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COMING SATURDAY Remote Possibilities • The season finale of “The Mentalist” has the cast seeing red as they continue to search for notorious serial killer, Red John. The show airs Sunday on CBS. Inside

May 2, 2013

Vol. 123 No. 87

TODAY’S

NEWS

TODAY’S WEATHER

75° 55° For a full weather report, turn to Page 15A.

CIVIL WAR WARNING Civil War Day planned • Sidney Residents who live in the Shelby County Fairgrounds area should be aware that the Shelby County Historical Society willh host a Civil War Day on Friday. Residents may hear the firing of rifles and cannons from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.

INSIDE TODAY

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Gearing up for GOBA Sidney prepares for bicyclists BY PATRICIA ANN SPEELMAN pspeelman@civitasmedia.com Sidney is gearing up to play host to more than 2,500 bicyclists when the Great Ohio Bicycle Adventure (GOBA) makes a stopover here June 21. So reported Sidney-Shelby County Chamber of Commerce President Jeff Raible GOBA participants are exduring his presentation about pected to come from as many the event to the Sidney Rotary as 40 states and several forClub membership Monday. eign countries. They will visit

Sidney near the end of their 250-mile, week-long ride through west central Ohio. Raible said that, typically, rid-

ers range in age from 2 to 85 and that they enjoy seeking out local points of interest and historical sites. While they are in Sidney, most will camp in tents on the lawn of Sidney Middle School in an encampment dubbed GOBAville. Some will camp inside, bedding down in sleeping bags on the middle school gym and Masonic Lodge floors. Area nonprofit organizations and churches will set upSee GOBA/Page 13A

Jordan: One of best town hall meetings he’s ever attended BY TOM MILLHOUSE tmillhouse@civitasmedia

Fairlawn plans Walk-a-thon • The Fairlawn FCCLA will host the fourth annual Walk-athon May 9 at the school. this year’s theme is Celebrate Life. All donations will be sent to Make A Wish Foundation. 6A

DEATHS Obituaries and/or death notices for the following people appear on Page 3A today: • John H. “Paw” Permenter • Don Lee Dicke

INDEX Anna/Botkins ......................9A City, County records ...........2A Classified.........................4-7B Comics .............................14A Hints from Heloise ..............6A Horoscope........................14A Let Yourself Go ...................7A Localife ............................6-7A Nation/World.......................5A Obituaries ...........................3A Religion ...............................8A Sports.......................1-3B, 8B State news..........................4A ’Tween 12 and 20.............12A Weather/Sudoku/Abby/Out of the Past/Dr. Roach .....15A

TODAY’S THOUGHT

Although U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan was called a barnyard obscenity — which he said was a first — he characterized a public forum Tuesday night at VFW Post 4239 one of the best town hall meetings he has attended. Jordan, R-Urbana, spoke briefly on a variety subjects at the town hall meeting sponsored by the Shelby County Liberty Group before taking questions. He represents the 4th Congressional District, which includes Shelby and Auglaize counties, in addition to a number of other counties. Jordan praised Frank and Phil Gilardi, owners of

Freshway Foods in Sidney, for their action to sue government over compliance with the federally mandated health insurance provisions because of their Catholic faith. They are against providing contraceptive methods, including abortion-inducing drugs for their employees. “They said ‘we take our faith seriously and we’re going to stand up and be counted,’” Jordan said. “God bless them.” Jordan spoke out against the administration and Democrat-controlled Senate piling up more debt for the SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg generations to come, which is he said is now almost up to U.S. REP. Jim Jordan, Urbana, 4th-District, talks about the greatness of America and what needs to change during a Lib$17 trillion. See JORDAN/Page 13A erty Group meeting at the Sidney VFW Tuesday.

Fairlawn levy returns to Tuesday’s ballot BY RACHEL LLOYD rlloyd@civitasmedia.com Fairlawn Local Schools returns a renewal tax issue to the ballot on Tuesday, after it fell by only 19 votes in November. The 2.98-mill levy is not an increase but is a renewal that will continue to provide $150,000 in operating funds for the school district. The tax must be renewed every five years. It will continue to cost the owner of a $100,000 home $93.87 per

year, or $7.82 per month. The tax was first approved in 1977, and it has been continuously renewed six time since then. “The renewal of this tax levy by the voters of the Fairlawn Local School District will assure that the board of education is able to continue to deliver a high quality education to all of its students,” Fairlawn Superintendent Steve Mascho said. “With the support of the citizens in our district, we have been able to meet the diverse needs of our students in the

“Even a liar tells a hundred truths to one lie; he has to, to make the lie good for anything.” — Henry Ward Beecher, American clergyman (18131887) For more on today in history, turn to Page 5A.

Date set for Community Prayer Breakfast

NEWS NUMBERS News tips, call 498-5962. Home delivery, call 4985939. Classified advertising, call 498-5925. Retail advertising, call 4985980 Visit the Sidney Daily News on the Web at www.sidneydailynews.com

past. By renewing this tax levy, our community will be continuing to support their board of education as we work to meet the needs of all students and keep our school district as Excellent. ” Fairlawn, rated “Excellent” by the Ohio Department of Education, operates at a $8,244 cost per student average, which is $511 per student less than the county average and $2,452 less than the state average. See BALLOT/Page 13A

Photo provided

State winners Logan Johnson (left) and Lauren Heaton (right) received first place at State FCCLA Conference in their Star Event Chapter Showcase Display. They will now compete at the national competition in Nashville, Tennessee in July.

Organizers of the 10th annual Community Prayer Breakfast announced today that plans for this year’s event are well underway. This communitywide, nondenominational event creates an opportunity for all in Shelby County to come together in fellowship and unified prayer. The Prayer Breakfast will take place at Christian Academy Schools on May 18. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. with the program beginning at 8 a.m. A complimentary break-

fast will be served and there is no cost to attend. All are invited to come enjoy the breakfast and uplifting program. Christian Academy Schools is located at 2151 W. Russell Road. Prayer Breakfast organizers include Mary Smith, Pastor Jane Madden, Catherine Toal, Vera Piper, Rodneyann Bensman, Bruce Inman, Paula Harshbarger and Jeff Raible. For more information or to make arrangements for group attendance, call Smith at 4927556.

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PUBLIC RECORD CONNECTION

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Osgood • The final euchre tournament was held April 25. Those who had the best scores were Carol Parmelee. Jerry Ruchty, Alan Gehret, Agnes Poeppelman, Ralph Winner and Bryon Davis. • St. Nicholas Parish Council will meet May 13 at 6:30 p.m. • On a wet Sunday morning, 18 young boys and girls received their First Communion at St. Nicholas. They were Erin Bergman, Cole Brunswick, Tyler Dirksen, Nicole Franck, Titus Gehret, Dean Hemmelgarn, Sydney Hutchinson, Regan Kremer, Lauren Meriring, Alexander Nelson, Samantha Oury, Emma Poeppelman, Grant Pohlman, Henry Stammen, Cole Steinburunner, Jake Topp, Jocelyn Tuente and Kendra Tuente. • The next recycling drive will be Saturday from 9 to 11 a.m. Items received will be paper, magazines, catalogs and cardboard. These items can be commingled, but they must be tied up, in paper bags, or in cardboard boxes that are easy to handle. In case of rain, cancellations are aired on WCSM or call Jude at (419) 582-2554. • On the weekend of May 11 and 12, the St. Nicholas and St. Louis Youth Ministries will sell long-stem, red roses for $2 each. The proceeds go to the Darke County Right to Life. • The Osgood American Legion will sponsor a dance on Saturday with Bill Corfield providing the music. Square dancing will be called.

For photo reprints, visit www.sidneydailynews.com

SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg

Hooping it up Taking part in hula hoop class are (l-r) Lilly Ison, 6, of Anna, hula hoop instructor Casey Bell, of Sidney, Teagan Ouhl, 7, of Anna, and Robin Ison, of Anna. The class was held Saturday in the parking lot of Village Salon and Spa in Anna. Lilly is the daughter of Robin Ison and Brian Ison. Teagan is the daughter of Doug and Jenny Ouhl.

Junior/senior event set The Christian Academy juniors and seniors will enjoy an evening at the Great Stone Castle Saturday for their formal junior/senior event. During the evening’s event, dinner will be catered by the Spot. Students will participate in an interactive Mur-

der Mystery drama performed by the Mahem and Murder Mystery group from Greenville. After the formal dinner and drama, the group will enjoy a fun night at Jumpy’s in Troy doing laser tag, arcade games and door prizes.

Weather teases, taunts county “April is the cruelest month,” wrote poet T.S. Eliot in 1922. In 2013, many area residents would agree with him. Although Shelby and its surrounding counties were spared the deep snows of the northern plains and the floods of the Mississippi River Valley in April, they were teased and taunted and thoroughly

driving under suspension. • Patrick L. Shropshire, 639 Linden Ave., was ordered to pay costs of $76 for a prohibited parking places violation. • Billie M. Bliss, 30, 225 Queen St., was fined $250 and ordered to pay $111 costs for driving under suspension. • Carolyn L. Maynard, 49, 5911 State Route 29 E., was fined $75 and was ordered to pay $111 costs for driving under suspension. • James E. Jones, 40, 210 University Drive, was fined $30 and ordered to pay $86 costs for a seatbelt violation. • Jordan A. Ragland, 19, 958 Port Jefferson Road, Apt. 2, was fined $25 for a right-of-way

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1451 N. Vandemark Road, Sidney, OH 45365-4099 www.sidneydailynews.com Frank Beeson Group Publisher

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I Circulation Customer Service Hours: The Circulation Department is open Monday-Friday 8 a.m. until 7 p.m. and on Saturday from 6 - 11 a.m. Call 498-5939 I All numbers are Area Code (937) Classified Advertising ..........498-5925 Retail Advertising ..................498-5980 Business News ........................498-5967 Comments, Story Ideas ..........498-5962 Circulation ..............................498-5939 City Desk ................................498-5971 Corrections (News) ..................498-5962 Editorial Page ..........................498-5962 Entertainment listings ..............498-5965 Events/Calendar items ............498-5968 Fax (Advertising) ..................498-5990 Fax (News)..............................498-5991 Social News ............................498-5965 Sports ......................................498-5960 Toll Free........................1-800-688-4820 e-mail:sdnnews@civitasmedia.com Published Monday and Wednesday through Saturday Open 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday

RECORD

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drenched by last month’s weather. Temperatures bounced from the low 20s to the 80s and back down again, first enticing residents with the promise of spring, then tickling them with early summer-like days, then pulling everyone back into winter, and by the end of the month, raising hopes again.

If April showers really do mean flowers, May should be a profusion of color and fragrance. Precipitation in Shelby County measured 5.51 inches last month, well over the 3.88-inch average. And it rained or snowed on 15 of the month’s 30 days. The historical average number of days with precipitation in April here is 13.

MUNICIPAL COURT In Sidney Municipal Court Monday, Judge Duane Goettemoeller fined Kenneth W. Marvin, 40, 237 1/2 W. South St., $250 for failure to reinstate a license and $30 for a seatbelt violation. He also was ordered to pay court costs of $221. • Ashley D. Gaugler, 41, 615 Montrose St., was ordered to pay a $50 fine plus $105 costs for no fishing license. She also got a $25 parks and recreation fine. • Lonnie E. Dixon, 50, 124 N. Miami Ave., was ordered to pay $134 costs for driving under suspension. • Joshua R. Holman, 26, 816 Taft St., was fined $250 and ordered to pay costs of $111 for

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Melanie Speicher News Editor Betty J. Brownlee Circulation Manager/ I-75 Group Business Manager I How to arrange home delivery: To subscribe to The Sidney Daily News or to order a subscription for someone else, call us at 498-5939 or 1-800-6884820.The subscription rates are: Motor Routes & Office Pay $41.00/13 wks. (incl. 2% Disc.) $77.00/26 wks. (incl. 5% Disc.) $143.00/52 wks. (incl. 10% Disc.) We accept VISA & MasterCard Mail Delivery $53.00 for 13 wks. $106.00 for 26 wks. $205.00 for 52 wks. Regular subscriptions are transferrable and/or refundable. Refund checks under $10 will not be issued. An administrative fee of $10 for all balances under $50 will be applied. Remaining balances of $50 or more will be charged a 20% administrative fee.

I Delivery Deadlines Monday-Friday 5:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. I Periodicals Postage Paid At Sidney, Ohio I Postmaster, please send changes to: 1451 N. Vandemark Rd., Sidney, OH 45365 I Member of: Sidney-Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, Ohio Newspaper Association and Associated Press

when turning left violation. • Deborah K. Walker, 55, 1627 Cypress Place, was fined $25 and ordered to pay $111 costs expired license for plates. • Shayne P. WadeCoulter, 19, 865 Crescent Place, was fined $30 and ordered to pay $105 costs for speeding. • Timothy L. Jacks, 37, 1621 Fair Oaks Drive, was ordered to pay $105 costs on a driving under suspension charge. • Dustin Ball, 18, was fined $75 and ordered to pay $111 costs for no operator’s license. • Stefanie A. Cain, 27, 17301 Lucas Geib Road, Botkins, was fined $30 plus $105 costs for speeding. • Brittany L. Edwards, 18, 1281 Maple Leaf Court, was fined $30 plus $105 costs for speeding. • Kevin D. Burdiss, 49, 218 Brooklyn Ave., was fined $25 plus $111 costs for a stop sign violation. In municipal court on Tuesday, April M. Radcliff, 32, 8422 Baker Road, Maplewood, was fined $20 plus $62.50 costs for a seatbelt violation. • Justin Perry, 28, 322 S. Wagner Ave., was fined $150 plus $10 costs for disorderly conduct. He also was ordered to pay $108 in costs on the dismissal of a criminal damaging charge. He was ordered to pay $10 costs for speeding, $103 costs for driving under the influence, $97 costs for DUI, $10 for operating a vehicle without reasonable control, and he was fined $600 for refusal with prior DUI and $250 for driving under suspension. A charge of driving under suspension was dismissed as well as a second offense in 20 years with refusal charge. • Jason Scott, 30, 327

N. West Ave., was sentenced to 11 days in jail with one day credit for time served on an attempted theft charge, amended from theft. • Rocky L. Stone, 32, 225 Queen St., was sentenced to serve 180 days in jail, with 42 days’ credit, for receiving stolen property. He also was ordered to pay $138 in costs. He was ordered to pay $128 costs on a stopping after accident violation, while charges of DUS and operating without reasonable control were dismissed, but he was ordered to pay $10 costs. • Demont D. Matthews, 33, 1127 Amherst Drive, Apt. 63, was fined $375 plus $97 costs and sentenced to five days in jail for physical control of a vehicle while under the influence, and fined $250 plus $10 costs for DUS, in addition to 160 hours of community service. A count of DUI first offense and use of headlight beams were dismissed. • Brooke D. Young, 28, 526 Michigan St., was fined $375 plus $122 costs and sentenced to 15 days in jail with 10 suspended for a DUI first offense. A charge of driving in marked lanes was dismissed. • Brandon P. White, 26, 4801 Dormire Road, was fined $200 plus $186 costs and sentenced to 30 days in jail for driving under suspension. Jail is suspended if fines and costs are paid. • Brittany V. Huston, 18, 250 Gemini St., was fined $25 plus $111 costs for operating a motor vehicle with a temporary permit. • Randi L. Gill, 28, 1510 Spruce Ave, was ordered to pay $111 on a DUS charge. • Michael A. Noll, 46, 7994 Amsterdam Road, Anna, was fined $30 plus $105 costs for speeding.

WEDNESDAY -12:52 a.m.: unruly juvenile. Police responded to a report of a 16-year-old girl leaving her residence without permission. The juvenile was later located and arrested on a probation violation. TUESDAY -11:21 p.m.: assault. Travis J. Bunch, of Huber Heights, reported being assaulted at 900 Wapakoneta Ave. Dillion M. Cornett, 19, was arrested for assault and underage consumption. -7:45 p.m.: OVI/DUS. Wayne H. King, 50, 1551 Cedarbrook Place, was arrested for operating a vehicle under the influence and driving under suspension. -7:01: grand jury indictment. Joseph Shawntale Wells, 36, 425 Jefferson St., was arrested on a grand jury indictment -5:59 p.m.: theft. Roy E. Elder Jr., 311 Maple St., reported somone took a brass ashtray stand with a bronze ashtray, painted silver, valued at $20, from his front porch sometime in the last six months. –5:36 p.m.: theft. Trevor M. Newbauer, 1527 E. Court St., Apt. H, reported the theft of cigarette rolling tubes, valued at $1, and a bag containing miscellaneous make-up and clothes, valued at $20. -2:17 p.m.: theft of dangerous drugs. Damara Lynn HarrodHicks, of Piqua, reported a prescription for Xanax was filled at the pharmacy at 1400 Michigan St. and was picked up but not by the person for whom it was prescribed. -10:14 a.m.: theft. Daniel A. Hamilton, 403 Summit St., reported unknown persons entered his vehicle and took two knives valued at $25. -9:32 a.m.: warrant. Lindsey Rice, 31, 12975 Sidney-Freyburg Road, Anna, was arrested on a warrant. -9:20 a.m.: warrant. Michael Lantz, 38, 202 N. Walnut Ave, was arrested on a warrant. -8:42 a.m.: failure to pay city taxes. Lacosta S. McGhee and Conrad McGhee Sr., 113 N. Pomeroy Ave, were issued summonses for failing to file taxes. MONDAY -2:01 p.m.: resisting arrest. Andrea L. Scholl, 21, 303 E. Court

COUNTY

St., was charged with resisting arrest at Jefferson Street and East Avenue. -1:59 p.m.: theft. Juan F. Mondragon, 500 N. Vandemark Road, No. 10, reported the theft of a car CD stereo, valued at $200, and a black jacket, valued at $50, taken from his vehicle.

Accidents Asha Marie Lee, 18, 730 Michigan St., was cited for failure to maintain assured clear distance following a two-vehicle collision Friday around 10:42 a.m. According to police reports, Lee was traveling west on Ohio 47 at the Interstate 75 southbound exit when her vehicle struck the rear of the vehicle driven by Stanley D. Godwin, 64, 9310 Turnpike St., DeGraff. The Lee vehicle was heavily damaged, while the Godwin vehicle sustained moderate damage. There were no injuries.

Fire, rescue WEDNESDAY -8:26 a.m.: false alarm. Emergency personnel were dispatched to 950 N. Vandemark Road. It was a false alarm. -3:25 a.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 300 block of North Miami Avenue. -2:31 a.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 1100 block of Hamilton Avenue. TUESDAY -9:02 p.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 1100 block of Constitution Avenue. -8:16 p.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 100 block of North Main Avenue. -6:45 p.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 100 block of West South Street. -5:05 p.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 1100 block of Riverbend Boulevard. -1:35 p.m.: medical. Medics were dispatched to the 200 block of Washington Street. -11:35 a.m.: gas leak. Emergency personnel responded to 2000 Schlater Drive for a gas leak. A towmotor had struck a gas line. The gas was shut off, and Vectren was notified. No injuries were reported.

RECORD

Sheriff’s log WEDNESDAY -11:18 a.m.: vandalism. A report was taken on a solar angel damaged at Shelby Memory Gardens, 8601 State Route 47. TUESDAY -6:35 p.m.: vandalism. Deputies took a report of vandalism at 202 Walnut St., Salem Township.

responded to the 12000 block of Ohio 65 in Salem Township for a medical call.

The Light Touch By Don Lochard The most important books to a married couple: cook and check. *** Sign at hearing aid center: “Let us give you some sound advice.” *** With so many things free these days — free world, free enterprise, free choice — why is the cost of living so high? *** The difference between news and gossip is whether you hear it or tell it. *** If you don’t stick your neck out, you’ll never get your head above the crowd.

Fire, rescue WEDNESDAY -1:20 a.m.: medical. Jackson Center Rescue responded to the 600 block of College Street, Jackson Center, for a medical call. TUESDAY -8:42 p.m.: medical. Anna Rescue responded to the 3100 block of Ohio 29 in Franklin Township for a medical call. -7: 21 p.m.: medical. Anna Rescue responded to Honda for a medical call. -6:41 p.m.: medical. Perry Port Salem Rescue

***

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Schools locked down

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

OBITUARIES John H. ‘Paw’ Parmenter

IN MEMORIAM

Shirley Lee Harris Visitation Friday 1pm - 2:30 pm Service 2:30pm.

BY MIKE ULLERY Civitas Media mullery@civitasmedia.com

COVINGTON — An alleged threat made in Darke County led to a precautionary lockdown at two of three buildings in the Covington School District on Wednesday. Superintendent David 492-5101 Larson said a parent View obituaries at called the office at Covcromesfh.com ington Elementary School and suggested they believed their child might possibly be in danger. In response, the elementary school was put Let your home pay you! on a “low-level lockdown,” Larson said. The low-level Teresa Rose lockdown means that 937-497-9662 classes continued as 800-736-8485 usual and children could 733 Fair Road, Sidney use the restrooms. Larson described the type of lockdown as the same procedure that is used if a child was injured 40039417 and a medic unit called. School officials want to make sure of the whereabouts of all students. As part of standard operating procedure, there BOTKINS, OHIO was in increased police Voted Readers presence at the school all Choice #1 day. Larson stated that Monument the police department Dealer for 3 years! was contacted “to be sure they were aware. Just to add a little extra secu- CALL 937-693-3263 for appointment 107 E. State St. rity.” “At no point today was any student or staff in any danger,” Larson said. % “It was just a pro-active situation to make sure Off that in the event someNow thru 5/31/13 thing happened, we were prepared.” Larson pointed out, on made-up, in-stock items only “Due to the increased 104 E. Mason Rd., Sidney police presence today and the importance of transparency to our families and making M, T, W 9-6, Th 9-1, F 9-8 Sat 9-3, Sun Closed sure our parents are fully aware of what is going on, we did issue a One Call message this afternoon with informaSoon to be Days Inn tion about the lockdown and that we were confi& Conference Center dent that our students 400 Folkerth Avenue, and our staff were Sidney safe.” School officials con937-492-1131 sider the situation to be NOW FEATURING alleviated and classes ROMER’S CATERING were scheduled to resume in a normal manner today.

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TROY — John H. “Paw” Parmenter, 73, of Troy, passed away suddenly at 5 a.m. W e d n e s d a y, May 1, 2013, at his residence. He was born Aug. 7, 1939, in Rupert, W.Va., to the late Fred and Anna Rose (Hinkle) Permenter. His wife of 48 years, Geraldine “Gerry” (Siegel) Permenter, survives. He also is survived by his daughter, Karen A. Permenter, of Cincinnati; son, John W. Permenter, of Troy; brother and sister-in-law, Fred R. and Barbara Permenter, of Troy; grandson, Griffin Permenter; and granddaughter, Alexandra Griffin. John was active with the Troy Strawberry Festival Soccer Invitational; a member of the Troy Fish & Game Club; and a lifetime member of the NRA. He was an avid hunter and fisher-

man. John volunteered for a number of years with the Troy High School soccer program. He is the retired owner/operator of Dayton Carbide. Services will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at Baird Funeral Home, Troy, with interment to follow at Riverside Cemetery, Troy. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to the Troy Strawberry Festival Soccer Invitational, P.O. Box 251, Troy, OH 45373, or the American Diabetes Association, Cincinnati, OH office, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 396, Cincinnati, OH 45342. Friends may express condolences to the family at www.bairdfuneralhome.com.

Don Lee Dicke On May 1, 2013, at 12:20 a.m. Don Lee Dicke quietly ascended from the pain and suffering of his physical body into the open arms of our Lord in Heaven, Jesus Christ. In his last days, he was comforted and reassured by all who loved him that he had fought and suffered long enough. He is survived by his wife, Lois Ann Berning whom he married on Sept. 13, 1958, and children Pamela (Dicke) Miller, Christine Dicke, Michael Dicke and friend Trish Carter, Todd and Bridget (Schwartz) Dicke. He will also be missed by his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, Luke and Amanda (Seigel) Kuenning, Cara Miller, Derek Dicke, Jacob Miller, Logan and Brook Dicke, Nolan, Halley and Reid Kuenning. His sister, Patricia Now survives in Coldwater. Her husband, Dale is deceased. He enjoyed a very extended family when he married wife Lois. He is survived by Harry Ingram (father-in-law), Jerry and Norma(Berning) Lunney, Ron and Marlene (Berning) Hittepole, Ray and JoAnn (Berning) Meckstroth, Kermit and Barb (Berning) Freewalt, and Stan Berning. It was time to join those on the other side that were waiting for him, his mother Fentrus (May) (Bill) Dicke;

Grandma Burden; mother-in-law Dorothy; brother and sister-in-law Jim and Carol Berning;his father, Paul and stepmother Lodema. And then there were his old buddies — Jim Wiseman, Tom Kettler and Norm Meckstroth — to pick him up in his old ’57 Chevy. We hope he is up in Heaven enjoying all of the things he had so very little time to enjoy after his retirement in 2004 from Crown Equipment Corp. and the many years of owning Dicke’s Service Station, both in New Bremen. He loved to work in the yard, ride his bike around town and talk to anyone and everyone on his daily travels. His family is forever grateful to those who treated him so tenderly in these past few weeks from the State of the Heart Hospice and Heritage Manor Nursing Center. They know who they are and we appreciate all they did for him. In lieu of flowers the family would like donations to be made in Don’s behalf to the Alzheimer’s Association for future research. The family will be receiving friends on Saturday from 2 until 5 p.m. at the GilbergHartwig Funeral Home in New Bremen. Condolences to the family may be left at gilberghartwigfh.com.

Edison tuition increases PIQUA - Edison Community College students will be paying more for classes following action by the board of trustees last week approved a 2.49 percent increase in tuition fees for the 2013-14 school year. An increase of $3.33 per credit hour is in instructional fees is one of three types of fees that make up tuition. There is also a general fee of $15.30 per credit hour and a technology fee of $5 per credit hour. The instructional fee increase will raise total tuition from the current $133.96 per credit hour charge to $137.29 per credit hour. Edison is more expensive than Sinclair Community College in

ANNA — Anna Local Schools Board of Education members heard updates on the achievements of Anna students and discussed personnel issues at their recent meeting. Rick Russell, high school principal, told board members that the Anna High School band had earned a superior rating at the district competition and qualified for the state competition. Middle school Principal Cindy Endsley told board members about a joint effort between student council members and the Anna Parent Advisory Committee to hold a spirit week prior to the Ohio Achievement Tests. John Holtzapple, elementary school principal, reported elementary students are producing their own newspaper and he noted that third grade enrichment students competed at the Invention Convention at Wright State University. Anna Local Schools Treasurer Dennis Raberding gave board members a copy of the Public Employees Risk Reduction report, which is regarding Workers’ Compensation-related incidents. Raberding told board members about a website called compareohioschools.org that compares measures of expenditures and performance of Ohio school districts. Anna Superintendent Andy Bixler told board members that there will be a waiver day on May 15 that has been approved by the Ohio Department of Education so that staff members can participate in ALICE training, which addresses student safety. Bixler reviewed with board members supplemental positions in Anna Local Schools. The board accepted the retirement resignation of Bob Gephart, effective Jan. 31, 2014. Since Gephart will be retiring at that time, the school district will be hiring a new high school guidance counselor for the beginning of the new school year.

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Dayton, which charges $95.70 per credit hour, but about the same as Clark State Community College in Springfield, which will charge $132.75 per credit hour for the upcoming summer session. This is the second tuition increase in as many years for Edison. Tuition went up 5.23 percent for the 2012-13 academic year. Edison’s enrollment for spring semester was down 12 percent. In other business, the board approved hiring Susan H. Barth as an engineering instructor at a salary of $44,312 and Elisha Hicks as assistant professor of early childhood education at a salary of $38,531.

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Anna grads honored Jim Egbert (left) of Cincinnati, and John Bertsch, of Sidney, talk at the Anna Educational Foundation dinner held at Shelby Oaks Thursday. The two men were honored as outstanding alumi at the event. Egbert graduated from Anna High School in 1949 and Bertsch graduated in 1981.

