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COMING Local businessman honored

Commitment To Community OPINION: Four-letter word that is reconciliation. Page 4.

VOLUME 129, NUMBER 249

PARENTING: Christmas ornaments can be family tradition. Page 6.

SPORTS: Piqua wrestlers compete in double duel. Page 12.

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Street policy draws praise Piqua leaders learn benefits of bike-friendly plan BY BETHANY J. ROYER Staff Writer broyer@dailycall.com PIQUA — Citing the easily accessible fruit of benefits — from health to dollars — city leaders congregated in commission cham-

Kaila Smith Third grade Springcreek

bers Thursday to discuss the recent release of a draft for their Complete Streets Policy for the city. “It’s a change, but it’s a good change,” said City Planner Chris Schmiesing, at the helm with special guest Andy Williams, an ambassador of the Miami Valley Mountain Bike Association, a local chapter of the International Mountain Biking Association or IMBA. “We could almost call this complete cities,” Schmiesing said.

CLEARING

After a brief introduction by Schmiesing to the Complete Streets Policy that would create a unification of streets for both vehicles, bicycles, and even pedestrians, biking enthusiast Williams presented a short presentation to commission members, city officials and those in attendance. The presentation showcased how transforming the present infrastructure into a more bike-friendly community through advocacy, education and

promotion is a win-win for all. Whether the positives are fighting obesity, tying in with the Safer Routes to School program, lowering traffic congestion, or attracting/retaining younger generations. The latter is especially important, even for those who may not bike but want to live in a community that does. Another plus, bicycling is a $700 billion industry.

B RU S H

Call center hours set to change As of Monday, Dec. 17, the Call Center for the Piqua Daily Call/Troy Daily News will open at 8 a.m. and close at 5 p.m. daily and be open on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to noon. You may still reach the call center after 5 p.m. at 335-5634 to leave a message.

Obama, Boehner meet on ‘fiscal cliff’ No indication if progress made BY JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press

Bradford BOE to meet Wednesday BRADFORD — Bradford Board of Education will meet in executive session at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, followed by a regular session at 6:30 p.m. in MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO room 404. The public is Workers from the Miami County Highway Department clear trees, brush and debris from the right-of-way welcome to attend. along Landman Mill Road on Thursday afternoon. Crews are expected to be working in the area for at least another day. Motorists are asked to use caution when in the area of Landman Mill Road.

Rice drops from contention USA Weekend coming Saturday

See Street policy/Page 2

Kerry seen as likely choice to be next secretary of state

long standoff with Republican senators who declared they would fight to defeat her nomination. The reluctant announcement makes Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry the likely choice to be the nation’s next top diplomat when Hillary Rodham Clinton departs soon. Rice withdrew when it became RICE clear her political troubles were not going away, and support inside the

White House for her potential nomination had been waning in recent days, administration officials said. In another major part of the upcoming Cabinet shake-up for President Barack Obama’s second term, former Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel of Nebraska now is seen as the front-runner to be defense

WASHINGTON — Face to face with time running short, President Barack Obama and Republican House Speaker John Boehner negotiated at the White House Thursday night in what aides called “frank” talks aimed at breaking a stubborn deadlock and steering the nation away from an economy-threatening “fiscal cliff.” Boehner returned to the Capitol an hour later, briskly walking past reporters without comment. There was no indication whether any progress had been made, though the use of the word “frank” by both sides to describe the talks suggested the president and the speaker stuck hard to their opposing positions. The meeting came shortly after Obama suggested that the sluggish pace of deficit-cutting

This week’s USA Weekend features a story on Billy Crystal and Bette Midler, stars of the new BY JULIE PACE comedy “Parental Guidance,” sharing their top 10 Associated Press tips for parents. WASHINGTON — Susan Rice, the embattled U.N. ambassador, Lottery abruptly withdrew from consideration to be the next secretary of state CLEVELAND (AP) — See Rice/Page 2 See ‘Fiscal cliff’/Page 2 on Thursday after a bitter, weeksThursday’s winning Ohio Lottery numbers: Night Drawings: ■ Rolling Cash 5 06-09-12-13-15 ■ Pick 3 Numbers the face of tough obstacles.” Discussions about a bikeway 8-2-5 through Miami County began in ■ Pick 4 Numbers 1999 when the county commis8-4-8-6 sioners appointed Shook to head FOR THE DAILY CALL Day Drawings: up the bikeway taskforce. Since ■ Midday 3 that time, he has volunteered TROY — The planned bikeway 7-5-3 countless hours to make this vibridge over the Great Miami ■ Midday 4 River just south of Peterson Road sion a reality. 4-8-6-4 “It was a labor of love and a lot has been officially named the of tough work to get it done; but it Robert J. Shook Bikeway Bridge. Index During a recent recognition cere- was worth it,” Shook said. He also Classified.......................9-11 mony, it was announced that the thanked a long list of the people Comics................................8 final link in the north-south sec- who worked with him to accomEntertainment.....................5 tion of bikeway would be dedi- plish this goal. “The bikeway has become an Horoscope...........................8 cated to Shook for his leadership asset for the community and on and development of the Great Local....................................3 any given day, hundreds of people Miami River Recreational Trail in Obituaries............................2 use it as part of a healthy Miami County. Opinion................................4 “The Park District Board of lifestyle,” Myers said. “It adds to Sports...........................12-14 State-Nation........................7 Commissioners thought it would the exceptional quality of life here Weather................................3 be fitting to honor Bob and his ef- in Miami County.” Today all sections of the trail in forts by naming the bridge after him,” said J. Scott Myers, execu- Miami County have been comtive director for the Miami pleted with the exception of the PROVIDED PHOTO County Park District. “Bob’s com- Robert J. Shook Bikeway Bridge, mitment to completing the bike- which is scheduled for construc- Bob Shook (right) shows Dan Kerber the rendering of the new bike6 2 way has been unwavering, even in tion in 2014. way bridge named in his honor. 7 4 8 2 5 8 2 1 0 1

Bikeway bridge named to honor Shook Span will be final link in county trail

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Obituaries

Patricia Ann Hornick Pat was a member of WEST MILTON — PaUnited tricia Ann Hornick, 81, of Hoffman West Milton passed away Methodist Church, West Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at Milton, was a member of Ohio Horseman’s Council, her residence. She was born Feb. 8, Union Township Histori1931, in Tipp City. She cal Society, enjoyed farmwas preceded in death by ing, camping, her horses, her parents, George dogs, cats, and antiques. Funeral services will be Harold and Gladys (Harshman) Eickmeyer; held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesbeloved husband, Robert day at Hale-Sarver FamB. Hornick; son, Robert ily Funeral Home, 284 Scott Hornick; and broth- N. Miami St., West Milton Pastor Justin ers, Keith B. Eickmeyer, with Gavin H. Eickmeyer, Williams officiating. BurJoseph B. Eickmeyer and ial will follow at Polk Grove Cemetery. Harold Ken Eickmeyer. Friends may call from She is survived by her daughter, Cecilia Ann 5-7 p.m. Monday at the fuHornick; grandchild Tr- neral home. In lieu of flowers, conisha Hornick; greatgrandchildren, Terrel and tributions may be made to Tianna; sisters, Barbara the family c/o Hale-Sarver, KATHY WLLENS/AP PHOTO L. Stafford of Tipp City P.O. Box 9, West Milton, In this Wednesday, Nov. 28, photo, the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is illuminated during the 80th an- and Jean Eickmeyer-Bir- OH 45383 to assist with nual tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller Center in New York. Scientists are working to decipher the DNA tle of Tipp City. funeral expenses. code of conifers, like this Norway spruce at Rockefeller Center in New York. In late 2012, scientific teams in the United States and Canada have released preliminary, patchy descriptions of conifer genomes. And a Death notices Swedish team plans to follow suit soon in its quest for the Norway spruce.

Christmas tree DNA revealed Discovery aids development of better varieties BY MALCOLM RITTER Associated Press NEW YORK — To millions of people, the Christmas tree is a cheerful sight. To scientists who decipher the DNA codes of plants and animals, it’s a monster. We’re talking about the conifer, the umbrella term for cone-bearing trees like the spruce, fir, pine, cypress and cedar. Apart from their Yuletide popularity, they play big roles in the lumber industry and in healthy forest ecosystems. Scientists would love to identify the billions of building blocks that make up the DNA of a conifer. That’s called sequencing its genome. Such analysis is a standard tool of biology, and doing it for conifers could reveal genetic secrets useful for basic science, breeding and forest management. But the conifer genome is dauntingly huge. And like a big price tag on a wished-for present, that has put it out of reach.

Now, as Christmas approaches, it appears the conifer’s role as a genetic Grinch may be ending. In recent months, scientific teams in the United States and Canada have released preliminary, patchy descriptions of conifer genomes. And a Swedish team plans to follow suit soon in its quest for the Norway spruce. “The world changed for conifer genetics,” said David Neale of the University of California, Davis. It’s “entering the modern era.” What happened? Credit the same recent technological advances that have some doctors predicting that someday, people will have their genomes sequenced routinely as part of medical care. The technology for that has gotten faster and much cheaper. “Until just a few years ago, the idea of sequencing even a single conifer genome seemed impossible,” said John MacKay of the University of Laval in Quebec City, who co-directs a multi-institution Canadian project that’s tackling the white spruce. The new technologies changed that, he said. How big is a conifer genome? Consider the 80-

foot Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center in New York. It’s a Norway spruce, so its genome is six times bigger than that of anybody skating below it. Other conifer genomes are even larger. Nobody expects a perfect, finished conifer genome anytime soon. MacKay and others say that reaching that goal would probably require some advances in technology. But even partial versions can help tree breeders and basic scientists, researchers say. Why bother doing this? For breeders, “genomes can really help you speed up the process and simply do a better job of selecting trees, if you understand the genetic architecture of the traits you want to breed for,” MacKay said. The prospect of climate change brings another dimension. As forest managers select trees to plant after a fire or tree harvesting, genetic information might help them pick varieties that can adapt to climate trends in coming decades, Neale said. It’s all about “giving them a tree that will be healthy into the future,” he said. To sequence a genome,

program started in 1996, the city of Piqua will work on an application that requires meeting criteria referred to as the five E’s — engineering, enforcement, education, encouragement, evaluation and planning. It will work with what a community already has to offer in terms of its infrastructure, while providing a balance between all users of the road, an important concern pointed out by many at the meeting. Overall, the policy pro-

motes a, “More livable community for citizens of all ages and abilities,” and is based upon insights garnered from the biking and walking enthusiasts who live and work in the community. “I can’t see any negatives to it, at all,” said Mayor Lucy Fess, who suggested Schmiesing place the completed policy on the next commission meeting agenda as soon as possible. “So we can adopt it,” she said. Stating the group is al-

demonstrates the strength of her character,” he said. “I am saddened we have reached this point,” Rice said. Obama made clear she would remain in his inner circle, saying he was grateful she would stay as “our ambassador at the United Nations and a key member of my Cabinet and national security team.” Rice, too, said in her letter she would be staying. Clinton, in a brief statement, said Rice had “been an indispensable partner over the past four years” and that she was confident “that she will continue to represent the United States with strength and skill.” Rice had become the face of the bungled administration account of what

happened in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012 when four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya, were killed in what is now known to have been a terrorist attack. Obama had defiantly declared he would chose her for secretary of state regardless of the political criticism, if he wanted, but such a choice could have gotten his second term off to a turbulent start with Capitol Hill. In a letter to Obama, Rice said she was convinced the confirmation process would be “lengthy, disruptive and costly.” The letter was part of a media rollout aimed at upholding her reputation. It included an NBC News interview in which she said her withdrawal “was the best thing

Street policy Continued from page 1 “It’s a huge, huge industry,” said Williams of not simply bike-related shops moving into the area but a number of byproducts that create an ambiance within a community and an active, social way of life. Examples given by Williams were coffee shops to small breweries, and the connection between work, school and other facilities. Through a BFC or Bicycling Friendly Community

Rice Continued from page 1 secretary, with official word expected as soon as next week. For the newly re-elected president, Rice’s withdrawal was a sharp political setback and a sign of the difficulties Obama faces in a time of divided and divisive government. Already, he had been privately weighing whether picking Rice would cost him political capital he would need on later votes. When Rice ended the embarrassment by stepping aside, Obama used the occasion to criticize Republicans who were adamantly opposed to her possible nomination. “While I deeply regret the unfair and misleading attacks on Susan Rice in recent weeks, her decision

