, Nascar models , luggage, miscellaneous tools, and lots of miscellaneous TROY 165 Fox Harbor Drive Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm Miscellaneous household , some furniture, decorative, books, luggage TROY 615 Mumford Drive Thursday and Friday 8am-5pm Moving sale, furniture, appliances, home decor, fishing equipment, tools, good stuff, everything must go

JobSourceOhio.com

Yard Sale

TROY, 60 Knollwood Drive, thursday & Friday 8am-5pm, Yard Sale Saturday 8am-12pm, WoodBRADFORD 6861 Smith Road working & Metal working tools, Friday 12pm-?, Saturday, and Hallmark ornaments, kitchen, Sunday 9am-? Electronics, holiday decor, tools, toys, TVs, VHS, game consoles, clothes, everything priced to dining room table and chairs, sell!! tools, Military, new Barbies in Child / Elderly Care boxes, GI Joe, air compressor, gun cabinet Teacher with Masters in Edu-

TROY 736 Branford Road Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm Bunk bed, dresser, night d=stand,(2) TVs, toys,housewares, boys clothes 3T-14, Misses, juniors, womens and mens clothes all excellent condition, and so much more TROY, 1890 Old Staunton Road, Saturday, June 1, 8-4 & Sunday, June 2, 8-1. Lots of miscellaneous items to benefit rescue animals of Lost and Found K9 Rescue. TROY, 402 Williams Street, Thursday & Friday 9am-3pm, Moving sale! Some furniture, household items, books, cds, dvds, Werner ladder, outdoor fountain, king size bedroom suite, 2 twin beds, and more!!!

NEWSPAPER PAGINATION Civitas Media, a growing leader in local news, is looking for full time experienced paginators with copy editing backgrounds for its Miamisburg, Ohio hub. Paginators will be expected to design pages for a variety of newspapers and special sections in InDesign while copy editing editorial content and writing headlines. Evening and weekend hours. Wages based on experience. Health, vision, dental, vacation. Email a resume, clips and references to: jmullen@civitasmedia.com Drivers & Delivery DRIVER Dancer Logistics is looking for Class A CDL driver with at least 2 years experience for home daily runs, over the road and regional. Great Benefits and great home time and your weekends off. Also looking for Teams to run West coast. Please apply at: 900 Gressel Dr Delphos, Oh or call (419)692-1435 DRIVERS RV Wholesalers is looking for drivers with their own truck to deliver RVs across the US leaving from Lakeview, OH 43331. Must have own DOT #, Liability and Personal Property Damage Insurance. Please contact Jeremy at: jmac@rvwholesalers.com (877)877-4494 for more info Food Services DIETARY ASSISTANT We are looking for experienced people. Come in and fill out an application and speak with Jeanine Colgrove, Dietary Director. Koester Pavilion 3232 North Co Rd 25A Troy, Ohio (I-75 at exit 78) (937)440-7663 Phone (937)335-0095 Fax Located on the Upper Valley Medical Center Campus EOE Help Wanted General 84 LUMBER COMPANY MANAGER TRAINEES We are seeking careerminded individuals for our TROY store who are looking for a career that includes customer service, hands-on work, growing sales, and management. College preferred. No construction knowledge necessary. Through our paid training, you will become an industry professional! We offer excellent benefits in a great work environment. Apply in person MondayFriday, 8am-5pm at: 84 LUMBER COMPANY 845 ARTHUR DRIVE TROY, OH 45373 You may also apply online at: www.84lumber.com/ careers 84 Lumber Company is an equal employment opportunity & affirmative action employer. Drug Free Environment.

CARRIERS NEEDED In Piqua, Tipp City Laura, Fletcher & Troy to deliver the Dayton Daily News. Must be available 7 days a week between 2:00 am to 6:00 am weekdays and 8:00 am weekends. Reliable transportation and proof of insurance necessary. Leave message with area of interest along with phone number where you can be reached. Cox Media Group, (937)603-9178 INDUSTRIAL CONTRACTOR HIRING LABORERS AND CDL TRUCK DRIVERS for hard hat environment. Training provided. APPLY AT: 15 INDUSTRY PARK CT TIPP CITY SALES/ SUPPORT, Nationwide Agent in Piqua seeking licensed support staff and licensed agents. Forward resume to jppp1@sbcglobal.net.


To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Friday, May 31, 2013 • 13

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

Continental Express Inc., a full service transportation company that specializes in hauling refrigerated food products is currently seeking the following: Weekend Dispatcher – Part time position. Duties will require communicating instructions to drivers about freight pick-up and delivery, transmitting load assignments, routing, trip planning, promoting safety, and interaction with customers regarding pickup and delivery information. Must have prior office experience, be able to handle multiple tasks simultaneously and have problem solving skills. Excellent computer and telephone skill are a must. Mechanics – Part time weekend positions available working on semi tractors and trailers. Must have own tools. Duties will include preventative maintenance, inspections and repairs, brake and tire repairs, and other duties as assigned. Qualified candidates should apply in person at: Continental Express, Inc. 10450 State Route 47 Sidney, OH OR email resume to mgoubeaux@ceioh.com GENERAL SHOP help wanted. Mechanical experience helpful. Own transportation, clean driving record record required. 3040 hours per week. Apply in person, Monday thru Thursday: Dennys Carb Shop, 8620 Casstown-Fletcher Road, Fletcher.

LOCAL DRIVERS Drivers needed for LOCAL tractor trailer driving positions. Various shifts and routes. Can make up to $850/ week. Must have CDLA, at least 1 year recent experience and be extremely dependable. Call Dave during the week at (800)497-2100 or on the weekend/ evenings at (937)726-3994 or apply in person at: Continental Express 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH www.ceioh.com Summer Photography Interns Wanted Anyone interested in a photography internship (unpaid) at the Sidney Daily News this summer should email examples of their work and a resume to: Chief Photographer Luke Gronneberg lgronneberg@ civitasmedia.com or drop them off at the office: 1451 N. Vandemark Road Sidney, Ohio 45365 For more information, call (937)498-5966. Leave a name and contact number. Interns will gain invaluable first-hand experience covering a wide range of subjects. The experience could also help fulfill college requirements for on-the-job training.

Both positions are on day shift and must have own tools. We offer a very clean work environment and newer model equipment. Excellent compensation and benefit package. Benefits include health/dental/vision insurance, short term disability, 401K with match, uniforms, direct deposit, paid time off.

Apply at:

Continental Express Inc. 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney, OH 45365 800-497-2100 Or email resume to: mgoubeaux@ceioh.com

Instruction & Training

call (937)684-0555

2005 KIA SEDONA LX

PIPE WELDERS/ FABRICATION Skills/Qualifications: *2+yrs experience *Welding Mig, Tig, Stick and Fabrication *Pipe welding carbon steel pipe, stainless steel pipe, schedule 10&40 pipe and stainless sanitary tubing *Rigging expierence *Welding Cert. D1-1 & B31-1 Requirements: * Willing to travel, work overtime, weekends and holidays if needed. *HS diploma or GED *Drug testing & background check

EVERS REALTY TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $725 3 Bedroom, 1 bath, Double, $675 (937)216-5806 EversRealty.net

2007 ACURA TL 66k miles, loaded! Black, leather, all power, heated seats, MP3 multi CD changer, sunroof, new battery, newer tires, very good condition! $14,850. Call (937)726-2791

40044472

40110426

Call Jim at

937-694-2454

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

House Sitting House Sitting Services

TMA Land Limited 40042552

* Security Checks * Mail Pickup *Light Housekeeping *Yard Maintenance * Errand Running * Flexible Hours *Other Services Available

Rest easy while you’re away 937-573-9098 Cell 937-552-9797 Landscaping

2007 FORD FOCUS SE Sport package, 2 door hatchback, auto, AC, power, silver, excellent condition, 50,000 miles, $8800 (937)286-8893 (937)286-3319

GRAVEL & STONE 40043994 Shredded Topsoil Topsoil Shredded Fill Dirt Dirt Fill

Driveways •• Excavating Excavating Driveways Demolition Demolition

WE DELIVER

2376886

Boats & Marinas 2002 POLARIS, Jet Ski,750 engine, 3 seater with trailer and cover, excellent condition, (937)492-3567 after 5pm RVs / Campers CAMPER, Rustic Haven Campground St Marys, good condition, furnished, clean (937)473-2398 Baby Items TODDLER BED, changing table, crib, blankets, high-chair. HANDICAP ITEMS, regular and seated walkers, commode, shower chairs, glider rocker, more! (937)339-4233 Cemetery Plots /Lots

TIPP CITY, 1/2 double, newly decorated, 2 bedroom, appliances, off street parking, trash paid, $450 month + deposit, NO PETS! (937)667-3568.