In Shelby County Common Pleas Court Monday, Richard Winemiller, 31, at large, pleaded guilty to one count of possession of drugs, a fifth-degree felony. A count of possession of criminal tools was dismissed. He was ordered to submit to weekly drug testing and was released on his own recognizance. According to his indictment, he was found in possession of heroin on Jan. 8. Sentencing is set for 2:30 p.m. June 13.

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Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Page 4A

Navy charges 2 DeWine honors in deaths of 2 fallen police officers divers at pond BY WILL E SANDERS Civitas Media wsanders@civitasmedia.com

BY DAVID DISHNEAU The Associated Press

TROY —About 200 people attended a solemn police pemorial ceremony at the courthouse square Wednesday to honor those fallen officers from Miami County and the nation who made the ultimate sacrifice. Local and state dignitaries, including Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, who has the keynote speaker, addressed the crowd during an at-times emotional memorial service attended by many of the surviving family members of seven law enforcement agents who met line-of-duty deaths in the county. “We are here today to remember a number of Miami County fallen officers,” DeWine stated, before briefly speaking about each one. DeWine expressed his condolences to the families of the fallen and noted how important, but also dangerous, the job of a police officer is. “It’s a very dangerous job,” he said, “but the men and women who take this job accept that risk.” He also said there are no truer words than those chiseled into the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C., and those words are: “It is not how these officers died that made them heroes, it is how the lived.” Piqua Deputy Chief Marty Grove, president of FOP Lodge 58, also spoke to the crowd and said the annual memorial service is one he wishes “we didn’t have to put on.” Grove thanked not only the families of the fallen, but families of all police officers for the sacrifices they, too, must make on a daily basis, whether it’s from missing sporting events their children are playing in to watching a loved one walk out the door each day wearing a badge and never knowing for sure if they will come back after their shift. And then he turned his attention to the surviving family members.

HAGERSTOWN, Md. (AP) — Two enlisted sailors who had a supervisory role with a Virginia-based Navy dive unit face military criminal charges of involuntary manslaughter and dereliction of duty in the February drowning deaths of two divers at an Army facility test pond near Baltimore, officials said Wednesday. Navy officials said in a news release that the two defendants, whom they haven’t identified, are a chief warrant officer 3 and a senior chief petty officer in Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2. The enlisted sailors had a supervisory role in the events at the pond, according to Navy officials in Washington who discussed the matter on condition of anonymity because the case is under investigation. They also belonged to the same unit as the victims, Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio, and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., said Lt. Cdr. Charity Hardison of the Navy Expeditionary Combat Command in Virginia Beach, Va. The two sailors drowned Feb. 26 during routine diving operations at an underwater weapons-testing facility, dubbed the Super Pond, at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The Maryland Army installation is about 20 miles northeast of Baltimore. Their deaths came weeks after the Jan. 30 death of civilian technician George Lazzaro at the same pond. Lazzaro was doing underwater maintenance of the facility. His cause of his death hasn’t been released. The defendants will face an Article 32 hearing, the military equivalent of a preliminary hearing or grand jury investigation, on May 21 at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia. The hearing will determine whether the charges will be referred to a court-martial, dealt with administratively or dismissed. “The command is saying, ‘We think there’s enough evidence for these charges,’” Hardison said. “An investigating officer will look at the information and decide whether the charges are substantiated.” Hardison said the command won’t disclose the defendants’ names until the May 21 hearing. The Navy divers’ deaths were investigated by Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group 2 and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. A spokesman for the explosive ordnance unit referred calls to Hardison. An NCIS spokesman didn’t immediately reply to an email from The Associated Press for information about the investigation. The death of Lazzaro, 41, of Nottingham, is being investigated by the Army’s Criminal Investigation Division, the Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center at Fort Rucker, Ala., and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The Army units didn’t immediately respond to AP queries. An OSHA spokeswoman said that agency’s investigation isn’t complete.

Civitas Media Photo/Mike Ullery

OHIO ATTORNEY General Mike DeWine delivers the keynote address at the 2013 Miami County Police Memorial Day in Troy on Wednesday. “You are surrounded by your extended family,” Grove stated. “A family that continues to be by your side.” Those police officers who are on the memorial, in the order of their deaths, are: • Marshal Harvey Hake, a Covington police officer, was shot and killed on Jan. 12, 1917, while chasing a suspect. • Patrolman George Eickmeyer, a Tipp City police officer, died Sept. 17, 1945, when his car was struck by a train. • Lt. Noah Studebaker, a Piqua police officer, died Oct. 17, 1957, from complications of a shotgun blast to his face, neck and chest area on May 29, 1949, after being dispatched to a burglary in process. • Patrolman Jan Mulder II, a Piqua police officer, was shot and killed Aug. 11, 1970, at the Fort Piqua Hotel by a fleeing gunman. • Sgt. William R. Morris, a Miami County sheriff ’s deputy, was shot and killed Nov. 22, 1972. • Detective Robert Taylor, a Piqua police officer, died Nov. 3,

1982, after suffering a heart attack while participating in strenuous police training. • Sgt. Robert L. Elliott, a Miami County sheriff ’s deputy, was shot and killed Feb. 25, 1987. As each officer’s brief background was read aloud, family members of the fallen were escorted to the memorial where each one placed a placed a flower in its shadow. Troy Pastor Greg Simmons, also the chaplain of Lodge 58, thanked the fallen officers whose names are etched into the granite of the county’s law enforcement memorial for their courage and sacrifice. “We will remember what they have done for us,” Simmons said. “We will remember them for what they have done for our community.” The memorial ended with a lone trumpeter playing Taps atop the courthouse steps. The Miami County Police Memorial was dedicated in 1999 to law enforcement officers who died in the line-of-duty in Miami County.

Ohio executes man who killed, raped 6-month-old LUCASVILLE (AP) — One family wept loudly and another family cheered Wednesday as a man was executed for killing a 6-month-old as he raped her. Steve Smith, 46, was executed by lethal injection at the state prison in Lucasville in southern Ohio for the 1998 killing of his live-in girlfriend’s daughter, Autumn Carter, in Mansfield. Smith had recently tried to get his sentence reduced to life in prison, arguing that he was too drunk to realize that his assault was killing Autumn and that he didn’t mean to hurt her. The Ohio Parole Board and Gov. John Kasich turned him down unanimously. In the 25 minutes between when Smith walked into the death chamber flanked by prison guards and when the

lethal injection killed him, his only child, 21-year-old Brittney, and his niece sobbed and shook with grief. Smith declined to say any last words, then looked at Brittney sitting behind a pane of glass. “I love you,” Brittney said as she wept. Smith turned his head away and appeared to be struggling not to cry, his chin shaking. As the lethal injection began, Smith took several heavy breaths before he closed his eyes. He was pronounced dead at 10:29 a.m. Less than 3 feet away from Brittney and separated by a wall, Autumn’s mother — Kesha Frye — watched Smith quietly. After he was dead, Frye’s sister pumped her fists in the air. “I’m glad he’s dead, and I

hope he burns in hell,” Frye said surrounded by her family after the execution. Frye’s father and Autumn’s grandfather, Patrick Hicks, said Smith’s execution was too good for him. “Because of him, Autumn never had a chance to take her first step, she never had her first birthday or a first day of school,” he said. “It’s just unfortunate that this man gets to die a peaceful death after the torture he put Autumn through.” Days before the execution, Brittney Smith said that she has never believed her father killed Autumn and that he had only admitted to it because he had given up hope. “I know my dad’s innocent,” she said. “I do not believe he did this, and you know, he raised all my cousins, my sister before I was even born, and

he never did anything (sexually).” After the execution, Smith’s attorney, Joseph Wilhelm, said that his client “felt great remorse for the tragic and shocking crime he committed.” “He was well-behaved and sober while in prison, causing no problems in the institution and living each day with the guilt and grief caused by his alcohol-fueled crime,” said Wilhelm, who also witnessed the execution. “While some may trumpet his execution as appropriate revenge for his crime, Ohio is no safer having executed Steven Smith than had he lived the remainder of his natural life in prison.” Back on the night of Sept. 29, 1998, Frye was awoken by Smith, her live-in boyfriend of four months. Smith, who was drunk and naked, laid a naked and life-

Woman’s remains identified

Trial hinging on dying man’s blinks opens eyes. Woods was later charged with murder, felonious assault and weapons counts in the case. The trial’s outcome is expected to hinge on a videotaped police interview with Chandler in the hospital. Jurors will have to determine whether Chandler was alert and knew what he was doing when police say he blinked three times for yes to identify a photo of Woods as his shooter. Police asked Chandler to blink three times for yes and twice for no to a series of questions in the interview, said Assistant Hamilton County Prosecutor David Prem. Chandler also blinked yes to indicate that he

knew the gunman and that his name began with the letter “O,” Prem said. “O” was a street name that Woods sometimes used, the prosecutor said. Prem told jurors that when they view the video, they will clearly see that Chandler knew what he was doing. “You are going to see how he was struggling to get it right,” Prem said. The motive for the shooting, the prosecutor said, was that Chandler owed Woods money for drugs. Chandler was a drug user who had bought drugs many times from Woods but had gone to an area near Woods’ home the night of the shooting with two friends to buy drugs

from someone else. Chandler was shot about 20 yards from Woods’ home and in an area known for drug deals, he said. Prem said that while neither of the men in the car with Chandler could clearly identify the man who shot him, one heard a voice saying Chandler owed him money. Defense attorney Wendy Calaway insisted that Woods did not shoot Chandler and is “an innocent man who found himself in a perfect storm of misinformation and misidentification.” Calaway said Chandler had stolen drugs from dealers previously. “He had many enemies,” Calaway said of Chandler.

PORT HURON, Mich. (AP) — Southeastern Michigan authorities say they’ve used DNA and dental records to identify remains found in 1994 as those of a central Ohio woman who disappeared in 1988. The St. Clair County sheriff’s office in Port Huron said Wednesday that University of North Texas experts confirmed the skeleton is that of Diann Tatum, who disappeared while traveling from Ohio to visit her parents in the Detroit suburb of Warren. The department is treating the case as a homicide. Columbus, Ohio, TV station WTTE says Tatum lived in Fayette County, near Washington Court House, Ohio.

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CINCINNATI (AP) — A dying, paralyzed man who couldn’t speak intentionally blinked his eyes to identify a photo of his attacker for authorities, prosecutors said Wednesday in opening statements at the suspect’s murder trial, while the defense insists those blinks were inconsistent and unreliable. Those arguments in the trial of Ricardo Woods are expected to be repeated over the next few weeks as jurors are asked to decide whether Woods killed David Chandler, of Cincinnati. Chandler, 35, died about two weeks after a shooting Oct. 28, 2010, left him paralyzed from the neck down and only able to communicate with his

less Autumn on Frye’s bed, according to court records. Frye rushed the baby and her other 2-year-old daughter to a neighbor’s house and called 911. Autumn was pronounced dead after doctors tried to revive her for more than an hour, and Smith was arrested. The baby was covered in bruises and welts and had severe injuries showing she had been brutally raped, though no semen was present. At the home, there was no sign of forced entry, and police found a large amount of white cloth that came from Autumn’s diaper strewn about; police found the rest of the diaper in a garbage bin outside, along with 10 empty cans of beer. At the time, Smith told police that he “didn’t do anything.”

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NATION/WORLD TODAY IN HISTORY BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Today is Thursday, May 2, the 122nd day of 2013. There are 243 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On May 2, 1963, the Children’s Crusade began in Birmingham, Ala., as more than 1,000 black skipped schoolchildren classes and marched downtown to protest racial segregation; hundreds were arrested. (During another march the following day, authorities unleashed police dogs and fire hoses on the young protesters.) On this date: • In 1519, artist Leonardo da Vinci died at Cloux, France, at age 67. • In 1670, the Hudson’s Bay Co. was chartered by England’s King Charles II. • In 1863, during the Civil War, Confederate Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was accidentally wounded by his own men at Chancellorsville, Va.; he died eight days later. • In 1890, the Oklahoma Territory was organized. • In 1936, “Peter and the Wolf,” a symphonic tale for children by Sergei Prokofiev, had its world premiere in Moscow. • In 1945, the Soviet Union announced the fall of Berlin, and the Allies announced the surrender of Nazi troops in Italy and parts of Austria. • In 1952, the era of commercial jet passenger service began as a BOAC de Havilland Comet carrying 36 passengers took off on a multi-stop flight from London to Johannesburg, South Africa. • In 1957, Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., died at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland. • In 1960, Caryl Chessman, who’d become a bestselling author and cause celebre while on death row for kidnapping, rape and robbery, was executed at San Quentin Prison in California. • In 1972, a fire at the Sunshine silver mine in Kellogg, Idaho, claimed the lives of 91 workers who succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning. Longtime FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover died in Washington at age 77. • In 1982, the Weather Channel made its debut. • In 2011, Osama bin Laden was killed by elite American forces at his Pakistan compound, then quickly buried at sea after a decade on the run.

OUT OF THE BLUE

All dressed up and no place to go SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. (AP) — Everyone got stood up at one Southern California high school’s prom. The dance itself was a no-show. KABC-TV Los Angeles reports dozens of tuxedoclad and corsage-wearing teens from Bloomington High School traveled 40 miles to Santa Anita Park on Saturday, only to discover they hadn’t been told that the date of the big night had changed. Instead of the enchanting evening they were expecting, students were served chicken strips in a hastily arranged small hall where someone played music from a laptop computer. The San Bernardino County school’s calendar and the prom invitations listed the event on April 27, but it was slated for May 4. Principal Ignacio Cabrera says there was miscommunication with event planners. A semi-formal substitute event is planned for May 18.

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

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FBI: Backpacks removed from room BOSTON (AP) — Three college friends of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were arrested and accused Wednesday of trying to protect him by going into his dorm room and getting rid of a backpack filled with hollowed-out fireworks three days after the deadly attack. The three 19-year-olds were not accused of any role in the bombing. But in a footnote in the court papers outlining the charges, the FBI said that about a month before the tragedy, Tsarnaev told two of them that he knew how to make a bomb. Azamat Tazhayakov and Dias Kadyrbayev, both of whom came to the U.S. from Kazakhstan, were charged with conspiring to obstruct justice by concealing and destroying evidence. Robel Phillipos, who graduated from a Cambridge high school with Tsarnaev, was charged with lying to investigators about the visit to Tsarnaev’s room. According to the FBI account, just hours after surveillance camera photos of

the Boston Marathon suspects were flashed around the world April 18, Tsnarnaev’s friends suspected he was one of the bombers and removed the backpack along with a laptop from Tsarnaev’s room at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. One of them later threw the backpack in the garbage, and it wound up in a landfill, where it was discovered by law enforcement officers last week, authorities said. In the backpack were fireworks that had been emptied of their gunpowder. The lawyers for the Kazakh students said their clients had nothing to do with the bombing and were just as shocked by the crime as everyone else. Phillipos’ attorney, Derege Demissie, said outside court: “The only allegation is he made a misrepresentation.” At a court appearance, the Kazakh students did not request bail and will be held for another hearing May 14. Phillipos was held for a hearing on Monday. If convicted, Kadyrbayev and Tazhayakov

could get up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Phillipos faces a maximum of eight years behind bars and a $250,000 fine. Three people were killed and more than 260 wounded on April 15 when two bombs exploded near the marathon’s finish line. Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died after a gunfight with police days later. His 19year-old brother was captured and lies in a prison hospital. Their mother has said the allegations against them are lies. Investigators have not said whether the pressure cooker bombs used in the attacks were made with gunpowder extracted from fireworks. Kadyrbayev and Tazhayakov have been in jail for more than a week on allegations they were in violation of their student visas, one because he was skipping classes, the other because he was no longer enrolled. All three men charged Wednesday began attending UMass with Tsarnaev in 2011, according to the FBI.

Wounded Knee for sale

AP Photo/Wong Maye-E

A WOMAN mourns as she arrived in hopes to find her sister, seen in the photograph she is holding, among unclaimed bodies brought to a cemetery from the garment factory building collapse in preparation for a mass burial on Wednesday in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Several hundred people attended a mass funeral in a Dhaka suburb for 18 unidentified workers who died in the building collapse last week last week in the country's worst industrial disaster, killing at least 402 people and injuring 2,500. The bodies, rotting in the spring heat, were brought to the graveyard on the back of a flatbed truck.

Bangladesh building collapse victims buried JURAIN, Bangladesh (AP) — Dozens of Bangladeshi garment workers whose bodies were too battered or decomposed to be identified were buried in a mass funeral, a week after the eight-story building they worked in collapsed, killing at least 410 people and injuring thousands. Hundreds attended the traditional Muslim funeral and many more watched from the roofs of nearby buildings Wednesday as the bodies, rotting in the spring heat, were brought to the graveyard on the back of flatbed trucks. Onlookers covered their noses. One woman rushed through the crowd to the back of a truck wailing that one body was her sister’s. She begged to take it as family members held her to keep her from collapsing. Local men and boys recited a prayer for the dead. Then, 34 bodies were unloaded and placed in the graves. Cemetery workers have dug several long rows of graves where scores more unidentified bodies are expected to be buried in the coming days.

“I would not have to take part in this if the government acted more responsibly,” said Rasel Islam, a 32-year-old man who attended the burial. Five garment factories were housed in the illegally constructed Rana Plaza building that collapsed April 24. The disaster and a garment factory fire five months earlier that killed 112 people exposed the unsafe conditions plaguing Bangladesh’s $20 billion-a-year garment industry that supplies many global retailers. At the Vatican, Pope Francis said he was shocked that some of the workers were living on 38 euros ($50) a month. “This was the payment of these people who have died … and this is called ‘slave labor,’” he said. Vatican Radio said the pope made the remarks during a private Mass at the Vatican. “Not paying a just (wage), not providing work, focusing exclusively on the balance books, on financial statements, only looking at making personal profit. That goes against God!” Francis was quoted as saying. He added: “People are less

important than the things that give profit to those who have political, social, economic power. What point have we come to? To the point that we are not aware of this dignity of the person; this dignity of labor.” EU officials said they are considering action including changes to Bangladesh’s dutyfree and quota-free access to the giant EU market to “incentivize” responsible management of the nation’s garment industry. Catherine Ashton, the EU’s foreign affairs chief, and its trade commissioner, Karel De Gucht, called in a statement for Bangladesh authorities to act immediately to ensure factories comply with international labor standards. In Washington, U.S. State Department spokesman Patrick Ventrell said businesses operating in the Rana Plaza appeared to have links to numerous companies in the U.S. and Europe. “We’ll continue to engage with U.S. companies to discuss what role they can play in improving conditions,” he told reporters. He did not give details on the companies.

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A small patch of prairie sits largely unnoticed off a desolate road in southwestern South Dakota, tucked amid gently rolling hills and surrounded by dilapidated structures and hundreds of gravesites — many belonging to Native Americans massacred more than a century earlier. The assessed value of the property: less than $14,000. The seller’s asking price: $4.9 million. Tribal members say the man who owns a piece of the Wounded Knee National Historic Landmark on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is trying to profit from their suffering. It was there, on Dec. 29, 1890, that 300 Native American men, women and children were killed by the 7th Cavalry in the final battle of the American Indian Wars. James Czywczynski, whose family has owned the property since 1968, is trying to sell the 40-acre fraction of the historic landmark and another 40-acre parcel for $4.9 million. He had given the Oglala Sioux Tribe until Wednesday to agree to the price, after which he said he’d open it up to outside investors. Oglala Sioux tribal president Bryan Brewer told The Associated Press on Wednesday that the tribe does not have the money to buy the land and that, even if it did, tribal members shouldn’t have to buy back something that is theirs. “We are hoping no one will buy this land. And I’d like to tell investors that if someone thinks they can go down there and commercialize this, it will never happen. We will not allow it,” he said. Czywczynski did not return repeated calls from The Associated Press by Wednesday evening to see whether outside investors are now able to bid for the land. Earlier this month he told the AP he had three offers from West Coast-based investment groups interested in buying the land for the original asking price. The ultimatum has caused anger among many tribal members and descendants of the massacre victims. “I know we are at the 11th hour, but selling this massacre site and using the victims as a selling pitch is, for lack of a better word, it’s grotesque,” said Nathan Blindman, 56, whose grandfather was 10 when he survived the massacre.

5-year-old shoots 2-year-old sister BURKESVILLE, Ky. (AP) — In southern Kentucky, where children get their first guns even before they start first grade, Stephanie Sparks paid little attention as her 5year-old son, Kristian, played with the rifle he was given last year. Then, as she stepped onto the front porch while cleaning the kitchen, “she heard the gun go off,” a coroner said. In a horrific accident Tuesday that shocked a rural area far removed from the national debate over gun control, the

boy had killed his 2-year-old sister, Caroline, with a single shot to the chest. “Down in Kentucky where we’re from, you know, guns are passed down from generation to generation,” Cumberland County Coroner Gary White said. “You start at a young age with guns for hunting and everything.” What is more unusual than a child having a gun, he said, is “that a kid would get shot with it.” In this case, the rifle was made by a company that sells

guns specifically for children — “My first rifle” is the slogan — in colors ranging from plain brown to hot pink to orange to royal blue to multicolor swirls. Kristian’s rifle was kept in a corner of the mobile home, and the family didn’t realize a bullet had been left in it. “It’s a normal way of life, and it’s not just rural Kentucky, it’s rural America — hunting and shooting and sport fishing. It starts at an early age,” said Cumberland County Judge Executive John

Phelps. “There’s probably not a household in this county that doesn’t have a gun.” In Cumberland County, as elsewhere in Kentucky, local newspapers feature photos of children proudly displaying their kills, including turkey and deer. Phelps, who is much like a mayor in these parts, said it had been four or five years since there had been a shooting death in the county, which lies along the Cumberland River near the Tennessee state line.


LOCALIFE Page 6A

Thursday, May 2, 2013

COMMUNITY

Contact Localife Editor Patricia Ann Speelman with story ideas, club news wedding, anniversary, engagements and birth announcements by phone at (937) 498-5965; email, pspeelman@civitasmedia.com; or by fax, (937) 498-5991.

Fairlawn plans Walk-a-thon

CALENDAR

This Evening • The New Knoxville Public Library Book Club meets at the library at 6 p.m. • The Narcotics Anonymous group, All in the Family, meets at 7 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 230 Poplar St. • Minster Garden Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Old Minster Council Chambers, Minster. • Temperance 73 Masonic Lodge at the corner of Miami Avenue and Poplar Street meets at 7:30 p.m.

Friday Morning • A.J. Wise Library in Fort Loramie hosts storytime for children 3 1/2 and older at 10:30 a.m. To register, call 295-3155. • The New Knoxville Community Library hosts story time from 10:30 to 11 a.m.

Friday Afternoon • Sidney Gateway Hi 12 Club No. 482, meets at noon at the Sidney American Legion on Fourth Avenue. All Master Masons are invited. • Parkinson’s support group meets at 3:30 p.m. at the Brethren s Home, 750 Chestnut St., Greenville. For more information, call (937) 5483188.

Friday Evening • Hope in Recovery, similar to traditional 12-step programs to confront destructive habits and behaviors, meets at the First Presbyterian Church, 114 E. 4th St., Greenville, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, call (937) 548-9006. • The Narcotics Anonymous group, Staying Clean for the Weekend, meets at 7 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 230 E. Poplar St.

Fairlawn The FCCLA will host the fourth annual Walk-athon May 9 at the school. This year’s theme is Celebrate Life. All donations will be sent to the Make A Wish Foundation. This year will be a color run for the walk. Each period, students can pay $5 to get out of class to attend the celebration. For every period, there will be a different color assigned, so students get to choose what periods they want to get out and what color goes on their shirts. The walk-a-thon is also a challenge between the Fairlawn and the FCCLA Botkins FFA to see which school can raise the most money. This will be the inaugural walk for Botkins High

School, whose donations will be sent to the American Cancer Society. Its relay will be held May 10. During the walk at Fairlawn, the senior class will present the Miss Relay Pageant, in which boys dress up in their finest lady attire and show off. They will be asked a variety of questions in pageant format. Pageant contestants will asked for donations to see who will be crowned Miss Relay Pageant. The participants will be Trey Everett, Anthony Gillem, Zach Rogers, Ryan Lessing and Grant Covault. All Fairlawn students will participate in a first-period ceremony to celebrate the people who have been helped by the Make A wish Foundation. The public is welcome to attend.

Photo provided

SENIORS TREY Everett and Anthony Gillem practice their poses for the Miss Relay Pageant at Fairlawn High School. The May 9 event will raise money for the Make a Wish Foundation.

Saturday Morning

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• Brukner Nature Center, 5995 Horseshoe Bend Road, Troy, hosts a bird walk at 7:30 a.m. Free and open to the public. (937) 698-6493. • Agape Mobile Rural Food Pantry Distribution, in Port Jefferson, 9 to 11 a.m. • Agape Mobile Rural Food Pantry Distribution, in Maplewood, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Saturday Evening • Lumber Company Baseball hosts fundraising bingo to support the children on the teams. Doors open at 4 p.m. and games begin at 7 p.m. at Sunset Bingo, 1710 W. High St., Piqua. $20 to play all night. For information, call (937) 543-9959. • The Sidney-Shelby County Chess Club Checkmates meets at 7 p.m. at the library at the Dorothy Love Retirement Community. All skill levels are welcome. For more information, call 497-7326. • The Narcotics Anonymous group, Saturday Night Live, meets at 8 p.m. at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 120 W. Water St.

Sunday Afternoon • Shelby County Deer Hunters holds its monthly Sunday Rifle Shoot at 7988 Johnston-Slagle Road beginning at 1 p.m. Program one round at five different targets, pays three places. Points awarded to members for end-of-the-year trophy. Open to the public.

Photo provided

Sunday Evening • Lumber Company Baseball hosts fundraising bingo to support the children on the teams. Doors open at 4 p.m. and games begin at 7 p.m. at Sunset Bingo, 1710 W. High St., Piqua. $20 to play all night. For information, call (937) 543-9959. • The Narcotics Anonymous group, Never Alone, Never Again, meets at 6:30 p.m. at First Christian Church, 320 E. Russell Road. • The Catholic Adult Singles Club meets for benediction in Maria Stein and then for supper in New Bremen. For information, call (419) 678-8691.

Monday Afternoon • Sidney Rotary Club meets at noon at the Sidney Moose Lodge. For more information on activities or becoming a member, contact Deb Barga at 492-3167. • The New Bremen Public Library Tween Book Club for children in fourth-sixth grades meets at 3:30 p.m. Advance registration appreciated.

Monday Evening • Minster Historical Society meets at 6:30 p.m. at the Minster Historical Society Museum, 112 Fourth St., Minster. • Overeaters Anonymous, a 12-step group offering experience, strength, and hope to anyone who suffers from an eating disorder, meets at 7 p.m. at Hillcrest Baptist Church, 1505 S. Main St., Bellefontaine. Use the rear parking lot and door. • The Narcotics Anonymous group, Vision of Hope, group meets at 7 p.m. at Russell Road Church, 340 W. Russell Road. • Sidney Boy Scout Troop 97 meets at 7 p.m. at St. Paul’s United Church of Christ. All new members are welcome. For more information, call Tom Frantz at 492-7075.

The Amos Memorial Public Library, 230 E. North St., will host a guided tour of the Children’s Room and digital services available at the library for child care providers and teachers on May 9 at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments and door prizes will be provided. Those interested in attending should register at the Children’s Desk or by calling 4928354.

Russia High School senior Alexa Counts paints a climbing staircase of books at the school. The senior Art III and IV students have designed the stairs which lead to the school library as book spines. Each stair step features a book cover from the class novels covered in grades 6-12.

RECENT

BIRTH

LUNDY Brian and Kristina Lundy, of Sidney, have announced the birth of a son, Ayden Michael Lundy, born April 30, 2013, at 7:49 a.m. in the Copeland-Emerson Family Birth Center at Wilson Memorial Hospital. He weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces, and was 20.5 inches long. He was welcomed home by his brothers, Alexander, 6, and Andrew, 3, and his sister, Audriana, 3. His maternal grandparents are Thomas and Sondra Boecker, of Sidney. His paternal grand-

parents are Mike Lundy, of Sidney, and the late Barbara Lundy. His stepgrandmother is Sheila Lundy, of Sidney. His great-grandparents are Dorothy Barker, of Sidney, Fred Boecker, of Minster, and Roger and Alma Lundy, of Anderson, Ind. His mother is the former Kristina Boecker, of Sidney.