BROKEN ARROW, Okla. — Joseph E. Schaffer, 78, of Broken Arrow, Okla., formerly of Piqua, passed away Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012. Funeral services and burial were held Dec. 11, at scientists start by chopFloral Haven Memorial Gardens in Broken Arrow. ping DNA into small bits, and let their machines sePIQUA — Christeen Brown, 84, passed away quence each bit. That’s the Dec. 13, 2012, at 4:25 a.m. at Heartland of Thursday, part that has become much Piqua where she had resided for the past month. faster and cheaper in reFuneral services will be held Monday at Cromes cent years. But then comes Funeral Home, Sidney, with the Rev. Leamon Branthe task of re-assembling scum officiating. Burial will follow at Shelby Memory these bits back into the Gardens in Sidney. long DNA chains found in trees. And that is a huge challenge with conifers, bePolicy: Please send obituary notices by e-mail to editorial@dailycall.com or by fax to (937) 773-4225. cause their DNA chains Deadlines: Notices must be received by 6 p.m. contain many repeated seSunday and Tuesday-Friday, and by 4 p.m. on Monday quences that make the asfor Tuesday’s online edition. sembly a lot harder. Questions: Please call Editor Susan Hartley at As a result, conifers (937) 773-2721, ext. 207 if you have questions about present “these large reobituaries. gions I think we will never be able to piece together” with current technologies, said Par Ingvarsson of Umea University in Sweden, who is leading the Continued from page 1 gotiations, Boehner comNorway spruce project. plains that the president Will scientists develop talks between the adminis- refuses to offer spending new technologies to over- tration and congressional cuts to popular benefit proRepublicans was a result grams like Medicare come that problem? “You should never say of a “contentious caucus” of whose costs are rapidly risnever in this game,” Ing- GOP lawmakers who were ing. making it difficult for varsson said. The White House has This past summer, Boehner to negotiate. pointed out that it has ofBoehner saw it differ- fered about $600 billion in Neale’s group presented ently. He said earlier in specific savings over the partial results for the the day: “Unfortunately, next decade, including genome sequence of the White House is so un- about $350 billion in loblolly pine, based on DNA extracted from a sin- serious about cutting spending reductions in gle pine nut. It includes spending that it appears health care programs such about a million discon- willing to slow-walk any as Medicare. nected chunks of DNA, agreement and walk our There’s increasing resigand altogether it covers economy right up to the nation within the GOP well over half the tree’s fiscal cliff.” that Obama is going to Thursday night’s meet- prevail on the rate issue genome. ing was the two men’s sec- since the alternative is to ond face-to-face encounter allow taxes on all workers in five days as they seek to to go way up when Bushfind an agreement that era tax cuts expire on Dec. ready working on an ap- avoids major tax increases 31. across-the-board plication for the upcoming and “I think it’s time to end spending cuts scheduled to the debate on rates,” said February cycle for the BFC, Schmiesing said he kick in January. Also at- Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C. hopes individuals will see tending were Treasury “It’s exactly what both parthe importance of the pol- Secretary Timothy Geith- ties are for. We’re for exicy, the opportunities it of- ner and Obama’s chief con- tending the middle-class gressional lobbyist, Rob rates. We can debate the fers and the amenities. Those in attendance Nabors. upper-end rates and what Before the meeting, they are when we get into agreed, but perhaps City Manager Gary Huff said Boehner accused Obama of tax reform.” it best of how the policy dragging out negotiations. “He’s got a full house implementation regard- Obama is insisting on and we’re trying to draw ing Complete Streets will higher tax rates for house- an inside straight,” said incomes above Sen. Johnny Isakson, Rprovide not only multiple hold $250,000 to cut federal opportunities but make Ga. When it was observed the city of Piqua, “A real deficits; Boehner says he that making a straight opposes higher rates, would still be a losing destination here.” though he has said he hand, Isakson said: “Yeah, would be willing to raise I know.” tax revenue instead by Boehner remains the closing loopholes and de- key figure, though, caught ductions. for our country.” between a tea party faction Obama, in an interview and more pragmatic ReRice may end up close to Obama’s side in another during the day with publicans advising a tactiway, as his national secu- WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, cal retreat. He dodged a rity adviser should Tom said that he was hopeful of question Thursday on Donilon move on to an- a “change in attitude” from whether he would be willother position, though that Republicans on raising ing to schedule a vote that is not expected immi- taxes on the wealthy. “It would permit the top two nently. The security ad- shouldn’t be hard to get re- tax brackets on family inviser position would not solved,” he said. come exceeding $250,000 He added that the no- and individual income over require Senate confirmation of not raising taxes $200,000 to rise back to tion. Rice would have faced “has become sort of a reli- 1990s levels. strong opposition from gion for a lot of members of Senate Republicans who the Republican Party. I challenged her much-ma- think Speaker Boehner ligned televised comments has a contentious caucus, about the cause of the as his caucus is tough on deadly raid on the U.S. him sometimes so he doesConsulate in Benghazi, n’t want to look like he’s * Your 1 choice for complete Home Medical Equipment giving in to me somehow Libya. Her efforts to satisfy because that might hurt Lift Chairs Sens. John McCain, Lind- him in his own caucus.” While the impasse over sey Graham, Kelly Ayotte 1990 W. Stanfield, Troy, OH and Susan Collins in un- the president’s demand for 45373 • 937-335-9199 usual, private sessions on higher tax rates continues www.legacymedical.net to be a main obstacle in neCapitol Hill fell short. 2343494

‘Fiscal cliff’

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Friday, December 14, 2012

Community spotlight Sun will give way to wet weekend

Grant to help rehab center

EXT ENDED FO RECAST

PIQUA — The Piqua High School Band Department announces its annual Holiday Concert to be held at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 7, in the Hartzell Center for the Performing Arts at Piqua High School. The concert will be conducted by director of bands Mitch Mahaney. The Symphonic Band, which meets every day, will play “Bobsled Run� by Conley, “From the Realms of Glory� arranged by Roszell and “A Christmas Festival� arranged by Leroy Anderson. The Symphonic Band will conclude their portion of the concert with a spirited “Jingle Bell Gallop� by Wagner. The Show Choir’s combo, “Audio Hype,� also will perform. This group does double duty as the featured back up for “The Company� as well as the resident jazz band. They will be playing “Have A Cool Yule � by Lewis, “Rest Ye Merry Samba� by Baker and “Santa’s in Town� by Strommen. They will finish with the comical “Two Front Teeth� by Baker. The concert is free and open to the public. For more information, call Ma-

MILD WITH CHANCE OF RAIN

MILD WITH RAIN LIKELY HIGH: 52

HIGH: 50

LOW: 35

LOW: 40

REGIONAL ALMANAC Temperature High Yesterday 46 at 2:28 p.m. Low Yesterday 23 at 5:05 a.m. Normal High 38 Normal Low 25 66 in 1901 Record High Record Low -6 in 1960

Precipitation 24 hours ending at 5 p.m.0.00 1.76 Month to date Normal month to date 1.34 Year to date 30.58 39.27 Normal year to date Snowfall yesterday 0.00

INFORMATION PROVIDED PHOTO

Piqua Rehabilitation Center staff member Jessica Hile and center participant James Wintrow test out the center’s new automatic doors at the entrance of the James R. Sherman Aquatic Therapy and Wellness Center.

In Brief PHS announces holiday concert

SUNDAY

SATURDAY

haney during school hours 17, in the Harriet Frantz Gymnasium at the school. at 773-6314. Included on the program New year Rotary will be selections performed by the Concert Club scheduled Band, the Cavalier Choir, PIQUA — The Rotary and The Lehman LimeClub of Piqua announces lighters. Doors will open at 6:30 their program schedule for Jan. 2013. On Jan. 8 Ed p.m. and the music begins Kreiger, Director of Power at 7 p.m. After the musical Distribution, will provide program, punch and cooka tour of the new Power ies will be served. The Service Center located on event is free and open to Hemm Ave., Jan. 15 Dr. the public. Music performed by the Randy Overbeck will Lehman Concert Band inspeak on Teachers: The clude “Hark! The Herald Real American Heroes while on Jan. 22 Lindy Angels Sing,� “Selections Schaffnit will provide a from Tchaikovsky’s Nutlook into Kids Read Now cracker Suite,� “God Rest and Jan. 29, Nancy Luce, Ye Merry Gentlemen,� Piqua Rotary Club Presi- “Away in the Manger,� and dent will present Getting “Jingle Bells.� The Cavalier Choir will to Know you. The Rotary Club meets perform “God Rest You every Tuesday at 11:45 Merry, Gentlemen,� “Sing a.m. at Edison Commu- We Now of Christmas,� and “It’s the Most Wondernity College. For more information ful Time of the Year.� Secontact Gary Huff at 778- lect members of the choir 2051 or email ghuff@pi- will be featured on a seven-hand rendition of quaoh.org. “Jingle Bells� arranged for three pianos. Lehman The Limelighters Show Christmas Choir will perform “The First Noel,� a ballad; and concert slated “Cool Yule: A North Pole SIDNEY — The Rock-n-Roll Spectacular,� Lehman Catholic Music a medley of Christmas faDepartment will present vorites complete with its annual Christmas Con- characters, costumes, and cert at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. choreography.

The band is directed by Elaine Schweller-Snyder. The Lehman choirs are under the direction of Jacquelyn Jenkinson and accompanist Jenny Weber. Senior Millie Wildenhaus and junior Millie Cartwright conceived and taught the choreography for the show choir’s “Cool Yule� medley.

Regional Group Publisher - Frank Beeson Executive Editor - Susan Hartley Advertising Manager - Leiann Stewart â–  History Established in 1883, the Piqua Daily Call is published daily except Tuesdays and Sundays and Dec. 25 at 100 Fox Dr., Suite B, Piqua, Ohio 45356. â–  Mailing Address: Piqua Daily Call, Postmaster should send changes to the Piqua Daily Call, 100 Fox Dr., Suite B, Piqua, OH 45356. Second class postage on the Piqua Daily Call (USPS 433-960) is paid at Piqua, Ohio. E-mail address: editorial@dailycall.com. â–  Subscription Rates: EZ Pay $10 per month; $11.25 for 1 month; $33.75 for 3 months; $65.50 for 6 months; $123.50 per year. Newsstand rate: Daily: $1.00 per copy, Saturday: $1.25. Mail subscriptions: in Miami County, $12.40 per month, unless deliverable by motor route; outside of Miami County, $153.50 annually.

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PIQUA — Christmas came early for the Rehabilitation Center in Piqua. The center recently received a grant from the Acorn Society of Troy to install automatic doors at the entrance of the James R. Sherman Aquatic Therapy and Wellness Center. Both doors are interior doors but proved challenging for many of the participants entering and exciting from the aquatic area. Now the clients can do so with little or no assistance. Those in wheelchairs can enter with the push of one button, which opens both doors or if being pushed the caregiver can maneuver things very easily. When the building was designed this area was cut due to costs. “We have patiently waited for this to happen, now our dream has come true,� said Carla Bertke, executive director. The Acorn Society is a fund within the Troy Foundation. It was started in 1989 by the late Joe Reardon. The Acorn Society has donated more than $1 million dollars since its inception. Mr. Reardon was a huge supporter of the Rehabilitation Center and played an important role in the Building A Legacy of Hope campaign to raise funds for the new facility. To become involved with the Acorn Society. call the Troy Foundation at 339-8935 The Rehabilitation Center located in Piqua is a non-profit agency who serves children and adults with minimal to severe brain injury. The center offers four programs including Nicholas School, Brain Wellness Center, The Aquatic Therapy & Wellness Center and the Rehabilitation Center. It has been in operation since 1972 and moved to its current location on Garby Road in 2004. For further information, call 773-7630 or visit the website www.rcnd.org

High pressure still influences our weather through the end of the week. Look for lots of sunshine today with cold temperatures to start out. A storm system heads this way just in time for the weekend. There’s a good chance of rain during the afternoon and evening on Saturday. High: 50 Low: 28.