BICYCLE, Boys 16 inch, excellent condition, $25, (937)3392800

937-606-1122

LAWN and LANDSCAPE SERVICES, 15 years experience, satisfaction guaranteed, lawn maintenance, mulching, landscaping projects. Call today for a free estimate. Will not be under bid, (937)570-1115 Land Care

MATT & SHAWN’S LAWN CARE & 40072136

BICYCLE, Girls, 16 inch, excellent condition, $25, (937)339-2800 Appliances

40053412

• Lawn care • Landscaping • Gardens Tilled • Mulching

2 8 Y e a rs E x p e ri e nc e Fr ee Est i mates

Painting & Wallpaper

MAKE YOUR HOME LOOK NEW AGAIN 40082895

TERRY’S

40065658 REPAIR APPLIANCE •Refrigerators •Stoves •Washers & Dryers •Dishwashers • Repair & Install Air Conditioning

HOME IMPROVEMENTS Lawn Mowing starting at $15 Landscaping •Trim Shrubs Pavers & Fence Installation Tree Removal • Wood Patios Install & Clean Spoutings • Siding Power Washing Nuisance Wild Animal Removal FREE Estimates 15 Years Lawn Care Experience

Call Matt 937-477-5260

Miscellaneous

Fax to: 937-394-2375

Painting - Interior - Exterior Pressure Washing Homes and Decks Cleaning Gutters Commercial, Industrial, Residential

FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES CALL RICK

937-726-2780

937-773-4552

Or mail to: 105 Shue Dr. Anna OH 45302

FRONT DESK/ DENTAL ASSISTANT Seeking self-starter with organizational, patient communication/computer skills to handle activities in high quality, restorative dental practice. Prior dental/ medical experience a plus but not required. Training supplied. 30-40 hrs. E-mail resume: dentistryresume@hotmail.com

J.T.’s Painting & Drywall

875-0153 698-6135

amyj@wellsbrothers.com

Medical/Health

40053415

Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

Email resumes to:

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE EOE

• Room Additions • Interior/Exterior • Drywall • Texturing • Kitchens • Baths • Decks • Doors

Hauling & Trucking

COOPER’S

CEMETERY LOTS, Riverside Cemetery in Troy, 2 lots together, northwest of the Mausoleum in older section, $500 each (937)962-2389

TROY TOWNHOUSE, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath. Bunkerhill $495 monthly, (937)216-4233

Remodeling & Repairs

LICENSED • INSURED 40099214 20 YEARS IN BUSINESS

GRAVEL 40072242

TIPP CITY townhouse, newly decorated, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, appliances, W/D hookup, trash paid, $475 month + deposit, NO PETS! (937)6673568.

TIPP/ TROY, new everything and super clean! 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, no pets, no prior evictions, $550 month, $550 deposit, 1 year lease, (937)5454513

Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

TOTAL HOME REMODELING

Handyman

1, 2 & 3 bedrooms Call for availability attached garages Easy access to I-75 (937)335-6690

DODD RENTALS Tipp-Troy: 2 bedroom AC, appliances $550/$450 plus deposit No pets (937)667-4349 for appt.

40110227

1-937-492-8897

Houses For Sale

Visit www.firsttroy.com Call us first! (937)335-5223

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992

Fully Insured Repairs • Cleaning • Gutter Guard

For Sale By Owner

Troy ranches and townhomes. Different floor plans to choose from. Garages, fireplaces, appliances including washer and dryers. Corporate apartments available.

Pet Grooming

40110426

Gutter Repair & Cleaning

Call today for FREE estimate

TUTORING, any age, including kindergarten readiness, also special needs by certified teacher (937)356-9692

937-875-0153 937-698-6135

B.E.D. PROGRAM

1002 N. Main St. Sidney, Ohio 45365

new tires, extra clean, cold air, only 129k miles, good gas mileage, $5100

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

493-9978

Gutter & Service 40110227

SECURITY OFFICERS WANTED (PT/ On Call) For local company Job requires 1 year experience, must have High School diploma, be trained in CPR and First Aid. $9 hour. For more info contact: Michael Corkum at (937)332-3501 or send resume via email to michael_corkum@ ahm.honda.com

1,2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

Description/Requirements: *Min. of 5 yrs. Exp. *Commercial & Industrial HVAC/Plumbing/Piping Exp. *Familiar with Local & State Codes *Able to read Blueprints & Schematic Drawings *Turn a concept, rough or detailed drawing into a detailed estimate. *Prepare proposals and aid in the sale as needed. *Understand basic control sequences and system operation. *Exp. in construction practices, project scheduling & planning. *Basic AutoCAD knowledge preferred. *Continuous communication with supervisors & job foremen to coordinate needs. *Willing to travel, work overtime, weekends & holidays if needed *Drug testing & background check.

(937)

DC SEAMLESS

Autos For Sale

www.hawkapartments.net

PLUMBING/ HVAC PROJECT MGR. ESTIMATOR

installed

PUPPIES, Shih Tzu, Yorkiepoos, Multi-poos, Miniature Poodles, $250 and up, (419)925-4339

Security/Protective Services

Apartments /Townhouses

4995

www.tdn-net.com

jkindell@brunsgc.com

As low as

$

40099214

Email:

Person will be responsible for maintenance and repairs to semi trailer refrigeration units. Must have ability to diagnose and repair units, perform preventative maintenance and install new units. Prior experience on Thermo King and/or Carrier units required with a preference on having certification.

Pets FREE to good home, male Australian Shepard Lab mix, great with kids, call after 2pm (937)418-7084

2385772

Fax: (937)339-8051

REFRIGERATION TECHNICIAN

Call: 715-876-4000

PAVING, REPAIR & SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

• Devices installed in all rooms • Easy Early find if Bed Bugs enter

40082895

H.R. Director Bruns General Contracting, Inc. 3050 Tipp Cowlesville Rd. Tipp City, OH 45371

Primary responsibility will be overseeing work being done by Mechanics on semi trailers including; preventative maintenance, DOT inspections, general repairs and new trailer preparation. This will be a hands-on, working supervisor position. Person must have working knowledge and experience on tractor trailers. Strongly prefer someone with prior supervisory or leadership experience.

This GREAT opportunity comes with SUPER SECURITY and UNLIMITED Earning Potential. This is YOUR opportunity to work with the #1 Home Improvement Center!!

COOPER’S 400444752

BLACKTOP

knowing your Free from BED BUGS

40042552

Mail, Fax, or E-mail resume to:

FLEET MECHANIC SUPERVISOR

DELIVERY TRUCK!

“Peace of Mind” 40053415

40072136

Bruns offers health & life insurance, 401(k) program, paid holidays & vacations and more. Compensation is commensurate with skills and experience.

Continental Express Inc., a full service transportation company that specializes in hauling refrigerated food products is recruiting for the following positions:

Has a great opportunity for an individual wanting to start their own delivery business by becoming an owner/ operator of a

Paving & Excavating

BED BUG DETECTORS

40053412

Bruns General Contracting, Inc. is currently seeking a commercial carpenter with management experience, metal building erectors, and a painter/ handyman.

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

40147176

Exterminating

2385753

PAINTER/ HANDYMAN

Want To Rent HOUSE NEEDED in Troy High School area the next three years so that my son may complete high school. Minimum 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath, excellent references available. (937)765-0262.

Building & Remodeling

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedrooms, appliances, CA, Water, Trash Paid, $425 & $525 Monthly. $200 Deposit Special! (937)673-1822 TROY, 1/2 double, 2 bedroom ranch, attached garage, , 1.5 baths, appliances, new carpet, very clean! No pets, 934 North Dorset, $695 + deposit. (937)339-6736, (937)2861199. Houses For Rent 3 BEDROOM country home, Covington Schools, $500 rent, $500 deposit, no pets! (419)628-4205 TROY, updated 2 bedroom ranch in Westbrook, 1 year lease, possible land contract, $775 (937)308-0679

BILL’S HOME

REMODELING 40045872 & REPAIR

Need new kitchen cabinets, new bathroom fixtures, basement turned into a rec room? Give me a call for any of your home remodeling & repair needs, even if it’s just hanging some curtains or blinds. Call Bill Niswonger

40045872

METAL BUILDING ERECTORS

Other

335-6321

Free Estimates / Insured

Cleaning & Maintenance

For Sale By Owner

FOR SALE BY OWNER 40090845

Sparkle Clean

40082326 Cleaning Service

Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured 40082326

COMMERCIAL CARPENTER

Help Wanted General

40147176

Help Wanted General

Tammy Welty (937)857-4222

1014 Plymouth Ave., Piqua Nice family home. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large 2 car garage, central air, extra large patio, privacy fence, also all appliances, flat screen and riding mower stay. (937) 570-1518 40090845


14 • Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Friday, May 31, 2013 Remodeling & Repairs

To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

www.tdn-net.com

Building & Remodeling

40058910 40072200

Handyman

• • • •

Spouting Metal Roofing Siding Doors

• • • •

Baths Awnings Concrete Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

40058910

Houses For Sale

510 Birchwood, Troy

NEW LISTING!

This 4 bed, 2.5 bath home, is in a great neighborhood and sits on a corner lot. Large backyard surrounded by mature trees, situated on approx. half acre. Upstairs you will find 4 large bedrooms with a HUGE Master Suite w/full bath. All bedrooms have very large closets. Downstairs the home has a very nice family room off of the large eat in kitchen. There is also a formal dining room located just off another nice living room. The over sized 3 1/2 car garage is awesome, with plenty of space for storage as well as 3 cars if needed. Exceptional location and very close to YMCA & I-75. $225,000.