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LOCALIFE

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Phlipot presents to Kiwanis Club Tilda Phlipot, director of the Shelby County Historical Society, discussed the organization’s history and outlined upcoming society projects during a speech before the Kiwanis Club of Sidney April 17. The society was formed on July 24, 1946, she said. Following a period of inactivity, the society was reactivated in 1965. After another period of decline, the society was revived for good in 1993 by Dr. Bill Ross III and local attorney Rich Wallace. As has been reported in the Sidney Daily News, March was the 100th anniversary of the Great Flood. Phlipot said that for the remainder of 2013, many of the exhibits at the society will focus on the Civil War. Tonight, “The Tale of an Emancipated Slave” will be presented by Anthony Gibbs during a Civil War dinner. Gibbs will portray John Parker, an Underground Railroad conductor from

Ripley. A USO show will be June 29. Next year, the society will focus on “JourStories,” a ney Smithsonian exhibition that shows how evolving mobility changed a young nation and how transportation made it grow. “The accounts of travelers themselves express the hopes and promises of fresh starts, the grim realities of forced migrations and difficult journeys, and the thrill of personal travel. It’s all about how you begin and what you do with your life,” Phlipot said. One story Phlipot shared was about a young nerdy school kid, not into sports but interested in science and chemistry. He used to break into school in order to take chemicals to do experiments in the basement of his home. One experiment went terribly wrong and an explosion occurred which injured this young scien-

tist. But rather than scolding her child, his mother told him to be more careful. This young man grew up in Sidney and, Paul Lauterbur went on to help develop the MRI and win a Nobel Prize in 2003. Prior to Phlipot’s remarks, President Phil Warnecke called the meeting to order. The invocation was given by Rick Lunsford and the group was led in song by Ralph Bornhorst, accompanied by Don Tangeman on the piano. John Coffield led the Fun & Games activities in which members had to complete a sudoku puzzle. Treasurer Ray Weber reported that 419 meals were served at this year’s Pancake Day. This was an increase of around 40 over last year. Gary Carter reported that the scholarship applications have been graded and a determination will be made on those to be interviewed.

Famous pianist to visit schools

SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg

A girl’s best date Brianna Lewis, 5, dances with her dad, Steve Lewis, of Sidney, during the Princess Ball, Gateway Arts Council’s annual father/daughter dance, at Lehman Catholic High School recently. Daughters and dads also made crafts, played games, and enjoyed refreshments. Brianna is also the daughter of Kelsey Lewis. For photo reprints, visit www.sidneydailynews.com

A delicious treat that was submitted for competition in the 2012 Shelby County Fair. EVERYTHING COOKIES

1 cup margarine 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup sugar 1 beaten egg 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 cup quick cooking oats 1 cup vegetable oil 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips 1 cup crisp rice cereal 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 3 cups flour 2 tablespoons vanilla extract Mix all ingredients. Drop by teaspoons onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake until lightly brown about 8-10 minutes. Connie Snapp

LIMA — The Public Employee Retiree System (PERI) annual District 2 luncheon will be May 16 at the Eagles Lodge, 800 W. Robb, Lima. Reservations must be made by May 11 by calling Carole Leffler at 4924499. The cost to attend is $10, which must be paid in advance when reservations are made. All PERI members are welcome. Doors will open at 10:30 a.m. and the buffet lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. Laura Herr, an OPERS educator, will present a program, “Changes to Retiree’s Health Plan.” Representatives of Humana, Medical Mutual, Express Scripts and Aetna will be available to answer questions.

OPENING MAY 10TH Watch for showings coming soon!

YOURSELF GO

TODAY • Ohio State University and CAPA present the Royal Shakespeare Co.’s “Julius Caesar” tonight, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Southern Theatre, 31 E. Main St., Columbus. Tickets: $38-$68 at (800) 745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. • The Shelby County Historical Society presents Anthony Gibbs as John Parker in a program about the Underground Railroad at 7 p.m. at the Sidney First United Methodist Church, 230 E. Poplar St. Tickets: $5 at the door. 498-1653. • La Commedia Dinner Theater, 765 W. Central Ave., Springboro, opens “The Sound of Music” today and it runs through June 30. Tickets: (800) 677-9505 and www.lacomedia.com. FRIDAY • The Ohio Watercolor Society Traveling Exhibition opens today at the Troy-Hayner Cultural Center, 301 W. Main St., Troy, and will be on display through May 26. (937) 339-0457. Free. • Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Springfield Street, Gate 1B, Fairborn, hosts its 16th annual Family Funfest Carnival today through May 12. Hours: Wednesday and Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m.; Friday, 5 p.m. to Saturday, midnight; noon to midnight; Sunday, noon to 9 p.m. Free admission and parking. $18 ride-all-rides wristbands or $1.25 ride tickets. Discount wristbands at www.DurantAmusements.com. (248) 7550433. • Miami County Relay for Life stages its relay at the Miami County Fairgrounds in Troy beginning at 6 p.m. • The Old Time Country Music Jamboree is at the Port Jefferson Community Center from 7 to 10 p.m. Live music in a family friendly atmosphere. • Gateway Arts Council, 216 N. Miami Ave., opens Spring Fling Fine Art Exhibition and Sale with a fundraising reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets: $25 for single, $40 for couple at 4982787. SATURDAY • The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Fairborn hosts Space Fest from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Space-related activities for all ages. Free. For information, visit http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/news/story.a sp?id=123338083. • Master Gardeners of Clark County present their annual perennial plant and barn sale at the Gateway Learning Gardens, 4400 Gateway Blvd., Springfield, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. • Brukner Nature Center, 5995 Horseshoe Bend Road, Troy, hosts Tunes in the Trees from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Acoustic music, nature hikes, refreshments, wildlife encounters. Free. (937) 698-6493. • Celebrate Recovery hosts a cornhole tourna-

Event & Catering

ment at 1 p.m. at the Sidney First Church of the Nazarene, 1899 Wapakoneta Ave. $20 per team for advance registrations, $25 per team today. To register in advance, go to crsidney.com or contact Steve Weller at (937) 541-6643. • American Czechoslovakian Club, 922 Valley St., Dayton, hosts a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. with music by the Hank Haller Ensemble. $14 per person includes beer, wine, soda and snacks. Food available. Public welcome. (937) 287-4275 or www.accdayton.com. • The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Fairborn hosts Space Fest from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Take pictures with astronauts and get autographs. Exhibits, activities for all ages. http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/news/story.a sp?id=123343054. • The Council of Religious Education offers a chicken/pork chop dinner from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the parking lot of Menard’s, 401 Lester Ave. Drive-through service. $7 for half chicken or pork chop, applesauce, dinner roll, and Little Debbie dessert. • The Master Gardeners of Clark County host a perennial plant and barn sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Gateway Learning Garden, 4400 Gateway Blvd., Springfield. • The Dayton Philharmonic Volunteer Association hosts its annual burger party at the Rike Estate, 2765 Ridgeway Road, Dayton, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Dinner and dance. Tickets: $50 at www.dpva.org. • Tim Horton’s, 635 W. Water St., Piqua, hosts a book signing by Greenville author David Hughes from 1 to 3 p.m. Hughes will sign copies of his book, “Road to Glory.” • Princess Day for a to support Cause, Walk4Hearing and Relay for Life, will pamper girls 2-12 at the Sidney Fire Department, 222 W. Poplar St., from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Girls can wear their princess costumes and have their hair and nails done and get facials. $15. • The Dayton Art Institute opens “I See Rhythm” in its Experiencenter with family activities throughout the day. Activities will highlight connections between art and music. For all ages. 1 to 3 p.m. $10 for a nonmember family of four. $2 for each additional child. (937) 2234ART (4278). • An exhibit of manon-the-street sculptures by Seward Johnson opens in downtown Troy today and runs through Sept. 2. • The New Bremen Public Library hosts a mother/daughter tea at 10:30 a.m. • Bear’s Mill, 6450 Arcanum Bears Mill Road, Greenville, hosts

its spring open house today and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (937) 548-5112. SUNDAY • The Fort Recovery Monument, Ohio 119 at Ohio 49, will mark its 100th anniversary with a 2 p.m. roundtable discussion by descendants of warriors who fought at the site in the 1700s and a rededication ceremony at 3 p.m. Both events are open to the public and free. (419) 375-4384. www.fortrecoverymuseum.com. • The Dayton Philharmonic Youth Orchestra performs a concert at 3 p.m. in the Schuster Center in downtown Dayton. Tickets: $6 at (937) 224-3521, ext. 1136, and at the door. • Brukner Nature Center, 5995 Horseshoe Bend Road, Troy, offers a talk about the Eastern screech owl at 2 p.m. Free. (937) 698-6493. • The Garst Museum, 205 N. Broadway, Greenville, presents a talk by Jeffrey Feltman, under-secretary general for Political Affairs of the United Nations, at 2 p.m. (937) 548-5250. • YMCA Camp Willson in Bellefontaine hosts a Family Fun Day from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. camp tours, archery target practice, rock wall climbing, group games, horseback tail rides at $10 per person, hiking. (800) 423-0427. MONDAY • The Francis J. Stallo Memorial Library in Minster offers afterschool stories and freeze pops from 3:30 to 4 p.m. for all ages. TUESDAY • The Victoria Theatre Association presents the Human Race Theatre Co. in “Next to Normal,” today through May 19 at the Victoria Theatre in downtown Dayton. Tickets: $40 and up at (888) 2283630 or online at w w w. t i c k e t c e n t e r stage.com. • The Tri-Moraine Audubon Society presents a talk by Dr. Juan L. Bouzat, “Tracking the Decline and conservation Status of the Greater Prairie Chicken,” at 7:30 p.m. in the meeting room of OSU-Lima’s Visitor and Student Services Center, 3900 Campus Drive, Lima. Free. • The Francis J. Stallo Memorial Library in Minster presents madeline and Her Cool T-shirt Scarves program at 3:30 p.m. Take a Tshirt and learn how to make it into a scarf. Advance registration required. WEDNESDAY • The Francis J. Stallo Memorial Library in Minster will screen a classic movie at 1 p.m. and offers a mother’s craft at 3:30 p.m. Advance registration is required for the craft. MAY 9 • The New Knoxville Public Library offers a Mom’s Day craft from 3 to 5 p.m. for all ages.

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The Shelby County Educational Service Center has scheduled a program, “Keys to Success with Leon Bates,” to be in county schools Monday through May 10. As one of America’s leading pianists, Bates has performed with the Philadelphia, Cleveland, New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, Atlanta Symphony, Detroit Symphony and the Boston Symphony orchestras. He is also a champion bodybuilder. Calling upon his professional training and life experiences, Bates will confront stereotypes associated with classical and jazz music by providing students with the opportunity to interact directly with a leading pianist. Seamlessly blending his musical performances with character-based lectures, Bates will demonstrate that physical wellness, personal discipline, integrity and a strong work ethic are essential to longterm success. His Shelby County school visitation and performance schedule is as follows: Monday – Botkins Local Schools Tuesday – Jackson Center Local Schools Wednesday – HardinHouston Local Schools May 9 – Sidney City Schools May 10 – Russia Local Schools He will perform in a free community concert May 9 at 7 p.m. at Sidney High School Performing Arts Center. Admission is free but tickets are required and are available at the Shelby County Educational Service Center, 129 E. Court St. between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Limited tickets remained at press time.

LET

Page 7A

40038137

937-492-2990

40039711


RELIGION

Contact Religion Editor Mike Seffrin with story ideas and press releases by phone at (937) 498-5975; email, mseffrin@sdnccg.com; or by fax, (937) 498-5991.

Page 8A

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Living and walking in obedience to God’s Word and developing — until terminated) and an unborn baby is a human (Genesis scripturally 1:26-27; Psalm 139; Jeremiah 1:5; Luke 1:41). The Word of God would have the church to stand and move (out of the pews and pulpits) with the helpless and defenseless! Where is the church? The biblical church is made up of those who have placed their faith, hope, and love — in the person of Jesus Christ. The mission of the church is to make disciples — to lead people into a growing relationship with Jesus. The church is not a place; it is a people. God honors his servants who are great in prayer (Acts 13), great in preaching biblical truth and morality (2 Timothy 3:1-7, 16, 4:1-5), and great in Holy Spirit power and discipleship (Genesis — Revelation). Whether we are legislators, judges, executives, teachers, preachers, lawyers, homemakers, students, doctors, truck drivers, citizens … we all have the responsibility to glorify God. Every day we should be conscious of our Christian responsibility to live and walk in obedience to God’s Word. The writer is the pastor of New Life Church PJBC in Port Jefferson.

Speaker at local church to focus on John’s Gospel Matthew Moore, a teacher at Cedarville U n i v e rsity, will be the g u e s t speaker o n Mother’s Day, May Moore 12, at Cornerstone Assembly of God in Sidney. He will present “John’s Gospel: So That You May Believe,” a 45minute performance of selected portions from the book of John. The service begins at 10:30 a.m. and is free to the public. The church is located at 1028 Park St. Moore is an associate professor of theater at Cedarville University, where he earned a degree in communication arts. He also obtained a Master of Fine Arts in classical acting at

George Washington University and a master’s degree in speech communication at Miami University. He has worked as a stage actor for CATCO, Actor’s Theatre and the Human Race Theatre. He has also performed as a voice-over artist for LeapFrog, Scott’s, LexisNexis, Glencoe Publishing and more. Moore said the presentation will allow people to experience the power of Jesus’ teachings, the miracles, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection. On his website at www.lampandlightproductions.com, Moore states, “I love stories — reading them, writing them, and, especially, telling them. And the Bible is full of the greatest stories ever told! For years, I’ve been passion-

ate about helping people have a dynamic encounter with the Bible, bringing its stories to life in a way that reminds us that the Scriptures are about real people with real emotions. More importantly, those stories can bring about real change in our lives.” Cornerstone Pastor Harry Peterson said Moore’s presentations give an enriching, encouraging understanding of Bible truths that are the foundation of the Assembly of God church. Peterson said, “Moore’s way of teaching us about the Gospel of John is intriguing as he brings it to life for us. I hope people will take advantage of visiting with us on Mother’s Day and be part of this experience.”

For photo reprints, visit www.sidneydailynews.com

SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg

Bike and Rider Blessing The Rev. John Tonkin, pastor of Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church in McCartyville, blesses a Harley-Davison motorcycle during a Bike and Rider Blessing at the church Sunday. Adult and youth motorcycle, bicycle and all-terrain vehicle riders were invited to the event.

FamilySearch.org redesign includes photo, story options SALT LAKE CITY — Digital technologies have progressively made family history work easier and more accessible. A new version of FamilySearch.org, which launched in April, makes family history research more interactive and conveniently collaborative, with added social media, photo and story elements that create a more personal family history experience for each user. FamilySearch, the world’s largest genealogy organization and a nonprofit sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, has updated its website to enable individuals to work together with others online to build their family tree, compile and share family photos and stories, create interactive fan charts and access 24-7 online assistance — all for free. The site’s enhancements seek to broaden family history’s appeal to those who don’t consider themselves researchers or genealogists, especially youth who are masters of digital realms such as social media. That is, until now. FamilySearch.org’s new features, which are free to the public, are described below. • Family Tree enables individuals to collaborate to build, manage and share family history online. Users will discover information submitted by other users in their family line among the more than 900 million names already submitted by online users. Family Tree also includes a click-and-drag feature that allows users to seamlessly move up, down and side to side and zoom in and out within a pedigree chart. Patrons also have access to billions of names on FamilySearch.org to help fill in missing branches on the tree. • The Photos and Stories options allow users to preserve photos and stories of ancestors. With photos, faces can be identified and then linked to the respective ancestors’ profiles in a user’s family tree. Photos and stories can also be seamlessly shared via Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and email. Each user can upload as many as 5,000 photos (with five-megabyte-perimage limit), and each story can be up to 100 pages long. According to FamilySearch CEO Dennis Brimhall, photos and stories

matter, because they “personally teach us time-honored principles from those who have gone on before us, like the value of hard work, dealing with life’s ups and downs and the impact of choices.” • Interactive fan charts present one’s ancestry lines in a colorful wheel, with the user at the center. Each layer of the wheel represents a different generation, and the wheel extends out to as many as six generations if such information is available. Fan charts can be used in a variety of ways. For example, some parents have printed out a fan chart for each child, with the child’s name at the center so they can see themselves in the context of a larger family that extends out for generations. • Family Tree Wizard: This feature is for family history novices. Family Tree Wizard asks new users questions about living and deceased ancestors and then builds connections into the family tree. • Live Help Page: FamilySearch has created a global online community that provides free product help and personal research assistance by phone and web chat all day, every day. Within several weeks, the website will be available in nine other languages, including Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Korean. Three million people use FamilySearch records, resources and services each month to learn more about their family history. Since 1894, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving and sharing genealogical records worldwide. Patrons can access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. The local Family History Library is located at 3060 Terry Drive, Fairborn. Call (937) 8789551 for more information. It is open Thursday-Saturday. FamilySearch’s commitment to helping people connect with their ancestors is rooted in the Mormon belief that families are meant to be central to our lives and that family relationships are intended to continue beyond this life.

Guest speaker to minister at Jackson Center church 3 days JACKSON CENTER — Terry Bennett from Tennessee, along with his son, Josiah, will be ministering at Christ the King Church in Jackson Center on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Services will be held at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 10:15 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday. Christ the King Church is located on the corner of Ohio 274 and Pasco-Montra Road.

Terry and his wife, Donna, have served in full-time ministry for more than 30 years. They have pioneered and pastored a number of churches during this time as well as participating in Shiloh, an international prophetic ministry based in Kansas City, Mo. Bennett has traveled extensively since the late 1990s, both internationally and across the United States

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Where is the ter,” (Isaiah church when 5:20). our modern soAs our socimorals cial righteousety’s ness differs move further from the rightand further eousness of the away from what Bible? The discithe Bible ples believed teaches, is there Your Jesus’ words but any hope to repastor tain laws in our their belief was only the first speaks nation that upstep toward the hold morality? The Rev. great faith they Several examwould receive Earnie Jones ples for considwhen the Holy eration: Spirit came to dwell in 1) Former congressthem. Before the cross man, athlete, and pastor and the resurrection, J.C. Watts was asked his Jesus informs the disci- perspective on the sameples (and us): “These sex marriage debate. “I things I have spoken am a believer in the unto you, that in me ye Word of God. At the end might have peace. In the of the day what matters world ye shall have is what the Word of God tribulation, but be of says. I’ve heard argugood cheer; I have over- ments for it and against come the world,” (John it. … I believe God’s 16:30-33). model for marriage is The Bible’s truths are clearly defined. God says timeless and relevant to when man sleeps with us today. God’s Word re- man or woman sleeps veals to us the sinful- with woman, that’s ness of our hearts — wrong. Politicians may pride, selfishness, im- attempt to redefine marmorality and rebellion. riage, it doesn’t change “God has not changed the fact that God’s defiand his standards have nition will never not lowered. God still change.” (Romans 1:26calls immorality a sin, 32). and the Bible says God 2) Since 1973 the U.S. is going to judge it.” Supreme Court decision (Billy Graham, Decision to legalize abortion as a Magazine January form of birth control, 2012). more than 50 million un“Woe to those who call born human children evil good, and good evil; have had their lives who put darkness for snuffed out. An unborn light, and light for dark- baby is a human life sciness; who put bitter for entifically (cells are sweet, and sweet for bit- human and are alive


Contact Anna reporter Kathy Leese, (937) 489-3711; email, newswriter777@yahoo.com, or by fax, (937) 498-5991, with story ideas and news releases.

ANNA/BOTKINS Page 9A

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Anna Council gets updates on issues Girls team honored, by mayor

For photo reprints, visit www.sidneydailynews.com

SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg

Former chief attends fundraiser Jake Boyer, of Anna, eats at the Anna volunteer firefighters all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast recently with his wife Nina Boyer, of Anna, at the Anna Fire Department. The hat Boyer wore while eating is accurate, he was the Anna fire chief in the 1950s. He joined the fire department when he was 14.

Botkins BOE conducts hearing on special funding BOTKINS — The Botkins Board of Education held a public hearing for IDEA funds and took action on several issues during its recent meeting. The board held a public hearing regarding Inwith dividuals Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) funding. The hearing is required by law for the discussion of how to use the funding that is available for students with disabilities. The IDEA funds are used to provide educational support to students who have individualized education plans (IEPs), as well as salaries for certified and classified staff, preschool services, technology and equipment. Keith Buehler, a Botkins resident representing the Botkins Community Club, was present to ask for the use of the school facilities for the 2013 Botkins Carousel. The board approved: • The list of 2013 graduates who will be completing their requirements to graduate this month. • Membership in the Ohio High School Athletic Association for the 2013-14 school year. • Handbooks for the 2013-14 school year for students, faculty and classified personnel. • Updates to board policy. • Overnight trips to FFA camp and boys basketball camp for June 14-15. • A lease agreement with the Botkins Community Club for the Botkins Carousel scheduled for June 7-9. • Donation of $150 from Willis and Lois Metz for the Becky Grillot Scholarship fund. The board went into executive session to discuss personnel for the purpose of contract renewal. The board took a number of personnel actions, including hiring Corrine Metzger as a tutor at $18.50 per hour and Jeff McPheron as a junior varsity coach. The board approved one-year teaching contracts for Heather Thaman, Ashlee Zimpfer and Jacquelyn Russell; a two-year contract for Maria Westgerdes; personnel in the middle of three-year contracts, Phil Groves, Vicki Steinke, Paula Owen and Brian Trego; threeyear contracts for Dan Knepper and Kris Vordemark; and a continuing contract for Ryan Gut-

man. The board approve Nancy Brown as staff eligible for a continuing contract and Adam Fullenkamp, athletic director, as staff in the middle of a continuing contract that expires July 14. The board approved Jane Fullenkamp, nurse; Dorothy Gehrlich, bus driver; and Connie Greve, bus driver, as staff in the middle of a two-year contract that will expire on Aug. 14. Mick Jones, maintenance supervisor, was approved as a staff member who has a one-

year contract that will expire on July 13 and is eligible for a two-year contract. The board approved the following staff members who have a oneyear contract scheduled to expire Aug. 13 and who are eligible for a two-year contract: Andrea Koenig, library/media; Kristin Ruppert, special education aide; Julie Schneider, high school secretary; Heather Thaman, aide; Jill Anthony, janitor; and Art Zimpfer, head custodian and maintenance.

ANNA — Anna Village Council members heard updates on maintenance issues in the village during their recent meeting. Also, the mayor read a proclamation regarding Law Day and a resolution honoring the Anna High School girls basketball team. Council member Gary Strasser told council members about maintenance issues at Anna Community Park. Among the issues to be addressed are the fact that the park rules signs are missing and there are spots where grass needs to be seeded. Mayor Robert Anderson read a proclamation recognizing Law Day, which was observed Wednesday. He also recognized the American Bar Association during the reading of the proclamation. Anderson also read a resolution honoring the Anna High School girls basketball team and gave copies of the resolution to each of the team members and coaches who were present, Council individually congratulated them. Richard Eshleman

reported on the Planning Commission meeting and told council that the commission reviewed the contract with Engine 99 rebuilders. The commission also discussed Subway restaurant’s parking lot and that Sav-A-Ton will be permitted to build its own wastewater facility as approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. The commission noted that a new house is being built at 512 W. Main St. There is also a physical therapy business that is discussing locating to the village. The commission also noted that a structure at 104 S. Third St. has been condemned. Council discussed a mosquito-control contract received from BugA-Boo, which will cost $175 per application. Council decided to discuss the contract and take action at the next meeting. Anderson reported that mayor’s court traffic fines in March totaled $1,310, and $412.50 of that amount was sent to the state of Ohio. Fiscal Officer Linda Pleiman said she attended the Local Government Officials Conference in Columbus and said the conference was beneficial. Anna Police Chief Scott Evans told council

members that the Police Department was scheduled to move into its renovated facility the week of April 15. Anna Fire Chief Tim Bender told council members that Thompson Masonry is working on the fire department building. He also said the tornado siren has arrived in McCartyville. Bender stated there were some shipping problems with the siren. It was noted that the Safety and Refuse Committee met and they discussed how to dispose of the old fire truck, the theft of seven DVDs from the Anna library, seeking reimbursement for the Miami Valley Crime Lab payment in March and the position of auxiliary police sergeant. The council approved: • The third reading of an ordinance accepting the offer of the Shelby County prosecutor to prosecute all Sidney Municipal Court cases for 2013. • The first reading of an ordinance establishing the position of an auxiliary police sergeant. • The second reading of a resolution authorizing the village administrator to enter an agreement with the Land and Water Conservation Fund and appropriating the necessary funds for the project.

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SENIOR LIVING

Contact Localife Editor Patricia Ann Speelman with senior living stories by phone at (937) 498-5965; email, pspeelman@civitasmedia.com; or by fax, (937) 498-5991.

Page 10A

Thursday, May 2, 2013

RSVP celebrates National Volunteer Week with awards

For photo reprints, visit www.sidneydailynews.com

SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg

PLAYING CARDS at the Senior Center of Sidney and Shelby County’s spring card party recently are Joann Barhorst and Marcia Schulze, both of Fort Loramie, Joan Vondenhuevel, of Minster and Phyllis Hehr, of New Bremen.

Center plans event for Senior Citizen’s Day Shelby County will celebrate Senior Citizen’s Day in Sidney with a luncheon, entertainment and bingo at the Senior Center of Sidney and Shelby County, 304 S. West Ave., on May 14. The cost of the lunch will be $5 and reservations are required by May 7 and can be made by calling 492-5266. will Registration begin at 10:30 a.m. on Senior Citizen’s Day. The event is open to the public and is intended as an

SENIOR

opportunity to celebrate the important role older Ohioans play in the community and to thank them for their contributions and accomplishments. Lu Ann Presser, chairwoman of the planning committee, said the highlight of the day will be the announcement of the Shelby County Senior Citizen and also outstanding organization. Each May, Ohio and the nation celebrate Older Americans Month,

HAPPENINGS

The following events have been scheduled at the Senior Center of Sidney and Shelby County, 304 S. West Ave. during May: Senior Citizen’s Day: May 14. Call the center to reserve a meal by Tuesday. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m., followed by welcome and lunch at 11 a.m., and the announcement of this year’s Outstanding Senior Citizen. Cost is $5. Foundation meeting: Friday at 8:30 a.m. Board of Trustees meeting: Friday at 9:30 a.m. All are welcome to attend the monthly board meetings. Carry-in lunch: Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. Take a dish to share and table service. Go early to get blood pressure and blood sugar checked by Koester Pavilion. The entree will be provided by Dorothy Love. Entertainment will be by Julie Pleiman. The election of officers will take place. Friday Night Out: Friday at 6 p.m. The Senior Center will be open for cards, shuffleboard and more. Take a salad to share. Spring dance: May 17 at 7 p.m. Entertainment will be by Bill Corfield. The dance will be sponsored by Senior Independence, the Pavilion and the Senior Center and is open to the public. Admission is $5 for members and $7 for nonmembers. Blood drive: May 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Register to donate at www.donortime.com or call Kathy at 295-3100. Get a free T-shirt and hot lunch. Memorial Day: May 27. The Center will be closed in observance of this holiday.