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Serving Piqua since 1883

OPINION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2012

Piqua Daily Call

www.dailycall.com

COA says thanks for assistance

Mother of the Munchkins

The four-letter word that is reconciliation S

The Village Idiot

I’m dreaming of a lottery windfall A lot of people ask how I won! I won! I won the picked the numbers. Is lottery! Seven dollars there a system I use? No, it on a $10 ticket. I’m was pretty much dumb taking it as a lump sum, luck. Sue’s birthday, my not that they even asked first address, the last two my preference. Now I’m digits in my Social Secucleaning the living room so rity number. I don’t know it won’t look like a pigsty if that will work for you, when the photographers JIM MULLEN but it sure worked for me. arrive. Was I disappointed I I can’t tell you how long Columnist didn’t win the grand prize? I’ve dreamed of this moment. I am the original guy who never Not until I learned I hadn’t won it. Before wins anything, but finally, all those years that, I was happiness itself. For the two of buying lottery tickets each week has days I had the ticket in my pocket, I daydreamed about what I’d do with hunpaid off. It’s not like I’ve been throwing that dreds of millions of dollars. Oh, I’d spend money away. A lot of it goes to keep the a little on myself — take a few trips, find state from raising my taxes to pay for out what the first-class compartment on things like lottery commissioners, and a plane looks like, buy a new car, fix up what’s left goes to our educational sys- the house, start making glockenspiel records — but that would still leave, oh, tem, which needs improving. Why, oh why, was I never taught how $150 million. I’d send some off to my to calculate the odds of winning the lot- brothers and sisters, give some to friends tery? If I buy two tickets, does it double who had fallen on hard times, make some anonymous donations. I daydreamed my chances of winning? “If you play the same numbers on two about making people happy, like some tickets, and why would you, your odds good lottery fairy godmother — dropping stay the same,” says Sue, who actually out of the sky and doling out $10,000 paid attention in school. “If you play two here, $5,000 there. I would be a force for tickets with different numbers, you have good; I would change lives in profound a gazillion ways to lose but only two ways ways. Just daydreaming about winning made to win. At the track, a dead horse could me a nicer, happier, more cheerful person get better odds than that.” Instead of practical math, I took band for those two days. For $10, I got two days in school and dreamed of turning profes- of happiness, which, compared to going to sional. But the days of making the big a movie or going bowling, seemed to be a money playing the glockenspiel have bargain. It’s way, way cheaper than seegone the way of buckled shoes and pow- ing a therapist. And what difference does dered wigs, though I still wear them it make if I win or not? No one expected me to drop out of the sky and solve all the around the house. Don’t worry; winning won’t change me. world’s problems anyway. I’m wondering now if I can get the I’m not going to quit my job and start lording it around like I’m the king of the same effect if I spend only $5 a week. To world. I’m the same today as I was the go out and buy hundreds of dollars of lotday before I won, just $7 richer. Most peo- tery tickets I can’t afford would be foolple might not even notice the difference, ish, but to spend a few bucks to improve my attitude? that’s how grounded I am. Sue would think it was a bargain. She By the way, I have a new unlisted number. I don’t want to answer a bunch of might even give me the money. nuisance calls from relatives now that Jim Mullen’s newest book is called “Kill I’m a winner. Too many people had my old unlisted number. And by too many peo- Me, Elmo: The Holiday Depression Fun ple, I mean my family. Who gave it to Book.” You can reach him at JimMullenBooks.com. them?

I

THE FIRST AMENDMENT Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Where to Write

Public officials can be contacted through the following addresses and telephone numbers: ■ Lucy Fess, mayor, 5th Ward Commissioner, ward5comm@piquaoh.org, 615-9251 (work), 773-7929 (home) ■ John Martin, 1st Ward Commissioner, ward1comm@piquaoh.org, 773-2778 (home) ■ William Vogt, 2nd Ward Commissioner, ward2comm@piquaoh.org, 773-8217 ■ Joe Wilson, 3rd Ward Commissioner, ward3comm@piquaoh.org, 778-0390 ■ Judy Terry, 4th Ward Commissioner, Mom of two munchkins and rooter for the underdog ward4comm@piquaoh.org, 773-3189 that is the ellipsis, Bethany J. Royer can be contacted at ■ City Manager Gary Huff, ghuff@piquaoh.org, 778-2051 bethanyroyer@yahoo.com. ■ Miami County Commissioners: John “Bud” O’Brien, Jack Evans and Richard Cultice, 201 W. Main St., Troy, OH 45373 4405910; commissioners@comiami.oh.us Send your signed letters to the editor, Piqua Daily ■ John R. Kasich, Ohio governor, Vern Call, P.O. Box 921, Piqua, OH 45356. Send letters by eRiffe Center, 77 S. High St., Colummail to shartley@dailycall.com. Send letters by fax to bus, OH 43215, (614) 644-0813, Fax: (937) 773-2782. (614) 466-9354 There is a 400-word limit for letters to the editor. Let■ State Sen. Bill Beagle, 5th District, Ohio ters must include a telephone number, for verification Senate, First Floor, Columbus, Ohio purposes only. 43215; (614) 466-6247; e-mail: SD-

Letters

For information regarding the Opinion page, contact Editor Susan Hartley at 773-2721, or send an email to shartley@dailycall.com

Letters

“I sought the Lord, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears.” (Psalms 34:4 AKJV)

everal years ago, at one of my divorce support group sessions, I was given a warning. “You may not want to attend next week’s class,” said a veteran of the program, and due to a Fight Club style ruling, (What’s shared at divorce support, stays at divorce support) I can’t say much else. But given I’d already gone through a rather unnerving class on forgiveness, and another about single sexuality, what could possibly be more uncomfortable? Reconciliation Insert a lot of screaming and yours truly racing to the nearest exit. Divorce, as we all know, tends to be a big black hole where anything that goes in, never comes back out. And this reconciliation, which must be said slow and chewy-like, (Think Mr. Ed with a mouth full of peanut butter) was not part of the divorce lingo I was familiar with. It definitely was not something brought up by immediate family, friends or the lawyer, though it was subconsciously at work in my life as stated in a past column. It’s this lack of acknowledgment, of the potential, if not downright fear of reconciliation that bothers me these days. And while this may come across as harsh, it all boils down to ego. We, the ever-fascinating human race, will do whatever it takes to protect, soothe, even humor our ego. Understandable, given that rejection, which is what divorce is all about, hurts our ego. BETHANY J. ROYER Staff Writer Rejection feels lousy, is broyer@dailycall.com depressing, leaves us questioning who we are, who our spouse was, and can make you feel pretty worthless. Worse yet, our remedy or response tends to be anger, even retribution. So when my first real-life, smack-in-the-face experience with reconciliation came about (Before the frightening reveal in the support group) with a widowed neighbor saying to me, “Can’t you kids work it out?” I was insulted. Work it out? Do I have sucker tattooed across my forehead? What planet are you from, woman? Course, the widowed neighbor (Who proceeded to unabashedly share her reconciliation story with me and I’m forever grateful) wasn’t the last as a divorce support group member went on to remarry their exspouse, followed by my meeting a couple who reconciled after five years of separation, then my meeting a couple who got back together after 20 years. Obviously, the Universe was trying to tell me something but I was too busy nursing my wounded ego and thinking these couples as complete freaks to pay any attention. No, actually, it was more like these couples were aliens that escaped the black hole that is divorce by doing something woefully unscrupulous and unpopular. That in disguise four-letter word of reconciliation. Who does that but the weak and foolish? What was popular, and something I was familiar with, if not expected of me, was poor behavior after my divorce. To forgive, to reconcile, to at the very least make peace with an ex-spouse is taboo in our society. I’ve a prime example of a divorced pal who had a birthday party for her child and invited the ex-husband/father. What followed upon this announcement of his attendance was everything from the mom must be running a fever, to questions about her sanity. There was even the statement of, “You invited your ex? Shouldn’t he be wearing a pair of cement shoes down at the lake?” Sadly, that was mine. These responses were downright insulting to her yet, they seemed perfectly normal, even acceptable by the people saying it, including yours truly. Which is horrible, when you stop and think about the kid overhearing such a statement. Kids pay a hefty price in divorce, and while I fully acknowledge some being better off in some cases with parents divorcing, one should not have to explain to junior why daddy is expected to be wearing cement shoes down at the lake. As I’ve written before, that proverbial high road may not be a guaranteed road to success. There may very well still be potholes, road kill and dead horses, (Poor Mr. Ed) littering the way but which road would you prefer to be on? The one of forgiveness or the one where you have to apologize to a child about their father and his cement shoes?

Contact us

05@sen.state.oh.us ■ State Rep. Richard Adams, 79th District, House of Representatives, The Riffe Center, 77 High St. 13th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215, (614) 466-8114, Fax: (614) 719-3979; district79@ohr.state.oh.us ■ Jon Husted, Secretary of State, 180 E. Broad St. 15th floor, Columbus, OH 53266-0418 (877) 767-6446, (614)466-2655; ■ David Yost, State Auditor, 88 E. Broad St., 5th floor, Columbus, OH 43215, 800-282-0370 or 614-466-4514 ■ Mike DeWine, State Attorney General, 30 E.Broad St., Columbus, OH 43266, (614) 466-4320 ■ U.S. Rep. John Boehner, 8th District, 12 S. Plum St., Troy, OH 45373, 3391524 or (800) 582-1001 U.S. House Office, Washington, D.C., 1020 Longworth, HOR, 20515 ■ U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 (202) 224-2315 ■ U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, 338 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510 (202) 224-3353

To the Editor: The Covington Outreach Association (COA) would like to thank the Covington Eagles (assisted by Fields of Grace Worship Center) for its food drive at their Community Thanksgiving dinner. More than 560 food times were received. We also thank the COA volunteers for their time in helping check in the food and stocking the pantry shelves. If you would like to donate to the Community Food Pantry please bring nonperishable items to Covington Church of the Brethren office weekdays between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Monetary donations may be sent to COA, Box 125, Covington, OH 45318. For more information, email: director@covingtonoutreach.org or call 473-2415. Covington Outreach Association is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Contributions are tax deductible. —Cindy Miller Executive Director Covington Outreach Association Inc.

Editorial roundup Excerpts from recent editorials in newspapers in the United States and abroad: Dec. 11 The New York Daily News on public support for immigration reform: The immigration reform debate is over. The nativists lost. That’s the undeniable conclusion to be drawn from a new Politico/George Washington University poll, and it means there ought to be a stiff wind at President Barack Obama’s back should he embark on a new push to overhaul immigration laws next year. Fully 62 percent of those surveyed want to give illegal immigrants an eventual path to citizenship as part of comprehensive reform. Perhaps most surprising, even Republicans favored a path to citizenship with 48 percent saying yes and 45 percent no. Obama must finally go all out for immigration reform, as he has long promised and never done. For their part, members of Congress Republicans especially should remember the November election. Obama won the Latino vote overwhelmingly, in no small part because of his pro-immigrant stances. Those include suspending deportations for many children of the illegal immigrants.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Like 9/11 concert, musicians turn out for Sandy benefit BY MESFIN FEKADU AP Music Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Call the “12-1212” benefit show “The Concert for New York City” 2.0. Eleven years after the benefit concert in response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks was held at Madison Square Garden, many of the same top musicians came together to raise money for those suffering from Superstorm Sandy, including Paul McCartney, The Rolling Stones, Billy Joel, The Who, Eric Clapton and Bon Jovi. Those singers set a serious tone Wednesday night, wearing mostly black and gray onstage as they encouraged people to call and donate money to help those affected by the devastating storm Oct. 29 that killed at least 140 people and destroyed or damaged homes and properties in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and other areas. Alicia Keys, who grew up in Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen, closed the show with her New York anthem “Empire State of Mind,” as doctors, nurses, firefighters, police officers and others joined the piano-playing singer onstage. They ended the night chanting “U.S.A.” Keys was one of two women who performed at “The Concert for Sandy Relief.” Diana Krall backed McCartney, who sang his solo songs, Beatles songs and played the role of Kurt Cobain with Nirvana members Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic and Pat Smear during the nearly six-hour show. Springsteen and the E Street Band kicked off the night, performing songs like “My City of Ruins,” ‘’Born to Run” with Bon Jovi and some of Tom Waits’ “Jersey Girl.” Springsteen said what made the Jersey shore special was its inclusiveness, a place where people of all incomes and backgrounds could find a place. “I pray that that characteristic remains along the Jersey shore because that’s what makes it special,” the New Jersey-born rocker said. E Street band guitarist Steven Van Zandt said backstage that musicians and entertainers always show up when tragedy hits. “It’s more personal because literally the Jersey Shore is where we grew up ... but we’d be here anyway,” he said. “You don’t see oil companies here, you don’t see insurance companies here, the Wall Street guys, with all due respect, they’re not waiting in line to help anybody, so we’re here.” The sold-out show was televised live, streamed online, played on the radio and shown in theaters all over the world. Producers said up to 2 billion people were able to experience it live. But the night wasn’t all serious:

STARPIX, DAVE ALLOCCA/AP PHOTO

This image released by Starpix shows Paul McCartney, center, on stage with firefighters at the 12-12-12 The Concert for Sandy Relief at Madison Square Garden in New York on Wednesday. Proceeds from the show will be distributed through the Robin Hood Foundation. Comedy helped break up the weightiness of Sandy’s devastation, including jokes from Jon Stewart, Chris Rock, Stephen Colbert and Adam Sandler, who performed a hilarious parody of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.” Even Coldplay’s Chris Martin brought on the jokes. “I know you really wanted One Direction,” Martin said of the popular British boy band. “But it’s way past their bedtime.” Martin was joined onstage by Michael Stipe, as they sang R.E.M.’s “This Is My Religion.” Roger Waters also collaborated with Eddie Vedder on “Comfortably Numb.” The participants, many natives of the area and others who know it well, struck a defiant tone in asking for help to rebuild sections of the New York metropolitan area devastated by the storm. About half of the performers were British. “This has got to be the largest collection of old English musicians ever assembled in Madison Square Garden,” said Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones, who performed two songs. “If it rains in London, you’ve got to come and help us.” Most of the acts performed about four tunes. McCartney performed for 40 minutes and The Who were onstage for 30. They weaved Sandy into their set, showing pictures of the storm’s wrath on video screens during “Pinball Wizard.” Pete Townshend made a quick revision to the lyrics of “Baba O’Riley,” changing “teenage wasteland” to “Sandy wasteland.” Joel performed one of the last century’s favorites, “New York State of Mind.” Joel’s “Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)” sounded

prescient, with new Sandy-fueled lyrics smoothly fitting in. He was also the only artist to mark the season, working in a little of “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” Kanye West’s performance gave the crowd a different sound, as the music lineup was heavily weighted toward classic rock, which has the type of fans able to afford a show for which ticket prices ranged from $150 to $2,500. Even with those prices, people with tickets have been offering them for more on broker sites such as StubHub, an attempt at profiteering that producers fumed was “despicable.” Proceeds will go to the Robin Hood Foundation, and the organization stressed that the earnings will get to those who need assistance. “We will make sure that that money goes out right away to the most affected (places) in New York City, New Jersey, Long Island, Connecticut,” David Saltzman, the organization’s executive director, said backstage. “The money that we raised from this concert will be distributed in the days, weeks and months, not years.” Robin Hood is working through existing organizations that “know what to do and know their communities,” he said. Saltzman added that Fuse TV, which is owned by Madison Square Garden, was giving its YouTube revenues earned from airing the concert to the victims, and that StubHub donated $860,000 in fees from those who re-sold tickets. The sold-out “12-12-12” concert was shown on 37 television stations in the United States and more than 200 others worldwide. It was to be streamed on 30 websites. The theaters showing it included 27 in the New York region.

■ Contract Bridge — By Steve Becker

Test your play tually lose a trump trick, but you will still make the contract by cashing the king of diamonds and ace of hearts followed by four rounds of clubs. If South ruffs a club at any point, he will be forced to make a losing return, while if he does not ruff, you next throw him on

5

Wife is alarmed by planned funeral DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have been married for seven years. Since our wedding, he has had increasing health problems. He recently told me that he planned his funeral three months ago, without saying a word to me. I am very concerned that he seems more focused on death than on life. Am I wrong to be upset? He says I am. — WIFE IN BURLINGTON, N.J. DEAR WIFE: I don’t blame you for being concerned because husbands and wives should be able to discuss important topics with each other, and this is one of them. When your husband has his next medical appointment, go with him so you can speak with his physician. It’s possible that because of his “increasing health problems” he has become depressed, and if that’s the case, his doctor should be told. It is always helpful for spouses to accompany each other to their medical appointments in case the patient forgets to ask a question or tell the doctor something he or she needs to know. DEAR ABBY: My 24year-old son, “Dustin,” moved out five years ago, but he expects me to keep all his childhood and college items in his old bedroom because he says he doesn’t have room for them in his apartment. I’d like to clear out his closet and dresser and use the space for things I want to store. I need more space for me. Dustin is calling me selfish because I want to change “his” room and move my stuff in there. I say I need the space, and if he wants to keep all his stuff, he should rent a storage locker. By the way, he sleeps here maybe five nights a year at most. How long are parents obligated to keep their grown children’s keepsakes? — WANTS MY SPACE DEAR WANTS YOUR SPACE: You are asking an emotionally loaded question. While, rationally, five years should be long enough, clearing “his” room instead of

ABIGAIL VAN BUREN

Advice maintaining it as a shrine may feel like abandonment to your adult child. Give Dustin a little more time to adjust — like six months — and then insist that he find a place for his things. That way it will be a little less traumatic. DEAR ABBY: During these hard times, may I tell you about my daughter? Every year at Christmas, I let our children pick one present for around $30 for themselves. They know that we don’t have a lot of money and that “Santa” brings only a few presents. My daughter chose to give her “Christmas money” to a charity so that another family can be blessed. She’s only 9, and she understands there are families who are in more need than us. She truly is an angel for reminding me of that. I went to our local food pantry and told them what my daughter wanted to do for Christmas. The director wrote her a letter of thanks and explained how many families her $30 would be helping. I’m so proud of my girl. Sometimes it takes a child to remind us how all of us should act. — BLESSED IN ILLINOIS DEAR BLESSED: Yes, it’s true. But invariably it takes good parents to instill a spirit of empathy and generosity in their children. So some of the credit belongs to you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Hoax nurse found hanging lead with a trump to accomplish the same result. Note that if you make the mistake of playing the heart ace at trick two, the contract fails if South has the king of spades and no hearts. Tomorrow: An elegant performance.

Solve it

UNIVERSAL

Sudoku Puzzle Complete the grid so every row, column and 3 x 3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. THURSDAY’S SOLUTION

2349645

1. You are declarer with the West hand at Three Notrump. North leads the finesse until the second four of spades, and you round of the suit. win South’s ten with the After winning the spade king. How would you play return at trick three, you the hand? cash the A-K-Q of hearts and then take the diamond finesse. If South started with two or three diamonds including the king -- which is essentially 2. You are declarer with your only chance -- you the West hand at Six are home. Hearts. North leads the 2. It is impossible to go ace of diamonds. How down unless you lose a would you play the hand? spade trick (because South has the king) and a trump trick (because one opponent has all three missing trumps). The problem is to make the 1. The first problem is slam even if both of these whether to tackle clubs or conditions exist. Ruff the diamond ace diamonds, but it shouldn’t and lead a low heart to the take long to recognize the futility of trying to estab- king. If both defenders follish clubs. If, say, you led a low suit, your troubles are club at trick two, a spade over. At worst, you lose a would come back, and spade trick. Now let’s assume one when you then led andefender shows out on the other club, the defenders first trump lead. If it’s would cash enough spades South, you have no probto set you at least one lem, since you can pick up trick. You therefore turn your North’s queen with a fiattention to diamonds, nesse. If instead North where you have to decide shows out, you will eventhe best way to tackle the suit. Oddly enough, the correct approach is not to lead a heart to dummy first, which would force SCHEDULE FRIDAY 12/14 ONLY AN UNEXPECTED RED DAWN (PG-13) you to cash the remaining HOBBIT: JOURNEY 3-D ONLY (PG-13) 12:20 2:45 5:10 7:50 10:20 2:25 6:10 6:50 10:00 LINCOLN (PG-13) top hearts prematurely 10:40 RISE OF THE GUARDIANS 11:45 3:10 6:30 9:50 3-D ONLY 1:40 7:05 WRECK IT RALPH 3-D before trying a diamond fi- HOBBIT: AN(PG) UNEXPECTED ONLY (PG) 10:50 4:10 JOURNEY 2-D ONLY (PG-13) TWILIGHT SAGA: nesse. Instead, you should 12:05 3:55 7:40 10:40 BREAKIGN DAWN PT 2 lead a low diamond from RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG-13) 2-D ONLY (PG) 11:00 1:50 4:35 7:30 10:30 your hand at trick two, 11:10 4:25 9:35 WRECK IT RALPH 2-D PLAYING FOR KEEPS (PG-13) ONLY (PG) 1:30 postponing the diamond 11:25 2:05 4:45 7:20 10:10

Friday, December 14, 2012

BY JILL LAWLESS Associated Press LONDON (AP) — A nurse was found hanging in her room three days after she had been duped by a hoax call from Australian DJs about the pregnant Duchess of Cambridge, a U.K. inquest was told Thursday. The case is being treated as an apparent suicide. Coroner’s officer Lynda Martindill said nurse Jacintha Saldanha was discovered hanging by a scarf from a wardrobe in her nurses’ quarters Friday by a colleague and a member of security staff at London's King Edward VII Hospital. Martindill said an attempt to revive Saldanha failed. Police detective chief inspector James Harman said Saldanha, 46, also had injuries to her wrists. He told the inquest at Westminster Coroner's Court that two notes were found at the scene and another was found among Saldanha’s belongings. He said there were no suspicious circumstances, meaning nobody else was involved in Saldanha’s death. Harman said police were examining the notes, interviewing the nurse’s friends, family and colleagues and looking at emails and phone calls to establish what led to her death. He also said detectives would be contacting police in the Australian state of New South Wales to collect “relevant evidence.” Saldanha answered the phone last week when two Australian disc jockeys called seeking information about the former Kate Middleton, who was being treated for severe morning sickness. The DJs impersonated Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles, and Saldanha was tricked into transferring the call to another nurse, who revealed private details about the duchess’ condition.

A Hometown Christmas Bazaar 2349434

WE RENT Tents, Tables and Chairs for all Occasions

Heritage Equipment Rental 1830 W. High St. Piqua 1714 Commerce Dr. Piqua• •937-778-1171 937-778-1171

When: Friday, December 14th 5:30pm to 9:00pm Where: Mote Park Community Center, 635 Gordon Street, Piqua, OH 45356

Benefiting the Bethany Center, Piqua, OH

Donations being accepted include: Gently used clothing, Non-perishable food item, Gifts marked for boys or girls Shoppers bringing donations will receive a free raffle ticket.

You will able to purchase gifts from vendors such as: Avon, Paparazzi, Thirty-One, Scentsy, Pampered Chef, Longaberger, Mary Kay, Collette’s Custom Designs, Jodena’s Gourd Art and much more!

Enjoy Christmas Shopping with us and help our friends at the Bethany Center.

2349201

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM


6

PARENTING

Friday, December 14, 2012

WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

■ Keeping It Real

Using holiday moments to build family traditions

he holiday season is an ideal time to employ special moments as a way to build lifelong traditions with your kids. Take time to slow down and invest in each other to build upon a set of traditions that can be carried on for generations and leave a lasting legacy in your family. Most of us are decking the halls and making the season bright, but you can turn this into an important time for your child through a few simple steps. Look at the ornaments on your tree.Are there special ones that have significance? Let your kids take ownership of ornaments like this and hang them in a place of honor on the tree. Be sure to tell the stories behind ornaments that are important to the family. Another way to build a family tradition with ornaments is to allow children to purchase a new ornament that they particularly like each Christmas. It will be their job to place it on the tree every year.To take the decorating tradition up a notch, find a small tree that is just for your kids to decorate. Let them be the masters of the tree and decorate it as they see fit. Knowing that they have their “own” tree, gives them something they can look forward to every year.This year my daughter decorated a small PROVIDED PHOTO Disney Princess tree that is dis- Children can decorate their own small Christmas tree as part of the family tratinctly her own work of art. Setting up the nativity scene ditions each year. can be another holiday tradition

■ Living with Children

A little glitch? Q: Our 7-year-old has always been a great, respectful, funny little kid. However, recently he started lying and become a little sneaky. We punished him by taking his television privilege away and making him write apology letters as well as apologizing over the phone to everyone he has lied to. We have explained to him that he is losing our trust and that we do not want to see this kind of behavior continue. Is this “typical” behavior for a 7year-old boy? What is an appropriate punishment and more importantly, how can we get him to stop? A: You’re doing the right thing, as in having him apologize to those he’s lied to and suffer other moderate consequences. It is not unusual for children to experiment with lying, usually in the form of fabricating stories that haven’t happened. More often than not, the child in question is otherwise welladjusted, like your son. Let’s face it, children do odd things, some more than others. It’s the nature of the species. This is most likely just a passing phase, something he’s experimenting with, seeing if he can fool people and what sort of reaction he gets when the lie is discovered. Along those lines, it may be that he has discovered that this gets a rise out of you. In that event, this little glitch might continue for a while no matter what you do. The bigger a deal you make of it, the worse it’s likely to get. The important thing is to be nonchalant about this as opposed to bent out of shape. Attitude is everything! Q: We have an adult child who doesn’t want to grow up. She quit college after two years and moved across the