FREE ESTIMATES

40091308

Blake Maxwell 937-541-9456 9 N. Market St. Troy, Ohio

(937) 339-1902

• Painting • Dr y wall • Decks • Carpentr y • Home Repair • Kitchen/Bath

937-974-0987 Email: UncleAlyen@aol.com

40091308 color ad Home Experts Realty

CALL BLAKE for a showing 937-541-9456

Small #Basements #Siding #Doors #Barns

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts 2385779

Roofing Windows Kitchens Sunrooms

2387996

937-573-4702

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

• • • •

#Repairs Large and #Room Additions #Kitchens/Baths #Windows #Garages

For your home improvement needs 40082989

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SHERIFF·S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-818 JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA vs. William L. Mangas, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on June 19, 2013 at 10:00 o·clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Concord, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: C06-082723 Also known as: 1895 Fox Run, Troy, Ohio 45373 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Seventy Five Thousand and 00/100 ($175,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Kevin L. Williams, Attorney 05/17, 05/24, 05/31-2013 40059044

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CONTACT US

SPORTS

■ Sports Editor Josh Brown (937) 440-5251, (937) 440-5232 jbrown@civitasmedia.com

15

JOSH BROWN

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

May 31, 2013

■ Softball

TODAY’S TIPS • BASKETBALL: The Troy Boys Basketball Camp will run from June 4-7 at the Trojan Activities Center. Times will be 9 a.m. to noon for grades 1-4 and 14 p.m. for grades 5-8. The cost is $55, with checks payable to Troy Basketball Parents Association. Camp forms are available at all Troy City Schools, or you can sign up on the first day of camp. For more information, contact coach Tim Miller at 332-6710 or 339-6576. • BASKETBALL: Troy High School girls basketball will be hosting a twoday girls basketball camp on June 3-4 for girls entering grades 1-8 at Troy High School’s new gymnasium. The camp will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and lunch will be provided. The cost of the camp is $55, and arrangements can be made. Girls from anywhere are welcome. If interested, email coach Nathan Kopp at koppn@troy.k12.oh.us or call him at (937) 469-2531. • BASKETBALL: Troy Christian girls basketball will run an elementary camp for grades 1-6 from 10 a.m. to noon June 10-14. The cost is $35. There is also a junior high camp for grades 7-8 from 1-3 p.m. June 10-14. The cost is $35. For more information, contact Dick Steineman at (937) 451-1723. • GOLF: The Milton-Union Bulldog Golf Classic, sponsored by the MiltonUnion Education Foundation, will take place June 22 at Beechwood Golf Course. The tournament is a Texas scramble with a noon shotgun start. The cost is $80 per person or $300 per foursome. The deadline to register is June 15. • BASEBALL: The Dayton Docs will hold a two-day youth baseball camp for children ages 8-14. It will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on June 13 and 21 at Wright State University’s Nischwitz Stadium.The cost is $55. For more information, call (937) 423-3053 or visit www.docsbaseball.com. • GOLF: The Tippecanoe boys basketball program will host a golf outing at 11:30 a.m. June 28 at Homestead Golf Course. Proceeds will benefit the Tippecanoe boys basketball program, and Hickory River Barbecue and drinks will be provided. Visit www.reddevilbasketball.com and click on “Golf” to download a registration form.

SPORTS CALENDAR TODAY Baseball Division II Regional Final at University of Dayton Tippecanoe vs. Jonathan Alder (5 p.m.) Tennis Division II State at Ohio State University Milton-Union (9 a.m.) Track Division I Regional Troy, Tippecanoe, Piqua (4:30 p.m.) SATURDAY Softball Division IV Regional Final at Tippecanoe Triad vs. Covington (noon) Tennis Division II State at Ohio State University Milton-Union (9 a.m.) Track Division II Regional at Welcome Stadium Milton-Union (11:30 a.m.) Division III Regional at Piqua Bethel, Bradford, Covington, Lehman, Miami East, Newton, Troy Christian (11:30 a.m.) SUNDAY No events scheduled

WHAT’S INSIDE Local Sports.....................16/18 Major League Baseball.........16 Television Schedule..............17 Scoreboard ............................17 NBA......................................18

Rockets top Vikings Viking postseason run ends in a 6-0 loss BY JOSH BROWN Sports Editor jbrown@civitasmedia.com

FAIRBORN

In the long run, the questionable call may not have mattered. But it sure got the Miami East Vikings off to a bad start. A Clermont Northeastern baserunner touched Miami East’s third baseman from behind on her way past as Olivia Edgell was waiting for what should have been an inning-ending pop to come down and what appeared to be an

obvious interference call. But the ball hit the ground and the run was allowed to stand, giving the Rockets the lead in the top of the first inning — and they used that momentum to bury the Vikings in a 6-0 Division III regional semifinal victory Thursday at Wright State University. STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER That first run came without the Miami East’s Kris Bigelow dives back into second during a benefit of a hit in the inning, and Division III regional semifinal game against Clermont

■ See VIKINGS on 18 Northeastern Thursday in Fairborn.

■ Baseball

■ Softball

STAFF PHOTO/BEN ROBINSON

Covington’s Cassidy Cain singles during the Buccaneers’ 100 win in the Division IV regional semifinal against Marion Local Thursday in Tipp City.

STAFF PHOTOS/MARK DOWD

Tippecanoe’s Ben Hughes slides back safely into first base during Thursday’s Division II regional semifinal game against Franklin at Woerner Field.

Foiling the curse

Buccs advance to third straight Devils advance to regional final with 3-2 win regional final BY BEN ROBINSON Sports Writer

BY COLIN FOSTER Associate Sports Editor colinfoster@civitasmedia.com

Sometimes when things aren’t going your way, you have to find a way to make your own breaks. Which is what the Covington Buccaneers did after a frustrating first two innings against Marion Local in a 10-0 win in the Division IV regional semifinal at Tipp City on Thursday.

The Division II regional round has been a stumbling block for Tippecanoe the last couple of years. That curse was lifted on Thursday. In a game impacted by one controversial call, the Red Devils escaped with a 3-2 victory over Franklin in the regional semifinal Thursday at Woerner Field in Dayton.

TIPP CITY

DAYTON The call came in the top of the fifth, with Tippecanoe clinging to a 3-1 lead and the Wildcats threatening. Franklin loaded the bases to open the inning, which spelled the end for Tipp starter Steven Calhoun, the eventual winning pitcher. Cameron Johnson came on with the bases juiced and gave up an RBI single to the first batter, which cut the score to 3-2. The next hitter up, Franklin’s Ben Kirby, hit a pop fly to left field that appeared score another run and tie the game. But moments later, the run was taken off the scoreboard when the umpire ruled the runner left the bag early. Then with two outs, Johnson threw a pitch by catcher B.J. Donathan and the Franklin runner attempted Tippecanoe catcher B.J. Donathan lifts closer Cameron

Johnson in celebration after the Red Devils closed out a 3-2 ■ See DEVILS on 16 win in the Division II regional semifinal against Franklin.

■ Legion Baseball

Post 43 shells Sidney, 18-4 Kazmir, Indians shut down Reds Scott Kazmir allowed one run in seven innings and the Cleveland Indians scored seven runs with two outs in the fourth to defeat the Cincinnati Reds 7-1 on Thursday. The fourth-inning rally, which featured six straight run-scoring hits, gave the Indians a split of the annual Ohio Cup interleague series. See Page 16.

Yingst no-hits Flyers

Staff Reports

SIDNEY

The rain officially put an early end to Troy Post 43’s game at Sidney. In reality, though, it was Troy’s bats. Post 43 hit three home runs in the first two innings Thursday night at Sidney and piled up 13 runs after only three, and the rain put an end to an 18-4 victory. Colton Nealeight started

things off with a two-run homer and Michael Pierce added a three-run shot as Post 43 (6-1) scored six in the first — all with two outs. Evans then hit a threerun blast in the second, and the rout was on. Nealeigh finished 3 for 4 with two doubles and a homer, Evans was 3 for 4 with a double and a homer, Garrett Mitchell was 2 for

4 with a double, Jacob Naas was 3 for 4 and Zach Thompson was 2 for 4. Austin Baumgardner got the win on the mound. “We’re on a good run to start off,” Troy Post 43 coach Frosty Brown said. “Our pitchers have thrown well, and we’re right where we should be.” Post 43 is off until Monday when it hosts the Miami Valley Wolverines.

“Things weren’t happening for us early on,” Covington coach Dean Denlinger said. “Casey (Yingst) was struggling and we had a couple of girls thrown out on the bases.” Yingst, who is one of the most accurate pitchers in the area and ended up recording a no-hitter, allowed three walks in the first two innings.

■ See BUCCS on 18

■ Track and Field

Bulldogs fall short at regional Staff Reports Milton-Union’s 4x400 team fell short of earning a spot in the finals of the Division II regional meet Thursday at Welcome Stadium in Dayton. The Bulldogs team of Zach Pricer, Skyler Deeter, Kyle Swartz and Joe Thoele finished with the 14th best qualifying

DAYTON time, running it in a time of 3:40.63. The 4x800 team of Pricer, Deeter, Connor Lunsford and Swartz also missed out on a state quaifying spot, finishing 13th in 9:00.63. Trevor Klosterman placed 14th in the long jump (18-10.5). Action resumes Saturday at Welcome Stadium.

For Home Delivery, call 335-5634 • For Classified Advertising, call (877) 844-8385


16

SPORTS

Friday, May 31, 2013

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

■ National Football League

■ Major League Baseball

Richardson: I’m not injury prone BEREA (AP) — Not quite into his second NFL season, Browns running back Trent Richardson has already undergone knee surgery, broken some ribs, hurt his ankle and strained a muscle in his shin. He’s been battered and bruised, but Richardson is confident he’ll be able to stay on the field this year and the remainder of his career. Don’t you dare put a label on him. “Injury prone,” he said, “is not going to be me.” Richardson missed practice on Thursday with a strain in his lower right

leg he sustained while running last week. Although the injury isn’t believed to be serious, the Browns are being extra careful with the former first-round pick, who may sit out next week’s minicamp as well. “It ain’t no biggie,” Richardson said. “It ain’t nothing to worry about. I could be out there but they want to be cautious about it and make sure I’m right for training camp.” As his teammates went through the final session of organized team activities under first-year coach Rob Chudzinski, Richardson worked off to the side on

his conditioning. When he was finished and the Browns began to scrimmage, all Richardson could do was watch. And that’s when the real pain kicked in. “It’s terrible, man” he said. “But I know in my mind that it’s not going to be near like last year, being hurt and injured. It’s hard to just watch. I do want to be out there. I tell coach every day that I can go. I put my helmet on or something, and we laugh. I know he means good about sitting me out for right now.” Injuries slowed

Richardson during a productive rookie season when he showed flashes of one day becoming a major star if he isn’t one already. He missed the exhibition season recovering from an arthroscopic procedure on his knee, and then played the final 10 games with “two or three” broken ribs, an agonizing injury that would have sidelined most players. Still, the muscular 5foot-9, 230-pounder managed to rush for 950 yards with 11 touchdowns and added 367 receiving yards. Richardson only missed the season finale.