The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) celebrated National Volunteer Week with recognition events that honored volunteers in each of organization’s service areas. During the recognition event which was held at Cornerstones of God Assembly Church, Evelyn Martz, who volunteers for Agape Distribution, was named Shelby County New Volunteer of the Year. Grace Steenrod was honored for Longest Volunteer Service for 17 years of service, and the Multi-Talented Award went to Leon Stockman, who works as a mobile food driver, in maintenance, in food preparation and as a driver. “We know our RSVP volunteers are passionate about their service and dedicated to improving nonprofits and people’s lives through

with Senior Citizens Day falling on the third Tuesday of the month. Ohio’s theme for celebrations this year, established by the state Department of Aging, is “Unleash the Power of Age.” Members of the committee are Lu Ann Presser, Marianne Helmlinger, Betty Hughes, Eileen Wise(StatePoint) — Want man, Therese Reed, to take control of your Darla Wilges, Hallie retirement planning, Hurley, and Jenny Huel- but don’t know how? skamp. You’re not alone. Most Americans want to manage their retirement portfolio on their own, but feel intimidated by the process, a new study reveals. Nearly three-quarNEW YORK (AP) — ters of Americans said He’s rock royalty and they’d love to manage likes to keep it old-school: their own retirement portfolio if they had the Keith Richards says he right knowledge and doesn’t own an iPod. tools, according to a sur“I don’t have an iPod. I vey by Jemstep.com, an still use CDs or records online investment adviactually. Sometimes cassor, and market resettes. It has much better search group, Harris sound; a much better Interactive. Meanwhile, sound than digital,” he 67 percent said they said in a recent interview. think retirement investThe 69-year-old be- ing is complex and inlieves music lovers are timidating. “all being shortchanged” The good news is that with the sound that planning for your future comes out of an iPod, doesn’t have to be comlaunched in 2001. plicated. Here are four “My old lady’s got one. things you can do to My kids have got them. I take control: say, ‘Look me up this.’ Or, • Know how much ‘Oh I like that. Check me you have and need: that,’” he said. “I know When you’re dieting, it’s what these things can do. helpful to weigh yourself I’m not totally anti-them.” and set a goal weight. The Rolling Stones’ “50 Retirement savings & Counting Tour” kicks works the same way. off Friday in Los Angeles. How much money do While Richards has ac- you have and what do cepted that the music in- you need to save for redustry is digitally driven tirement? today, he’s not completely You can turn to free OK with it. online tools for help. For

engagement in their communities” said Greg Morrow, RSVP director. “RSVP in Shelby County has volunteers that work with young children to cultivate a love of learning through the Reading Buddies and Project More literacy programs, other volunteers that work as paralegals, and our everyday volunteers that answer phones and work as receptionists in nonprofit offices. All of the volunteers are important and fulfill a need that probably can’t be met any other way.” In the four, county, service areas, RSVP volunteers served 7,921 hours. “Now we could try to put a monetary value on those hours of work and the amount would surprise you, but volunteering should not be measured in dollars. Volunteering is people creating a vibrant cul-

ture where an act of kindness is given freely. Volunteering is helping, not hiring; giving, not contributing, taking; not counting. Volunteerism is local citizens doing work in extraordinary ways that connect a community together,” Morrow said. The local recognition was also sponsored in part by Wilson Memorial Hospital, Allison’s Custom Jewelry, Emerson Climate and Bob Evans. RSVP is always looking to engage volunteers and find innovative ways to encourage new volunteers to join in their community. People 55 and older looking for something new to do can call Connie Kinsella at 4928225 or email at rsvpsh-mi@councilonruralservices.org to talk with her about all the opportunities.

Tips for taking control of retirement income

No iPod for Keith Richards

example, CNN Money’s online calculator factors in your age, current income and savings to determine what you should be saving yearly to support 80 percent of your pre-retirement income. Visit the website, cgi.money.cnn.com/tools to determine your goals. • Create a diversified portfolio: Research shows that the single best thing you can do for your retirement portfolio is to diversify holdings. That means splitting money between different asset classes, such as stocks, bonds, cash and commodities. Each asset class behaves differently under different market conditions. For example, when a recession hits, some asset classes might rise while others fall. Diversifying means that your portfolio should be more stable. How should you slice the pie? That depends on three things: your tolerance for risk, your goals, and the number of years until retirement. • Select the best investments: Next, you’ll need to pick specific funds for each asset class. You might decide, for example, to put 20 percent of your portfolio in funds that represent

the stocks of large, stable companies. Which funds should you choose? When you’re making that choice, you’ll want to look at “fund characteristics,” such as the fees it charges, its historic returns, its volatility, and other factors. If this sounds complex, don’t worry. There are resources that can help. For example, Portfolio Manager, a new service from Jemstep, analyzes your current portfolio, gives you a personalized investment strategy, and offers stepby-step instructions on what to buy and sell to build the ideal portfolio for you. More information is available at Jemstep.com. • Stay on track: Things change over time. Stocks rise and fall. As they do, the weight of your different asset classes in your portfolio will change. Remember to periodically “rebalance” your portfolio with your diversification goals so you can maintain your target weights. Retirement investing doesn’t have to be complex or intimidating, especially if you have the right tools at your fingertips.

Dept. of Aging seeks online essays, photos Floor, Columbus, OH 43215-3363. Photos and videos cannot be returned. Followers of the Ohio Department of Aging Facebook page receive updates about the department from various sources, including the department’s awardwinning electronic publications, as well as news

and information about opportunities to grow, thrive and contribute. Since 1963, people in towns and cities across the nation have used the month of May to celebrate the contributions of older Americans. The Ohio Department of Aging has sponsored Older Americans Month in the state since 1977

and sets a state theme. The national theme for 2013, established by the federal Administration for Community Living, is “Unleash the Power of Age!” Ohio’s theme

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builds on that with a personal call to “Unleash the Power: Be a Golden Buckeye!” To learn more, visit www.aging.ohio.gov/new s/olderamericansmonth/.

READY FOR THE BEACH?

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us how they choose to live healthy, active lives defined by their actions and contributions,” said Bonnie Kantor-Burman, director of the department. “Are you a Golden Buckeye? How do you unleash your power?” From now through the end of May, essayists may visit the website, www.facebook.com/Ohio DepartmentOfAging/, and post their responses to the department’s timeline. Posting requires a free Facebook account and the photos and videos must conform to Facebook’s terms of service. Individuals also may submit their essays by mail to Ohio Department of Aging, ATTN: Communications Unit, 50 W. Broad St. 9th

40037767

May is Older Americans Month, and Ohio’s theme for 2013 is “Unleash Your Power: Be a Golden Buckeye!” The Ohio Department of Aging invites Ohioans of any age to submit a written, photo or video essay that completes the statement “I am a Golden Buckeye and I unleash my power by…” Submissions will be accepted via the department’s page on Facebook and by postal mail through May 31. The department will highlight selected submissions on its website and social media. “As the nation is being encouraged to unleash the power of age, we are turning to our Golden Buckeyes to tell

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YOUTH

Sidney Daily News, Thursday, May 2, 2013

Volume V

Thursday, May 2, 2013 What was your favorite thing about prom?

McKenzie Anderson (left) Allison Neu (right)

“Prom is great because you get to dress up, have pictures taken, go dancing, and have fun with all of the people you have gone to school with for so long!” -McKenzie “The night is amazing. Hanging out with friends for an evening, going to after-prom, and having this one big event with our graduating class is something you never forget.” Allison

A Special thanks to the businesses who contributed to the SHS After-Prom! 47 Bar & Grill AAA Shelby County Acker Photography African Safari Wildlife Park Air Handling Equipment, Inc. Allison Custom Jewelry Allstate Insurance Al's Pizza Alvetro Orthodontics American Legion Arby's Area Energy & Electric, Inc. Area Wireless Arrowhead Golf Club Auto Lube of Sidney Auto Zone Bank One, NA Barker Insurance Agency Inc. Bel-Mar Lanes Big Brothers Big Sisters Bob Evans Boonshoft Museum Bowers Burial Vault Buckeye Lincoln Mercury of Sidney, LLC Buffalo Wild Wings Bunny's Pharmacy Cassano's Pizza & Subs Chase Chipotle

Choice One Engineering Corp. Cincinnati Bengals Clancy's Clean All Services Cleveland Browns CR Frame Gallery Cromes Funeral Home Davis Meats Dayton Dragons Dekker's Flowers Detailed Machine Dickman Supply Inc. Eck Refrigeration, Inc. Emerson Climate Technologies Emmy's Bridal Ernst Sporting Goods Family Video First Call NAPA First National Bank New Bremen Frantom Sunoco French Connection Freshway Foods Freytag & Associates, Inc. Great Clips Hair Company Holloway Sportswear Ivy Garland Kastner Photo Kings Island Kroger Company

Lee's Famous Recipe Lock One Theater Low Voltage Solutions Marco's Pizza Medicine Shoppe Melissa Bower's Home Bakery Miami Valley Mall Midwest Ohio Dental Minster Bank Mutual Federal Savings Bank Newport Aquarium NK Telco Norcold Inc. Northwestern Mutual Financial Network ORL, Inc. Hearing Professionals Panache Papa John's Perkins Perry ProTech Picture Perfect Pizza Hut Russel Rd Pizza Hut Vandemark Rd PJ Carryout Primary Eye Care Primecare Physicians of West Central Ohio, Inc. Regal Trophy Reliable Process Solutions LLC Ron & Nita's

Issue 26

Boys Varsity Baseball Friday 05/03/13 West Carrollton Home 5:00PM Saturday 05/04/13 St. Mary's Memorial HS Away 12:00PM Saturday 05/04/13 St. Mary's Memorial HS Away 2:00PM Monday 05/06/13 Butler Home 5:00PM Tuesday 05/07/13 Butler Away 5:00PM Wednesday 05/08/13 Beavercreek Away 5:00PM

HAPPENINGS AT THE HIVE

Another prom success!

Page 11A

Ruese Insurance Agency Save A Lot Sidney Ace Hardware Sidney Athletic Boosters SIDNEY BODY CARSTAR Sidney Electric Co. Sidney Food Town Sidney Marathon Smokin Joes Staples Sturm Construction, Inc. Subway Michigan Ave Subway Wapakoneta ave Super Subby's The Spot Top Notch UPS Store US Bank Wal*mart Wiford Jewelers William Lee Huskey, DDS Wilson Memorial Hospital Public Relations Woody's Market and all the Parents who make it all possible

!

Boys Junior Varsity Baseball Thursday 05/02/13 Piqua High School Home 5:00PM Friday 05/03/13 West Carrollton Away 5:00PM Saturday 05/04/13 St. Mary's Memorial HS Home 12:00PM Saturday 05/04/13 St. Mary's Memorial HS Home 2:00PM Monday 05/06/13 Butler Away 5:00PM Tuesday 05/07/13 Butler Home 5:00PM Wednesday 05/08/13 Beavercreek Home 5:00PM

Boys Freshman Baseball Thursday 05/02/13 Cancelled - Bellefontaine Home 5:00PM Thursday 05/09/13 Russia Away 5:00PM Girls Varsity Softball Thursday 05/02/13 Fairlawn Away 5:00PM Friday 05/03/13 West Carrollton Home 5:00PM Saturday 05/04/13 Brookville High School Away 11:00AM Saturday 05/04/13 Brookville High School Away 1:00PM Monday 05/06/13 Butler Home 5:00PM Tuesday 05/07/13 Butler Away 5:00PM Wednesday 05/08/13 Beavercreek Away 5:00PM

Girls Junior Varsity Softball Thursday 05/02/13 Piqua High School Home 5:00PM Friday 05/03/13 Cancelled - West Carrollton Away 5:00PM Saturday 05/04/13 Brookville High School Home 11:00AM Saturday 05/04/13 Brookville High School Home 1:00PM Monday 05/06/13 Butler Away 5:00PM Tuesday 05/07/13 Butler Home 5:00PM Wednesday 05/08/13 Beavercreek Home 5:00PM Boys Varsity Tennis Thursday 05/02/13 Northmont Home 4:30PM Monday 05/06/13 Northridge High School Away 4:30PM Tuesday 05/07/13 Milton Union Home 4:30PM Wednesday 05/08/13 Beavercreek Home 4:30PM Thursday 05/09/13 Lehman Catholic Home 4:30PM

Track Saturday 05/04/13 Cardinal Invitational @ New Bremen Away 9:00AM Tuesday 05/07/13 Anna Quad Away 4:30PM Thursday 05/02/13 Graham Invite @ Graham Away 4:30PM Monday 05/06/13 Greenville MS Away 4:30PM Tuesday 05/07/13 Bellefontaine Away 4:30PM Wednesday 05/08/13 GWOC @ Butler HS Away 5:00PM

Reporters: Ally Bergman Madilyn Brown Ellie Cain Kennedy McIver Adviser: Elaine Schweller-Snyder

Issue #30 - May 2, 2013

Cedar Point is ‘Top Thrill’ for Physics Class BY: ELLIE CAIN Every year, Sister Ginny Scherer takes her physics classes to Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio. Cedar Point, opened in 1870, is the second oldest running amusement park in the United States behind Lake Compounce. It is also home to many well-known roller coasters in America. High school Physics classes from around the state of Ohio attend the park every year for “Physics Day.” This year, the day is May 16 and the park is open only to Physics students so that they can use the rides to calculate specific equations. Lehman students will leave school at 7 a.m. They will take a bus up to the park, and not return home until at least 9 p.m. During the day, they will be riding the rides and “understanding the practicality of physics,” said Sister Ginny. Since the problems done on the trip make up half of their final exam, before they can really relax and enjoy the park, the students have to complete worksheets, using everything they have learned over the course of this year. They are to bring stop watches, calculators, protractors, anything they might need to determine the answer to the equations. There are a few set rides that Sister Ginny requires them to ride, along with a partner. Sister Ginny has another motive for attending the Cedar Point Physics Day each year. She loves roller coasters. Out of all of the rides Cedar Point has had to offer over the years, she said her favorites are Raptor and Millennium Force.

From Cavs to Raiders BY: ALLY BERGMAN Although some seniors are still deciphering the next step for their futures, most have already made commitments to their colleges. It looks as though Wright State University will be seeing an influx of Lehman students. As of now, seven Lehman seniors plan on spending the next four years at Wright State University, Dayton campus. Wright State has a variety of great programs to prepare students for future careers which is why these seven students have all chosen this college. Senior Emilie Cavinder plans to major in Nursing; Katie Rossman wants to study Psychology; Andrew Gilardi has chosen Business; Kennedy McIver plans to major in Physical Therapy; and Brian Bach-Nguyen has chosen Engineering. Danny Davis and Stephany McEldowney are still undecided as to their majors. Senior Katie Rossman says she is ready to be on the Wright State campus adding, “I’m excited to meet new people but also love that other Lehman students will be there. It’s also so great to be starting the process of preparing for my career.” Fellow classmate Danny Davis also expressed his excitement for a new start. “I’ve had a lot of good times at Lehman but I’m really pumped for college,” he said. “I can’t wait to be a Raider.” At least seven out of 44 Lehman seniors will be attending the same college. While it’s a sure thing they will meet a lot of great new friends, they will still have their own small Lehman family with them.

Arranged marriage BY: KENNEDY MCIVER In our culture, we rarely hear about arranged marriages, but one of our class of 44 seniors is facing this interesting challenge. Senior and international student Brian Bach-Nguyen is engaged to Bella back in Vietnam. In an arranged marriage, the bride and groom are selected by a third party rather than by each other. “I don’t have any say dealing with whom they choose for me, and honestly I would rather choose someone by myself because I want to have a say in whom I marry,” said Nguyen. Most people don’t understand the concept of why they continue to have arranged marriages. In some countries, they base it on religion, money, reputation, fitness, family and horoscope, but in Nguyen’s case they based his choice on lifestyle. “They matched us up because we expressed the same lifestyle idea. We both wanted to live in America and go to college and be together,” said Nguyen. When I think of arranged marriages, I think of parents matching you up with people they like, but someone you don not like. Thankfully, Nguyen’s case is different. “I actually like Bella very much,” he said. As we contemplate graduation and going on to college and careers of our own choosing, we wonder how they are going to make this work. Bella is coming to America to attend Ohio State University. Nguyen is very excited to help her get settled in America. Nguyen plans to attend Wright State University next fall and transfer to Ohio State University the following year when they will wed. We wish best of luck to both of them for their future life together here in America.

Mary’s month BY: MADILYN BROWN In the Roman Catholic Church, the month of May is known to be dedicated to the Virgin Mary, Mother of God. Catholics all over the world participate in celebrating and honoring the Virgin Mary by having a “May crowning,” laying a wreath of flowers on the statue of Mary. At Lehman, this has become quite a tradition. “Lehman has celebrated May Crowning as long as I can remember,” said Mr. Henry Cordonnier, religion teacher. Every year the seniors vote for three seniors girls to lead this ceremony. The girl with the most votes gets to put the crown on Mary’s head while the other two assist her in saying the prayers, carrying the crown, etc. Girls chosen are to exemplify qualities of purity, modesty, sacrifice, and devotion to the Blessed Mother. The girls are not the only participants in this celebration. We all join in by singing the song “Immaculate Mary” and reciting the Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary prayers. It is no coincidence that May is also the month in which we celebrate Mother’s Day. It is a great time to celebrate our own mothers as earthly examples of the greatest Mother of all time, the Blessed Mother. “Kids are always picking flowers for their moms to show their love,” said Mr. Cordonnier. “Crowning Mary with a wreath of flowers and laying flowers at her feet is a symbol of our love for Her as the Mother of the Church.”


LOCAL NEWS HONOR

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Teen asks how she can improve her self-esteem

ROLL

Sidney Middle School Sidney Middle School Damien Jones, Chase has released its honor Myers, and Eli Straman. roll for the third nine 3.49–3.0 weeks of the 2012-13 Kristen Alexander, school year. Joelle Cecil, Michaela Herbert, Brookelyn IriGrade 5 Riley Barnes, Tristan arte, Logan Moores, Barga, Weslee Brubaker, Jacob Palmisano, Jared Katie Butts, Natalie Cal- Santos, Paige Stephens, houn, Lindsey Carr, Devin Watkins, Liam Prem Dev, Mia Fogt, Aberle, Taylor Bisbee, Makali Gibson, Megan Leah Burnside, Paris Heckler, Mason Homan, Cheek, Mya Henderson, Hostetler, Merzades Jelks, William Savanna Kaitlin Jalen Hudgins, Nathan Klepinger, Allison Johnson, Jaron Kelly, TJ Koewler, Leonard, Bryce Lowery, Michael, Emily Sauers, Patrick McClain, Ezekiel Cheyenna Sniffen, TayPereira, Zechariah lor Walker, Dieynaba Pereira, Jaxon Rickey, Sow, Daniel Blosser, Noah Schwepe, Aliyah Gavin Bockrath, RaySheppard, Jay Sherman, onna Daniel, Charles Kaitlyn Smith, Jillsen Fagan, Lindsey FreeStanley, Erin Stephens, man, Kylie Henderson, Nate Topp, Hallie Trues- David Ostendorf, Skylar dale, and Kyah Vonden- Parker, Blake Shreves, Brandon Stotler, Kaeden huevel. Walker, Hallie WesterGrade 6 beck, Jeffrey Williams, 4.0 Danial Douglas, Seth Zayne Arbogast, Frantom, Isaiah FreeMolly Batchelder, Broc man, Annie Gillem, Bey, Joseph Bishop, Caleb Boberg, Payton Kiana Howard, Kyle Jessie Alyxandra Strunk, Boshears, Williamson, Braydon Carson, Alyssa Chavez, Cooper Collingsworth, Dean, Devin Glant, Evan Deam, Reece Fan- Caleb Harris, Evelyn non, Colin Freistuhler, Hawthorne, Aaron LeiKelly Garber, Joshua bold, Eugene Maxwell, Harlett, Macie Ivey, EJ Morrison, Cameron Caleb Johnson, Heidi Perry, Christian RetMcRill, Jeffrey Over- terer, Candace Shunk, holser, Megan Piatt, Destiny Smith, Evan Samantha Lauren Riley, Aidan Smith, Smith, Allen Tangeman, Snider, Gregory Spencer, Sage Swiger, and Emma and Rachel Trudeau. Zerkle. 3.99-3.5 Grade 7 Levitta Barnes, Ari4.0 ana Bolin, Chandler Allyson Ball, Hayley Davis, Erin Fultz, Emily Guinther, Nonoko Gunji, Barker, Jennifer Barnes, Allie Herrick, Jonathan Jenna Beremand, Isaiah Holloway, Makayla Bowser, Laura Brady, Christian Evan Burden, Zoe Crist, Kennedy, Dahlinghaus, Townsend, Emma Emma Finke, Madison Lucas Wiford, Taylor Williams, Bryce Adkins, Brooke Frank, Gage Fridley, Elsner, Jordan Frazier, Tyler Kelch, Jared LindLandon Johnson, Han- sey, Erin Luellen, Jill nah Lillard, Madison Mann, Sean Martin, Osborne, Kaila Sims, Gavin Miller, Travis OltElaine Wiesenmayer, man, Alexis Quinlisk, Patrick Acedera, Emily Jada Rowland , Tyler Fogt, Noah Houts, Alina Sibert, Austin Simon, Kindle, Shyann Kinney, Christian Smith, Dylan Ava Money, Aliviya Smith, Kelton Stockton, Schulze, Lexi Thompson, Emily Tolbert, and Lexi Olivia White, Tiffany Wysong. 3.99–3.5 White, Madeline Bailey, Justin Beard, HanLogan Bunker, Kaycee Brown, Claire Fortkamp, Jacob Fran- nah Busse, Regan Carey, cis, Olivia Hall, Samuel Jackson, Keith Lee, Raenah Daniel, Todd Fateh Singh, Madisyn Hostetler, Emily Jones, Machimura, Allen, Tyler Edwards, Ayaka

Elections board discusses pay reinstatement The Shelby County Board of Elections at its recent meeting discussed reinstating board pay that was cut several years ago because of economic problems, but took no action on the matter. Chris Gibbs, board chairman, asked the board to consider reinstating board compensation that was reduced by 10 percent in June 2009 and is still in effect. Compensation for board members is set by statue in the Ohio Revised Code (ORC). Board member Jim Thompson asked if board members could give themselves a raise. Dawn Billing, board director, stated it was not a raise because in 2009 the board voted to voluntarily take a 10 percent decrease, along with some of the elected officials, to help with the general fund shortage due to the economy. Gibbs clarified that

he was inquiring if members wanted to consider reinstatement of the correct amount as set in the ORC. No action was taken. Billing will calculate the correct compensation amount and make members aware of the difference. In other business, the board discussed the Summer Conference. Billing reviewed the dates received from the Secretary of State’s Office. Conference will be one full day and one half-day on June 26 and 27. Billing will forward more information about the conference as soon as it is available. Billing and Philip Warnecke, deputy director, stated all is moving forward for the special election on Tuesday. Training and supply pickup will be on Saturday. The next meeting will be Tuesday at 6 a.m.

Page 12A

Barker, Mackenzie Beemer-Bates, Hannah Deal, Alexis Doyle, Carly Drury, NourEddine Hijazi, Alexis Hobbs, Ian Humphrey, Erin Ivey, Andrew Mitchell, Anthony Mitchell, Brandi Motsinger, Parker Riley, Grace Shell, Emily Wiesenmayer, Elliott Wilson, and Dylan Zerkle. 3.99-3.50 Savannah Brabbin, Angelina Carpenter, Jennifer Ferree, Jenna Fo s t e r - W h e e l e r, Kathryn Saunders, Sarah Smith, Cole Hofmann, Kiera Leiss, Luke Rees, Kavan Sarver, Corey Febo, Paige Graham, Logan Johnson, Harley Rose, Mikayla Sullenberger, William Wallace, Conor Beer, Matt Elliott, Jadyn Ford, Kirsten Hufford, Olivia Jones, Riley Kittle, Emily Knasel, Amanda Thomas, Brandon White, Ashley BorAllison Davis, ror, Cameron Fogle, Lauren Heaton, Dylan Hensley, Alex Larger, Bailey Wiford, Hannah Wiford, and Bethany Yinger. 3.49-3.0 Kiana Calvert, Marcus Chamberlin, Kaden DeMarcus, Hannah Fogt, Emily Gunnerman, Jesse Kruckeberg, Cain Ruiz, Alexis Steele, Alisha Weaver, Hunter Clark, Kayla Coffey, Alan Davidson, Kylee Kleinhans, Grace Martin, Mariah McDonald, Hayden Spurgeon, Brianna Gallimore, Talia Herron, Kiersten Malloch, Olivia Martin, Hayley Powers, Jonathon Turner, Kylie Williams, Joshua Abbott, Daniel Bleigh, Miracle Odom, Jenna Rice, Kayla Slife, Kristen Strunk, William Burnside, Damian Clason, Keaton Eilert, Austin McLain, Tessa Rose, Alex Saunders, CeGrade 8 lena Taborn, Madilee 4.0 Thompson, and Madison Emili Aselage, Clare Young.

Emma Richards, Kylie Stanley, Avery Voress, Madison White, John Wimer, Hayley Allspaw, AJ Brussell, Jacob Edwards, Christian Freisthler, Ryan Heins, Troy Oltman, Jeffrey Shunk, Joshua Spaugy, VanTilburgh, Chase Jenna Beatty, Josie Broaddrick, Morgan Carey, Alicia Garrett, Kiaya Haver, Pearl Hinkle, Jada Lee, Devon McLane, Olivia Pereira, Gabi Rice, Christopher Weber, Lauren Baker, Mya Browning, Jay Golden, Collin McClain, Taylor New, Chad Nolen, Cameron Sutter, Trista Taylor, Kelli Daisy, Alyssa Davis, Louis Hauff, Nathan Miu, Harrison Moore, and Noah Ulrey. 3.49–3.0 Marcus Brux, Jessica Case, Michael Gusching, Austin Ham, Holden Hickman, Spencer Karn, Jhiear Malveaux, Joshua Marruffo, Kaitlyn Scherer, Zachary Slone, Xavion Strunk, Brian Weber, Marshall Wilson, Tehya Bockrath, Taylor Clemons, Kara Frantom, Kathy Imke, Autumn Neville, Naomi Riegel, Makayla VanHook, Seth Wallace, Ethan Carlson, Lindsi Johnson, Demont Rucker, Ayla Shropshire, Ally Spangler, Kobey Vondenhuevel, Rodney Campbell, Maria Cox, Joseph Douglas, Alix Grieshop, Max Hawk, Mackenzie Hickerson, , Katie Smith, Jordon Stanley, Caleb Straman, Joshua Walker, Devin Winkleman, Thomas Atwood, Jacob Balta, Michael Bunker, Andrew Douglas, Makenzie Elliott, Michael Ferree, Addison Hudgins, Karlie Lee, Eliza Paet, Damion Phillis, Andrew Snyder, Noel Spillers, and Kacey Swiger.

WALDR. it hinder your atLACE: I’m 13 tempt to imand have been prove your told that I don’t self-esteem. All have a positive humans make self-esteem. Does mistakes, but this mean that you need to self-esteem is learn from them negative? Please and then forget ’Tween them. explain. Maybe I don’t have any 12 & 20 Finally, make close friends befriends with Dr. Robert cause my self-esthose who you Wallace teem is low. What feel have good can I do to imself-esteem. prove my self-esteem? I These future friends can really want to change it. come from your neighbor— Rosa, El Paso, Tex. hood, your church, or your ROSA: Self-esteem is school. Please make imhow you feel about your- proving your self-esteem self. When someone has a an important part of your positive self-esteem, this future. Please contact me person has self-confi- again and let me know dence. This means the how you are doing. person sets goals and is confident that these goals DR. WALLACE: I’m can be successfully ac- 15 and really like a cercomplished. tain boy, and I know that When a person has low he likes me, too. He has self-esteem, he or she may told this to my best feel not worthy of being friend, and he even told accepted or even loved. my brother. The problem For example, this person is that he is very shy, may feel or say “I’m really and I’m sure he won’t dumb,” or “Nobody cares ask me out. I want to ask for me or likes me.” All hu- him out, but my best mans have some degree of friend keeps telling me weaknesses and some de- that “nice” girls don’t ask gree of strengths. Spend boys to go out with them. some time thinking about I really don’t believe your strengths. Are you that and that’s not my honest, loyal, helpful, problem. If I would ask kind, considerate, etc.? Carlos out and he would Think about these posi- happen to refuse my tive attributes that apply offer, I’d be so embarto you and remember rassed. I’d just die. What them every day. Keep should I do? — Dawn, telling yourself every day Phoenix, Ariz. that, “I’m intelligent,” and DAWN: Ask him out. If “I can do this.” Practice in he refuses (I’ll bet that he front of a mirror to give won’t) you surely won’t yourself an opportunity to die. You’ll just be disapsee yourself while think- pointed, and that will fade ing positive thoughts, and away in a week or two. remember to smile! The alternative is that Keep a daily journal, he won’t ask you out belisting events from the cause he is too shy. By day where you exhibited asking him, you have a your strengths. If you good chance of getting make a mistake, don’t let your wish.