Born on 12-12-12 BOSTON (AP) — At least five newborns have come into the world with a little once-a-century good luck. They arrived at 12:12 on 12-12-12. Ohio’s WTTE-TV says Tiffaney and Joshua Diles of Chillicothe welcomed son, Austin Matthew, at 12:12 a.m. Wednesday. Three girls and a boy clocked in 12 hours later. Noelle Joy Klinker was

for religious families.As each piece is placed, retell the story of Jesus, and invite your children to be part of the storytelling. As more and more lights make their appearance on our holiday horizon, make a yearly tradition of visiting the area’s light displays. I still remember visiting the light display at Ludlow Falls every year. My family made it a tradition to go to the falls and walk down the path to view the display. It was an annual event and one that I eagerly anticipated. Search out a light display in the area, and make a point to visit that display, even if it’s just a drive-by viewing. Top off the night with a cup of hot cocoa and you’ve got a family tradition in the making. Christmas Children’s books abound at this time of year, and your family may already have a favorite. Whether the story is read every night of the season or only on a certain night, bringing those moments of literature into the house en-

country. As we anticipated, she’s having difficulty supporting herself. In fact, she doesn’t have a job and seems to have no real motivation to get one. Her mother, my husband’s ex-wife, thinks we should be sending her a monthly allowance to help with her rent and food. We have kept her on our health insurance, but feel that sending her money would equate to approving her poor choices and unacceptable lifestyle. What would you do? A: I’d do what you’re doing. Legally, you are under no obligation to support an adult child, and supporting an irresponsible adult child will only further delay her maturity. It may be what she wants, and it is surely going to make her life temporarily more comfortable, but it is not what she needs, not in the long run. Her mother is obviously addicted to enabling, and the girl is obviously addicted to entitlements. This is a toxic arrangement, one that you should not participate in. She isn’t going to learn how to deal with life’s realities if you make it possible for her to be both irresponsible and care-free. Decisions of this sort are riddled with guilt and selfdoubt. They are the toughest of parental decisions, in fact. Hang tough, and remember that life’s most valuable lessons are learned the hard way. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents’ questions on his web site at www.rosemond.com. born in Boston to parents Colleen and Joe Klinker. In Fremont, Neb., Robin Heaton gave birth to daughter, Zoey. The New York Post reports, an as yet unnamed baby girl was born to Michael and Olivia Patterson of Manhattan. And the (Newark) Star-Ledger says Debbie and Joe Turner of Brick, N.J., who survived Superstorm Sandy, have their own little reminder — son Carson Hurricane Turner.

HOLLY MCELWEE Columnist goodness of your kitchen by delivering plates of baked goods to neighbors. Let the kids add a personal touch by decorating Christmas cards with drawings and stickers. This will surely warm your neighbors’ hearts, and it will help your children understand what it means to give. Whatever traditions you choose to build in your family both this year and in the years to come, remember that the essential element is time. Spend time together away from the other distractions of life. Turn off the TV and the other electronics. Connect with your kids by giving them your undivided attention while you make those holiday traditions ones that will last a lifetime. Holly McElwee is a teacher at Wilder Intermediate in Piqua. McElee’s Keeping It Real column will run once a month on the parenting page, giving tips for parents from her perspective as a parent and a teacher.

Adoption transformed by Internet BY DAVID CRARY AP National Writer

JOHN ROSEMOND Columnist

courages reading while fostering enjoyment of the season. It may be the story of Jesus read straight from the Bible, a beautifully illustrated version of “Twas the Night Before Christmas,” or even the Dr. Seuss Classic How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Whatever it is, make the reading of a Christmas classic an event for everyone. Pull up pillows in front of the fireplace, grab the milk and cookies, and gather together for the story. Parents don’t necessarily have to do the reading, either. Older siblings can read to the family, or let the willing readers take turns with different books. Stuck on what book to read? Visit Jay & Mary’s Book Center in Troy, and they will be happy to make suggestions for you from the great selection of holiday books that they always stock at this time of year. Create little sous chefs by allowing kids to be an integral part of the cookie baking process. Everyone can don aprons and set about with cookie making and decorating. Containers of sugars and sprinkles will definitely catch a child’s eye, and they’ll remember spending time in the kitchen baking up warm memories. Share the

NEW YORK — In the emotion-charged realm of adoption, the Internet has been a transformative force, often for good, sometimes for ill. It has facilitated matches bringing neglected orphans into loving homes on the far side of the world, and provides crucial advice and support for families at every challenging stage of the adoption process. Yet it also can be an effective tool for scammers and hucksters seeking to exploit would-be adoptive parents. “I can’t imagine an area more ripe for exploitation — people trying to form families or find a place for their unborn child,” said Denise Bierly,president of theAmerican Academy of Adoption Attorneys. “It’s like Internet dating, except way more scary and dangerous.” Through nearly two decades of widespread Internet use,there’s been little rigorous research into its impact on adoption. A leading think-tank, the Donaldson Adoption Institute, has launched a multiyear study to fill that void and is issuing a comprehensive report Thursday outlining the profound changes that have unfolded. Internet-based tools “are transforming adoption practices, challenging laws and policies, offering unprecedented opportunities and resources, and raising critical ethical, legal and procedural

issues,” says the report. On the plus side, the report notes that many websites and Internet-based tools — including the photolisting of available children — have expedited adoptions of countless children.The Internet offers a vast array of information and training, and enables would-be adoptive parents to present themselves in online profiles to pregnant women considering adoption. Vicki and Jed Taufer of Morton, Ill., who battled months of bureaucratic delays to adopt a girl from Nepal, said they could scarcely imagine going through that trying experience in the pre-Internet age. They were able to communicate regularly by Skype during the six months in 2010-11 when Vicki stayed with their daughter, Purnima, in Katmandu, waiting for the adoption to be authorized by U.S. authorities.They also used the Internet to build close friendships with other families struggling to complete adoptions from Nepal, and to raise funds to cover their ever-ballooning legal and logistical costs. “We had to make some pretty big decisions over Skype,”saidVicki.“It allowed us to stay connected as a family.” Another important consequence of the Internet: Finding birth relatives is becoming easier and more common thanks to online search capabilities, hastening the likely phase-out of “closed” adoption while

broadening relationships between adoptive and birth families. The report advises adoption professionals to revise their training regimens to reflect the reality that many affected parties will be able to find each other at some point, and to prepare them for such reunions, whether wanted or unwanted. On the negative side, the report details how adoption scams — which predate the Internet — now take more sophisticated and wide-ranging forms thanks to the misuse of social media. There have been at least a half dozen recent cases across multiple states where women who claiming to be pregnant used the Internet to connect with couples wanting to adopt. In exchange for paying the woman’s living expenses, couples were promised — falsely — that they would eventually be able to adopt the baby. Scott Rowland, a prosecutor in Oklahoma, said one victim lost $30,000 while supporting what turned out to be a fictitious pregnancy. “People need to be more

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educated, or there’s a very real risk they can pulled into bad practices and scams,” said Donaldson Institute executive director Adam Pertman. “We hope regulators, educators, law enforcement officials and child welfare organizations will look at this and say ‘Enough already. We can’t allow the Wild West.’” The Donaldson report also warns that the Internet is accelerating a “commodification” of adoption, with would-be adoptive parents being viewed as commercial clients and less emphasis placed on the idea that adoption’s primary purpose is finding families for children. Far too often, says Pertman, the child’s best interest is not the paramount factor as an adoption is arranged. The report notes that ads for adoption services can crop up on websites amid ads for other commercial products, pitching the possibility of completing adoptions in a few months. “Promising a quick, easy adoption raises serious questions about how that can be accomplished,” Pertman said.“That’s not how it works in most of the real world.”

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7

Turnpike plan may fund road projects Kasich touts proposal to raise funds through bonds BY JULIE CARR SMYTH Associated Press

TONY DEJAK/AP PHOTO

This photo taken Wednesday shows motorists passing through a toll booth in Streetsboro. Ohio Republican John Kasich planned several northern Ohio stops Thursday to discuss the 241-mile road and how he'll close a $1.6 billion highway funding gap through cost cutting and the sale of bonds. turnpike objected loudly to meander through small this turnpike for decades to local and federal funds. Nearly three dozen mulcome.” leasing the turnpike, fear- towns. The proposal centers on timillion-dollar road proj“People need to undering that a private operator would eliminate jobs, spend stand we’ve listened to raising $1.5 billion through ects slated for the coming less on maintaining the them,” Kasich said. “This bond sales backed by future years were put on hold or road and impose higher turnpike will remain a toll revenues. Up to an ad- delayed significantly last tolls that would drive traf- valuable asset, and we will ditional $1.5 billion could January because the state’s fic onto local routes that be able to unlock value in be generated by matching transportation department

Holiday sales pick up after superstorm Upswing reverses previous decline BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER Associated Press WASHINGTON — U.S. consumers shook off Superstorm Sandy last month and stepped up holiday shopping, helped by a steady job market and lower gas prices. Retail sales rose 0.3 percent in November from October, reversing the previous month’s decline. Sales increased mostly because Americans spent more online, bought more electronics and began to replace cars and rebuild after the storm. And a sharp drop in gas prices lowered the overall increase. Excluding gas stations, retail sales rose a solid 0.8 percent, according to the Commerce Department report released Thursday. Still, department store sales tumbled. And consumer confidence has slipped in recent weeks, which has raised concerns that some Americans may be growing worried about looming tax increases. That could dampen December sales. Many retailers depend on the two months of holiday shop-

ping for roughly 40 percent of their annual revenue. High unemployment and weak wage growth have kept consumers cautious about spending, which accounts for 70 percent of economic growth. Most economists expect just slim gains in consumer spending in the final three months of the year, which should keep growth weak. “Despite the positive numbers today … we are not in a consumer-led resaid Chris covery,” Christopher, an economist at IHS Global Insight. A Labor Department report suggested the job market is improving, which could set the stage for more spending next year. Applications for unemployment benefits, which are a proxy for layoffs, fell by 29,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 343,000. That’s the second-lowest total this year. The drop indicates companies are cutting fewer jobs and not yet panicking about the “fiscal cliff.” That’s the combination of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect next month if President Barack Obama and Republican lawmakers fail to reach a budget deal before then.

Bill to allow guns in Ohio Capitol parking lot passed by Senate COLUMBUS (AP) — Guns could be left in vehicles parked in the Statehouse garage beneath the Ohio Capitol under a bill on its way to the governor’s desk. The measure cleared the Senate on 26-7 vote Thursday, the last voting day of the General Assembly. The House then agreed to the changes on a 66-23 vote. A spokesman for Republican Gov. John Kasich said he was likely to sign the legislation. Passage came after senators stripped parts of the bill that dealt with concealed weapon agreements between states. The provision would have expanded how the attorney general enters into

such reciprocity agreements with states to allow Ohioans with concealed weapons permits to carry firearms. Currently, the attorney general must negotiate written reciprocity agreements with states. The provision would have allowed “automatic” reciprocity with states that offer such a provision in their law. It would have worked in a way similar to how states recognize outof-state driver’s licenses. Some law enforcement groups opposed that section of the bill because they said it could permit license-holders from states with weaker training requirements to legally carry weapons in Ohio.

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TOLEDO — Highway and bridge construction projects put on hold a year ago for as many as two decades will be sped up under a proposal to use the Ohio Turnpike to raise as much as $3 billion for roadwork. And it will be done without huge toll increases or giving away control of the turnpike, Gov. John Kasich said Thursday. The plan comes two years after Kasich first floated the idea of getting more money out of the northern Ohio route that links the East Coast with the Midwest, suggesting Ohio follow the lead of other states and cities that have pocketed cash for their toll roads. County leaders along the

said there just wasn’t enough money. The turnpike financing plan, which will need some legislative approval, would erase a $1.6 billion highway budget deficit, said Ohio Transportation Director Jerry Wray. “We are going to move 20 years of projects into six years,” he said. Most of the new money perhaps 90 percent would be spent on projects in counties in the northern third of Ohio, primarily those above U.S. Route 30. That also would free more money to spend in the rest of the state, backers of the proposal said. Democrats accused Kasich of essentially borrowing against the future and raiding the turnpike to spread money on projects across the state. “There is no finer operated highway in the country,” said state Rep. Ron Gerberry, a Democrat from Austintown in northeast Ohio. “Why are we trying to fix something that works? I guess the answer is because there’s a pot of gold.”