■ Baseball

Devils

AP PHOTO

Cleveland Indians’ Asdrubal Cabrera doubles to drive in a run in the fourth inning against the Cincinnati Reds Thursday in Cleveland.

Tribe shuts down Reds CLEVELAND (AP) — Scott Kazmir allowed one run in seven innings and the Cleveland Indians scored seven runs with two outs in the fourth to defeat the Cincinnati Reds 7-1 on Thursday. The fourth-inning rally, which featured six straight run-scoring hits, gave the Indians a split of the annual Ohio Cup interleague series. The Reds won in Cincinnati on Monday and Tuesday before the Indians took both games when the series shifted to Cleveland. The Reds have lost nine in a row at Progressive Field and haven’t won in Cleveland since May 22, 2010. Kazmir (3-2), recording his longest outing in the majors in three years, dodged a bases-loaded jam in the third when he got Joey Votto to bounce into an inning-ending double play. Run-scoring singles by Michael Brantley and Yan Gomes, an RBI double by Ryan Raburn, a two-run double by Michael Bourn and an RBI single by Jason Kipnis chased starter Homer Bailey (3-4) in the fourth. Asdrubal Cabrera added a run-scoring double off Alfredo Simon. Jay Bruce drove in Cincinnati’s only run with an RBI single in the sixth. The Indians carried a five-game losing streak, in which they scored 14 runs, into the series. Cleveland had also dropped seven of eight, but the bats woke up when the Reds hit town. Cleveland homered twice Wednesday, including a game-clinching three-run homer by Jason Giambi,

and fell one run off their biggest inning of the season Thursday. Cabrera was hit by a pitch to start the fourth and took second on Carlos Santana’s one-out single. After Mark Reynolds struck out, Brantley, who was in a 1-for-15 skid, singled sharply through the left side to score Cabrera. Gomes followed by lining a single to left, scoring Santana. Raburn’s double to left scored Brantley before Bourn drove a double into the left-field corner for two more runs and a 50 lead. Kipnis, who was in a 4for-34 slump, singled to right to score Bourn and finish Bailey. Cabrera doubled to right against Simon. Brantley and Kipnis weren’t the only Cleveland hitters to break out of slumps in the inning. Santana came into the game batting .204 in May while Raburn was in a 3for-24 skid. Bailey, who threw 45 pitches in the fourth, lasted 3 2-3 innings, his shortest outing of the season. The right-hander allowed seven runs — tying his season high. Kazmir, a two-time AllStar with Tampa Bay, had his career sidetracked by arm problems that began in 2009. He was traded to the Angels that season but was 9-15 in 2010 and appeared in only one game the following year before being released. The Indians signed him to a minor-league contract in January after he pitched in an independent league last season.

■ CONTINUED FROM 15 to take home. The ball took a good bounce off the brick backstop, Donathan recovered the ball and flipped it to Johnson to get the out at the plate. Disaster averted for the Red Devils — and a new school record for wins set with 28. “It’s the first time we’ve won a regional game, so that itself is a big monkey off our back,” Tippecanoe coach Bruce Cahill said. “Our top six guys I thought could hit him, I mean make contact anyway. I think all of our strikeouts were at the bottom of the order. We got the three (runs) we needed, then we held on for dear life. “There were some calls in that game that I wasn’t sure of. Their kids called out at the plate for leaving early, I didn’t see it. I don’t even know who appealed it, if anyone appealed it, or if the umpire just called it himself. No one said anything, I just all of a sudden saw him throw up the out sign.” “I didn’t see it,” said Johnson about the call. “I guess coach appealed it, maybe B.J. appealed it. I don’t know. I wasn’t even watching, I was backing up home plate. That was a huge break. That was a huge play.” Ace Ben Hughes started warming up in the bullpen in the sixth, but the Red Devils didn’t need to use him. Johnson was in complete command from that moment on, allowing two hits and striking out two. And the defense backed him up in the process. Johnson recorded a onetwo-three inning in the sixth and Tipp made clutch plays in the away seventh to secure the win. After Alex Rutledge led off the seventh with a single, Johnson fielded a sacrifice bunt attempt and threw out Rutledge at second for the first out. On the next atbat, Hughes covered some serious ground to make a catch on a screaming line drive hit to center. Following that, Johnson struck out the final batter looking — and the Red Devils locked up their spot in the regional final. “I’ve been closer for most of the year actually, so I’m kind of used to situations like that,” Johnson said. “I

CIVITAS MEDIA PHOTO/MARK DOWD

Tippecanoe’s Cameron Johnson tags a Franklin runner out at the plate trying to score on a wild pitch Thursday during a Division II regional semfinal game.

Tippecanoe starter Steven Calhoun delivers a pitch Thursday against Franklin. just try to get one out at a time, throw strikes. That’s the main thing, especially when we were getting squeezed a little bit by the umpires. I was just trying to make them put the ball in play.” Tippecanoe scored all of its runs in the bottom of the third. Cole Quillen led off the inning with a double

and Johnson bunted him to second on the next at-bat. After a Zack Blair walk, Hughes singled and Quillen scored seconds later on a passed ball to tie the game. Cleanup hitter Carter Langdon — who will play baseball for the University of Dayton next year — followed by drilling an RBI triple off the left

field fence, before Austin Hadden knocked him in, courtesy of an error by Franklin. Leading the Tipp offense was Langdon, who finished the game 2 for 3. Hadden had a hit and a pair of stolen bases. Tippecanoe and Franklin both finished the game with six hits. All of the players and fans knew the history of the Tippecanoe baseball program in the regional round entering Thursday, but that topic wasn’t brought up during the week of preparation. After all, the past is irrelevant at this point in the season. “We tried to stay away from that,” Johnson said. “This is a new season. Unfinished business has been our motto all year. We’ve just been waiting to get back here. It feels good to come out with a win today.” “You’ve got to have breaks,” Cahill said. “That’s what it’s all about anyway. When you get to this level, it’s not all about how good you are, a lot of times, it’s about catching a break, and we haven’t caught too many breaks here in the past. That’s one for us I guess.” Now the Red Devils have a chance to take it one step further with a win today against Jonathan Alder. The game starts at 5 p.m. in Dayton, with the winner advancing to state. Frank......100 010 0 — 2 6 1 Tipp.........003 000 x — 3 6 0 WP — Calhoun. LP — Laykins. 2B — Quillen (T). 3B — Langdon (T). Records: Tippecanoe 28-4.

■ Tennis

Mattek-Sands tops Li, advances at French Open PARIS (AP) — There were moments, as recently as last year, when a body that would not stay healthy and on-court results prompted Bethanie MattekSands to wonder whether it was simply time to call it a career after more than a decade as a professional tennis player. “She was ready to quit,” her husband, Justin Sands, recalled. “She was like, ‘I’m done. I can’t do it. I don’t want to come back.’” Instead, Mattek-Sands “stuck it out,” in her words, making some significant changes to her diet after discovering a host of food allergies, to her point-topoint focus. And at age 28, in her 27th Grand Slam tournament, Mattek-Sands earned her most significant

victory to date, a 5-7, 6-3, 62 upset of 2011 champion Li Na at the rain-soaked French Open on Thursday to join four other American women in the third round. “I know how I can play, and, you know, there were times when I just physically couldn’t do it,” the 67thranked Mattek-Sands said, “and I think that’s really frustrating.” There was hip surgery less than a week after her wedding in late 2008, a torn shoulder in 2011, a broken right big toe in 2012. Her ranking plummeted from a best of 30th to outside the top 200. She found herself playing in the sport’s minor leagues and going through qualifying just to get into tournaments. And now?

“She can take more enjoyment out of it, out of playing,” said her coach, Adam Altschuler. “We’ve got to go do it the day after this and the day after that. But it’s great for her to show the world she’s this good.” By beating the sixthseeded Li to earn her fourth career win in 25 tries against top-10 players, Mattek-Sands helped give the United States its largest group of women in the third round at the claycourt Grand Slam tournament since six made it in 2004. The five U.S. women left, out of the 15 in the main draw, are the most this far at any Grand Slam tournament since the halfdozen at Wimbledon in 2005. “We have a lot of talent-

ed, young kids,” MattekSands said, then added with a wink and a smile, “Obviously, older kids, too.” The other Americans in the third round: No. 17 Sloane Stephens and 54thranked Jamie Hampton, who also won Thursday, and No. 1 Serena Williams and No. 29 Varvara Lepchenko, who won Wednesday. “Other than Serena, we’re all a work in progress. A couple years ago, we were not even here. And so we’ve definitely taken a step forward and we’re still progressing and still trying to make that push,” said Hampton, who beat qualifier Anna Karolina Schmiedlova of Slovakia 75, 6-2. “Whenever you have a big group like that, there are going to be a few that

are going to rise.” Up next for the 23-yearold Hampton is No. 7 Petra Kvitova, the 2011 Wimbledon champion. The 20-year-old Stephens, meanwhile, faces 92ndranked Marina Erakovic, who beat No. 16 Dominika Cibulkova 6-2, 2-6, 6-4 to become the first woman from New Zealand to reach the French Open’s third round. Stephens, like other players on a wet afternoon, weathered two rain delays during a 6-1, 6-3 win against Vania King of the U.S. “You literally have nothing to do,” Stephens said. “Should I eat? Do cartwheels?” Only 18 of 32 scheduled singles matches were com-

pleted, with two-time Australian Open champion Victoria Azarenka and 2011 U.S. Open champion Sam Stosur among the winners. Six were suspended in progress defending champion Maria Sharapova led Canada’s Eugenie Bouchard by a set and a break when they stopped and eight were postponed entirely, including seventime French Open title winner Rafael Nadal against Slovakia’s Martin Klizan. Last year’s runner-up to Nadal, Novak Djokovic, gestured at the dark, threatening sky between points, as if to admonish the clouds for even considering halting play before he could finish a 6-2, 6-0, 6-2 victory over 83rd-ranked Guido Pella of Argentina.