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LOCAL NEWS

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

GOBA food stands in GOBAville and on the courtsquare, where entertainment options, as well as the food, will be available to the riders and to the public. “GOBA provides a template for success,” Raible said in explaining how cities hosting stopovers prepare for the onslaught of cyclists. “If we make it easy, they’ll be out spending money in our town.” GOBA estimates the economic impact of a one-night stay is $50,000-$75,000. The Shelby County Visitors Bureau is the coordinator. local Raible said most of the riders will arrive in Sidney midmorning on June 21, although some could get here as early as 8 a.m. He noted that area volunteers are already busy with plans to cover campgrounds, logistics, transportation, emergencies, entertainment, food and information. Mark Barhorst, with Sidney City Schools, is heading a committee to oversee camping and transportation. Chad Hollinger, with Sidney Police, leads the emergency services committee. Dawn Eilert, vice president of the Chamber of Commerce, is chairwoman of the food committee. Ellen Keyes, executive director of Gateway Arts Council, will oversee entertainment and Deb Barga, president of the Rotary Club, is chairing the information booth committee. The booth will be staffed by Rotary volunteers. GOBA pays varying amounts to cover the costs of expenses that venues incur to accom-

BALLOT The district has kept costs down while retaining services and even offering programs unavailable in other county schools, Mascho noted. Fairlawn offers free programs for college credit through Urbana University that are taught at Fairlawn. The school has an iPad program, offering use of the latest technology to the student body. The district does not charge for extracurricular activities, as many districts do. Busing is not restricted to a certain distance from the school and is available to all Fairlawn students. The school has an all-day kindergarten program, as well as a preschool program for Fairlawn district 4-year-olds to help them be ready for kindergarten. District employees are continuing to work on a three-year pay freeze that has already been negotiated for next year. Fairlawn district voters have supported the levy in the past as the school has proven its abil-

ON

From Page 1

modate the project. The school system will receive $2,500 to host the group and $1,200 toward transportation, Raible said. The plan is to use school buses as shuttles among GOBAville, Vandemark Farm, Tawawa Park, Rolling Hills and BelMar Lanes, eateries on the west end of town and the courtsquare. Campers pay $5 per person to sleep inside. The Sidney Music Boosters will organize the camping and receive those monies. GOBAville will include mobile showers and portable toilets that travel with the group. There will also be a medical RV parked at the middle school. No open fires are permitted and GOBA is a nonalcoholic event. The Sidney Athletic Boosters have volunteered to help take luggage and gear from the support trucks to the individual campsites of riders. “They’ll work for tips,” Raible said. The Sidney tennis courts will serve as a locked bike corral. The city of Sidney will receive $1,000$1,500 and the Shelby County Sheriff ’s Office will receive $1,000 for emergency services. They will provide escorts to assure riders’ safety on the road and

From Page 1 ity to combine effectiveness with fiscal responsibility. “We are very optimistic that the voters of Fairlawn will understand the need to continue to support the school district as they have in the past,” Mascho said. “The board of education has not developed a plan at this time to make any reductions if the tax levy does not pass. That would be an issue that we would discuss at a future board meeting if there is a need.” Also on Tuesday, some Logan County and Auglaize County voters will have issues to consider. The village of Quincy will have two levies on the ballot, each for 2 mills, which will each generate approximately $11,000 per year. One is a general operating levy and the other is designated for street repair. Auglaize County voters who live in the Marion Local School District will be voting on a 13.8mill, five-year levy that is a renewal and an increase for the district.

police and EMTs in GOBAville and on the courtsquare. GOBA provides $1,200 to the entertainment committee. The Sidney Civic Band will perform on the courtsquare that evening. In addition, the following activities have been scheduled: a disc jockey playing music on the courtsquare during the day, zip-lining at Vandemark Farm, racquet sports and swimming at the YMCA, swimming in Tawawa Park, walking tours of downtown Sidney hosted by the Shelby County Historical Society, bingo and movies at the Sidney First United Methodist Church, the movie, “Jimmy,” at the Historic Sidney Theatre, skating at Rolling Hills, bowling at BelMar Lanes, and a beer tasting and exhibit of photos by GOBA photographers at the Gateway Arts Council galleries. The Masonic Lodge is offering a breakfast to campers who stay there. The Amos Memorial Public Library will give riders Internet service and a place to recharge their cell phones. Choice One Engineering is creating maps to help riders find their way to various sites around town. The Sidney Daily News will publish Sidney-focused booklet that will be distributed to all riders, Raible said. He has encouraged businesses to put welcome signs on their marquees. “When you get the right partners, it makes all the difference,” he said, praising local efforts to make the event successful.

Sidney Recreation Board The rotation of officers, donations for swimming lessons, a batting helmet grant, park ranger update. early bird swimming pool ticket sales and the Born Learning Trail will be on the agenda when the Sidney Recreation Board meets at 4:15 p.m. Monday in Sidney City Council Chambers.

JORDAN He said there has been some headway made, thanks to the sequestration, which cut government spending by $85 billion. While admitting that there is much more work to be done to trim the deficit, “it’s a good first step.” Jordan took shots at leaders of government agencies who blamed the sequestration for a variety of problems. Jordan said he asked one bureaucrat testifying before a subcommittee he sits on when the sequestration legislation passed. Jordan informed him that the bill passed Aug. 2, 2011. “You had 20 months to get ready for it, for goodness sake,” Jordan said. He was particularly upset by remarks made by Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education. “He said 40,000 teachers would get pink slips because of sequestration,” he said. “The Washington Post gave him four Pinocchios out of a possible four Pinocchios,” saying Duncan lied to the American people. Jordan said he has seen some encouraging developments recently, notably the push back on gun control and sequestration. “We’re still Americans and we don’t care what the hurdle is, we’ll overcome it, we’ll deal with and we’ll get through it,” he said. “It’s in our DNA.” After making his remarks, Jordan took questions from a large crowd on subjects ranging from immigration reform to wind energy. The questions from the audience included a challenge from a man who wanted Jordan to introduce legislation to impeach President

From Page 1 Barack Obama. Jordan said the opportunity to change presidents was in November and that he wasn’t going to push for impeachment. His response led the man to call him an obscenity, which brought laughter from the crowd. “This is the best town hall meeting I’ve ever been at,” Jordan said at the end of the session, adding that he had never been chicken manure. Kathy Monnin, of Jackson Center, and Dave Hemmert, of Botkins, were among several attendees who asked Jordan to take action against efforts in Shelby County to develop wind farms. “I have four children and I don’t want it,” Monnin said. Hemmert contended that taxpayers money for energy subsidies for wind power is going overseas, saying a company promoting wind turbines is Shelby County is from Scotland. “They’re using our tax dollars to ruin our lives,” Hemmert said. Jordan said wind power and other forms of alternative energy are supported by the president and other Democrats. “Until we get a different Senate and a new president, we’re not going to stop it.” He said the president is not going to sign legislation to stop green energy subsidies. “The bottom line is it’s too expensive,” Jordan said of alternative energy. He said natural gas and oil are better for the economy, despite opposition from Democrats. “We’re now going to be an exporter of natural gas,” he said, noting that the development of nat-

ural gas reserves in eastern Ohio is one of the reasons why Ohio’s unemployment rate is lower than some states. When asked about immigration reform, Jordan while he likes Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, he’s not in support of a proposed immigration reform bill. Noting that the release of 2,228 detainees, including 647 criminals was blamed on sequestration, he doesn’t think the administration can be trusted to follow through with securing the border with Mexico. “Nobody trusts Janet Napolitano (secretary of Homeland Security),” Jordan said. “I’d like to see Obamacare defunded,” said Mary Schmiesing, of Sidney. Jordan said he supports defunding or repealing the health care act. “I’ve voted 30 or 40 times to repeal it,” he said. “It’s tough to repeal Obamacare when he’s the guy in the White House who would have to sign it.” Sidney resident John Laws spoke out against foreign aid. “Why are we spending all this money on these foreign countries?” Laws asked. Jordan agreed that foreign aid is out of hand. “You help your friends, not your enemies,” he said. Cheryl Corthell, of Sidney, called for a end to tax credits for energy. Jordan agreed that the tax code should be simplified. He had commented earlier that he doesn’t think “one form of energy should have an advantage over another. “Let the market work,” he said, instead of giving tax dollars to companies that often go bankrupt.

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Fairlawn Board of Education The Fairlawn Local School Board of Education will meet in regular session May 9 at 6:30 p.m. Items on the agenda include presentations from Mason Huelskamp, on an Eagle Scout project, and Aaron Cox, on technology updates. To be discussed will be Race to the Top, light poles and having a reserve officer in the school. Other items on the agenda include the following: approval of the graduating seniors, continued membership in the OHSAA, proposals to adopt board policies, a resignation, school fees, volunteers, service contracts and classified personnel salaries.

Page 13A

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COMICS

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Friday, May 3, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) If shopping today, you’ll be tempted by elegant luxuries. (You want to reward yourself.) When it comes to finances, be careful, because things might not be as good as they look. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You feel sympathetic to the underdog today and will go out of your way to help someone. You’ll find it rewarding to be part of a group that does charitable activities. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You won’t mind putting yourself second if you can help someone today, because you feel selfless and sympathetic. This is a great day to practice a kindness. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might be active in groups today, especially nonprofit or charitable groups that seek out ways to help others. In fact, you can influence any group to be more caring and humane. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) You have a clear perception of your relationship with authority figures. (It’s almost as if you can read minds.) You instinctively know what they expect of you. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Travel for pleasure will delight you today. You also will enjoy being surrounded by beauty, gorgeous buildings, pristine parks and the creative work of others. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) If sharing something with someone today, you will be more than fair because you feel generous. (This is all very well, but don’t give away the farm.) SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) This is a good day for partners and friends to patch up quarrels and mend broken fences. People are insightful today, and are ready to meet each other halfway. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You might have a chance to help a coworker today, or vice versa, perhaps someone will help you? People are mutually sympathetic today. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your ability to be creative is wellhoned today. This is a great day for working with arts and crafts, or just partying and having fun! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Family discussions can be meaningful today because everybody knows what everyone else wants. People are not hiding things. Everyone is willing to share. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Although you can clearly pick up on many things today, you might spend time daydreaming or living in a fantasy world. That’s because your imagination is so activated! YOU BORN TODAY You have charm, intelligence and a strong intuition. Because of this, you have much to teach others. You are a realist, but you also are pragmatic and practical. Your wit can make others laugh. Privately, you sometimes demand too much of yourself and others. In your year ahead, set aside time for study or course work, because you will learn something valuable. Birthdate of: Frankie Valli, singer; Sugar Ray Robinson, boxer; Golda Meir, Israeli prime minister. (c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

Page 14A


WEATHER

Sidney Daily News,Thursday,Thursday, May 2, 2013

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3&-* "#-& "/% "$$63"5& 4&7&3& 4503.  $07&3"(&

Today

Tonight

Mostly sunny, southeast winds 5 to 10 mph High: 75°

Partly cloudy, southeast winds 5 to 10 mph Low: 55°

Friday

Saturday

Partly cloudy, southeast winds around 10 mph High: 75° Low: 52°

Sunday

Partly cloudy High: 68° Low: 52°

Partly cloudy High: 68° Low: 52°

Monday

Partly cloudy, 30% chance of showers High: 68° Low: 52°

Tuesday

LOCAL OUTLOOK

Warmer temps here

Partly cloudy High: 72° Low: 52°

A slow moving upper low will gradually approach the region at the end of the week. We'll see a little more cloud c o v e r today, but it will remain dry and Temperature Precipitation Sunrise/Sunset w a r m . High Tuesday.........................76 24 hours ending at 7 a.m. .none Thursday’s sunset ......8:33 p.m. Slight rain Low Tuesday..........................48 Month to date .....................5.51 Friday’s sunrise ..........6:33 a.m. c h a n c e s Year to date ......................13.64 Friday’s sunset ...........8:34 p.m. move into our west- Brian Davis Source: The Sidney Wastewater Treatment Plant, official weather reporting station for ern counon Shelby County, and the U.S. Naval Observatory. For current daytime conditions, low/high ties Friday, but the best chance temperatures, go to AccuWeather.com. holds off until the weekend.

REGIONAL

ALMANAC

National forecast

Today's Forecast

Forecast highs for Thursday, May 2

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Cloudy

City/Region High | Low temps

Forecast for Thursday, May 2

MICH.

Cleveland 70° | 55°

Toledo 73° | 50°

Youngstown 75° | 45°

Mansfield 79° | 54°

Fronts Cold

-10s

-0s

Showers

0s

10s

Rain

20s 30s 40s

T-storms

50s 60s

Flurries

Warm Stationary

70s

80s

Pressure Low

Cincinnati 82° | 55°

High

Portsmouth 81° | 55°

90s 100s 110s

Snow

Ice

Weather Underground • AP

© 2013 Wunderground.com Thunderstorms

Cloudy

Active Weather Pushes Across Nation's Mid-Section Heavy rainfall and more thunderstorms are expected along a strong cold front as it reaches from the Great Lakes to the Western Gulf Coast. Significant snow will also accompany this front from parts of the Upper Midwest into the Central Plains.

W.VA.

KY.

Partly Cloudy

Showers

Ice

Flurries Rain

Snow Weather Underground • AP

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Vitamin D, weight connection DEAR DR. been listless, ROACH: Is there useless, and just any connection thought it was between exmy age (then tremely low vita85). It took more min D-3 level than six months (mine was 15) and to get to 51, weight retention? sometimes takI recently caught ing as much as the tail end of To your 50,000 IU three some doctor’s times a week. — good show on TV and I S.L. health counted back: ANSWER: Dr. Keith Summer of Some aspects of 2010, I started vitamin D reRoach losing weight. I main controverwas swimming a lot for sial; others are not. It is exercise, and it kept generally accepted that coming off. By fall I was adequate calcium and wearing “vintage” cloth- vitamin D are essential ing I’d never discarded. for daily health. It is also I’ve settled in at 130 true that there is a lot of (down from 170). vitamin D deficiency in In May 2010, my D-3 this country — how had tested at 15. I was many are deficient deshocked: I already had a pends on how strictly tan and was taking you define “deficiency,” 1,000 IU daily. But I had but anywhere from 10

percent to 75 percent has been quoted. It’s also clear that replacing deficient vitamin D can improve strength and energy levels. What isn’t clear is whether everybody should be taking vitamin D, or should be tested for it. I recommend testing or vitamin D supplementation if there is a risk factor for deficiency; these include older age, darker skin, staying indoors and living north of Atlanta or Los Angeles. That’s a lot of people. It’s also not clear if vitamin D helps people lose weight. Some studies have said yes, but it’s not completely conclusive. I have to say I’ve never seen your degree of weight loss from vita-

OF THE

min D supplementation, and I am reassured by your feeling good with lots of energy. But there are medical conditions that cause weight loss (excess thyroid comes to mind) that it would be prudent to look for. READERS: The booklet on sodium, potassium chloride and bicarbonate explain the functions of these body chemicals and how low or high readings are corrected. To obtain a copy, write: Dr. Roach — No. 202, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.

PAST

100 years May 2, 1913 The lot sale of the Haslup Mt. Auburn allotment being conducted by the Oldham-Bennett Realty Co. opened this morning. The allotment is located just north of the old Haslup homestead near Mt. Auburn stop on the Western Ohio Railway. It consists of 31 beautiful lots and is in as nice and convenient location as could be desired. Quite a large number of people visited the property this morning and four lots were sold during the first hour, the first lot being purchased by Lillian Ziessler. ——— Col. Catrow, commanding officer of the Dayton military district, recommended to General Wood yesterday that martial law in the city of Dayton be lifted by tomorrow. Only two companies of the national guard still remains on duty. There has been little disorder reported and the Dayton police are practically handling the situation in its entirety.

75 years PA.

Columbus 81° | 50°

Dayton 75° | 52°

OUT

Page 15A

May 2, 1938 A report on progress being made to purchase and locate the new x-ray machine here to further the fight being waged in the community against tuberculosis, was given by Dr. C.E. McCorkle at the meeting of the executive committee of the Shelby County Tuberculosis and Health Association last evening. Dr. McCorkle heads the committee of the association directly in charge of this phase. His report showed 100 positive cases at the present time awaiting further examination and treatment under the program. ——— The operetta, “The Sunbonnet Girl,” will be presented on Thursday evening of this week in the auditorium at the Jackson Center High school. The cast of characters includes: Helen Waitman, Arleen Ware, Kathryn Ambos, August Rinehart, Alma Jane Lochard , DaHas Kemp, James Fink, Eileen Ware, John Davis, Irene Meranda, Norman Gross, Janet Snyder, Mary Swiger, J.L. Hovis, Edith Peacock. The operetta is under the direction of Viola Haberkamp and the accompanist is Betty Mann. ——— Huber Staley, a junior in the liberal arts college at Ohio Northern University, returned last evening

after a tour of 1,800 miles through the eastern states with the a cappella choir of the university. The tour included a broadcast and an appearance at the Rainbow room at Rockefeller Center in New York City.

50 years May 2, 1963 C.C. Johnston, Sidney realtor, may be in line for top honors among local mushroom hunters for this year as a result of a “find” he made Wednesday afternoon, “someplace southeast of Sidney.” Included in Johnston’s find were the largest spongetype mushrooms reported this year — some measuring up to nearly 10 inches in height. ——— Installation of the new officers for the coming school year for Emerson ParentElementary Teacher Association took place at its final meeting for the year held Thursday evening. Richard Maze was installed as president; Mrs. Harrison Brown, vice president; Mrs. Emerson Setsor, secretary and Ed Smith, treasurer.

25 years May 2, 1988 Lehman High School was again the scene of the annual Shelby Special County Olympics, which this year was joined by the Shelby County Special Field Day for the younger participants. The Special Olympics is only for participants eight years of age and older so once the meet had ended and was officially declared closed, the Field Day event commenced. There were 80 participants in the Special Olympics and35 more in the Field Day. ——— The Shelby County unemployment rate rose .4 percent from February to March but still remains one of the lowest rates in the state, according to figures just released by the Ohio Bureau of Employment Services. Shelby County has an unemployment rate of 5.5 percent with 22,000 people in the labor force of which 1,200 are unemployed.

Middle schooler’s hearing aids can’t tune out laughter DEAR ABBY: should also Last year, I began to have a meetlose my hearing due ing with the to a genetic disorder principal of and now I have to your high wear hearing aids. I school before will be a freshman in you go so the high school next year. problem can My teachers all have be avoided. to wear microphones When I was Dear so I can hear them. in grammar Abby I’m scared other school, a classAbigail kids will make fun of mate of mine me for being differ- Van Buren had severe ent. I have already hearing loss. gotten laughed at. What Because the students unshould I do? — EMBAR- derstood what her probRASSED TEEN lem was, she was never DEAR EMBAR- ridiculed. RASSED TEEN: When P.S. Making fun of a people laugh at a person child who has a disability who has a disability, it is is a form of bullying, and usually out of ignorance. should be treated as such. Because this happened at school or another place DEAR ABBY: I’m 25 where there is adult su- and have been with my pervision, you and your husband for nine years, parents should talk to the married for four. I principal or person in au- cheated on him twice. He thority so that person can caught me both times. speak privately with the Even though I strayed, guilty parties and explain he decided to stay. But why your hearing aids now he treats me like I’m and the microphone are a child and a prisoner. He necessary. Your parents took away my phone, my

Internet and I can’t go anywhere. He says this is my punishment for what I did. Do I really deserve that? I know we’re both wrong, but is he more wrong? — BROKEN WIFE DEAR BROKEN WIFE: From where I sit, you are equally wrong. How long ago did the cheating incidents occur? If they are recent, you two should be in marriage counseling. If they were long ago, then you must decide if you want to live the rest of your life being treated as a child and a prisoner. Your husband doesn’t trust you because you haven’t been trustworthy. But taking away your phone and Internet and keeping you under lock and key will not help you to rebuild it. You two need more help than anyone can give you in a letter, and I hope you will seek it. If he won’t go for counseling, you should go without

him because I don’t think the status quo can last. DEAR ABBY: My sister and brother-in-law passed away two years ago. I am the only living relative of their 28-yearold son, “Louis.” He is a loner, spoiled and a poor houseguest. I invite Louis over only because I don’t want him to be alone at holiday times. My husband, teenage daughter and I have nothing in common with him, and frankly, he spoils our holidays. How can I stop inviting my nephew without feeling guilty? Or is there another solution? I hate to make waves. — HOLIDAY HATER IN CANADA DEAR HOLIDAY HATER: If you invite your nephew for FEWER holidays you will be able to ease your conscience, enjoy more holidays and allow the young man a chance to become more proactive in planning entertainment for himself.

Sudoku puzzles also appear on the Sidney Daily News website at www.sidneydailynews.com.

ODDS

AND ENDS

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City elementary school has adopted an all-vegetarian menu, serving kids tofu wraps and veggie chili. Public School 244 is the first public school in the city to go all-veggie. The animal-welfare group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals says it might be the first all-veggie public elementary

school in the nation. Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott says he’s proud of the “trailblazing” school. The Queens school has 400 students in prekindergarten through third grade. It wanted to offer healthy food options and started serving a vegetarian lunch three times a week and then increased it to four times a week. It recently went all-vegetarian.


Sidney Daily News, Thursday, May 2, 2013

Page 16A

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SPORTS Page 1B

Thursday, May 2, 2013

TODAY’S

SPORTS

REPLAY 50 years ago May 2, 1963 Irene Sanders wound up the New Bremen Women’s pin program for the season with one of her best performances at Ray Ann Lanes the other night. The co-owner of the runways, operated by herself and husband Ray, smashed out a 604 total in heading the circuit’s concluding round.

25 years ago May 2, 1988 Several Sidney wrestlers competed in the Xenia Freestyle Tournament over the weekend. Clay Inman and Chris Dilbone were first in their weight classes, while Brett Bender finished second and Chad Inman and Hank Spangler were both third.

10 years ago May 2, 2003 Anna exploded for 16 hits against Arcanum, leading to an easy 12-1 victory. Kurt Hoying continued his amazing spring of driving in runs, finishing with six to up his season total to 40.

CALENDAR High school sports TODAY Baseball Lehman at New Bremen Jackson Center at Botkins Anna at Russia Lima Bath at Minster Fort Loramie at Houston Wapakoneta at Minster Riverside at Triad Softball Sidney at Fairlawn Jackson Center at Botkins Anna at Russia Minster at Parkway St. Henry at New Bremen Fort Loramie at Houston Marion Local at Versailles Boys tennis Northmont at Sidney Track New Knoxville at Minster quad

Contact Sports Editor Ken Barhorst with story ideas, sports scores and game stats by phone at (937) 498-5960; email, kbarhorst@civitasmedia.com; or by fax, (937) 498-5991.

Cards handle Reds again Reds finally get day off today after playing 20 straight days ST. LOUIS (AP) — Fast starts are becoming routine for Lance Lynn and the St. Louis Cardinals. Lynn won his 10th straight decision, allowing one run and five hits in seven innings Wednesday to lead the Cardinals over the Cincinnati Reds 4-2. Lynn (5-0) struck out five and walked two, improving to 10-0 in 10 starts and one relief appearance since losing to Milwaukee on Sept. 7. He became the NL’s first five-game winner. “It’s early — but it’s fun so far,” Lynn said. He was 6-0 with a 1.48 ERA through May 7 last season, then went 12-7 with a 4.46 ERA the rest of the way. Leading the NL Central at the start of May for the sixth straight year, St. Louis has won six of its last nine. “To be able to pitch like this and win games, it feels good,” Lynn said. “I just go out there, concentrate and keep trying to improve every day.” Lynn retired the leadoff hitter six times. He also slapped a fifth-inning single to break out of an 0 for 52 slump. In addition, he set down a perfect bunt in the sixth inning. “That bunt, that’s what I’m most happy abut,” he said. St. Louis manager Mike Matheny applauded Lynn’s, “bulldog tenacity.”

AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Chris Lee

ST. LOUIS Cardinals shortstop Pete Kozma receives the throw from right fielder Carlos Beltran and tags out Cincinnati Reds’ Homer Bailey trying to advance to second on a single during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Mo. “He just goes out there and St. Louis, including 0-5 with a way.” does his job,” he said. “The 6.90 ERA at Busch Stadium. NOTES: Beltran threw starting pitching has been a Brandon Phillips drove in out Bailey at second in the constant for us and he’s both Reds’ runs, hitting a solo fifth inning when the pitcher helped lead the way. You can’t homer in the ninth. tried to stretch a single to ask the starters to do more fourth-inning right. ... Lynn struck out Shin Beltran’s than they’ve done.” homer was his third in the soo-Choo three times. ... The Lynn retired the first four six-game homestand. Reds have won three of their and last five hitters he faced. “I’m not really trying to hit last 29 series in St. Louis. ... “We had opportunities, but homers,” Beltran said. “It’s Carpenter had two doubles in he pitched out of it,” Cincin- one of those streaks as a hit- a game for the third time this nati’s Todd Frazier said. ter where every ball you hit is season. ... Cincinnati is off “We’re scuffling a little bit, in the air and has a chance of Thursday after playing 20 but you’ve got to give him being a homer.” days in a row. and starts a credit.” Phillips tied the game with three-game series at Chicago Trevor Rosenthal pitched a an RBI double in the sixth. on Friday. Mike Leake (1-1, hitless eighth, and Edward Allen Craig walked with 4.34) will face the Cubs’ CarMujica finished the six-hitter one out in the bottom half, los Villanueva (1-1, 2.29) in for his sixth save in six Yadier Molina singled him to the opener. St. Louis will play chances. second, and Carpenter’s bro- four games at Milwaukee Carlos Beltran hit his ken-bat single drove in the go- starting Thursday, when team-high seventh homer for ahead run, Pete Kozma and Jake Westbrook (1-1, 0.98) the Cardinals and Matt Car- Daniel Descalso chased Bai- and Wily Peralta (2-1, 5.02) penter had three hits, includ- ley with consecutive run-scor- start. ... The Cardinals’ ing a go-ahead single in the ing singles. seven-game errorless streak sixth. “In that sixth inning I don’t ended when Descalso allowed Homer Bailey (1-3) gave up think they hit any ball solid,” Jay Bruce’s ninth-inning four runs and nine hits in 5 1- Bailey said. “Right now, grounder to bounce under his 3 innings. He is 3-9 against things are just not going our glove.

SPORTS IN BRIEF Longtime Detroit girls coach shot to death DETROIT (AP) — The principal at Detroit's Cody High School says the school's longtime girls basketball has been shot to death. Principal Jonathan Matthews tells WDIV-TV that authorities notified the school Wednesday of the death of 50-year-old Charles Knott. The station says Knott was sitting in his car overnight when he was shot in the back. Knott was a coach of Cody's girls teams for more than two decades, and Matthews says he'll be "deeply missed" by the school and the community.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “I think the best thing for me is to take it all in. Then tomorrow I've got to let it go. I've got my whole career in front of me.” —Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard, after being named NBA Rookie of the Year.

ON THIS DATE IN 1917 — Fred Toney of the Cincinnati Reds and James "Hippo" Vaughn of the Chicago Cubs pitch a double no-hitter for nine innings, but the Reds win 10 with two hits in the 10th. 1939 — Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees does not play against the Detroit Tigers at Briggs Stadium, ending his streak of 2,130 consecutive games played.