8

Friday, December 14, 2012

COMICS

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Make travel plans or accept invitations to travel because you want to broaden your horizons. Take a course or learn something new. Talk to people from other backgrounds. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You are never casual about money. This is a good time for you to sort out loose ends regarding shared property, inheritances, insurance matters and anything you own jointly with others. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be sure to get extra sleep now, because the Sun is as far away from your sign as it gets all year. (The Sun is your source of energy.) CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Because you feel energized to work hard now, by all means do so! Not only that, give yourself the right tools to do a great job. Buy shelving, file folders, paint, cleaning equipment — whatever you need. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) This is an especially playful time for your sign. Accept invitations to party. Enjoy the arts. Delight in playful activities with children. Let romance swoon dizzily along. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Your attention definitely is focused on home, family and your domestic life. Conversations with a parent probably will be significant. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) The tempo of your days is accelerating because of short trips, errands and your desire to enlighten others. Talk to people without hesitation, because you want some exciting two-way conversation! SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You’re thinking about your self-worth and what you have achieved so far. That’s par for the course now, for all Scorpios. Actually, you’re embarking on a whole new path! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) This continues to be your strong time in the Sun. Use it to your advantage, because auspicious circumstances and important people will easily be attracted to you now. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Continue to work alone or behind the scenes to further your best interests. You’ve got a plan. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Share your hopes and dreams for the future with others because their feedback will be helpful to you now. Join clubs, groups, classes and associations. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Just accept the fact that you are in the limelight now because the Sun is so high in your chart. The good news is that this light is flattering! YOU BORN TODAY People see you as easygoing and cheerful, which is why you are well-liked. You are certainly an optimist who believes in your own good luck. In truth, what others value is your ability to see good in them. They find this so encouraging! You never hesitate to make a fresh start. Your year ahead will be very social and one that blesses all your relationships. Birthdate of: Michelle Dockery, actress; Michael Shanks, actor; Edna O’Brien, author. (c) 2012 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

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9

Friday, December 14, 2012

PIQUA DAILY CALL • PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

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105 Announcements OPEN HOUSE, Hand crafted garden stone, featuring 3 local stone artists, Stonescapes, Patt's Garden Treasures, KRB Design, Thursday Friday & Saturday 9am-5pm, 1020 Statler Road, Piqua, By Interstate

125 Lost and Found LOST: Female Jack Russell, approx. 10 mos old. Lost in area of Hardin Rd and Landman-Mill Rd. Goes by "Shorty". Had on shock collar. (937)606-0918 MISSING BOSTON TERRIERS (1) male, (1) female, male 32lbs, black, some white, brindle, Female 19lbs, black, some white, Brother & sister 2 years old, West Milton area, Reward offered (937)689-0880 MISSING CAT, Male Bengal with distinct black spots, weighs around 18lbs, answers to name George, Missing from Colleen Drive/ Eagles Nest area, Please call, (937)418-6001 or (937)606-2445

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140 Happy Ads BUTCH EMSWILER Happy Birthday. Congratulations on making it to 80 years old! Love, your sons - Jamie and Adam

200 - Employment

235 General

CITY OF PIQUA REFUSE COLLECTOR The City of Piqua is accepting applications for the position of refuse collector. Work consists primarily of residential and commercial trash removal, and assisting in maintaining refuse trucks. Collectors may drive refuse truck on a temporary fill-in basis. Candidates must possess a valid Ohio Commercial Driver's License (CDL). Apply at City of Piqua Human Resources Department 201 west Water Street Piqua, Ohio 45356 or visit our website at: www.piquaoh.org to download an application. Application deadline is December 21, 2012. EOE DELIVER PHONE BOOKS Work Your Own Hours, Have Insured Vehicle, Must be at least 18 years old, Valid DL. No Experience Necessary!

(800)518-1333 Ext. 224 www.deliver thephonebook.com NOW HIRING: Companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info: (985)646-1700 Dept. OH-6011.

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UTILITY SUPERVISOR Continental Express Inc, a leader in the transportation industry, is accepting applications for a working Supervisor in our Utility Dept. Ideal candidate must be dependable, have past supervisory experience and a steady work history. Experience operating or working around semi’s or large equipment a plus. Person will be responsible for supervising a crew that washes and fuels trucks. This is a day shift opportunity on Tuesday-Saturday schedule. We offer excellent pay & benefits, uniforms, and a clean work environment.

(937)492-5006 PIQUA, Parkridge Place. Roomy 2 bedroom, 1.5 baths, CA, stackable washer/ dryer furnished, $525, no animals! (419)629-3569.

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedrooms, appliances, CA, water, trash paid, $425 & $525 monthly. $200 Deposit Special! (937)673-1821

235 General

TROY, 1142 Lee Road, 3 bedrooms, garage. $750 month + deposit. Available 1/1, (937)552-9644.

325 Mobile Homes for Rent IN COUNTRY, Near Bradford, 2 bedroom all electric trailer, $400 plus deposit, (937)417-7111, or (937)448-2974

400 - Real Estate

411 FIRST, 2 bedroom, appliances furnished, tenant pays utilities, $400 monthly or $100 weekly, (937)778-8093.

425 Houses for Sale

EXECUTIVE HOME, 3 bedroom. Custom built ranch with basement, pool & clubhouse, upscale with all amenities, 1341 Paul Revere, Troy, $1700 monthly, (937)335-6690, www.hawkapartments.net

PIQUA, 410 Cleveland Street, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, single family, 1116 sq.ft. Fenced yard, owner financing or cash discount! $1000 down, $289 month, (803)978-1539, (803)978-1607.

PIQUA, 8394 Piqua-Lockington Road, 2 bedroom, fenced in yard, detached garage, $600 + deposit, (937)206-7754

105 Announcements

PIQUA, 910 New Haven. 3 bedroom, 1.5 car, CA, fenced yard. $850, deposit. (937)778-9303, (937)604-5417.

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PIQUA Lovely, large 4-5 bedroom house in country. Appliances furnished. No pets. Credit check required, $1600 monthly. (937)418-8912 TROY, duplex, walk to downtown, renovated 1 bedroom with addition, laundry, $500 + utilities (937)524-9093

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NOTICE Better Business Bureau 15 West Fourth St. Suite 300 Dayton, OH 45402 www.dayton.bbb.org 937.222.5825 This notice is provided as a public service by

235 General

A newspaper group of Ohio Community Media

and Operated

SECURITY OFFICERS WANTED (PT/ On Call) For Local company Job requires 1 year experience, must have High School diploma, be trained in CPR & First Aid. $9 hour. For more info contact Keith Price: (310) 863-3683 or e-mail resume to keith_price@ahm.honda.com

Visiting Angels seeks experienced caregivers for in-home, private duty care. Immediate need for live-in, nights, and w e e k e n d s . 419-501-2323

Tank Washer Needed Pneumatic Trucking Company seeking individual to Wash and perform preventative maintenance on pneumatic semi-trailers. Full-time, Shift flexibility.

265 Retail

Wings Sidney and Troy. Hiring a Manager with minimum of 3 years restaurant management experience, and experience managing a restaurant with a full bar is preferred. Join a team that is all about sports, great food and friends. To apply, fax resume to: (937)660-3300.

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300 - Real Estate

For Rent

305 Apartment 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday 1 BEDROOM, upstairs, 431 West Ash, stove, refrigerator, no pets $335, Credit check required, (937)418-8912 1 BEDROOM, 322 S Main St. downstairs, stove & refrigerator furnished. $385. No pets. Credit check required, (937)418-8912

280 Transportation

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105 Announcements

CAUTION Whether posting or responding to an advertisement, watch out for offers to pay more than the advertised price for the item. Scammers will send a check and ask the seller to wire the excess through Western Union (possibly for courier fees). The scammer's check is fake and eventually bounces and the seller loses the wired amount. While banks and Western Union branches are trained at spotting fake checks, these types of scams are growing increasingly sophisticated and fake checks often aren't caught for weeks. Funds wired through Western Union or MoneyGram are irretrievable and virtually untraceable. If you have questions regarding scams like these or others, please contact the Ohio Attorney General’s office at (800)282-0515.

Apply at Continental Express, 10450 St Rt 47 Sidney,OH or contact Mark at 937/497-2100

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POLICY: Please Check Your Ad The 1st Day. It Is The Advertiser’s Responsibility To Report Errors Immediately. Publisher Will Not Be Responsible for More Than One Incorrect Insertion. We Reserve The Right To Correctly Classify, Edit, Cancel Or Decline Any Advertisement Without Notice.

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Good MVR & References

Chambers Leasing 1-800-526-6435

TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath, 1 car garage, $695 (937)216-5806 EversRealty.net 1273 CAMARO Court, 2 Bedroom, luxury apartment, garage, kitchen appliances. $600 Monthly, available now! (937)570-3288. 2 BEDROOM in Troy, Move in special, Stove, refrigerator, W/D, A/C, very clean, no pets. $525. (937)573-7908 EFFICIENCY APARTMENT perfect for one person. Washer/ dryer, CA, appliances. $450 month. Absolutely non-smoking, no pets. Utilities paid. (937)524-9114. PIQUA. Pets welcomed, on Jill Ct. 2 bedroom, CA/ heat, washer/ dryer hook-up, appliances including dishwasher. $495/ month plus deposit. (937)418-1060.

NOTICE OF JOB OPPORTUNITY The Shelby County Department of Job and Family Services is accepting resumes for the position of CLERICAL SPECIALIST 3 within the Administration team. DUTIES: K First Backup for Receptionist. Excellent Customer Service. Answer telephone calls, Scan items brought by consumers to be distributed to the worker, Print and distribute receipts for items brought to the agency K Post outgoing mail K Process incoming mail; Open, date stamp, scan and distribute mail K Responsible for monthly and quarterly report distribution K Responsible to schedule maintenance of agency vehicles K Track JFS Expense requests K Assist Child Support Unit with clerical duties MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: K 1 year experience as a Clerical Specialist 2 K -or formal education in arithmetic that includes addition and subtraction, and reading and writing common English vocabulary along with Computer Skills-Excel, Word, Databases. Also requires one course or six months experience in typing or keyboarding and one course or six months experience in word processing. In addition, applicants must have an additional twelve months previous clerical experience in a position similar to a Clerical Specialist 2. Customer Service experience a must K -or education, training and/or experience in an amount equal to the Minimum Qualifications stated above. PAY FROM: $-10.01 to $15.84- per hour based on experience. FRINGE BENEFITS INCLUDE: • Work Hours: M,W,TH,F 7:30am- 4:00pm- Tuesday 7:30am-6:00pm • Health insurance available • Prescription drug card • Paid sick leave if leave available • Paid vacation (after 1 year of service) or after accumulated if applicant has prior countable service • OPERS pickup • Deferred compensation plans available Anyone interested should submit a resume and cover letter by December 14, 2012 to:

Remit to: Patricia Raymond-Administrative Supervisor Shelby County Department of Job and Family Services 227 South Ohio Avenue Sidney, Ohio 45365

2348174

100 - Announcement

All Display Ads: 2 Days Prior Liners For:

2345473

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE-24/7

GENERAL INFORMATION

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS:

Shelby County is an Equal Opportunity Employer

NOTICE OF JOB OPPORTUNITY The Shelby County Department of Job and Family Services is seeking a qualified applicant for a Fiscal Specialist. DUTIES: K Reviews, tracks and approves monthly foster care and adoption subsidy activity. K Reviews, enters and tracks manual claims and adjustments for subsidized child care. K Prepares, executes and monitors agency contracts and agreements. K Additional duties include; monitoring children’s services allocations and completing quarterly reports, procuring agency supplies, collecting payments for clients and maintaining agency RMS system. K Wage from $12.32 to $21.24 with supplements paid for education. This position is Classified, Certified Civil Service and may require passing a Civil Service Test. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: K Completion of undergraduate major core coursework in accounting or finance or similar field of study. K Or three courses or eighteen months experience in accounting, two courses or twelve months experience in finance, one course or six months experience in written communication for business, and one course or six months experience in typing, keyboarding or word processing that included generating a spreadsheet. K Or education, training, and/or experience in an amount equal to the Minimum Qualifications stated above. K Degree is preferred but not required. FRINGE BENEFITS INCLUDE: • Work Hours: M,W,TH,F 7:30am- 4:00pm- Tuesday 7:30am-6:00pm • Health insurance available • Prescription drug card • Paid sick leave if leave available • Paid vacation (after 1 year of service) or after accumulated if applicant has prior countable service • OPERS pickup • Deferred compensation plans available Anyone interested in this position should submit a resume and cover letter no later than, December 14, 2012.

PIQUA, large 1 bedroom, 1.5 baths, carpeted, appliances, utilities included, off-street parking, no pets, (937)552-7006.