SPORTS

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Scores

BASEBALL Baseball Expanded Standings All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB WCGB Boston 33 22 .600 — — New York 30 23 .566 2 — 30 24 .556 2½ ½ Baltimore 29 24 .547 3 1 Tampa Bay 23 31 .426 9½ 7½ Toronto Central Division L Pct GB WCGB W Detroit 29 23 .558 — — Cleveland 29 24 .547 ½ 1 24 27 .471 4½ 5 Chicago 23 28 .451 5½ 6 Minnesota 21 29 .420 7 7½ Kansas City West Division L Pct GB WCGB W Texas 33 20 .623 — — Oakland 31 24 .564 3 — Los Angeles 24 29 .453 9 6 23 31 .426 10½ 7½ Seattle 16 37 .302 17 14 Houston NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB WCGB Atlanta 32 21 .604 — — Washington 27 27 .500 5½ 6 26 28 .481 6½ 7 Philadelphia 22 29 .431 9 9½ New York 13 41 .241 19½ 20 Miami Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB St. Louis 35 17 .673 — — Pittsburgh 34 20 .630 2 — Cincinnati 33 21 .611 3 — 22 30 .423 13 10 Chicago 19 33 .365 16 13 Milwaukee West Division L Pct GB WCGB W Arizona 30 23 .566 — — San Francisco 29 25 .537 1½ 4 Colorado 28 25 .528 2 4½ 24 29 .453 6 8½ San Diego 22 29 .431 7 9½ Los Angeles INTERLEAGUE Wednesday's Games Chicago Cubs 9, Chicago White Sox 3 Philadelphia 4, Boston 3 Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 2 Pittsburgh 5, Detroit 3 N.Y. Mets 9, N.Y.Yankees 4 Baltimore 9, Washington 6 Tampa Bay 3, Miami 1 Toronto 3, Atlanta 0 Arizona at Texas, ppd., rain Minnesota 4, Milwaukee 1 St. Louis 5, Kansas City 3 Houston 6, Colorado 3 L.A. Angels 4, L.A. Dodgers 3 San Diego 3, Seattle 2, 10 innings Oakland 9, San Francisco 6 Thursday's Games Texas 9, Arizona 5 Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 3 Seattle 7, San Diego 1 San Francisco 5, Oakland 2 Boston 9, Philadelphia 2 Cleveland 7, Cincinnati 1 Pittsburgh 1, Detroit 0, 11 innings N.Y. Mets 3, N.Y.Yankees 1 Baltimore 2, Washington 0 Tampa Bay 5, Miami 2 Atlanta 11, Toronto 3 Minnesota 8, Milwaukee 6 Kansas City at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Houston at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. AMERICAN LEAGUE Friday's Games Boston (Lester 6-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-4), 7:05 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 7-0) at Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 8-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 3-3), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (W.Davis 3-4) at Texas (D.Holland 4-2), 8:05 p.m. Seattle (Iwakuma 5-1) at Minnesota (Pelfrey 3-5), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 3-3) at Oakland (Colon 5-2), 10:05 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 1-2) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 2-1), 10:05 p.m. Toronto (Jenkins 1-0) at San Diego (Marquis 6-2), 10:10 p.m. Saturday's Games Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City at Texas, 4:05 p.m. Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:15 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. Detroit at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Texas, 3:05 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 8:05 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Wednesday's Games Houston 6, Colorado 3 Thursday's Games Houston (Harrell 3-6) at Colorado (Nicasio 4-1), 8:40 p.m. Friday's Games Arizona (Miley 3-4) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 0-0), 2:20 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 2-0) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 6-2), 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 3-5) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-8), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Marcum 0-5) at Miami (Turner 0-0), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 3-5) at Atlanta (Teheran 3-1), 7:30 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 4-2) at St. Louis (S.Miller 5-3), 8:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-3) at Colorado (Garland 3-6), 8:40 p.m. Toronto (Jenkins 1-0) at San Diego (Marquis 6-2), 10:10 p.m. Saturday's Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 7:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:15 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7:15 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Sunday's Games N.Y. Mets at Miami, 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Arizona at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 4:10 p.m. Toronto at San Diego, 10:10 p.m. Indians 7, Reds 1 Cincinnati ab r h bi Choo cf 3 0 1 0 CIzturs ss 4 0 1 0 Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 4 1 1 0 Bruce rf 4 0 2 1 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 Mesorc dh 4 0 1 0 DRonsn lf 3 0 2 0 Hanign c 3 0 0 0

Cleveland ab Bourn cf 5 Kipnis 2b 5 ACarer ss 3 Aviles ss 0 Swisher 1b 4 CSantn dh 4 MrRynl 3b 4 Brantly lf 3 YGoms c 4 Raburn rf 1

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Home 16-12 20-10 16-10 14-13 14-15

Away 14-11 9-15 12-15 10-16 8-14

Stubbs rf 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 8 1 Totals 35 711 7 Cincinnati .................000 001 000—1 Cleveland..................000 700 00x—7 DP_Cleveland 2. LOB_Cincinnati 6, Cleveland 7. 2B_Phillips (13), Bruce (18), Mesoraco (6), Bourn (7), A.Cabrera (18), Raburn (7). SB_Brantley (4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati H.Bailey L,3-4 . . .3 2-3 7 7 7 1 5 Simon . . . . . . . . .2 1-3 2 0 0 1 2 Hoover . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 0 0 1 M.Parra . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 0 0 2 Cleveland Kazmir W,3-2 . . . . . . .7 8 1 1 1 5 Hagadone . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 0 1 Albers . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 0 1 HBP_by H.Bailey (A.Cabrera). Umpires_Home, Eric Cooper; First, Paul Schrieber; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T_2:54. A_18,364 (42,241). Thursday's Major League Linescores INTERLEAGUE Arizona . . .000 003 200—5 14 0 Texas . . . . .024 120 00x—9 15 1 McCarthy, Collmenter (3), W.Harris (6), Sipp (7), Mat.Reynolds (8) and M.Montero; Grimm, Kirkman (7), Cotts (7), R.Ross (9) and Pierzynski. W_Grimm 5-3. L_McCarthy 2-4. HRs_Texas, Moreland (11), Dav.Murphy (7). Chicago (A) 001 001 001—3 8 1 Chicago (N) 020 410 01x—8 11 1 Peavy, N.Jones (5), Lindstrom (7), Omogrosso (8) and Flowers; Tr.Wood, Russell (7), Putnam (7), Marmol (8), Gregg (9) and Castillo. W_Tr.Wood 5-3. L_Peavy 6-3. HRs_Chicago (N), Tr.Wood (2), Schierholtz (6), Valbuena (6). Seattle . . . .012 001 210—7 9 0 San Diego .000 100 000—1 4 0 F.Hernandez, O.Perez (9) and Sucre; Cashner, Stauffer (7), Vincent (9) and Hundley. W_F.Hernandez 6-4. 4-3. HRs_Seattle, L_Cashner K.Morales (7), Ryan (2), Franklin 2 (2), En.Chavez (2). Oakland . . .010 000 100—2 5 1 San Fran . .000 004 10x—5 10 1 Griffin, Okajima (6), Blevins (7), Neshek (8) and D.Norris; Zito, R.Ramirez (7), Kontos (7), Affeldt (7), Romo (9) and Posey. W_Zito 4-3. L_Griffin 5-4. Sv_Romo (14). Washington 000 000 000—0 3 0 Baltimore . .001 000 01x—2 9 0 Haren, Abad (8), Storen (8) and K.Suzuki; F.Garcia, Ji.Johnson (9) and Wieters. W_F.Garcia 2-2. L_Haren 4-6. Sv_Ji.Johnson (17). Boston . . . .400 001 103—9 14 0 Phil . . . . . . .200 000 000—2 6 1 F.Morales, Breslow (6), Mortensen (7), Tazawa (8), A.Bailey (9) and Saltalamacchia; Pettibone, Horst (6), Stutes (8), Durbin (9) and Kratz. W_F.Morales 1-0. L_Pettibone 3-1. HRs_Boston, J.Gomes (3), D.Ortiz (9). Philadelphia, D.Young (4). Detroit . . . .00000000000—0 9 0 Pittsburgh .00000000001—1 9 0 (11 innings) Fister, Benoit (8), Coke (9), Putkonen (10) and B.Pena; Locke, Mazzaro (6), Watson (8), Ju.Wilson (9), Melancon (10), Morris (11) and R.Martin. W_Morris 3-2. L_Putkonen 1-1. New York (N)020000 010—3 4 1 New York (A)001000 000—1 4 0 Gee, Rice (8), Parnell (9) and Recker; Nuno, Kelley (7), Logan (8), Chamberlain (8) and Au.Romine, C.Stewart. W_Gee 3-6. L_Nuno 1-2. Sv_Parnell (9). HRs_New York (N), Byrd (6). New York (A), Cano (14). Tampa Bay .000 002 102—5 6 1 Miami . . . . .100 000 010—2 5 0 Colome, McGee (6), J.Wright (7), Jo.Peralta (8), Lueke (8), Rodney (9) and J.Molina; Nolasco, Da.Jennings (7), A.Ramos (8), M.Dunn (9), Qualls (9) and Brantly. W_Colome 1-0. L_Nolasco 3-6. Sv_Rodney (11). HRs_Tampa Bay, Joyce (9), Loney (5). Toronto . . .000 003 000—3 7 1 Atlanta . . . .111 00332x—11 16 1 Dickey, Lincoln (7), Redmond (8) and H.Blanco, Arencibia; Minor, Walden (8), A.Wood (9) and McCann. W_Minor 7-2. L_Dickey 4-7. HRs_Atlanta, F.Freeman (4), R.Johnson (1). Milwaukee .000 003 120—6 12 0 Minnesota .001 411 10x—8 12 0 Lohse, D.Hand (5), Axford (8) and Lucroy; Walters, Roenicke (7), Duensing (8), Pressly (8), Burton (9) and Doumit. W_Walters 2-0. L_Lohse 1-6. Sv_Burton (2). HRs_Minnesota, Parmelee (5), Dozier (2), Mauer (5), Doumit (5). Midwest League At A Glance Eastern Division W L Pct. GB South Bend (D’Backs) 34 17 .667 — Fort Wayne (Padres) 30 22 .577 4½