SDN Photo/David Pence

NEW BREMEN’S Clay Bertke (right) hustles back to the base as Minster’s Andrew Knapke tries to get the tag on him in

Minster wins to go to 15-1 NEW BREMEN — Powerful Minster ran its record to 15-1 on the year, including 5-0 in the Midwest Athletic Conference, with a 16-3 run-rule verdict over New Bremen in a makeup high school baseball game Wednesday at Bremen. The two-time defending state champion Wildcats trailed 1-0 after an inning, but scored nine times in the top of the second. It was 10-3 after five innings and Minster erupted

again, scoring six times. The Wildcats had 14 hits in the game, and all of them were singles, including three by Josh Nixon and Adam Niemeyer, and two by Devon Poeppelman and John Baumer. For Bremen, David Zirkle singled and doubled and Clay Bertke doubled. The linescore: Minster ..................090 106_16 14 1 Bremen ....................101 010_ 3 5 4 Trushaw (WP), Knapke (5) and Wolf; Leugers (LP), Gilberg (2), Fultz

Starting Sat. May 4 - Fri. May 10

105 40039433

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high school baseball action Wednesday at New Bremen in a makeup game. Minster rolled to a 16-3 victory.

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——

Pirates claim outright title MILFORD CENTER — Riverside played at Fairbanks in the Northwest Central Conference finale and won 7-0 to clinch an unbeaten league season and the conference title. “I’m very proud of the boys, and for some of the seniors, that’s their third title in four

years,” said coach Scott Mann. We take pride in our defense and we played flawless tonight. And what’s great is every night someone else steps up. These guys have each other’s backs.” Dalton Bollinger had three hits with a double, Landon Kelsey had two hits and drove in four runs, and Dustin Proffitt had a double and scored three times. See BASEBALL/Page 3B

Hannah Trent

Houston's Hannah Trent hit a home run in a 14-0 win over Fairlawn last week, and it was her sixth round-tripper of the season. And that's a new single-season record. With her leading the way, Houston has also set new team record for home runs in a season, currently standing at 11. Check out all the sports at www.sidneydailynews.com


SPORTS

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Page 2B

Penalties against Penske upheld

ATHLETES TAKE part in the Shelby County Special Olympics opening ceremony at Sidney Middle

CONCORD, N.C. (AP) — A three-member appeals board upheld NASCAR’s sweeping penalties against Penske Racing on Wednesday for a failed inspection last month at Texas and team owner Roger Penske vowed to take the ruling to the series’ highest level. three-member The National Stock Car Racing Appeals Panel unanimously upheld all penalties levied against the organization, includSDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg ing defending champion School Saturday. The Shelby County Sheriff’s Of- Brad Keselowski and fice color guard led the athletes into the gym. Joey Logano, over confiscated parts in the rear suspensions of the drivers’ Fords. NASCAR chief appellate officer John Middlebrook will hear Penske’s final appeal next Tuesday. “Obviously a disappointing outcome with the panel,” Penske said. 3. Lea Stephens “We have a good case Heat 64 and we are allowed 1. Heather McCroskey, 2. Tonya under the NASCAR York, 3. Sara Mestemaker Heat 65 rules in the rule book to 1. Paul Thieman, 2. Carol appeal this to the next Reames level. We’ve notified SOFTBALL Heat 66 NASCAR that we will 1. Seth Underwood, 2. Brendan appeal this ruling today Clay to the next level.” Heat 67 1. Malea Smith, 2. Dallas PoepPenske declined to pelman, 3. Chad Nolen discuss much of the case Heat 68 1. Collin Meyer, 2. Heather because the team will Hopkins, 3. Mikayla Ryder argue again Tuesday beHeat 69 1. Robert Wright, 2. Ashley fore Middlebrook. But he Weber has previously said the Heat 70 team was working in a 1. Larry Coffield, 2. Jay Born,

Annual Shelby County Special Olympics held The annual Shelby County Special Olympics was held on Saturday at Sidney Middle School. A large crowd was welcomed by Mark Harrod, Director of Shelby County Special Olympics. The Parade of Athletes was led by the Shelby County Sheriff ’s Department Honor Gaurd, then Banner Carriers Sara Mestemaker and Kyle Borgerding. Nikole Hoover and Dean Jones led the National Anthem and Jesse McName provided sign language for the hearing impaired. Rev. Jonathan Schriber provided the invocation and Calvin Cooley led the athletes in the Olympic Oath and declared the meet open. Jeremy and Jamie Reese, representing the Shelby County Fair Board, presented awards to the athletes for their accomplishments. Caven Risk was the announcer for the event. The Shelby County Fair Board is hosting for the first time and first of its kind, A Special Day for Special Athletes in which Shelby County Special Olympics athletes and a guest will be welcomed to come to the Fair on July 21 by entering the entrance near the Sidney Middle School. There will be people there to guide anyone in need of assitance and a day of special events including an Equestrian Show by three of our athletes. “We are very excited and thankful to the Fair Board for their efforts, and can’t wait for the fair this year,” said Harrod. “We were blessed to have a great day Saturday) and our athletes had an awesome time. We couldn’t exist without the support of our volunteers, donors and businesses in the community that pitch in to make this happen. “Now we are looking forward to softball season and basketball will be here before you know it.” Following are the results:

SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg

JOLENE CRAWFORD of Sidney crosses the finish line first during the wheelchair race at the Shelby County Special Olympics held Saturday at Sidney Middle School.

Heat 10 1. Eric Marshall, Robby Biza, 3. Beth Grimm Heat 11 1. Donald Jarvis, 2. Craig Howell, 3. Kyle Borgerding Heat 12 1. Ronald Leong, 2. Jamie Roddy, 3. Matthew Hoying, Heat 13 1. Tricia Kaim, 2. Veronica Yamaguchi, 3. Sara Mestemaker Heat 14 1. Seth Underwood, 2. Shane Marlow Heat 15 1. Selena Ramirez, 2. Courtney Hoehne Heat 16 1. Dallas Poeppelman, 2. Isaac Bensman 3. Colin Meyer Heat 17 1. Makayla Nichols, 2. Mikayla Ryder Heat 18 1. Robert Wright, 2. Ashley Weber, 3. Daivion Ivery BEAN BAG TOSS Heat 19 1. Selena Ramirez, 2. Hayley Barker Heat 20 1. Allie Post, 2. Noah Righter, 3. Jack Barker Heat 21 1. Dakota Mullennix, 2. Brendan Clay, 3. Maliyah Pleasant Heat 22 1. Gage Castle, 2. Justine porath Heat 23 1. Chad Nolen, 2. Dustin Haglin, 3. Dallas Poeppelman Heat 24 1. Daivion Ivery, 2. Ashlie Freeman, 3. Katie Nation Heat 25 1. Virginia Ammon, 2. Rich Bruns Heat 26 1. Carl Banks, 2. Tom Blake, 3. Tony Chambers WHEEL CHAIR RACE Heat 27 Heat 1 1. Angel Bergman, 2. April Bar1. Justine Porath, 2. Myles rett, 3. Andrea Bender Gray, 3. Philip Schafer Heat 28 Heat2 1. Mark Gates, 2. Karen Ernst, 1. April Barrett, 2. Gloria Dou- 3. Robby Biza glas Heat 29 Heat 3 1. Michele Homan, 2. Cassie 1. Brenda Jones, 2. Nikki Webb, Dawson, 3. Adam Gilbert 3. Mark Gates Heat 30 Heat 4 1. Billy Cowen, 2. Alyssa Ellis1. Jolene Crawford, 2. Becky ton, 3. Gloria Douglas Heat 31 milner, 3. Nicole Redinbo 1. Pete Foy, 2. Brenda Jones, 3. Heat 5 1. Jay Dues, 2. Steve Boyer, 3. Jay Dues Heat 32 Pete Foy 1. Beth Grimm, 2. Amanda 50 M DASH Frederick, 3. Melissa Dawson Heat 6 Heat 33 1. Hayley Barker, 2. Megan 1. Paul Thieman, 2. Mary Marlow Hughes Heat 7 Heat 34 1. Makayla Blankenship, 2. 1. Ronald Robbins, 2. Dean Allie Post, 3. Maliyah Pleasant Jones Heat 8 Heat 35 1. Dakota Mullennix, 2. Jack 1. Heather McCroskey, 2. Lee Barker, 3. Christian Nolen Kinder, 3. Tricia Kaim Heat 9 Heat 36 1. Leslie Davis, 2. Andrea Ben1. Nathan McConnahea, 2. Joey der, 3. Michele Homan

Toney Heat 37 1. Scott Skinner, 2. Nancy Reeves, 3. Terry Stiver Heat 38 1. Eric Marshall, 2. Nina Van Horn, 3. Samantha Ostendorf Heat 39 1. Carol Reames, 2. Nikki Webb, 3. Philip Schafer Heat 40 1. Becky Milner, 2. Greg Westerheide Heat 41 1. Patty Waters, 2. Veronica Yamaguchi, 3. Ricky Cook KICKBALL WITH RAMP Heat 42 1. Ashile Freeman, 2. Myles Gray, 3. Justine Porath Heat 43 1. April Barrett, 2. Billy Cowen Heat 44 1. Nicole Redinbo, 2. Mark Gates KICKBALL Heat 45 1. tie. Heather Hopkins and Hayley Barker, 2. Makayla Nichols Heat 46 Robert Wright, 2. Isaac Bensman, 3. Collin Meyer Heat 47 1. Mikayla Ryder, 2. Katie Nation Heat 48 1. Dustin Hoaglin, 2. Seth Underwood, 3. Shane Marlow Heat 49 1. Malea Smith, 2. Megal Marlow, 3. Courtney Hoehne Heat 50 1. Greg Castle Heat 51 1. Christian Nolen, 2. Brendan Clay, 3. Noah Righter Heat 52 1. Allie Post, 2. Mikayla Blankenship, 3. Danielle Gillem Heat 53 1. Angel Bergman and Kyle Borgerding, 2. Michelle Homan Heat 54 1. Jay Born, 2. Larry Cofield, 3. Robby biza Heat 55 1. Tia Braun, 2. Lesli Davis, 3. Cassie Dawson Heat 56 1. Steve Boyer, 2. Alyssa Elliston, 3. Virginia Ammn Heat 57 1. Lee Kinder, 2. Amanda Frederick, 3. Beth Grimm Heat 58 1. Eric Gross, 2. Adam Gilbert,3. Michael Gerdes Heat 59 1. Matthew Hoying, 2. Donald Jarvis 3. Craig Howell Heat 60 1. Nathan McConnahea, 2. ryan Hoying, 3. Jamie Roddy Heat 61 1. Scott Skinner, 2. Ronald Robbins, 3. Nina Van Horn Heat 62 1. Aaron Klosterman, 2. Ronald Leong, 3. Joe Man Heat 63 1. Dean Jones, 2. Patty Waters,

3. Rich Bruns Heat 71 1. Tony Chambers, 2. Michael Gerdes, 3. Tom Coffield Heat 72 1. Tia Braun, 2. Cassie Dawson, 3. Melissa Dawson Heat 73 1. Jay Dues, 2. Rebecca Milner, 3. Jolene Crawford Heat 74 1. Matthew Hoying, 2. Adam Gilbert, 3. Donald Jarvis Heat 75 1. Eric Gross, 2. Aaron Klosterman, 3. Craig Howell Heat 76 1. Nathan McConnahea 2. Ryan Hoying, 3. Joe Mann Heat 77 1. Jamie Roddy, 2. Eric Marshall Heat 78 1. Lea Stephens, 2. Tonya York, 3. Mary Hughes Heat 79 1. Nancy Reeves, 2. Samantha Ostendorf, 3. Sara Mestemaker Heat 80 1. Greg Westerheide, 2. Terry Stiver, 3. Danielle Gillem Heat 81 1. Joey Toney, 2. Nina VanHorn BOWLING Heat 82 1. Noah Righter, 2. Jack Barker, 3. christian Nolen Heat 83 1. Makayla Blankenship, 2. Maliyah Pleasant, 3. Dakota Mullennix Heat 84 1. Gage Castle Heat 85 1. Selena Ramirez, 2. Courtney Hoehne Heat 86 1. Shane Marlow, 2. Chad Nolen, 3. Dustin Hoaglin Heat 87 1. Megan Marlow, 2. Malea Smith Heat 88 1. Myles Gray and Daivion Ivery, 2. Isaac Bensman Heat 89 1. tie Heather Hopkins and Makayla Nichols Heat 90 1. Ashlie Freeman, 2. Katie Nation, 3. Ashley Weber Heat 91 1. Tom Coffield, 2. Carl Banks, 3. Jay Born Heat 92 1. Jolene Crawford, 2. Philip Schafer, Carol Reames Heat 93 1. tie Tia Braun, Leslie Davis, and Andrea Bender Heat 94 1. Brenda Jones, 2. Billy Cowen, 3. Virginia Ammon Heat 95 1. Melissa Dawson, 2. Angel Bergman, 3. Lee Kinder Heat 96 1. Pete Foy, 2. Steve Boyer, 3. Rich Bruns Heat 97 1. Kyle Borgerding, 2. Ryan Hoying, 3. Ronald Leong Heat 98 1. Tom Blake, 2. Larry Coffield, 3. Tony Chambers Heat 99 1. Mary Hughes, 2. Alyssa Elliston, 3. Gloria Douglas Heat 100 1. Karen Ernst, 2. Samantha Ostendorf, 3. Patty Waters Heat 101 1. Lea Stephens, 2 tie. Nancy Reeves,. Amanda Frederick Heat 102 1. Dean Jones, 2. Michael Gerdes Heat 103 1. Joey Toney, 2. Aaron Klosterman, 3. Eric Gross Heat 104 1. Tricia Kaim, 2 tie. Heather McCroskey Veronica Yamauchi Heat 105 1. Nikki Webb, 2. Paul Thieman, 3. Nichole Redinbo Heat 106 1. Ronald Robbins Heat 107 1. Joe Mann, 2. Terry Stiver, 3. Scott Skinner Heat 108 1. Greg Westerheide, 2. Danielle Gillem, 3. Tonya York

gray area of the rule book when NASCAR confiscated the parts. NASCAR docked both drivers 25 points, fined the two crew chiefs $100,000 each and suspended seven Penske team members. “It’s clear we have a process, and I am better off to wait to see that conclude and at that point I can make any other personal comments I want to make about this,” Penske said. “All I can say about the process is that I think it’s fair and equitable and we had the opportunity to explain the case and situation in detail and obviously the information we were able to demonstrate to the panel, they determined they would uphold the appeal.” The decision was not surprising. Since NASCAR began keeping records in 1999, the panel has upheld 106 of 150 appeals. Keselowski seemed to hint he’d already accepted his fate when he tweeted earlier Wednesday from a tire test at Indianapolis: “Inner peace is easily achievable once you realize that sometimes all you can do is hope for the best and prepare for the worst. (hashtag)Appeal.”

NK’s Mackie wins 3 events at Anna ANNA – Anna hosted a track meet on Tuesday, b e i n g joined by Fort Lor a m i e , e w N Knoxville and Fort Recovery. A n n a the won Mackie boys meet with 123 to 83 for New Knoxville and 47 for Fort Loramie. Loramie won the girls title with 114.5, to 68.5 for Anna, 42 for New Knoxville and 340 for Fort Recovery. In the boys meet, Andrew Mackie of New Knoxville won three events, the 100 in 11.49, the 200 in 23.46, and the 400 in 52.88. Teammate PJ Kiernan took first in both the 110 hurdles in 17.29 and the 300 hurdles in 45.33. Parker Stone won the pole vault at 10-6, Isaac Kuntz won the high jump at 5-9, and Jacob Shaw was first across the line in the 3200 in 10:50.14. Anna took first in the 3200 relay in 8:55.1, in the 400 relay in 44.98, in the 800 relay in 1:35.65, and in the 1600 relay in 3:46.55.

Anna’s Adam Larger was first in the 1600 in 4:45.62, Logan Grewe won the shot put at 41-5, Matthew Bruce was first in the long jump at 184.75, Jonathan Berning won the 800 in 2:11.54, and Ryan Spicer won the discus at 153-5. In the girls action, Fort Loramie won the 3200 relay in 10:34.45, the 800 relay in 1:56.86, the 400 relay in 55.97, and the 1600 relay in 4:28.01. Individually, Meg Westerheide was first in the 800 in 2:28.67, and first in the 1600 in 5:18.17. Melanie Kremer of Loramie won the pole vault at 8 feet, Lauren Luthman won the discus at 89-7, and Elena Moore won the 100 in 13.69. New Knoxville’s Haley Horstman won the 100 hurdles in 16.42, and the long jump at 148.75. Teammate Hannah Privette won the 3200 in 12:41.72. For Anna, Megan Fogt won the shot put at 399.5, Nicole Smith won the high jump at 4-9, and Sarah Steinbrunner won the 400 in 1:07.66.

Golf scramble fundraiser planned for Cliffside in Tipp TIPP CITY — The Troy Post 43 baseball team, along with the U17 and U15 Troy Bombers, are holding a golf scramble to help raise funds. It will be held at Cliffside Golf Course in Tipp City on May 19 with a noon check-in and 1 p.m. shotgun start. The cost for the event is $65 per person and includes 18 holes of golf with cart, coffee and donuts at check-in,

grilled lunchy, goody bag and door prizes. Golfers will also have a chance to win a 2013 Chrysler, Dodge or Jeep from Dan Hemm Automotive Group in Sidney with a hole-in-one. There are other golf-related prizes for other hole-inones also. The event is limited to the first 30 teams that register. Those interested in entering a team can contact Irvin “Frosty” Brown at ibrown@woh.rr.com.

Free physical night at FL FORT LORAMIE — Fort Loramie High School will hold a free physical night on May 8 starting at 6:30.

Athletes can pick up a packet for the 2013-14 school year in the high school office. It is also available online.


SPORTS

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Page 3B

Bengals try to diversify running game CINCINNATI (AP) — Six years passed before the Bengals drafted a running back in anything other than one of the last rounds, an indication the position wasn’t all that much of a priority. Now they’re getting serious about diversifying their running game. The Bengals took tailback Giovani Bernard from North Carolina in the second round last week, showing a determination to address one of their shortcomings. They hadn’t drafted a running back higher than the sixth round since 2007, when they took Kenny Irons from Auburn in the second round. It became a priority after last season, when the Bengals failed to run for at least 100 yards in 10 games. They didn’t reach 100 yards in four consecutive losses that led to a 3-5 start. Cincinrecovered and nati reached the playoffs, but

AP Photo/Al Behrman

CINCINNATI BENGALS second round draft pick Giovani Bernard, a halfback out of North Carolina, gestures during a news conference Saturday in Cincinnati. failed to run for 100 at Houston. yards in any of the final Time to change. three games, including a Coach Marvin Lewis first-round playoff loss took a special interest in

the running backs at the various pre-draft workouts. “I try to pick out a position each year where I want to go and see the guys, and running back was my position this year,” Lewis said. The running back spot has been in transition in Cincinnati the last few years. The Bengals became a grind-it-out team in the late 2000s, with some success. They couldn’t throw it enough to get beyond the first round of the playoffs. They let Cedric Benson leave after the 2011 season, looking to get a running back that was more diversified and a better fit for their new West Coast offense. BenJarvus GreenEllis signed from New England, giving them a reliable starter known for running between the tackles. They had Bernard Scott as a change-of-pace back, but he suffered hand, ankle

Orb made 7-2 favorite for Kentucky Derby LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Orb has been made the early 7-2 favorite for the Kentucky Derby, with undefeated Verrazano the second choice in a full field of 20 horses. Trained by Shug McGaughey, Orb drew the No. 16 post on Wednesday. Four horses have won from there, most recently Animal Kingdom two years ago. McGaughey is in racing’s Hall of Fame, but the 62year-old trainer has yet to win the Derby in six previous tries. Orb comes into Saturday’s big race on a fourrace winning streak. He won the Florida Derby in his last start. Wood Memorial winner Verrazano drew the No. 14 post and is the 4-1 second choice. The colt is one of a record-tying five starters trained by Todd Pletcher. He won his first and only Derby in 2010 with Super Saver. Santa Anita Derby winner Goldencents is the third choice at 5-1 and will break from the No. 8 post. He’s trained by Doug O’Neill, who won last year with I’ll Have Another. Another Pletcher horse, Revolutionary, is

Kentucky Derby field Orb drew the No. 16 post and was made the early 7-2 favorite for the 139th running of the Kentucky Derby. PP

Horse

Jockey

Odds

1.

Black Onyx

Joe Bravo

50-1

2.

Oxbow

Gary Stevens

30-1

3.

Revolutionary

Calvin Borel

10-1

4.

Golden Soul

Robby Albarado

50-1

5.

Normandy Invasion

Javier Castellano

12-1

6.

Mylute

Rosie Napravnik

15-1

7.

Giant Finish

Jose Espinoza

50-1

8.

Goldencents

Kevin Krigger

9.

Overanalyze

Rafael Bejarano

15-1

5-1

10.

Palace Malice

Mike Smith

20-1

11.

Lines of Battle

Ryan Moore

30-1

12.

Itsmyluckyday

Elvis Trujillo

15-1

13.

Falling Sky

Luis Saez

50-1

14.

Verrazano

John Velazquez

15.

Charming Kitten

Edgar Prado

20-1

16.

Orb

Joel Rosario

7-2

17.

Will Take Charge

Jon Court

20-1

18.

Frac Daddy

Victor Lebron

50-1

19.

Java’s War

Julien Leparoux

15-1

20.

Vyjack

Garrett Gomez

15-1

4-1

AP

the fourth choice at 10-1 on the morning line set by Churchill Downs oddsmaker Mike Battaglia. The colt is ridden by Calvin Borel, a threetime Derby winner famous for riding the rail. Revolutionary drew the No. 3 post, leaving Borel close to his favorite route

on the track. Normandy Invasion is the fifth choice at 12-1. The other 15 horses are all 15-1 or higher, including Pletcher’s other horses — Overanalyze (15-1), Palace Malice (20-1), and Charming Kitten (20-1). Spiral Stakes winner

Black Onyx drew the dreaded inside post and is one of five 50-1 shots in the field. Oxbow and Will Take Charge will be the record 46th and 47th Derby starters for Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas, a fourtime Derby winner. Both are long shots — Will Take Charge at 20-1 and Oxbow at 30-1. The 21st horse on the points list is Fear the Kitten, an also eligible who would need a defection before 9 a.m. Friday, when Derby wagering opens, to get into the 1 1/4-mile race. Post time is 6:24 p.m. EDT Saturday. Kentucky Derby Female Jockeys Diane Crump, 1970, Fathom, 15th Patty Cooksey, 1984, So Vague, 11th Andrea Seefeldt, 1991, Forty Something, 16th Julie Krone, 1992, Ecstatic Ride, 14th Julie Krone, 1995, Suave Prospect, 11th Rosemary Homeister, Jr., 2003, Supah Blitz, 13th Rosie Napravnik, 2011, Pants On Fire, 9th Rosie Napravnik, 2013, Mylute

Owner threatens to move Cubs CHICAGO (AP) — The owner of the Chicago Cubs for the first time publicly threatened to move the team out of Wrigley Field if his plans for a big, new video screen are blocked, saying Wednesday he needs new advertising revenue to help bankroll a $500 million renovation of the storied ballpark. Cubs Chairman Tom Ricketts until now had said nothing as dire, despite months of contentious negotiations over how to keep everyone happy in sprucing up the 99-year-old stadium in the heart of Wrigleyville on Chicago’s North Side. “The fact is that if we don’t have the ability to generate revenue in our own outfield, we’ll have to take a look at moving ‚— no question,” Ricketts told reporters after outlining renovation plans to Chicago business leaders.

AP Photo/Courtesy the Chicago Cubs

THIS ARTIST rendering provided Wednesday by the Chicago Cubs shows renovations planned at Wrigley Field. Part of the $500 million renovation plan for the 99-year-old stadium is to build an exterior plaza at the corner of Addison and Sheffield. He added that he remains committed to working out a deal and it is difficult to imagine the Cubs playing anywhere else. But the fight over the Friendly Confines boils down to money and, of course, something unusual — it’s the Cubs, after all. By far the thorniest issue is the plan for a 6,000-square-foot video screen over left field, a common feature in many major league ballparks.

The difference is that Wrigley Field — the second oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball behind Fenway Park in Boston — is surrounded by privately owned clubs with rooftop bleachers whose owners object to any changes that could block their bird’s-eye views into the stadium. The rooftop businesses have been left out of discussions on the proposed upgrade, but they feel they should

have a seat at the bargaining table because they have a contract in which they share 17 percent of their revenue with the Cubs. Legal action is a possibility. Ricketts presented an architectural rendering of the video screen during his speech to the City Club of Chicago and insisted that the team’s own studies have shown it would have minimal, if any, impact on the views. He described the sign as “midsize” compared with those at other stadiums, thought it is nearly three times as large as the scoreboard currently atop the centerfield bleachers. Another smaller sign with the name of a sponsor is planned for right field. He said without such signage, the team was losing out on $20 million a year in ad revenue — essential for helping fund the extensive renovations without dipping into taxpayer funds.

and knee injuries that limited him to two games last season. Cincinnati finished 18th in the league in yards rushing. The Bengals ran for only 14, 47 and 80 yards in the final three games. “We can’t have one facet of our offense rolling and the other facet kind of sluggish and the other half picking it up,” said GreenEllis, who finished with a career-high 1,094 yards. “We’ve got to have all those things working in continuity together. “That’s what was the biggest (shortcoming) about us. We started off and our passing was very good, our run was shaky. Then our run is good, and our pass is shaky. That can’t happen. We have to have them going together at the same time.” The Bengals haven’t had much luck lately in drafting running backs in the early rounds.

They made Chris Perry their top pick in 2004, but he was hurt and managed only 606 yards in four seasons. Irons tore a knee ligament in preseason as a rookie, sidetracking his career. The Bengals would like to have a running back that can blend into the passing game. Green-Ellis caught 22 passes for 104 yards last season. No other running back caught more than 11 passes. That’s what made Bernard appealing enough that the Bengals were willing to get him in the second round. He caught 45 passes in 2011 and 47 last season at North Carolina. “We’re looking for a guy who would fit what we do, who can catch and run with it,” running backs coach Hue Jackson said. “But you also have to be able to pass-protect and be multifaceted. The young man has that skill set.”

Anna beats Botkins in County game BOTKINS — Anna notched a win in County softball action Wednesday, beating Botkins 110 in five innings. Anna, 8-7, had five girls with two hits each, including Amanda Rickert, Allison Harris, Haley Steinbrunner, Caleigh Kirtley and Paige Richard. One of Harris’ hits was a triple. Kylie Keener held Botkins to three hits. The linescore: Anna.............2103 06_11 12 2 Botkins ...........000 00_ 0 3 5 WP: Keener; LP: Dietz Records: Anna 8-7, Botkins 4-8.

——

Minster routs Wapak 13-3 WAPAKONETA — Minster ran its record to 10-7 with a 13-3 rout of Wapakoneta in non-league softball Wednesday. The Lady Wildcats led just 6-3 after six but tacked on seven in the top of the seventh. Marissa Conrad, Rachel Heckman and Sara Hosey all had three hits, with Hosey driving

in four runs and Heckaman three. Regan Hahn had two hits and Nicole Brandewie two RBIs, and Hosey and Heckman both doubled. The linescore: Minster.....200 112 7_13 20 1 Wapak ......020 100 0_ 3 5 0 WP: Richard; LP: Sammons Records: Minster 10-7.

——

Lehman pounds Ridgemont 17-5 RIDGEWAY — Lehman rolled to a 17-5 win over Ridgemont in girls softball action Wednesday, raising its record to 7-9. Lehman had 23 hits, led by Julia Harrelson with five and Ava Schmitz with four, three of them doubles. Lindsay Bundy had three hits with a double, Andrea Thobe had tgwo doubles, Erica Paulus singled and doubled, and Brooke Jones and Ellie Cain both had two singles. The linescore: Lehman ....433 003 4_17 23 1 Ridgemont021 200 0_ 5 14 2 WP: Bundy; LP: McFadden Records: Lehman 7-9.

Sidney Women’s Tennis taking doubles signups The Sidney Women’s Summer Tennis League, now in its 28th year, is accepting sign-ups for doubles tennis teams. Women’s summer doubles teams play a match, consisting of 15 games, on Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. on the Sidney High School tennis courts. The fee is $5 per person which covers the cost of balls and prizes. All levels of skill are encouraged to play in the league. There will be divisions for beginner, intermediate and advanced skill. Play starts Monday, June 3 and continues for ten consecutive Mondays with the exception of July 8th. In the event of rain, all matches will be cancelled via email notification.