Remit to: Patricia Raymond- Administrative Supervisor Shelby County Department of Job and Family Services 227 South Ohio Avenue Sidney, Ohio 45365 Shelby County is an Equal Opportunity Employer

2348171


10

Friday, December 14, 2012

500 - Merchandise

PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL

545 Firewood/Fuel

577 Miscellaneous

SEASONED FIREWOOD $150 per cord. Stacking extra, $120 you pick up. Taylor Tree Service available, (937)753-1047

510 Appliances WASHER/DRYER, na, light use, (937)773-4016

Ama$285

545 Firewood/Fuel FIREWOOD, $125 a cord pick up, $150 a cord delivered, $175 a cord delivered and stacked (937)308-6334 or (937)719-3237

FIREWOOD, All hardwood, $150 per cord delivered or $120 you pick up, (937)726-2780.

FIREWOOD for sale. All seasoned hardwood, $150 per cord split/ delivered, $120 you pick up. ( 9 3 7 ) 8 4 4 - 3 7 5 6 (937)844-3879

LIFT CHAIR, good condition, brown in color, $150, (937)693-4781 anytime. RECLINER/ROCKER, Lazy-Boy, oversized, medium tan, heat/massage built in. Very good condition. $1000 new, asking $225. (937)492-7463 SOFA & LOVESEAT, like new. Call in mornings or email, $650, amvirgint@gmail.com (937)308-8687. TV, Hitachi 52" HD; entertainment center; (2) head board with frame and dressers, and other household items, excellent condition. (937)339-8411

ARC WELDER, Sears 230 amp electric, new helmet, works good, $125 (937)552-7752

WALKER, seated walker, wheel chair, tub, shower/ transfer benches, commode chair, toilet riser, grab bars, canes, entertainment center, more! (937)339-4233.

DOLLS, Cabbage Patch, Real Babies, Bratz, Barbies, My Size Barbie, doll furniture, Boyd and Care Bears, TY Buddies, animated Santa Claus and phones, movies, more EXERCISE EQUIPMENT Ab circle, $150 (NEW!) and A-frame, $40. (937)497-1018 AMPLIFIER Hartke Bass Stack, 350 watt head. 4X10 cab and 1X15 cab. $650. (937)726-2621

PIQUA

LONGABERGER BASKETS, Boyd's Bears, purses, dresses, leather jackets, Bratz dolls, lamps, remote control car, clocks, (937)773-9025 RIFLE, Winchester Model 94 SE, large loop lever, 30-30, 1987, never been fired, original box, saddle model. Barrels only 16". $600. (937)698-6362

GIRL'S BIKES, would make good Christmas present (937)335-1938 STOVE TOP Frigidaire ceramic stove top, white $200. (937)698-6362

Garage Sale DIRECTORY

OPEN SAT. 12-2

Please call: 877-844-8385 to advertise

577 Miscellaneous

555 Garage Sales/Yard Sales

AIR COMPRESSOR, Craftsman, 5 HP, 25 gal. tank, very good condition, $195 (937)773-4016

PIQUA, 715 Broadway, December 14th 9am-4pm & December 15th 9am-2pm, Inside Estate & Moving Sale, Lots of Antiques, Coke Memorabilia, Vintage advertising, collectibles, double track train, local items, household goods, Miscellaneous, Please no early birds!

CRIB, changing table, doorway swing, swing, high chair, booster chair, travel bassinet, tub, child rocker, clothes, blankets, movies, dolls, (937)339-4233.

10925 HARDIN RD.

Tamara Westfall

Wow what a present! Wrap up the sale of this beautiful home for the holidays. This is 3 bedrooms, 2 baths just on the outer edge of town. 1600 W. Main St. • TROY “Rock” Solid in Real Estate! 339-8080

478-6058

2350099

JOHN DEERE, 4020 gas, PS, 3pt, live pto, weights, 96 HP, only 4578 hours, sharp original tractor. (937)489-1725

577 Miscellaneous

CRIB, real wood, good condition, stationary sides, $75 (937)339-4233

SEASONED FIREWOOD for sale. $135 delivered. (937)638-6950

560 Home Furnishings 535 Farm Supplies/Equipment

577 Miscellaneous

An Independently Owned & Operated Member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-497 Bank of America, NA vs. Andrew S. Adams, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-020370 Also known as: 715 West Water Street, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Forty Five Thousand and 00/100 ($45,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. George J. Annos, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012 2348375

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-517 U S Bank, NA vs. Danielle L. Blankley, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-053370 Prior Deed Reference: Volume 730, Page 216 Also known as: 907 Nicklin Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Eighty One Thousand and 00/100 ($81,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Kelly M. McKoy, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012 2348376

Service&Business DIRECTORY

To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Service & Business Directory please call: 877-844-8385 655 Home Repair & Remodel

OME IMP ROVEM AL H EN T T TO ALL YOUR NEEDS IN ONE

TERRY’S

www.thisidney.com • www.facebook.com/thi.sidney NO JOB TOO SMALL, WE DO IT ALL

ROOFS • KITCHENS • BATHS • REMODELING

(937) 339-1902

PAINTING DECKS

or (937) 238-HOME

DRYWALL ADDITIONS

Glen’s Heating & Cooling

PURE PURE COMFORT COMFORT

24 Hour Service All Makes Service Sales, Service, Installation

Eden Pure Service Center

660 Home Services 620 Childcare

BED BUG DETECTORS

“Peace of Mind”

K I D S P L AC E

Special

• 1st, 2nd and 3rd shift • Tax Claimable • Price Negotiable for more than one child • Meals and snacks provided • Close to Nicklin & Wilder School District • Mornings, before and after school

$

69

4995 Sparkle Clean installed

(937)

493-9978

Cleaning Service

Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured

B.E.D. PROGRAM

CALL TODAY! (937)418-4712 or (937)710-5277 655 Home Repair & Remodel

Residential/Commercial Licensed & Insured 2346461

Water Damage Restoration Specialist

660 Home Services

BEWARE OF STORM CHASERS!!! Shop Locally

Commercial / Residential

All Types of Interior/Exterior Construction & Maintenance

2341457

• New Roof & Roof Repair • Painting • Concrete • Hauling • Demo Work • New Rubber Roofs

ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS: Seamless Gutters • Re-roofs • Siding• Tear Offs New Construction • Call for your FREE estimate

(937) 418-7361 • (937) 773-1213 25 Year Experience - Licensed & Bonded Wind & Hail Damage - Insurance Approved

(937) 473-2847 Pat Kaiser (937) 216-9332

2321579

AK Construction

Affordable Roofing & Home Improvements

645 Hauling

875-0153 698-6135 MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

(937) 489-8553 Commercial • Residential Insurance Claims 2330353

SELL IT

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992 Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

HERITAGE GOODHEW

“WE REPAIR METAL ROOFS”

765-857-2623 765-509-0069 725 Eldercare 2345722

2344183

937-573-4737

Senior Homecare Personal • Comfort

• Spouting • Metal Roofing • Siding • Doors

• Baths • Awnings • Concrete • Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

2342821

COURT OF COMMON PLEAS MIAMI COUNTY, OHIO Case No.: 12 CV 00648 Judge: Christopher Gee CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, -vs-

710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

• Roofing • Windows • Kitchens • Sunrooms

The Defendants names above are required to answer the Complaint within Twenty-Eight (28) days after the last publication of this legal notice. This legal notice will be published once a week for three successive weeks.

2343976

• Metal Roofing • Sales & Service • Standing Seam Snap Lock Panels

670 Miscellaneous

COOPER’S GRAVEL Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

A Baby Fresh Clean, LLC

LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Situate in the City of Troy, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio and further described as follows: Being In Lot Numbered Two Thousand Four Hundred Seventy-Seven (2477) in said City of Troy, Ohio. Previous Deed Reference: General Warranty Deed as recorded in Volume 751, Page 304 Address: 831 S. Market Street, Troy, OH 45373 Parcel: D08-025310

11/30, 12/07, 12/14-2012

(937)778-8093 • Carpet • Upholstery • Auto & More!

Unknown Tenants, whose last known address is 831 S. Market Street, Troy, Ohio 45373 will take notice that on 10/4/2012 Fifth Third Mortgage Company filed a Complaint in the Common Pleas Court of Miami County, Ohio, in Case No. 12CV661. The object and demand for relief in the Complaint is to foreclose the lien of Plaintiffʼs mortgage recorded upon the real estate described below and in which Plaintiff alleges that the foregoing defendants have or claim to have an interest:

Richards & Associates, Co., L.P.A., by Thomas D. Richards, Attorney for Plaintiff, 9200 Montgomery Road, BLDG 7B, Cincinnati, OH 45242. (513) 8718755

675 Pet Care

937-492-ROOF

937-335-6080

625 Construction

To Place An Ad In The Service Directory Call:

877-844-8385

We Eliminate

Bed Bugs

660 Home Services

5055 Walzer Rd. Russia, OH 45363

Tammy Welty (937)857-4222

Sullenberger Pest Control

Roofing, Windows, Siding, Fire & Water Restoration

FIND IT

492-0250 • 622-0997

2348796

MOTHER OF 2 looking to start babysitting in my Covington home. Just 2 blocks from Elementary. EXCELLENT Rates!!! Meals and snacks provided. Open to 1st and 2nd shift. References available upon request. Contact Lindsey at (937)473-3056.

2339396

2334532

1144 Fisher Dr., Piqua, OH 45356

Check & Service All Heating Systems

Case No. 12CV661 Fifth Third Mortgage Co. v. Juliet Swope, et al.

Mon.-Thurs. 5pm-8pm or by Appointment

As low as

$

2344767

CHILDREN 2 YRS AND UP 40 HOURS $70 WEEK 25 HOURS AND LESS $30 WEEK

937-418-1361

knowing your Free from BED BUGS • Devices installed in all rooms • Easy Early find if Bed Bugs enter

Foreclosure of Mortgage Common Pleas Court Miami County, Ohio

2344581

620 Childcare

2348378

Free Estimates • Fully Insured • 17 Years of Home Excellence

2342850

PORCHES GARAGES

2341461

WINDOWS SIDING

937-773-4552

INFANTS 0-2 YEARS 40 HOURS $70 WEEK 25 HOURS AND LESS $30 WEEK

Small #Basements #Siding #Doors #Barns

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts 2344184

2310858

•Refrigerators •Stoves •Washers & Dryers •Dishwashers • Repair & Install Air Conditioning

FREE ESTIMATES

937-489-8558

APPLIANCE REPAIR

660 Home Services

#Repairs Large and #Room Additions #Kitchens/Baths #Windows #Garages

INSURED

BONDED

615 Business Services

660 Home Services

2339390

655 Home Repair & Remodel

2347316

600 - Services

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-597 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation vs. Jody R. Causey, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 16, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-013850 Prior Deed Reference: Book 679, Page 156 Also known as: 531 Cottage Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Seventy Eight Thousand and 00/100 ($78,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Ellen L. Fornash, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012

~ Flexible Hourly Care ~ ~ Respite Care for Families ~

419.501.2323 or 888.313.9990 www.visitingangels.com/midwestohio 2336487

Barbara A. Goings, et al Defendants. LEGAL NOTICE

Unknown heirs, the devisees, legatees, executors, administrators, and assigns of Barbara A. Goings, and the unknown guardians of minor and/or incompetent heirs of Barbara A. Goings (if any) and Unknown Spouse (if any) of Barbara A. Goings, whose last known address is 363 Home Avenue, Piqua, Oh 45356, will take notice that on October 2, 2012, CitiMortgage, Inc. filed its Complaint in the Court of Common Pleas, Miami County, Ohio, Case No. 12 CV 00648. The object of, and demand for relief in, the Complaint is to foreclose the lien of plaintiffʼs mortgage recorded upon the real estate described below and in which plaintiff alleges that the foregoing defendants have or claim to have an interest: Parcel number(s): N44-047230, N44-047220 Property address: 363 Home Avenue, Piqua, OH 45356

The defendants named above are required to answer the Complaint within twenty-eight (28) days after last publication of this legal notice. This legal notice will be published once a week for three successive weeks. 11/30, 12/07, 12/14-2012

2342531


Friday, December 14, 2012

PIQUA DAILY CALL • PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

800 - Transportation

577 Miscellaneous GOOD STUFF Cheap for Christmas, Lead Crystal Compote, plus and others; oil painting 32x27; new and used- mens Burberry coat, London Fog jacket, all weather, silk and cashmere scarves; womens cardigan and pullover pure wool sweaters, Lambskin short coat; Beautiful China 10 place settings plus; William Rogers silverware 12 place settings plus, Swiss blue Topaz AAA necklace 8.5 ct, earrings 2.5 ct. each, all items fraction of retail, details, pricing, appointment, cell (937)497-1929 evening or later SOFA BED, Serta, print, like new, Washer & Dryer, Homedic heated massager, used $75, (937)308-4986

Floral $350, $75, back twice,

WANTED! Need money? I buy guns, gold and silver coins. Fair prices. (937)698-6362 WHEELCHAIR, Manual, supports up to 600 lbs. $350. (937)698-6362

583 Pets and Supplies BLACK LAB puppies for sale, AKA and CKC registered, (937)539-0474. CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES born November 7th. 1 male, 3 females. $100 each. (937)489-1866 SIBERIAN HUSKY, $100 with AKC papers, free without papers. Friendly, and loveable. (937)497-1018 WEIMARANER PUPPY AKC, 8 weeks old, vet checked, tails, nails and have been wormed. First shots, ready for good homes. (1) Blue, (2) Silvers, (3) females, Parents on premises. $600. (937)658-0045

586 Sports and Recreation GUN CABINET, Christmas for your hunter! 6 capacity, wood, locking glass front door, lockable storage space, (937)773-4644 leave message.