AND SCHEDULES

SPORTS ON TV TODAY AUTO RACING 10 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualifying for Lucas Oil 200, at Dover, Del. 11 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for FedEx 400, at Dover, Del. 12:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for 5-Hour Energy 200, at Dover, Del. 3 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for FedEx 400, at Dover, Del. 5 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, Lucas Oil 200, at Dover, Del. COLLEGE SOFTBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — World Series, game 5, teams TBD, at Oklahoma City 9 p.m. ESPN2 — World Series, game 6, teams TBD, at Oklahoma City GOLF 9 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Nordea Masters, second round, at Stockholm Noon TGC — LPGA, ShopRite Classic, first round, at Galloway, N.J. 2:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, second round, at Dublin, Ohio 7 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic, first round, at Des Moines, Iowa (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. FSN — Cincinnati at Pittsburgh MLB — Regional coverage, Boston at N.Y. Yankees or Detroit at Baltimore 10 p.m. WGN — Chicago White Sox at Oakland NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference finals, game 2, teams TBD TENNIS 5 a.m. ESPN2 — French Open, third round, at Paris Bowling Green (Rays) West Michigan (Tigers) Dayton (Reds) Lansing (Blue Jays) Great Lakes (Dodgers) Lake County (Indians) Western Division

30 26 23 21 18 17

23 25 30 29 35 33

.566 5 .510 8 .434 12 .42012½ .340 17 .34016½

W L Pct. GB Cedar Rapids (Twins) 32 19 .627 — 31 22 .585 2 Beloit (Athletics) Quad Cities (Astros) 29 23 .558 3½ Peoria (Cardinals) 27 24 .529 5 Clinton (Mariners) 25 27 .481 7½ Kane County (Cubs) 24 27 .471 8 Wisconsin (Brewers) 23 26 .469 8 20 28 .41710½ Burlington (Angels) Thursday's Games Lake County 6, Bowling Green 1 Wisconsin 9, Beloit 5 Cedar Rapids 5, Clinton 3, 1st game West Michigan 4, Great Lakes 3 Dayton 9, South Bend 0 Fort Wayne 7, Lansing 4 Peoria at Burlington, ccd., rain Clinton at Cedar Rapids, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game Kane County at Quad Cities, ccd., rain Friday's Games Lake County at Dayton, 7 p.m. Lansing at Great Lakes, 7:05 p.m. West Michigan at Fort Wayne, 7:05 p.m. Cedar Rapids at Kane County, 7:30 p.m. Quad Cities at Beloit, 7:30 p.m. Burlington at Clinton, 8 p.m. Peoria at Wisconsin, 8:05 p.m. South Bend at Bowling Green, 8:05 p.m. Saturday's Games Burlington at Clinton, 7 p.m. Lake County at Dayton, 7 p.m. West Michigan at Fort Wayne, 7:05 p.m. Lansing at Great Lakes, 7:05 p.m. Cedar Rapids at Kane County, 7:30 p.m. Peoria at Wisconsin, 7:35 p.m. Quad Cities at Beloit, 8 p.m. South Bend at Bowling Green, 8:05 p.m. Sunday's Games Cedar Rapids at Kane County, 2 p.m. Lake County at Dayton, 2 p.m. Peoria at Wisconsin, 2:05 p.m. Quad Cities at Beloit, 3 p.m. Burlington at Clinton, 3 p.m. Lansing at Great Lakes, 3:05 p.m. West Michigan at Fort Wayne, 3:05 p.m. South Bend at Bowling Green, 6:05 p.m. Thursday's Scores Boy's Baseball Division I Regional Semifinal Region 1-Canton Aurora 7, N. Can. Hoover 5 Mentor 6, Brunswick 3 Region 2-Dublin Gahanna Lincoln 10, Marysville 1 Hilliard Darby 15, Thomas Worthington 13 Region 3-Bowling Green/Cleveland Cle. St. Ignatius 3, Avon Lake 2 Tol. St. Francis 10, Perrysburg 5 Region 4-Cincinnati Cin. Moeller 10, Liberty Twp. Lakota E. 1 Clayton Northmont 6, Mason 1 Division II Regional Semifinal Region 5-Hudson Akr. Hoban 3, Chardon NDCL 2 Youngs. Mooney 8, Can. South 4 Region 6-Tiffin Defiance 15, Parma Hts. Holy Name 1 Granville 6, Wapakoneta 5 Region 7-Zanesville Cadiz Harrison Cent. 3, Vincent Warren 0 Waverly 3, Millersburg W. Holmes 2 Region 8-Dayton Plain City Jonathan Alder 6, Spring. Shawnee 5 Tipp City Tippecanoe 3, Franklin 2 Division III Regional Semifinal Region 9-Massilon Orrville 8, Wickliffe 4 Youngs. Ursuline 6, LaGrange Keystone 1 Region 10-Elida Bloom-Carroll 4, Ontario 1 Genoa Area 8, Lima Central Catholic 3 Division III Region 11-Chillicothe W. Lafayette Ridgewood 12, Oak Hill 2 Wheelersburg 4, Portsmouth W. 2 Region 12-Xenia Hamilton Badin 1, Cin. Hills Christian Academy 0 Johnstown Northridge 1, Cin. Summit Country Day 0 Division IV Regional Semifinal Region 13-Copely

Cuyahoga Hts. 4, Dalton 0 New Middletown Spring. 6, Attica Seneca E. 0 Region 14-Hamler Defiance Tinora 11, McComb 1 Northwood 4, Delphos St. John's 3 Region 15-Lancaster Newark Cath. 12, Racine Southern 2 Tuscarawas Cent. Cath. 5, Mowrystown Whiteoak Region 16-Springfield Convoy Crestview 3, Lewisburg TriCounty N. 2 Russia 3, Arcanum 1 Thursday's Scores Softball Division I Regional Semifinal Region 1-Akron Medina 5, Austintown Fitch 3 Region 2-Clyde Elyria 9, Cle. St. Joseph 0 Region 3-Columbus N. Can. Hoover 8, Gahanna Lincoln 5 Region 4-Clayton Mason 3, Clayton Northmont 0 Division II Regional Semifinal Region 5-Akron Cuyahoga Falls Walsh Jesuit 4, Geneva 0 Region 6-Bucyrus Granville 11, Oberlin Firelands 0 Region 7-Pickerington Newark Licking Valley 4, Dover 2 Region 8-Mason Spring. Kenton Ridge 4, Hamilton Ross 3 Division III Regional Semifinal Region 9-Massillon Leavittsburg LaBrae 10, Youngs. Ursuline 2 Region 10-Ashland Magnolia Sandy Valley 3, Milan Edison 2, 10 innings Region 11-Lancaster Chillicothe Zane Trace 3, Chillicothe Huntington 0 Region 12-Fairborn Batavia Clermont NE 6, Casstown Miami E. 0 Division IV Regional Semifinal Region 13-Kent N. Robinson Col. Crawford 2, N. Jackson Jackson-Milton 1 Region 14-Findlay Edgerton 5, Fremont St. Joseph 4 Region 15-Pickerington Strasburg-Franklin 9, Racine Southern 0 Region 16-Tipp City Covington 10, Maria Stein Marion Local 0

HOCKEY NHL Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1 Tuesday, May 14: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 1 Friday, May 17: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3 Sunday, May 19: Ottawa 2, Pittsburgh 1, 2OT Wednesday, May 22: Pittsburgh 7, Ottawa 3 Friday, May 24: Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 2 Boston 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Thursday, May 16: Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT Sunday, May 19: Boston 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Tuesday, May 21: Boston 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Thursday, May 23: N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT Saturday, May 25: Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Detroit 3 Wednesday, May 15: Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Saturday, May 18: Detroit 4, Chicago 1 Monday, May 20: Detroit 3, Chicago 1 Thursday, May 23: Detroit 2, Chicago 0 Saturday, May 25: Chicago 4, Detroit 1 Monday, May 27: Chicago 4, Detroit 3 Wednesday, May 29: Chicago 2, Detroit 1, OT, Chicago wins series 4-3 Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday, May 14: Los Angeles 2, San Jose 0 Thursday, May 16: Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3 Saturday, May 18: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1, OT Tuesday, May 21: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 Thursday, May 23: Los Angeles 3, San Jose 0 Sunday, May 26: San Jose 2, Los Angeles 1 Tuesday, May 28: San Jose at Los

Friday, May 31, 2013 Angeles, 9 p.m. CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Saturday, June 1: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. Monday, June 3: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 5: Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m. Friday, June 7: Pittsburgh at Boston, 8 p.m. x-Sunday, June 9: Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 11: Pittsburgh at Boston, TBD x-Wednesday, June 12: Boston at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles vs. Chicago Saturday, June 1: Los Angeles at Chicago, 5 p.m. Sunday, June 2: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 4: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Thursday, June 6: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Saturday, June 8: Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m. x-Monday, June 10: Chicago at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 12: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBD

BASKETBALL NBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami vs. Indiana Wednesday, May 22: Miami 103, Indiana 102 OT Friday, May 24: Indiana 97, Miami 93 Sunday, May 26: Miami 114, Indiana 96 Tuesday, May 28: Indiana 99, Miami 92 Thursday, May 30: Miami 90, Indiana 79, Miami leads series 3-2 Saturday, June 1:Miami at Indiana, 8:30 p.m. x-Monday, June 3: Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 4, Memphis 0 Sunday, May 19: San Antonio 105, Memphis 83 Tuesday, May 21: San Antonio 93, Memphis 89, OT Saturday, May 25: San Antonio 104, Memphis 93, OT Monday, May 27: San Antonio 93, Memphis 86

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Points Leaders Through May 26 1. Jimmie Johnson...........................445 2. Carl Edwards ...............................413 3. Matt Kenseth................................394 4. Clint Bowyer.................................385 5. Kasey Kahne ...............................370 6. Dale Earnhardt Jr. .......................364 7. Kevin Harvick ...............................362 8. Paul Menard.................................347 9. Martin Truex Jr..............................336 10. Brad Keselowski ........................335 11. Kyle Busch .................................332 12. Aric Almirola...............................328 13. Greg Biffle ..................................324 14. Jamie McMurray........................321 15. Jeff Gordon................................320 16. Ryan Newman...........................315 17. Ricky Stenhouse Jr....................312 18. Kurt Busch .................................304 19. Joey Logano ..............................298 20.Tony Stewart ..............................291

GOLF Memorial Scores Thursday At Muirfield Village Golf Club Dublin, Ohio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,352; Par 72 (36-36) First Round a-denotes amateur Charl Schwartzel..................33-32—65 Scott Piercy ..........................31-35—66 Josh Teater ...........................33-34—67 Russell Henley .....................35-32—67 Kyle Stanley..........................31-36—67 Charlie Wi .............................34-33—67 Bill Haas................................36-32—68 Matt Kuchar ..........................36-32—68 Matt Jones............................33-36—69 Michael Thompson...............33-36—69 Robert Karlsson...................35-34—69 Chris Stroud .........................35-34—69 Brandt Jobe..........................35-35—70 Ryan Moore..........................37-33—70 Stewart Cink.........................37-33—70 Justin Leonard......................34-36—70 Billy Horschel........................34-36—70 Justin Rose...........................34-36—70 Derek Ernst ..........................37-33—70 Scott Stallings.......................36-34—70 James Driscoll......................35-35—70 Graham DeLaet ...................36-34—70 Fred Couples........................36-34—70 Trevor Immelman .................33-37—70 Gary Woodland ....................35-35—70 George Coetzee...................36-34—70 John Senden........................35-36—71 David Hearn .........................34-37—71 Roberto Castro.....................36-35—71 Martin Laird ..........................35-36—71 Bubba Watson......................36-35—71 Carl Pettersson.....................34-37—71 Cameron Tringale.................32-39—71 Kevin Chappell .....................35-36—71 Henrik Stenson ....................36-35—71 Tommy Gainey .....................37-34—71 Kevin Streelman...................37-34—71 Tiger Woods .........................35-36—71 Keegan Bradley....................37-34—71 Bud Cauley...........................35-36—71 Jason Day.............................36-36—72 Jordan Spieth.......................36-36—72 Charlie Beljan.......................35-37—72 J.J. Henry..............................34-38—72 K.J. Choi................................34-38—72 Brandt Snedeker..................36-36—72 Luke Guthrie.........................36-36—72 Brian Stuard .........................34-38—72 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano .......33-39—72 Pat Perez ..............................39-33—72 Camilo Villegas.....................38-34—72 Rickie Fowler........................37-35—72 John Huh..............................36-36—72 Bryce Molder........................34-38—72 Jimmy Walker.......................34-38—72 Charles Howell III.................36-36—72 a-Guan Tianlang ..................34-38—72 William McGirt......................37-36—73 Justin Hicks...........................34-39—73 Davis Love III........................34-39—73 Adam Scott...........................37-36—73 Ernie Els ...............................38-35—73 Luke Donald .........................34-39—73 Charley Hoffman..................38-35—73 Bo Van Pelt ...........................39-34—73 Tom Gillis ..............................38-35—73 Zach Johnson.......................35-38—73 Ben Curtis.............................37-36—73 Hunter Mahan ......................38-35—73 Dustin Johnson ....................39-34—73 Richard H. Lee .....................37-36—73 Erik Compton .......................35-39—74 Ryo Ishikawa ........................37-37—74 Mark Wilson..........................37-37—74 Marc Leishman ....................38-36—74

17

George McNeill ....................37-37—74 Ricky Barnes........................36-38—74 Brian Harman.......................37-37—74 Daniel Summerhays ............37-37—74 Matt Every ............................35-39—74 Robert Allenby......................35-39—74 Chris Kirk..............................34-40—74 Ted Potter, Jr.........................37-37—74 Vijay Singh............................38-36—74 Aaron Baddeley ...................36-38—74 Brian Davis ...........................39-36—75 Scott Brown..........................37-38—75 Mike Weir..............................38-37—75 David Lingmerth...................35-40—75 Ken Duke..............................39-36—75 James Hahn.........................36-39—75 Brendon de Jonge ...............38-37—75 Jim Furyk..............................35-40—75 Webb Simpson.....................36-39—75 Justin Bolli.............................38-37—75 Lee Westwood......................36-40—76 Jason Kokrak........................39-37—76 Fabian Gomez......................36-40—76 Jeff Overton..........................36-40—76 Kenny Perry..........................36-40—76 D.A. Points ............................37-39—76 Ben Kohles ...........................39-37—76 Casey Wittenberg.................36-40—76 Jonathan Byrd......................38-39—77 Geoff Ogilvy..........................38-39—77 Sang-Moon Bae...................36-41—77 Greg Chalmers.....................40-38—78 Lucas Glover ........................37-41—78 Rory McIlroy .........................38-40—78 Nicholas Thompson.............39-39—78 Seung-Yul Noh .....................39-39—78 Branden Grace.....................39-39—78 Shane Lowry ........................42-36—78 a-Steven Fox ........................38-40—78 Johnson Wagner..................37-42—79 Kevin Stadler ........................38-41—79 Brendan Steele ....................38-41—79 Nicolas Colsaerts.................39-41—80 a-Peter Williamson ...............44-37—81 Nick Watney..........................41-41—82

TRANSACTIONS Thursday's Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS_Named George Brett interim hitting coach and Pedro Grifol interim special assignment coach. MINNESOTA TWINS_Placed INF Trevor Plouffe on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 29. Recalled INF Chris Colabello from Rochester (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES_Designated 3B Juan Francisco for assignment. CHICAGO CUBS_Recalled RHP Zach Putnam up Iowa (PCL). Assigned RHP Alex Burnett to Iowa. Transferred RHP Kyuji Fujikawa to the 60-day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS_Placed OF Matt Kemp on the 15-day DL. Recalled C Tim Federowicz from Albuquerque (PCL). Reinstated RHP Stephen Fife from the 15-day DL and optioned him to Albuquerque. NEW YORK METS_Placed INF Ruben Tejada on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Omar Quintanilla from Las Vegas (PCL). Transferred RHP Frank Francisco to the 60-day DL. SAN DIEGO PADRES_Recalled RHP Nick Vincent from Tucson (PCL). Optioned RHP Anthony Bass to Tucson. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS_Selected the contract of RHP Michael Wacha from Memphis (PCL). Optioned RHP Michael Blazek to Memphis. Tranferred LHP Jaime Garcia to the 60-day DL. American Association WICHITA WINGNUTS_Traded LHP Kristhiam Linares to Amarillo for a player to be named. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS_Reinstated OF Ben Broussard to the active list. Placed OF Ray Navarrete, LHP Dontrelle Willis and LHP Matt Way on the inactive list. SUGAR LAND SKEETERS_Announced INF Chase Lambin has signed with Kansas City (AL). Can-Am League ROCKLAND BOULDERS_Released RHP Brandon Moore. NEWARK BEARS_Signed RHP David Dinelli. QUEBEC CAPITALES_Signed RHP Julian Sampson. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA_Fined Miami F LeBron James, Indiana F David West and Indiana G Lance Stephenson $5,000 each for violating the league's anti-flopping policy in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS_Signed FB Patrick DiMarco. BUFFALO BILLS_Signed WR DeMarco Sampson. CLEVELAND BROWNS_Signed LB Tommy Smith. Waived WR Perez Ashford. DETROIT LIONS_Signed RB Montell Owens. GREEN BAY PACKERS_Signed RB Eddie Lacy. NEW YORK GIANTS_Signed LB Kyle Bosworth and TE Chase Clement. NEW YORK JETS_Placed QB David Garrard on the reserve-retired list. Signed WR Ben Obomanu. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS_Signed CB Tharold Simon and OT Michael Bowie. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS_Signed D Alexei Marchenko to a three-year entrylevel contract. Assigned F Joakim Andersson, F Gustav Nyquist and G Jordan Pearce to Grand Rapids (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS_Agreed to terms with D Robyn Regehr on a twoyear contract extension. MONTREAL CANADIENS_Signed F Tim Bozon to a three-year contract. WINNIPEG JETS_Announced a new partnership with the Ontario Reign as their ECHL affiliate for the 2013-14 season. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA_Named Sacha van der Most interim coach. NEW YORK RED BULLS_Signed D Matt Miazga. National Women's Soccer League SKY BLUE FC_Called up D-F Rachel Breton and F Danielle Schulmann from Jersey Blues FC (WPSL). COLLEGE S O U T H E R N CONFERENCE_Announceed the addition East Tennessee, Mercer and VMI to the league, beginning July 2014. CUMBERLAND_Named Kyle Smith men's soccer coach. HAMLINE_Named Alex Focke men's assistant basketball coach. MONTANA WESTERN_Named B.J. Robertson football coach. QUINNIPIAC_Named Suzy Whaley volunteer women's golf coach.