If you are interested in playing, please contact Joan Schroeder at 937-498-1001 by May 15, 2013 with your team information and skill level. If you would like to play and do not have a partner, please contact Joan as well because an attempt will be made to find a partner for everyone that is interested in playing. Substitute players are also invited to sign up. The Women’s Tennis League would like to thank the City of Sidney for reserving the Sidney High School tennis courts for them on Monday nights, and for scheduling this summer’s court resurfacing during the week in July that the tennis league does not play.

BASEBALL

From Page 1B

Conner Cotterman four-hitter. The linescore: and Jake Herron also had two hits for the Pi- Riverside ....203 101 0_7 11 0 ...000 000 0_0 4 1 rates, who are now 13-8 Fairbanks Daniels (WP) and on the year. Bollinger; Hall and StuderDallas Daniels mond. pitched a complete-game Records: Riverside 13-8.


LOCAL NEWS

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Page 4B

TourismOhio, McDonald’s team up to promote Ohio COLUMBUS — The Office of TourismOhio, McDonald’s restaurants of Ohio and Coca-Cola have announced the launch of Discover Ohio To Go, a first-of-its-kind promotion designed to provide travelers with exclusive discounts at some of Ohio’s most popular tourism attractions. Customers who purchase a large soft drink or iced tea beverage at For photo reprints, visit www.sidneydailynews.com SDN Photo/Luke Gronneberg participating Ohio McDonald’s locations between April 29 and June 9 can redeem the cup at Julie Gilardi, of Sidney, looks through a batch of tree seedlings as she picks participating tourism them up at the Shelby Soil and Water Conservation District annual seedling attractions for discounts sale on the Shelby County Fairgrounds recently. Working to become a mas- on admission, lodging ter gardener, Gilardi bought a wide range of seedlings which indcluded and more. The discounts white oak, red maple, sugar maple and red bud. are available for redemption at more than a dozen tourism attractions throughout the spring and summer. “McDonald’s restaurants are a stop for many Ohio travelers, and working with McDonald’s and Coca-Cola allows us to provide those travelers with exclusive deals to help them stretch their travel budgets and maybe stay an extra night,” said Interim State Tourism Director Pat Barker. “This Mike Dodds, executive store will be opening soon projected. She noted the program also is launchdirector of the West Ohio in the village and noted county is studying the ef- ing at a perfect time of Development Council, re- the village has sold the old fects of the health care re- year to help stimulate ported at a recent meet- Lacal building. Potential form law, which is ing that he is pleased buyers have expressed in- expected to raise costs with donations for the terest in the former Hobo’s substantially. Workforce Partnership. restaurant and the HenIt was reported Sheriff He said almost all of the schen building. He said John Lenhart is continudonations for the pro- Airstream also plans to ing to house federal prisgram are from private hire approximately 60 em- oners at the jail. The businesses. Dodds said a ployees. A feasibility study sheriff’s office also is reprogram director is ex- is planned by the village placing the radio console, pected to be hired within on emergency medical which will allow newer the next several weeks. services. technology for dispatchOfficials from Shelby Fort Loramie Admin- ing. County communities re- istator Tony Schmitmeyer Sidney City Manager TOLEDO — The ported on economic activ- reported IMS plans to ex- Mark Cundiff advised Northwest Ohio Affiliities. Nancy Benroth, pand this summer, al- those in attendance that ate of Susan G. Komen Anna village administra- though no plans have the city’s first quarter is accepting nominator, reported Wells Broth- been received. He also revenue is up over 2012. ers has received approval noted village income tax He also reported that tions for both “In Celeand “In of a 10-year abatement revenues are up for the $20,000 in unpaid city in- bration” Memory” honorees for for its expansion. The first quarter. There are come taxes have been rethe 2013 Toledo Race EPA has approved the also plans to redevelop covered. new truck stop operating the village canal park He said after a favor- for the Cure and the Inits own waste water with funds from the Ger- able outcome in an law- augural Findlay Race treatment. Benroth also man Family Days Com- suit in Iowa against the for the Cure. Nominees from the reported the new owner mittee, along with help EPA’s wastewater reof an ice cream parlor from the village. quirements, Sidney will following counties will hopes to open in the fall. Botkins Administrator be contacting other cities be considered for the She also reported for Jesse Kent reported on to see if this is a route Toledo Race honor, DefiRussia Administrator the recent groundbreak- they want to pursue. Cun- ance, Erie, Fulton, Rick Simon. It was noted ing for the new school. diff said the Holiday Inn Henry, Huron, Lucas, that the Clopay wood The former Botkins lum- Express/Suites plans to Ottawa, Paulding, Sandoor line will employ 30 ber building will be torn begin construction this dusky, Williams, Wood, to 35 new employees and down to make way for a summer. He reported the and Monroe County, operate about 54 hours a new Family Dollar, ac- city has several improve- Mich. Nominees from the week. The village also cording to Kent. ment projects going this following counties will plans some street imKent also reported the year, including the reconbe considered for the provements through a new FocusShelby website struction of another secgrant and a mini park is is showing great promise. tion of Wapakoneta Findlay Race honor, Allen, Auglaize, Crawbeing planned with grant Shelby County Com- Avenue. funds. missioner Julie Ehemann Members also dis- ford, Hancock, Hardin, Bruce Metz, Jackson reported the county’s cussed a possible WODC Logan, Mercer, Putnam, Center administrator, re- sales tax receipts were 30-year anniversary cele- Seneca, Shelby, Van Wert and Wyandot. ported the Family Dollar $8,000 less for April than bration.

Seedlings arrive

Dodds pleased with Workforce Partnership

some early Ohio travel planning.” Travelers can visit w w w. D i s c o v e r O hioToGo.com to find a full list of discounts and deals, as well as a list of nearly 400 participating McDonald’s locations. To receive the discount, travelers should follow directions on the website for each offer and present the clean, empty cup upon arrival at participating attractions, including: Cedar Point, Cedar Point Resorts, Cincinnati Museum Center, Columbus Museum of Art, Great Wolf Lodge (Mason and Sanlocations), dusky Greater Cleveland Aquarium, Hocking Hills Canopy Tours, Kalahari Resorts and Conventions, Kings Island, National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Ohio State Parks, Wild Zipline Safari and Wildwater Kingdom. “Our partnership with TourismOhio and Coca-Cola is an extension of our commitment to providing a great overall experience for our customers,” said Shirley Rogers-Reece, vice president and general manager, McDon-

ald’s Ohio Region. “In addition to quality food and beverages, this promotion allows McDonald’s to provide our guests with an added value they won’t find at other restaurants.” “As a long-time partner of McDonald’s, the Discover Ohio To Go partnership offers a great opportunity for Coca-Cola to provide icecold refreshment to onthe-go road trippers this spring and summer,” said Pete Maguire, CocaCola Business Development Director. “We’re proud to support TourismOhio and create moments of happiness for Ohio travelers this year.” Specially marked “Discover Ohio To Go” cups are available at participating McDonald’s locations while supplies last in Greater Cincinnati, Central Ohio, Dayton/Miami ValLima and ley, Toledo/Northwest Ohio. For more ideas on Ohio vacations and to begin building a trip itinerary, visit DiscoverOhio.com, join the conversation on Twitter with @DiscoverOhio using #OH2GO, or like TourismOhio on Facebook.

Nominations sought for ‘In Celebration,’ ‘In Memory’ for Race for the Cure The deadline for the nominations will be May 14. Nomination forms can be found on the website www.komennwohio.org. For more information call (419) 724-2873. The Inaugural Findlay Race for the Cure will be held Sept. 28 and the 20th Annual Toledo Race for the Cure will be held in Downtown Toledo on Sept. 29. Registration for both Races is available online at www.komennwohio.org . About Susan G. Komen for the Cure and the Komen Northwest Ohio Affiliate Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan G. Komen, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, the promise became Susan G.

Komen for the Cure and launched the global breast cancer movement. The Northwest Ohio Affiliate of Komen for the Cure is working to better the lives of those facing breast cancer in the 24-county service area. Since its founding in 1999, the Northwest Ohio Affiliate has invested nearly $9 million dollars into local breast health and breast cancer awareness projects. Seventy-five percent of net proceeds generated by the Affiliate stay in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan. The remaining income goes to fund research. For more information, call (419) 724 CURE or (877) 604CURE, or visit www.komennwohio.org.

Student, meteorologist become friends Longfellow fourthand fifth-graders were recently treated to a visit from WHIO-TV and Storm Center 7 meteorologist Erica Collura. Collura was brought to Longfellow as a result of a chance meeting by fourth-grade student Sean Sullenberger at the Dayton Home Show at the beginning of February. Sean, the son of Jim and Michelle Martin and Brett and Heather Sullenberger, suffers from autism but dreams of being a weatherman someday. He had always been a fan of Storm Center 7 meteorologist Jamie Simpson and the all weather channel, WHIO-TV Weather Now. Sean’s adoration has shifted from Simpson to Collura in recent years. Knowing she would be at the Dayton Home Show,

Photo provided

LONGFELLOW STUDENT Sean Sullenberger sits at the WHIO-TV Channel 7 news desk with Erica Collura, a Storm Center meterologist. Sean’s mother Michelle Martin reached out to Collura and told her how much Sean would love to

meet her. Sean and his at the home show. mother battled the win“We went straight to ter elements on Febru- the booth and there she ary 2nd to meet Collura was. Sean was smiling so

big! He was nervous but he said hi and shook her hand,” said Michelle. “She talked with him for a while and he enjoyed every minute of it! We took some pictures and left. As we were walking away, he said he wished she would come to his school, so I said let’s go ask!” Collura agreed to visit Longfellow, but she also invited him and his family to visit the WHIO-TV studio where he could give his own forecast using the green screen. Sean and his family visited the studio on Feb. 16 where Sean got to learn how to do the forecast by looking at the TV monitors to the sides of the green screen. With a clicker in his hand, Sean flipped from screen to screen to report the weather. The family then got to watch the noon

news live with Mark Bruce and Collura. Collura then took the family on a tour of the studio and showed them the sky-deck. “I have made a new friend with Erica and she calls Sean her main bud,” said Michelle. “I have a feeling we may be hanging out at the studio more this summer!” Collura spoke to Longfellow students about the different types of severe weather and the “ingredients” necessary for each severe weather storm. From everyday thunderstorms to hurricanes and tornados, Collura hit on many of the weather-related science standards the students will be facing on their upcoming Ohio Achievement tests, engaging students along throughout the presentation.


Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Page 5B

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40037809 Roofing â&#x20AC;˘ Drywall â&#x20AC;˘ Painting Plumbing â&#x20AC;˘ Remodels â&#x20AC;˘ Flooring Eric Jones, Owner

which it was acquired, by internet auction. Pursuant to the term of that Ordinance, internet auctions will be conducted according to the rules and regulations of GovDeals. Interested bidders may view property placed for auction and may place bids for such property by going to the GovDeals website at www.govdeals.com or visiting the village website at www.jacksoncenter.com. Any such auction will remain open for bidding for period of not less than ten (10) consecutive days, including Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays. Information about bidding on GovDeals may be obtained from GovDeals, Monday-Friday, 8am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 pm ET at (800) 613-0156. Apr. 25, May 2 40038579

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40037809

937.492.8003 â&#x20AC;˘ 937.726.2868

~ Fully Insured ~

Time: 10:00 A.M. Truck, Cars, Equipment: 2006 Ford Crown Victoria police cruiser w/ 160,598 miles, as is; 1995 Ford F250, 4WD pickup truck; Kubota G6200 mower w/ 48â&#x20AC;? deck & catcher, all wheel steer w/ 1679 hrs.; JD 86â&#x20AC;&#x2122; wide backhoe bucket; attachment only; Farmall Model A tractor w/ fert. spreader; Snapper LE19 snow blower; Western Model 60390, 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; snow plow; Snapper 21â&#x20AC;&#x2122; mower w/ bagger; homemade concrete screed w/ 6.5 B & S engine; Sheldon metal lathe; 2 aluminum tool boxes; Agrifab pull type fert. spreader; push fert. spreader; gas edger; ball field striper, push type; 200 gallon hot water tank; school zone lights w/ poles; metal office desk; 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; homemade trailer; Metrotech locater Model 9890SFLXT; 6-175 watt street light heads; 60-4â&#x20AC;? PVC sweeps; drinking fountains; street light poles; cabinets; chairs; radios; Panasonic telephones; lockers; cabinets; credenza; filing cabinet; tv w/ VCR; and other items. Village of Minster and Village Police Department â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Owners Consigned by the Village of Ft. Loramie â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2002 Ford F350 Dump Truck, V10 gas engine, 51,700 miles, 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; dump bed w/ Tailgate salt spreader & 9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; snow blade, sells with reserve. Consigned by N.B. EMS - Panasonic 36â&#x20AC;? HDTC 1080i, w/ Spatializer stereo.

16 years experience

REAL ESTATE AUCTION Sat., May 11, 2013 - 10:00 AM 40038057

817 North Buckeye Ave, Sidney, Ohio Parcel ID # 01-18-25-301-020. Situate in the City of Sidney, County of Shelby and State of Ohio, viz: Being Lot Number Twenty Four Hundred Thirty Nine (2439) in H.C. Lenoxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addition in said City of Sidney, Shelby County, Ohio, and being the same premises conveyed by Deed recorded in Book 140, Page 343 of the Deed Records of Shelby County, Ohio, and subject to the restrictions set forth in said deed. Prior Deed References: Volume 1273, Page 361 of the Official Records of Shelby County, Ohio, and Volume 1867, Page 485 of the Official Records of Shelby County, Ohio. Basic Terms and Conditions: The property has been appraised for $24,000 and must sell for at least 2/3rds of the appraised value. Therefore, the minimum acceptable bid shall be $16,000. The successful bidder shall enter into a purchase agreement immediately following the auction and make an earnest payment of 10% of the sales price. The payment may be made in the form of cash or bankable check. The earnest payment will be returned at closing.There will be no financing contingencies of any kind. Closing shall occur within 30 days of the auction. Property is being sold in AS-IS condition without warranty or representation. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining and paying for any evidence of title Purchaser may require. Owner will provide at closing a duly executed and recordable fiduciary deed to the purchaser subject to and excepting real estate taxes, restrictions and easements of record, road right of way and zoning ordinances. Real estate taxes and assessments prorated to date of closing. Terms of the purchase agreement supersede the terms of this notice and any other terms or representations. Realty 2000 Group is the exclusive agent for the seller. Property being sold under authority of: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Timothy Hawkins, Executor of the Estate of Juanita Hawkins v. Banc One Financial Services, et al., Case No. 2012-CVA-006, Probate Court, Shelby County, Ohioâ&#x20AC;? Timothy Hawkins, Executor of the Estate of Juanita Hawkins, and James J. Chrisman attorney for Executor.

Auctioneer: Thomas Roll, 937-638-7847 Brokerage: Realty 2000 Group For questions about the property call: Tom Roll, 638-7847. Property will not be open for inspection.

Tom Roll

Terms: Cash or Check with proper ID

638-7847

40038057

Auctioneer/Realtor

40038102

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:HLJDQGW# ZHLJDQGWGHYHORSPHQWFRP Auctions

NICE ESTATE AUCTION 40039478

Sat. May 11, 10:00am Shelby County Fairgrounds Sidney, Ohio

Household Items, Nice Furniture, John Deere Items, Toy Tractor Collection 60+ tractors, Large Longaberger Basket Collection, Baseball and Sports cards, Honda Scooter, 2 small ATVs, Vintage Toys, Kitchen Aid Mixer, Garage Items, ANTIQUES, John Deere 325 Lawn Tractor, and Much much more!

Also included will be an entire Estate from Dayton, Oh. Estate of Margaret R. Bland Executor, Craig E. Bland Attorney, Justin A. Morocco Montgomery Co. Probate #2013EST00789

A large 2 Ring Auction from the start with something for everyone! go to auctionzip.com for pictures Auctioneer ID#22728 Terms-check or cash with ID

937-726-8970

SHERIFFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE OF REAL ESTATE CASE NUMBER 12CV000242 Beneficial Financial I Inc. fka Beneficial Ohio, Inc., Plaintiff -vsMichael Smith aka Michael A. Smith, et al., Defendants Court of Common Pleas, Shelby County, Ohio In pursuance of an Alias Order of Sale Without Reappraisal in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction at the 2nd floor lobby of the Courthouse in the above county, on the 15thth day of May, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. the following described real estate: Situated in the County of Shelby in the State of Ohio and in the Township of Jackson: Being part of the Northeast quarter of Section 31, Town 7 South, Range 7 East, Jackson Township, Shelby County, Ohio, and further described as follows: Beginning at a RR Spike found on the south line of the NE 1/4 said Section 31, in the center of the Pasco-Montra Rd.; thence N89°-33'W, along the south line of said northeast quarter, 423.93 ft. to an iron pin; thence N6°31'E, 310.00 ft. to an iron pin; thence S89°-33'E, 423.93 ft. to a RR Spike in the center of said Pasco-Montra Rd.; thence S6°-31'W, along said center, 310.00 ft. to the place of beginning; Containing 3.000 acres, more or less, being subject to all legal highways, and subject to a perpetual sanitary tile easement from the premises herein conveyed into adjacent tile fields, and being part of the premises recorded in Volume 246, page 271 of the Shelby County Deed Records; Plat recorded in Volume 19, page 13; (The above description prepared by William G. Fultz, Jr., Registered Surveyor No. 5173, of 1310 Hickory Court, Sidney, OH 45365). Parcel Number(s): 19-06-31-200-006 Prior Deed Info.: Fiduciary Deed, Book 294, Page 81, filed June 07, 1991 Said premises also known as 13045 Pasco Montra Road, Maplewood OH 45340 PPN: 19-06-31-200-006 Appraised at: $81,000.00 and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds (2/3) of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: A DEPOSIT OF A CERTIFIED CHECK, PAYABLE TO THE SHERIFF, OR CASH, FOR TEN (10%) PER CENT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE WILL BE REQUIRED AT THE TIME THE BID IS ACCEPTED; EXCEPT WHERE THE BID AMOUNT IS $3,000.00 OR LESS, THE MINIMUM DEPOSIT SHALL BE $300 AND THE MAXIMUM DEPOSIT IN ANY CASE SHALL BE $10,000. THE FULL PURCHASE PRICE PAID TO THE SHERIFF WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE, AND UNLESS PAID WITHIN EIGHT (8) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE SHALL BEAR INTEREST AT THE RATE OF TEN (10%) PER CENT UNTIL PAID, AND ON FAILURE TO DO SO, THE PURCHASER, SHALL BE ADJUDGED IN CONTEMPT OF COURT. John R. Lenhart, Sheriff of Shelby County THE LAW OFFICES OF JOHN D. CLUNK, CO., LPA John D. Clunk #0005376 Ted A. Humbert #0022307 Timothy R. Billick #0010390 Robert R. Hoose #0074544 4500 Courthouse Blvd, #400, Stow OH 44224 PH: 330-436-0300 FAX: 330-436-0301 Apr. 24, May 1, 8

40038601

FREE ESTIMATES

NOTE: Items may be previewed on Friday May 10th from 1:00 to 3:00 PM.

Tim Eiting, Auctioneer

DQG PDLO WR

12-12359

AUCTION

Saturday May 11, 2013

jasonweigandt.com

LEGALS

QUALITY WORK AT AFFORDABLE PRICES

VILLAGE OF MINSTER The Village of Minster and Village Police Department will sell the following items at the Utilities Office Building, located at 285 N. Ohio Street, Minster, Ohio. ON:

Help Wanted General

40039478

Auctions

40038102 PUBLIC

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Land Services

Insurance jobs welcome â&#x20AC;˘ FREE Estimates $700.00 off $6k or more on a roof & $150.00 roof tune up

RECEPTIONIST/ ASSISTANT

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Yard Sale

40038601


Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Reliable Castings Corporation Attn.: HR Manager 1521 W. Michigan Street P. O. Box 829 Sidney, OH 45365 email to: hr@reliablecastings.com Or fax to: (937)492-1233 An Equal Opportunity Employer TRI-COUNTY BOARD OF RECOVERY & MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES A multi-county alcohol, drug addiction and mental health services board seeks two fulltime professionals to join its efforts in providing community outreach, training, education and communication within Miami, Darke and Shelby Counties. Director of Community Resource Development :LOO OHDG WKH %RDUGҋV PDUNHW ing and community outreach programs through a variety of social media platforms. Development of training programs designed to enhance worker retention throughout the tri-county area. Program Coordinator Will provide administrative support, communication and leadership to targeted programs such as the Family and Children First and NAMI. A Bachelors Degree in health education, communications, social work or a closely related field; two to four years of related experience; advanced computer skills and ability to prepare and present reports, outreach and training materials are required for both positions. The Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services offers a competitive salary and benefit package that includes PERS. Resume must be received by 4:30 p.m. on May 17, 2013 to be considered. Resumes should be forwarded by mail or via email to; Mark McDaniel, Executive Director Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services 1100 Wayne Street, Suite 4000 Troy, OH 45373 mcdanielm@ mdsadamhs.mh.state.oh.us For detailed position descriptions visit our website at: mdsadamhs.mh.state.oh.us The Tri-County Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer

WOOD WORKER Experienced Wood Worker Needed,Must be comfortable working with machinery of the trade and reading drawings. May be required to travel on installs, if needed. Pay depending upon experience. Email resumes to: resumes@gopir.com OR Kathy Kirtley Partners In Recognition, Inc. PO Box 27 Fort Loramie, OH 45845

Boats & Marinas

Miscellaneous

CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT

COMPUTER DESK, wood tone with file drawer, $30. 14" and 20" TVs. $15 each, (937)492-9863

Busy OBGYN office seeking part time possible full time position. Certified Medical Assistant with 1 year experience required, preferably OBGYN experience.

Country Meadows NOW OFFERING

PONTOON, 50 Mercury outboard, power anchor, trolling motor, big live well, depth finder. Life jackets/ trailer, accessories included, $4200, (937)214-4413.

CAT, approximately 7-8 months, very small, all black, house trained, very well behaved and friendly, free, (937)710-3549

HOMES FOR SALE Financing & Lease option to own AVAILABLE

Please fax resume and references to: (937)339-7842

Call for an appointment today! (937)497-7763

Other FENIX, LLC PRODUCTION TEAM MEMBERS Seeking team members who want to build a career with our growing company. The ideal candidate should be highly motivated, excel in team environments and, have 3-5 years of manufacturing experience. The plant operates on a 12-hour shift basis with current openings on the 7pm to 7am shift. We offer a highly competitive wage and full benefits. Please send resumes to: HUMAN RESOURCES 319 S. Vine St. Fostoria, OH 44830 MAINTENANCE Accepting applications for Maintenance position at Blossom Village Apts. 9 hours weekly, must have own tools. Apply in person: Wednesday, May1st or Thursday, May 2nd at: 120 Red Bud circle (office) Jackson Center, OH 45334 Equal opportunity provider and employer TREE TRIMMER/ GROUNDSMAN/ CLIMBER, Must have experience in rope/ saddle, good driving record. Wages depend on experience. Good pay/ benefits, (937)4928486(937)492-8486 WANTED:

CABINET MAKERS Some experience needed. Interested parties apply Monday-Friday between 3pm-5pm Robertson Cabinets Inc 1090 S. Main St. West Milton, OH 45383 Production/Operations

HANDYMAN Special, Needs some repairs, some electrical & plumbing, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, appraised at $29000, asking $5000, 317 Oak Street, (937)844-8923 NEARLY NEW 5 bedroom country ranch. Finished basement, Anna Schools, John Barnett, (419)738HOME(4663). Scott Ross Realty. Apartments /Townhouses 1 BEDROOM, 1-2 adults, no pets. 217 Brookburn. Deposit, references. (937)492-0829. 1 BEDROOM, Northend Sidney, appliances, air, some utilities, laundry facility, NO PETS. $375, (937)394-7265 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, appliances, fireplace, secure entry. Water & trash included, garages.

2009 HONDA Rancher, TRX420, automatic, Green, excellent condition, (937)5966861 Autos For Sale 1985 LINCOLN Continental, Sea foam green, carriage top, 56k, beautiful car inside and out, 1 owner, $7500, call (937)362-2261

632 LINDEN, 3 bedroom, new flooring, water/trash included, $490 + deposit, no pets, (937)394-7478, (937)7263098.

Time to sell your old stuff... Get it

SOLD

WOOD CHIPPER, 16.5hp, electric start, limbs up to 4-1/2 inch diameter, good shape, new knife, $1600, (937)2160202

with

that work .com

Cleaning & Maintenance

2007 HARLEY Davidson Ultra Classic, black pearl, 22,400 miles, CB/CD/MP3, intercom, spoiler with LED lights, heatshield, highway pegs, $14,500, (937)773-8428.

Opportunity Knocks...

2007 HONDA Rebel, red in color, 2500 miles, like new, saddle bags and helmet, $2150. Call (937)418-3727.

Affordable Cleaning LLC

Motorcycles

CLEANING 40037837 HOMES & BUSINESSES IN SIDNEY, ANNA, AND NEW BREMEN AREAS INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

419-905-2507

MINI BIKE, 2 cycle, looks like small Harley, $250, (937)2160202

40037867

RVs / Campers

JobSourceOhio.com Auto Classic /Antiques

2003 TRAIL-LITE 22' hybrid Commercial Residential trailer, 3 burner stove with Bonded Insured oven, refrigerator with freezer, Loria Coburn microwave, AC/furnace, sleeps 937-498-0123 6, great condition! $8250, loriaandrea@aol.com (937)676-2590. Appliances WASHER & DRYER, 2 sets available, electric, both work great! $200-$400 per set, (937)418-5756

Sparkle Clean Cleaning Service

40037557

Furniture & Accessories SOFA, 3 Seat, colonial wood and covering, good condition, Free for the hauling, (937)7266464

DISCOVER PEBBLEBROOK

(937)498-4747 www.firsttroy.com

TABLE, 4 chairs, china cabinet $60; patio furniture complete with umbrella $110; coffee table, 3 end tables $125; wooden desk, chair $60; entertainment center $25 (937)3356064 or (937)216-8199

40041521

2006 NISSAN Quest SE, blue with grey interior, 110,000 miles. Fully loaded, very good condition, great family vehicle, $9900. (937)710-3907.

40041124

LAWNMOWER, White, 48in riding lawnmower, 20hp, excellent condition, $700, (937)3622261

Mopeds

2007 HONDA CH80 scooter, asking $1500 OBO. Call (937)418-2702

ANNA, Large 3 bedroom duplex. Attached garage. No pets. gemstoneofanna.com (937)538-6793 dmgreve@bright.net

Village of Anna. 2 & 3 Bedroom townhomes & ranches. Garages, appliances, washer & dryer. Close to I-75, Honda, 20 miles from Lima.

AUTO PARTS SWAP MEET, Sunday, May 5th, 8am-4pm. Wapakoneta Fairgrounds, Ohio. For information 419-394-6484.

2005 FORD 500, good condition, well maintenanced, AM/FM/CD, AC, power everything, newer tires, $6000, (937)710-3907.

1520 SPRUCE. 2 bedroom, $475 month, $200 deposit. Air, range, refrigerator, laundry, no pets. Call for showing: (937)710-5075

1975 CHEVY CAPRICE CLASSIC Convertible, A1 condition! 350 V8 engine, 125k miles, $12,000 OBO. Call (419)628-4183

IN OSGOOD, 2 Bedroom, all Boats & Marinas utilities including Cable and In2000 YAMAHA jet boat, (2) ternet furnished, (419)582135HP engines, boat & trailer 2891 in excellent condition, engines have between 60-80 hours Condominiums running time, boat cover, life SURFSIDE BEACH, SC, 2 jackets, water skis & tubes, bedroom, 2 bath, ocean view can be seen at 808 North condo, pool, full kitchen & Miami Avenue, Sidney. Around more! Select weeks for spring, back. Paid $23,000 new. Asksummer and fall 2013. Call ing $9500. Will consider any (937)469-1576. offer, (937)638-2222.

PRODUCTION Norcold, Inc., recognized as the leader in refrigerator manufacturing for the RV, Marine, and Truck markets, is currently accepting applications for 3rd shift Production positions at both our Sidney and Gettysburg, Ohio facilities.

SOFAS, 2 Floral Sofas, 1 new, 1 used in excellent condition, (937)492-4792 Miscellaneous BOOKS, Boys and Girls books, Dave Dawson, Tom Swift Jr., Dana Girls, Vicki Barr, Connie Blair, Rick Brant, and others, English mystery Series, Blue Mask (AKA the Baron) by Anthony Norton (AKA John Creasy) Hardcovers 1930's1950's, Paper Backs 1960's, (937)492-0606 CAMPING MEMBERSHIP, Lakewood Village Resort located in Wapakoneta, Ohio, asking $3500. Call for more details (937)418-2702.

Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured

Tammy Welty (937)857-4222 Concrete & Masonry

Fullenkamp, Inc. Concrete Construction

40037741

Serving the area since 1995

Driveways Floors • Footers Patios • Sidewalks Material & Workmanship Guaranteed

Call Mel Fullenkamp

937-394-7253

Production positions start at $10.00/hr with pay progression opportunities for $.50/hr increases every 6 months up to $13.00/hr plus a $.50/hr shift premium. After progression, annual merit increase opportunities become available. Opportunities for higher skilled positions with higher pay such as Shipping, Machine Operators, Welders, Advanced Production, and more are posted internally to afford current employees advancement and growth within the Norcold, Inc. business. You must be flexible, able to excel in a fast paced environment and willing to work overtime.We offer an excellent benefits package including health, dental, vision, 401(K) and many others. For confidential consideration, forward resume in Word format with salary history and requirements to: recruiter@norcold.com with job title in the subject line.

In Loving Memory 40037694

We remember those who have passed away and are especially dear to us. On Monday, May 27, 2013, we will publish a special section devoted to those who are gone, but not forgotten.

Verse Selections: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Or complete an application at the Shelby, Miami or Darke County Job Center

10.

No phone calls please

12.

Please visit: www.norcold.com to learn more. EOE

11.

13. 14. 15.

In our hearts your memory lingers, sweetly tender, fond and true. There is not a day, dear Mother/Father, that we do not think of you. Thank you for loving and sharing, for giving and for caring. God bless you and keep you, until we meet again. Your life was a blessing, your memory a treasure. You are loved beyond words and missed beyond measure. Those we love we never lose, for always they will be, loved remembered, treasured, always in our memory. It broke our hearts to lose you, but you did not go alone. For part of us went with you, the day God called you home. My heart still aches in sadness, my silent tears still flow. For what it meant to lose you, no one will ever know. Memory is a lovely lane, where hearts are ever true. A lane I so often travel down, because it leads to you. Oh how we wish he/she was here today, to see all the blessings we have. Yet somehow you know that he/she is guiding us on our paths. Tenderly we treasure the past with memories that will always last. Remembering you on this day, comforted by so many memories. In the hearts of those who loved you, you will always be there. If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever. . Loved always, sadly missed. Forever remembered, forever missed. Suffer little children to come unto me.

Instruction & Training MATH TUTORING by appointment only. Professional licensed by Ohio Department of Education. (937)492-5992

September 19, 1917 thru March 7, 2006

937-419-0676

The memory of you will always be in our hearts!

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

Spouting Metal Roofing Siding Doors

• • • •

Baths Awnings Concrete Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

40037831

Name of Deceased:____________________ Date of Birth:_________________________

Date of Passing:_______________________

Number of verse selected :______________

Or write your own (20 words or less):______

____________________________________

____________________________________ ____________________________________ Closing Message: (Example: Always in our

hearts, Sue & Family):__________________

____________________________________

Name of person submitting form:__________ ____________________________________

Phone Number:________________________ Address:_____________________________

City, State and Zip Code:________________ ____________________________________

Visa, Mastercard, Discover, Am. Ex. Number: ____________________________________ Expiration Date:_______________________

Signature:____________________________

Only $16.50

To remember your loved one in this special way, submit a photo, this form and payment to:

John Doe

• • • •

ATVs /Dune Buggies

FURNITURE, Moving, nice items for sale, Couch's, beds, matching chair sets, big screen tv, stereo system with surround sound, (937)726-8029

Miscellaneous

Memory / Thank You

40037831

Roofing Windows Kitchens Sunrooms

KITTENS, Cute light grey tigers, very loving, litter trained, Free to good homes, (937)4928148

(937)498-4747 Carriage Hill Apts. www.firsttroy.com

Remodeling & Repairs

• • • •

Pets

40037741

Please submit resume to:

Houses For Rent 3 BEDROOM, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator included. $550 + utilities. Call (937)492-3447 between 10-2 M-F.

40037837

Process Production Engineer is responsible for design, development, setup of product processes and equipment from Core making, Casting & Finishing, Quality. Directly involved in troubleshooting product processes. Works closely with quality in regard to ISR and/or PPAP requirements. Design of tooling as well as providing estimating assistance for quoting. Working knowledge of TS16949 and ISO14001 environmental standards along with experience with CAD and SolidView Works. Help sustain and improve 5'S throughout facility and also would be willing to learn industrial time study to compare standard cost against actuals. Qualified candidates must possess 3-5 years experience in Aluminum Sand Foundry environment. BS in engineering or related engineering field.

Houses For Sale 1236 TURNER, Sidney. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home, C/A, 2 car garage. $128,500. Jim Walterbusch, (419)305-3231, Arnold Group.

40037867

SAND FOUNDRY ENGINEER

Medical/Health

40037557

Help Wanted General

Page 6B

Sidney Daily News Attn: In Loving Memory 1451 North Vandemark Road Sidney, OH 45365

Deadline for this special tribute is May 10, 2013. Please call (937) 498-5925 with any questions.

* Limit one individual per 1x3 space

Love always, Wife, Children, Family and Friends 40037694


Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

M&S

BED BUG DETECTORS

40037636 Contracting

“Peace 4007438of Mind”

Call 937-236-5392

installed

(937)

AMISH CREW 40040074 Wants roofing, siding, windows,

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

493-9978

(937) 232-7816

SEAMLESS DC 40038561

within 10 mile radius of Sidney

• Interior/Exterior • Drywall • Texturing • Kitchens • Baths • Decks • Doors • Room Additions

LICENSED • INSURED

TOTAL HOME REMODELING Call Jim at 937-694-2454

937-698-6135

!

40038962

40037454 Senior Homecare

Gutter & Service

Personal • Comfort

1002 N. Main St. Sidney, Ohio 45365

~ Flexible Hourly Care ~ ~ Respite Care for Families ~

40038561

Amos Schwartz Construction

40040074

30 Years experience!

FREE pickup

40037383 937-875-0153

40037842 20 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Help Wanted General

Gutter Repair & Cleaning

ANY TYPE OF REMODELING

REPAIR & PAVING, Paving & Excavating SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

Health Care

B.E.D. PROGRAM

doors, repair old floors, joust foundation porches, decks, garages, room additions.

All Small Engines • Mowers • Weed Eaters • Edgers • Snowblowers • Chain Saws Blades Sharpened • Tillers

875-0153 698-6135

4995

J.T.’s Painting & Drywall

BLACKTOP

937-658-0196 40037852

As low as

Remodeling & Repairs

COOPER’S 40041088

MOWER REPAIR 40037852 & MAINTENANCE

Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

• Devices installed in all rooms • Easy Early find if Bed Bugs enter

Painting & Wallpaper

Rutherford

COOPER’S GRAVEL

40037668

knowing your Free from BED BUGS

$

Mower Maintenance

40037668

40037438

40037636

Since 1977 FREE ESTIMATES on Roofing, Siding, Gutters, Windows, Patio Covers, Doors Insured & Bonded

Hauling & Trucking

40037842

Exterminating

40037383

Construction & Building

Page 7B

Call today for FREE estimate Fully Insured Repairs • Cleaning • Gutter Guard

www.visitingangels.com/midwestohio

1-937-492-8897

Land Services

419.501.2323 or 888.313.9990 40037454

40037487

www.sidneydailynews.com LEGALS

DON’T

40039304

Land Care

FORGET

40037728

GJ’s LAWN SERVICE 40037728 • Lawn Rolling • Mowing • Trimming • Mulching • Bush Trimming • Gutter Cleaning • Grass, Leaf Pickup

Crown Equipment Corporation, a leading manufacturer of material handling equipment,

is currently seeking qualified candidates for the following positions at our New Bremen and Celina, OH locations.

937-362-2103 Free Estimate Miscellaneous

4th Ave. 40037860 Store & Lock 1250 4th Ave.

Equipment Services Technician

Theater Lead Person

Ref # JA005416

Ref # KAB006714

SAP Systems Administrator

PC Support Specialist - Temporary

Ref # 006378

Ref # KAB005633

Toolmaker

Web Applications Developer

Ref # JA005195

Ref # KAB005650

CNC Machinist

Supplier Quality Engineer

Ref # JA004356

Ref # KAB005883

Welders

Marketing Research Manager

Ref # JDB6491 New Bremen, Ref # LJB002121 Celina

Ref # KAB006296

937-497-7763

Ask about our monthly specials

Electrical / Plumbing Technician Ref # A005340 New Bremen, Ref # KAB006071 Celina

40037860

Paws & Claws Retreat: Pet Boarding 40038050

Crown offers an excellent compensation and benefits package including Health/Dental/Prescription Drug and Vision Plan, Flexible Benefits Plan, 401K Retirement Savings Plan, Life and Disability Benefits, Paid Holidays, Paid Vacation, Tuition Reimbursement, and much more!

Sidney/Anna area facility.

937-492-3530

40038050

Make your pet a reservation today. • Climate controlled Kennel • Outdoor Time • Friendly Family Atmosphere

16900 Ft. Loramie-Swanders Rd., Sidney

498-5925 When you’re looking for that certain something special, check the

For detailed information regarding these openings and to apply, please visit crown.jobs. Select “Current Openings” and search by reference number above. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer M/F/D/V 40038962

Happy Ads / Birthday / Anniversary

Only $21.75

40037680

Classifieds That Work

2013

First! Auctions

PUBLIC AUCTION Saturday, May 4, 2013 • 9:00 A.M. 40038568

Celebrate Your Special Graduate in our Graduation Keepsake Edition on May 23, 2013

LOCATION: Miami County Fairgrounds, 650 N. Co. Rd. 25A, OH DIRECTIONS: County Rd. 25-A North of Troy. Auction to be held in the Duke Building.

ANTIQUE FURNITURE - PRIMITIVES - GLASSWARE LINEN - TOOLS

DEADLINE IS 5:00 P.M., MAY 3, 2013

FURNITURE: 6’ Walnut Corner Cabinet w/Glass Doors on Top; 2 pc. Oak Dry Sink w/Tin; Oak Deacons Bench; 2 Oak Rockers; t Leg Oak Table; Set of 6 Press Back Oak Chairs; 3/4 Bakers Cupboard; 3/4 Dry Sink Mahogany Bed & Dresser; 2 Oak Childs Desk Chairs; Childs Rocker; 2 Victorian Side Chairs; Oak Youth Bed; Oval Cherry Table; 2 Side Chairs (Stickly Brothers, Grand Rapids, Michigan); Walnut Towel Rack w/Mirror; 44” Round Oak Table w/Ball & Claw; Child’s School Desk; Oak Drop Front Secretary; Small 4 Drawer Wall Cabinet; Braun Brothers Wooden Box Made into Coffee Table; Duncan Fyfe Table; Oak Plate Racks; Small Oak Desk; Duncan Fyfe Drum Table; Small Carpenters Chest; Wooden Clothes Dryers; Night Stand; Small Wall Cabinet; Oak Wash Stand; Large Gold Framed Beveled Mirror; Winter Print; Iron Floor Lamp; 5 Drawer Oak Dresser; Oak Record Cabinet; 5 Leg Round Oak Table; Drop Leaf Oak Table; Nice Wooden High Chair; Misc. Press Back Chairs; Plank Bottom Chair; Bentwood Chairs; 5 Wooden Ironing Boards, all sizes; Pair of Walnut Dresser Boxes: Oak Church Pew; Picture Frames; Type Drawer; Iron Bed w/Brass Knobs; GLASSWARE: R. S. Prussia Pitcher (Red Seal); Seller Jars; Seller Sugar Bowl; Hens Nest; Dog on Nest; Salt & Peper Black Folks; Cranberry Hobnail Overlay; Cranberry Baskets; Glass Baskets; Spooner; Carnival Basket; Salters; Tea Leaf Covered Bowl; Set of Royal Coplay Chickens; Ironstone Bowl & Pitcher; Blue & White Serving Pieces (Berle Onion); Cranberry Cream & Sugar; Hand Painted Deep Bowls (German-Bavarian); Prussia Glass; Fenton; Jewel-T Items; Bowls Coffee Pot, Cups, Cream & Sugar, Variety of Mixing Bowl; Approx. 50 Pieces Ironstone Willow Ware – Plates, Saucers, Bowls, Serving Pieces; Pink Etched Bed Lamp w/Matching Dresser Lamp (Electrolite); Misc. Fostoria Pieces; Flo Blue Plate; Hand Painted Bowls & Plates; 3 Legged Glass Bowl; Sterling Candle Holders; Heisy Spooner; Misc. Carnival Glass; Cake Stands; Green Overlay Footed Bowl: Assorted Ironstone Pieces; Covered Butter Dish; 2 Hurricane Lamps. PRIMITIVE – CROCKS – COLLECTOR ITEMS: Childs Hand Pump Cart (Needs Seat); Star Milking Stool; Brass Bucket; Little Giant duster; 2 Stomper Butter churns; Nickel Plated #8 Griswold Skillet; Metal Sign w/Rooster & Sold by Harry F. Little, Tipp City, Metal Sign, Peoples Building Savings & Loan, Troy, Ohio; Toledo Cooker w/Copper Bottom; Old Buggy Jump Seat; Cast Iron Cooker; Salesman Sample Burial Vault (from Suber Hardware in Fletcher, Ohio); 2 Quart Dazy Churns; Coffee Grinders; IH Tool Box; Lunch Pail; Granite Coffee Pots; Plates, Serving Pieces; Sad Irons; Large Selection of Tins; Braun Brothers Lard Cans; Crocks; Crocks Made into Lamps; Large Chicken Collection; Feed Bag; Purina Sign; Crock Bowls; Boxes of Caster & Furniture Pulls; Blue Favorite Skillet; Blue #3 Favorite Kettle; Maytag Motor Oil Tin; Assorted Tins; Approx. 10 Butter Pats; 3 Butter Mods; Beams Tobacco Tin; Slocums Grass Seeder; Klik Ball Game; Oil Lamps; Stereoscope & Cards; Old Calendars – 1956 Shafer Garage, Gettysburg; 1952 Sellmans; Greenville, Ohio; Feed Scoops; 7-up Red Letter Cases (2); Approx. 10 Longaberger Baskets; 2 Quilts; Wool Blankets; Assorted Decker Lard Cans; Braun Brothers Lard Cans: Bonanza Apple Peeler & Corer; Champion Duster; Cast Iron Cobbler; Nail Wheel (Damaged); Miniature Sad Iron; Lanterns; Globes; Wooden Shoe Beer Song Book; Feed Bags; Leather Doctor Bag (Dr. Wilmeyer, Piqua, Ohio); Baskets; Hob Nob Chicken Bucket, Troy, Ohio; Granger Tobacco Sign; Rug Beater; Hook Rugs; Wagner Roaster; Boxes of Linens. TOOLS: Craftsman 5.5 hp Push Mower, 3 Lawn Edgers; Craftsman 4.5 hp Air Compressor; Master Mechanic 10” Table Saw; Drill Master 18 Volt Drill Set; Roto Zip; Heat Gun; Step Ladder; Aluminum 16’ Ladder; Chain Saws (Craftsman & Homelite); Log Chain; Hand Tools; Lawn Tools; Pipe Clamps; Schwinn Bike; 2001 GMC Sonoma Extended Cab Pickup, 50,000 miles (Good Condition). AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Many Items Not Listed. Tools sell at 9:00 a.m. Will run 2 rings most of the day. TERMS: Cash or Check with Proper I.D. Not Responsible for Accidents. Any Statements Made Day of Sale Supersede Statements Hereon.

Please submit information along with a payment of $21.75 to: Sidney Daily News Attn: Grad Ads 1451 North Vandemark Road Sidney, OH 45365 If you would like your photo returned, please include a SASE along with your payment. Please contact us at (937)498-5925 with questions.

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2012 MORGAN HUELSKAMP Anna High School Congratulations! We are proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Nick


SPORTS

Sidney Daily News,Thursday, May 2, 2013

Four Turns

Tracks on Tap SPRINT CUP SERIES

RICHMOND Brad Ke1 ROCKING selowski won Friday night’s Nationwide

3

4

Sprint Cup Standings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

POINTS BEHIND DRIVER (WINS) Jimmie Johnson (2) 343 — Carl Edwards (1) 300 -43 Kasey Kahne (1) 297 -46 Dale Earnhardt Jr. (1) 297 -46 Clint Bowyer 263 -53 Brad Keselowski 262 -59 Kyle Busch (2) 257 -65 Greg Biffle 252 -71 Kevin Harvick (1) 247 -72 Paul Menard 240 -72

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Aric Almirola Jamie McMurray Matt Kenseth (2) Jeff Gordon Martin Truex Jr. Ryan Newman Joey Logano Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Jeff Burton Kurt Busch

^ CHASE FOR THE SPRINT CUP ^

227 224 222 204 202 201 200 196 193 187

-85 -98 -102 -108 -112 -114 -115 -119 -125 -127

Nationwide Standings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

DRIVER (WINS) Sam Hornish Jr. (1) Regan Smith Brian Scott Justin Allgaier Elliott Sadler Brian Vickers Austin Dillon Parker Kligerman Trevor Bayne Kyle Larson

POINTS BEHIND 259 — 258 -1 236 -23 225 -34 224 -35 222 -37 222 -37 219 -40 213 -46 204 -55

Truck Standings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

DRIVER (WINS) Matt Crafton (1) Johnny Sauter (2) Jeb Burton Ryan Blaney Ty Dillon James Buescher Brendan Gaughan Darrell Wallace Jr. Joey Coulter Dakoda Armstrong

POINTS BEHIND 162 — 149 -13 149 -25 141 -33 135 -39 133 -41 128 -46 127 -47 125 -49 121 -53

Throttle Up/Throttle Down RICHARD CHILDRESS RACING After a season in which none of its three drivers had scored a top 5, RCR got a pair Saturday night at Richmond – including the win, by Kevin Harvick. Jeff Burton survived the last-minute chaos to finish fifth. BRAD KESELOWSKI Saturday night was a tough one for the defending champion. A blown tire sent him into the wall, and late in the race he was blackflagged by NASCAR for not meeting the minimum speed requirement. He finished 33rd, his worst run of the year. Compiled and written by Mike Hembree. Follow Mike on Twitter: @mikehembree.

Race: Aaron’s 499 Track: Talladega Superspeedway Location: Talladega, Ala. When: Sunday, May 5 TV: FOX (1:00 p.m. EST) Layout: 2.66-mile tri-oval Banking/Turns: 33 degrees Banking/Tri-oval: 18 degrees Banking/Backstretch: 2 degrees 2012 Winners: Brad Keselowski (May); Matt Kenseth (Oct.) Crew Chief’s Take: “Talladega is classic restrictor plate racing. I really don’t care for the place that much, but the fans love it because of the crashes and all that. I liked it when we were unrestricted and when guys could race a little and get away from one another and use the slingshot move. But that’s gone out the window, and you just ride around there and wait on the Big One to happen, which makes the drivers and crew feel sort of helpless. It’s all about being at the right place at the right time with the right push at the end.” NATIONWIDE SERIES Kevin Harvick celebrate his win in the Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway.

Photo by ASP, Inc.)

Closing Time

Kevin Harvick snags victory at Richmond in green-white-checker finish By MIKE HEMBREE

Kevin Harvick’s 2013 season, a lame-duck one for the veteran driver at Richard Childress Racing, hadn’t gone particularly well through the first eight races. He had a ninth at Las Vegas in the third race of the year, but there had been no other top-10 runs, and the team seemed to be battling a bad case of mediocrity. It led to some recent over-the-team-radio sniping between Harvick and crew chief Gil Martin. The possible salve for that situation arrived Saturday night at Richmond International Raceway. Known as “The Closer” for the expertise he has shown in end-ofrace duels, Harvick demonstrated those abilities again Saturday by charging to the front during a green-white-checker finish and leading the final two laps to win the Toyota Owners 400, marking his first Sprint Cup victory since November 2012. It was the 20th career Cup win for Harvick, who plans to move to the Stewart-Haas Racing team next season. Saturday’s win appeared to be within the grasp of Juan Pablo Montoya, the former Formula One winner who owns a pair of Sprint Cup road-course victories but has not been able to score on a Cup oval track. He came frustratingly close at Richmond. Montoya led 67 straight laps

over the closing portion of the race and had a slim but sturdy lead over Harvick with the end of the event in sight. But everything changed four laps from the finish when Brian Vickers crashed in Turn 3, bringing out the race’s 11th and final caution. Montoya’s lead suddenly dissolved, and the severity of Vickers’ accident made it clear that the race would go into “overtime” and conclude with a green-whitechecker run. Most of the leaders dashed into the pits for fresh tires, while others — notably Jeff Burton and Jamie McMurray — stayed on the track with much older tires, planning to take a long shot at the victory. When the green flag fell for the final two laps, Harvick showed the value of new tires almost immediately, dropping low in the first turn and firing off Turn 2 down the backstretch to take a lead he never relinquished. Burton, McMurray and the others with older tires were sitting ducks. Clint Bowyer and Joey Logano followed Harvick through the traffic to finish second and third. Montoya took fourth, and Burton was fifth. “It all worked out,” Harvick said. “We were fortunate to have it all line up. I drove it in there, hoped for the best. I figured four, eight, 12 (tires on other cars), whatever was on the outside tirewise, would be plenty to lean

 The Richmond results produced quite a bit of movement in the point standings. Carl Edwards jumped four spots to second (behind Jimmie Johnson), and Hendrick Motorsports teammates Kasey Kahne and Dale Earnhardt Jr. are tied for third. Clint Bowyer gained three spots to fifth, and defending champion Brad Keselowski, who had his worst night of the season with a 33rd-place run, fell to sixth. The points could be scrambled again this week as the tour moves on to Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama for the first of two seasonal races at the 2.66-mile track. Multicar crashes – and subsequent early-race exits – often are part of the challenge at Talladega.  Aric Almirola is making some noise for Richard Petty Motorsports. With his third straight top-10 finish — an eighth at Richmond — Almirola moved to 11th in points, only 13 out of the top 10. Only three weeks ago, he was 16th.  Major penalties handed recently to Penske Racing and Joe Gibbs Racing have teams on alert in the Sprint Cup garage, said driver Carl Edwards. He said everyone is taking extra care in hopes of avoiding NASCAR’s big hammer. “I think all of us are on guard, and we realize that NASCAR is very, very serious about staying within the rules and the spirit of the rules and that they’ve definitely gotten everyone’s attention in the garage,” Edwards said.

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on, and, by the time we got to the backstretch, everything had cleared out.” Team owner Richard Childress said the late-race push to the front was “vintage Kevin Harvick. When they dropped that green, he found the hole, drove it through there, made it happen. Won the race.” Harvick said he probably would not have had a shot at the win without the late-race caution. “My car had lost drive up off the corner,” he said. “I think one thing that led to being so confident in my car on that last restart was our car had been really good on restarts for four or five laps. The car would turn, do all the things I wanted it to. I could be really aggressive with it on the restarts. “I think I had a better shot to win starting seventh (with new tires). I don’t think I was going to catch Montoya because he had a little bit better drive up off the corner at that point.” The chaos of the two-lap sprint to the finish resulted in some frayed tempers after the race. Both Tony Stewart and Matt Kenseth were upset by the driving of Kurt Busch, who bumped both of their cars as he pushed to a ninth-place finish. Kenseth finished seventh, while Stewart, who had a shot at a top-5 run, dropped to 18th. Kenseth won the pole and led 140 laps — most in the first half of the race.



In an odd moment for a NASCAR facility, Charlotte Motor Speedway has made a significant change in the program for its pre-race show prior to the Sprint All-Star Race May 18. The track had announced country singer Billy Currington for the gig, but Currington recently was charged with making terroristic threats and abuse of an elderly person. He will be replaced at CMS by Josh Turner, also a country artist.

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Race: Aaron’s 312 Track: Talladega Superspeedway When: Saturday, May 4 TV: ESPN (3:00 p.m. EST) 2012 Winner: Joey Logano CAMPING WORLD TRUCK SERIES

Race: N.C. Education Lottery 200 Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway When: Friday, May 17 TV: SPEED (8:00 p.m. EST) 2012 Winner: Justin Lofton

Classic Moments Talladega Superspeedway No one knew at the time that they were witnessing what would be Dale Earnhardt’s last Cup Series win. But everyone knew they were witnessing something special. Earnhardt, in vintage “Intimidator” fashion, used a strong draft from Kenny Wallace to rocket from 18th to first in four laps and win the 2000 Winston 500 at Talladega Superspeedway as 170,000 paying witnesses howled their approval. Earnhardt, who would lose his life in a crash on the final lap of the following year’s Daytona 500, won for the 10th time at Talladega — a track where he was worshipped like no other — and claimed the $1 million Winston No Bull 5 bonus money in addition to his race earnings. The win, his 76th, only added to the famous folklore that Earnhardt could “see the air” at Talladega and Daytona International Speedway, NASCAR’s two restrictor-plate tracks where drafting is the key to winning. Air vision or no air vision, Earnhardt had a knack for navigating Talladega like few others, and his victory that day served as the quintessential reminder.

Athlon Fantasy Stall Looking at Checkers: Matt Kenseth (below) earned finishes of first, third, third and first at the circuits two restrictor plate track at Daytona and Talladega last season. Hard to top that. Pretty Solid Pick: Tony Stewart had the best car at Daytona in February before being caught up in an accident. Plus, he has ground to make up. Good Sleeper Pick: Since 2008, Ryan Newman has finished outside of the top 15 at RIR only once. He won’t win, but he’ll be solid. Runs on Seven Cylinders: A deep sleeper, David Ragan has three top-5 runs in 12 Talladega Cup Series starts. Insider Tip: A complete crap shoot, Talladega is as tough to handicap as any track in NASCAR. That said, think Daytona contenders Kenseth, Stewart, Kyle Busch, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Jimmie Johnson, and Kasey Kahne. Then cross your fingers.

Photos by ASP, Inc.

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Series race at Richmond, but that fact almost was lost in the mayhem of postrace. Brian Scott and Nelson Piquet Jr., who had tangled on the track, also went head-to-head on pit road. Scott approached Piquet, and Piquet kicked him in a location Scott described as “below the belt.” Later, there was an altercation in the speedway driverowner motorcoach lot involving Piquet and two members of Scott’s crew. The crew members were arrested and charged with misdemeanor assault. GIBBS APPEAL Joe Gibbs stressed at Richmond that he is appealing recent NASCAR penalties levied against his No. 20 team because of the severity of the penalties. After Matt Kenseth’s engine was found to be illegal after his win at Kansas, NASCAR hit Kenseth and Gibbs with 50-point penalties, fined crew chief Jason Ratcliff $200,000 and suspended Ratcliff for seven races. Both Gibbs and Kenseth said the penalties were too severe, particularly considering the engine was built by Toyota Racing Development, not the Gibbs team. VICKERS BUSY Brian Vickers continues to drive in a substitute role for the injured Denny Hamlin, and he earned his pay at Richmond. Vickers was involved in at least three incidents, including a late-race crash that caused the final caution and dramatically changed the nature of the race. THE PATRICK REPORT Danica Patrick recently made an appearance on The Colbert Report, trading jabs with comedian/commentator Stephen Colbert. And she carried a Colbert decal on her car in the Richmond race. “I had a good time,” Patrick said. “I felt like he went kind of easy on me. I’m glad I’ve watched the show because I was prepared for anything.”

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05/02/13  

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