18

Friday, May 31, 2013

SPORTS

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

■ Softball

Buccs ■ CONTINUED FROM 18 But a huge catch by Jessica Dammeyer in center field and some plays made in the infield helped get Yingst out of the first two innings without suffering any damage. Covington couldn’t break through offensively in the first two innings despite connecting for two hits in the first and two more in the second inning. That’s because Marion Local threw out two Bucc runners at second, switching the momentum heavily to the Flyer side of the field.

That would change in the third, however, as Yingst found her groove in the circle by shutting down the side and then Covington followed up with a three-run effort in the bottom of the inning. “Casey lost her focus a bit in the second inning, but she started to find herself in the third inning,” Denlinger said. “We kind of fed off of that at the plate.” Jessie Shilt got things rolling with a one-out single and Heidi Snipes followed with a single to put runners at the corners. After Snipes

stole second, Yingst helped out her cause with a sacrifice RBI that scored Shilt for the first run of the game. Connor Schaffer then wrapped a hard-hit ball up the middle and reached on the error, which set up a two-run single by Brittanie Flora. “We hit the ball well,” said Denlinger after his team connected for 15 base hits in the contest. “I think once we broke through, we relaxed and kept the pressure on.” Covington followed up the huge third inning with

another three-run effort in the fourth as Haley Adams led off with a double to left field, and hits by Cassidy Cain, Heidi Cron and Jessie Shilt followed to push the lead to 6-0. A pair of Covington doubles by Schaffer and Morgan Arbogast pushed the lead to 7-0 in the bottom of the fifth and then Covington put the game away in the bottom of the sixth. Shilt singled and stole second with one out and Snipes followed with a walk to set up a two-run double

by Schaffer. Flora then connected on a walk-off double that scored Erin Olson, who was inserted as a courtesy runner for Schaffer. “The girls are focused,” said Denlinger. “We’re playing solid defense, and that’s who we really are. That’s our identity.” Covington once again put together an error-free performance in recording its 16th shutout of the season, but the offensive firepower was just as impressive as nine Buccs recorded hits or contributed with an RBI. Schaffer led the way

with a pair of doubles and two RBI on three hits, while Flora drove in three runs on a double and a single. Shilt had a pair of base hits for two RBI to go along with doubles turned in by Arbogast and Adams. Snipes had a pair of hits, while Cain and Snipes reached on singles. Yingst rounded out the Covington offensive performance with an sacrifice fly to drive in a run. The Buccs advance to their third straight regional final on Saturday at noon against Triad at Tipp City.

■ National Basketball Association

■ Softball

Vikings

Miami East’s Madison Linn tracks a fly ball. ■ CONTINUED FROM 15 the Rockets (22-5) added two more unearned runs in the second — and then unloaded for three earned runs in the fourth to put the game away. “They’re one heck of a team,” Miami East coach Brian Kadel said of the Rockets. “Their pitcher threw well, held us to only one hit, their defense played well and they hit the ball hard. “You’ve got to have your best day against a team like that — and we did not have our best day.” Things certainly didn’t start well. After a leadoff walk to begin the game, the Vikings recorded two outs and looked ready to get out of the inning. A hit-batter put runners on first and second, but starter Paige Kiesewetter induced an easy pop to third. But even after there was contact on the basepaths that led directly to the ball hitting the ground, the run stayed on the board, the runners stayed on base and the inning continued. The umpires ruled that the third baseman had given way to the shortstop and that’s why the ball had dropped, not addressing the contact at all. “There were a couple of plays we should have made defensively early on, and it gave them a little momentum,” Kadel said. The second play came in the second inning. After a one-out single and a twoout infield single, Chelsae Osborn blooped a single to right. The fielder overran the ball on the ground, allowing both runners to score. “We’ve been able to work out of situations like that before,” Kadel said. “Usually we’re putting the ball in play hard. But if we don’t have it going at the plate and the other team gets going, it’s tougher to come out of it.” And with Emily Anderson dealing on the mound, the Vikings (23-7) couldn’t get its offense started. Anderson struck out five, walked four and gave up one hit in the game to Lindsay Brookhart in the

AP PHOTO

Miami Heat forward LeBron James hangs from the basket after dunking during the second half of Game 5 in the Eastern Conference finals against the Indiana Pacers Thursday in Miami.

STAFF PHOTOS/ANTHONY WEBER

Miami East’s Lindsey Brookhart runs to third base during a Division III regional semifinal game against Clermont Northeastern Thursday in Fairborn. fourth inning. And that was the one inning that the Vikings threatened in — after Brookhart’s oneout single, Christine Bowling drew a two-out walk and Paige Mullen reached on an error to load the bases. But Anderson got the final batter of the inning swinging to end it. The Vikings’ lone highlight in the game came on defense in the fifth. After a leadoff double by Alexis Burden and a single to put runners on the corners, Miami East caught the trailing runner trying to steal second. Then Rachel Ward hit a grounder to Bowling at short. Bowling paused to look the runner at third back then fired to Sam Denlinger at first — and Burden took off. Denlinger recorded the out and fired home to Sarah O’Neal to complete the double play. It was the second time the Vikings’ senior class had been to the regional semifinal — they were there as freshmen. “Two district titles, district runners-up last year, and I haven’t checked the record books but I have no doubt that this is the winningest senior class to go through the school,” Kadel said. “They’ve helped us

Miami East pitcher Paige Kiesewetter fires a pitch Thursday. get this program moving in a positive direction, and it’s going to be sad not seeing them here anymore.” CNE ..120 300 0 — 6 11 1 ME.......000 000 0 — 0 1 4

Anderson and Gilkerson. Kiesewetter, Denlinger (4) and O’Neal. WP — Anderson. LP — Kiesewetter. 2B — Gilkerson (C), Miller (C), Burden (C). Records: Clermont Northeastern 22-5, Miami East 23-7.

Heat recapture momentum with 90-79 win MIAMI (AP) — There will be no win-or-else Game 6 in the Eastern Conference finals for the Miami Heat this season. LeBron James saw to that, and now the reigning champions are one victory from a third straight trip to the NBA Finals. James finished with 30 points, eight rebounds and six assists, Udonis Haslem made his last eight shots on the way to a 16-point night, and the Heat used a dominant third quarter to turn things around and beat the Indiana Pacers 90-79 in Game 5 on Thursday. Mario Chalmers scored 12 points and Dwyane Wade added 10 for the Heat, who lead the series 3-2 and will look to close it out at Indiana on Saturday night. The Heat ousted the Pacers in six games in a second-round matchup last season. Paul George had 27 points and 11 rebounds for the Pacers, who got 22 points from Roy Hibbert and 17 from David West. The Pacers led by as many as seven at one point, but had no answer for the Heat in

the third, getting outscored 30-13 in the period, including 21-6 in the final 7 minutes. James and Haslem combined for 26 points in the third, and were simply too much. Haslem’s first shot of the night hit the side of the backboard. He didn’t miss again, going 8 for 8 and sealing it with a jumper with 1:51 left 12 seconds before drawing an offensive foul against Lance Stephenson, the sixth for the Pacers’ guard, who finished with just four points. A year ago, the Heat lost Game 5 of the East finals to Boston, and needed a 45-point game from James in Game 6 just to extend their season. Not this time. The Finals and a date with San Antonio is now one win away. As if this one needed any more buildup, there was plenty of news long before tipoff. And all that happened more than eight hours prior to game time. Things didn’t exactly calm down once the ball went into the air.

■ Golf

Schwartzel takes early lead at the Memorial DUBLIN (AP) — Charl Schwartzel made sure one hole didn’t ruin an entire round Thursday in the Memorial. Schwartzel hit the ball so consistently well at Muirfield Village that the former Masters champion twice had stretches of four straight birdies. And when he made a double bogey with an 8-iron in hand and his ball on a tee toward the

end of the round, he got rid of that bad taste with one last birdie for a 7-under 65. Schwartzel had a oneshot lead over Scott Piercy, who went from smashing it to playing it safe, and he was six shots clear of five-time winner Tiger Woods. Woods hit the ball well enough to be much closer, though he missed too many birdie chances and didn’t make up any ground on the

par 5s. “That’s probably the highest score I could have shot,” Woods said after his 1under 71. Woods was one shot worse than 53-year-old Fred Couples, the Presidents Cup captain at Muirfield Village this fall, and one shot better than 14-year-old Guan Tianlang, who has played more PGA Tour events than Woods over the last two

months. Rory McIlroy, meanwhile, might be headed for another short week at the tournament Jack Nicklaus built. After opening with a birdie, McIlroy didn’t putt nearly well enough to atone for some loose shots. McIlroy four-putted the par-3 12th for a double bogey, had a three-putt bogey on No. 7 and ended his round by missing a 4-

foot birdie putt. That gave him a 78. “I don’t really have many explanations for this,” McIlroy said. Schwartzel played in the morning, when the slick greens were still smooth, and he made 10 birdies in his round. Most of them were in the 10-foot range, though he picked up a bonus with a 25-foot putt down a slight ridge on the 16th. As

well as he played, he thought a great round might turn into just a good one with one swing. His 8-iron on the par-3 eighth hole drifted right and caught the downward slope of a bunker. The South African tried to put a little more spin on the difficult shot and wound up sending it over the green. He chipped past the hole to about 8 feet and missed that to take double bogey.


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