Picture it Sold Please call

877-844-8385 to advertise in Picture It Sold

2000 PONTIAC GRAND AM SE Great gas mileage, sunroof, 144K miles, runs great, asking $3200 (937)684-0555

2003 DODGE RAM 1500 Hemi 5.7L SLT, quad cab, cap, 135K miles, excellent condition, $7900 OBO. (937)773-1204

805 Auto

805 Auto

805 Auto

805 Auto

899 Wanted to Buy

1989 FORD VAN club wagon, good condition, new parts, runs good, $1600 OBO (937)552-7752

1996 HONDA ACCORD LX Manual transmission, 156,000 miles. $2950. Call (937)214-2373

JEEP WRANGLER, 1994, 4x4, nice, clean, mostly redone, low miles, great on gas, 4 cycle, 5 speed manual, $4500 OBO cash only, no trades (937)776-9789 (Piqua)

1998 DODGE DAKOTA, well maintained, low mileage per year, $3750 OBO (937)773-4016

CASH PAID for junk cars and trucks. Free removal. Call us to get most for junker (937)732-5424.

805 Auto 1957 CHEVY 4 Door Post, Complete solid car, Does not run, $3250, (937)335-9353, Days

1993 HONDA Accord, 2 door beige sporty coupe, runs and shifts smoothly, automatic, $1500 (937)552-9986

Nice and loaded! 77,000 miles. $9900. Call Bob (937)339-8352

2009 CHEVY SILVERADO Extended cab, red with black interior, locking rear differential, Reese hitch, chrome step rail, 17,000 miles, $15,500. Call (937)524-6656

that work .com

895 Vans/Minivans 2002 DODGE Grand Caravan Sport, 186k Miles, $2850, (937)214-5798

CASH PAID for junk cars and trucks. Free removal. Just call us today (937)732-5424.

PUBLIC NOTICE DIRECTORY SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-371 Bank of America, NA vs. Matthew OʼReilly, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Washington, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: M40-029620 Prior Deed Reference: Volume 759, Page 514 Also known as: 5820 North Stillwell Road, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Twenty Six Thousand and 00/100 ($126,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Ryan F. Hemmerle, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 11-734 U S Bank, NA vs. Michael A. Kraft, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-034200 Also known as: 1302 Nicklin Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Seventy Eight Thousand and 00/100 ($78,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Joshua J. Epling, Attorney 12/07, 12/14, 12/21-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-629 CitiMortgage, Inc. vs. Michael F. Erwin, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-072255 Also known as: 923 New Haven Road, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Sixty Three Thousand and 00/100 ($63,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Kevin L. Williams, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-523 PNC Bank, NA vs. William C. Edgell, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-061260 Also known as: 404 Glenwood Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Sixty Three Thousand and 00/100 ($63,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Canice J. Fogarty, Attorney 12/07, 12/14, 12/21-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-527 Bank of America, NA vs. Catherine J. Mackellar, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-097900 Also known as: 1505 Broadway, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Thirty Eight Thousand and 00/10 ($138,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Colette S. Carr, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-342 The Bank of New York Mellon vs. John B. Wright, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-030540 Prior Deed Reference: Quitclaim Deed, Book 757, Page 732, filed February 08, 2005 Also known as: 545 Gordon Street, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Seventy Eight Thousand and 00/100 ($78,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Charles V. Gasior, Attorney 12/07, 12/14, 12/21-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-492 Bank of America, NA vs. Stefani N. Pierce, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-015890 & N44-015880 Prior Deed Reference: OR Volume 117, Page 424 Also known as: 1052 Caldwell Street, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Forty Eight Thousand and 00/100 ($48,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Ryan F. Hemmerle, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-592 Fifth Third Mortgage Company vs. Randy W. Carnahan, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-027100 Prior Deed Reference: Volume 781, Page 592 Also known as: 1322 Madison Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Seventy Five Thousand and 00/100 ($75,000.000) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Jennifer A. Baughman, Attorney 12/07, 12/14, 12/21-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-400 Bank of America, NA vs. Judith A. & Thomas E. McFadden, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 9, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-069210 Prior Deed Reference: Volume 764, Page 634 Also known as: 401 North Parkway Drive, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Eighty Four Thousand and 00/100 ($84,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Ryan F. Hemmerle, Attorney 12/14, 12/21, 12/28-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-345 Bank of America, NA vs. Jeffrey A. Haney, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-073315 Also known as: 1111 Marwood Drive, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Twenty Nine Thousand and 00/100 ($129,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Jeffrey R. Jinkens, Attorney 12/07, 12/14, 12/21-2012

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SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 11-229 U.S. Bank, National Association vs. Joshua L. Worley, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-073444 Prior Deed Reference: Volume 765, Page 387 Also known as: 517 Cottage Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Fifty Four Thousand and 00/100 ($54,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. S. Scott Martin, Attorney 12/07, 12/14, 12/21-2012 2345781

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2007 BUICK LUCERNE

11

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SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-296 Bank of America, NA vs. David A. Rohrbach, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on January 3, 2013 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Village of Fletcher, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: B05-001830 Also known as: 224 South Walnut Street, Fletcher, Ohio 45326 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Sixty Nine Thousand Nine Hundred and 00/100 ($69,900.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Jeffrey R. Jinkens, Attorney 11/30, 12/07, 12/14-2012 2343996

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-197 Green Tree Servicing, LLC vs. Leigh A. Bashore, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on December 27, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Newberry, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: H17-051453 Prior Deed Reference: General Warranty Deed, Book 764, Page 716, filed September 02, 2005 Also known as: 8341 West Covington Gettysburg Road, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Thirty Nine Thousand and 00/100 ($39,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Robert R. Hoose, Attorney 11/30, 12/07, 12/14-2012 2343288

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-202 PNC Bank, NA vs. James A. Schmidt, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on December 27, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Newberry, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: H17-047850 Also known as: 8825 West State Route 185, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Sixth Nine Thousand and 00/100 ($69,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Canice J. Fogarty, Attorney 11/30, 12/07, 12/14-2012 2343294

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 11-763 Fryman-Kuck General Contractors, Inc. vs. Keith Randall Kuck, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on December 27, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Newton, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: I22-000010 & I22-000035 Also known as: 5821 West State Route 41, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Twenty Three Thousand and 00/100 ($123,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. J. Joseph Walsh, Attorney 11/30, 12/07, 12/14-2012 2343300


INFORMATION Call ROB KISER, sports editor, at 773-2721, ext. 209, from 8 p.m. to midnight weekdays.

SPORTS

Piqua Daily Call • www.dailycall.com

INSIDE ■ Marshall doesn’t like Packers, page 13. ■ Watson back as Ryder Cup captain, page 14.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2012

IN BRIEF ■ Basketball

Piqua falls to Elks

Buccs selling tourney tickets The Covington High School boys and girls basketball teams will be playing in the B.I.G. WPTW Holiday Classic in Piqua Dec. 27, 28 and 29. Covington will play Piqua in the first round on Dec. 27. The JV girls game is 10:30 a.m., followed by the JV boys game at noon. The varsity girls game is at 7 p.m., followed by the varsity boys game at 8:30 p.m. The consolation games are Dec. 28 and the championship games are Dec. 29. There are no pre-sale tickets for the JV tournament. All tickets will be $3 at the door. Pre-sale tickets for students for the varsity games are $4. There is no pre-sale for adults. All varsity tickets will be $6 at the door. Pre-sale tickets will be available at the Covington High School main office during regular school hours until the Christmas break.

Piqua eighth girls fall 28-20 The Piqua eighth grade girls basketball team lost 28-20 to Trotwood-Madison Wednesday. Alyssa Jones scored five points and Kelsie Hall grabbed six rebound. Piqua will play at Northmont Tuesday. PIQUA SCORING Curtner 2, Brownlee 2, Booker 2, Bowen 3, Jones 5, Hilleary 3, Hall 3.

■ Baseball

Extra Innings to host camp Extra Innings-Troy will host a Pro Player baseball camp. This Pro Player Camp is a two-day event on Dec 29 and 30 from noon to 5 p.m. The staff for this camp will include Reds Hall of Famer Tom Browning, along with former Reds’ players Jeff Shaw and Jeff Branson. Other instructors include Craig Stammen of the Washington Nationals, Adam Eaton of the Arizona Diamondbacks, Tyler Melling of the St. Louis Cardinals, Chris Peters of the Toronto Blue Jays, and Brian Garman of the Milwaukee Brewers. For more information, contact Extra Innings at 937-339-3330.

STUMPER

When was the Q: last time the U.S. Ryder Cup team won on European soil?

A:

1993

QUOTED “We are just really tired of losing the Ryder Cup.” — Ted Bishop on bringing Tom Watson back as U.S. captain

12

Lady Indians held to 11 CENTERVILLE — The Piqua girls basketball team will play at Stebbins Monday night. The Lady Indians, 2-6, struggled at the offensive end in a 74-11 loss to Centerville Wednesday. PHOTO PROVIDED BY NICKI HOGSTON Piqua was just two of 27 from the floor for seven Piqua’s Jake Hetzler closes in on a pin of Brandon Bronaugh in a 285-pound match percent, but made six of 1 1free throws for 54 percent. The Lady Indians trailed 30-0, 42-5 and 656 at the quarter breaks. Katie Allen, Frannie Haney and Tasha Potts BY ROB KISER to Eaton. Piqua recorded 2-0. the first period. We just scored three points each three wins in its eight He pinned Brandon need to clean that up.” Sports Editor and Morgen Grunkematches against Wayne Bronaugh of Wayne in After a 9-4 loss against meyer added two off the rkiser@dailycall.com and four wins against 1:01 and recorded a forfeit Wayne’s Jordan Davis, bench. win against Eaton. Bryant held on for a 7-6 HUBER HEIGHTS — Eaton in eight matches. “We felt like we needed “At the Edgewood tour- win against Eaton. Piqua wrestling coach “Hunter (Bryant) wres- Lady Cats win Scott Kaye wasn’t so much to show improvement,” nament, every time Jake HOUSTON — Houston concerned with the final Kaye said. “In the first two (Hetzler) was in position tled a good match,” Kaye rolled to a 12-2 lead after scores in Piqua’s double- tournaments we have had to throw, the guy would said. “That kid (from one quarter and went on dual wrestling match with some critical mistakes roll through and pin him,” Eaton) was a tough kid.” a 53-40 victory over to that cost us matches. I Kaye said. “Jake was After losing by tech fall Wayne, Middletown and in Shelby Eaton Thursday at Wayne thought tonight was defi- doing things that were against Jarrod Hardrick Fairlawn County League girls basnitely a step forward.” getting him in trouble. We of Wayne, Durand bumped High School. ketball action Thursday Caje Kindred (138) worked with him on up to 220 against Eaton “It wasn’t about throwing his leg out. The and returned the favor night. whether we won the went 3-0 on the night. The win puts the Lady After getting a win over guy fell for it and he was with a 19-2 win by tech matches or not,” Kaye Wildcats at 2-2 in the fall. said. “One of the toughest Wayne by forfeit, he able to get the pin.” league and 3-5 overall. Eric Clay (120), Hunter “He helped them out things coming down here pinned a Wayne wrestler Fairlawn is 0-3 in the in an exhibition match. Bryant (145) and Drew and gave them a match,” is competing against teams and have 30 kids Against Eaton, he was Durand (195) all went 1-1. Kaye said about Durand SCL and 1-6 overall. Houston had three Clay defeated Cassius bumping up. “He came out when we have eight. I trailing 7-5 in the third players in double figures, think we did a good job of period when he got a re- Bailey of Wayne 8-1, be- and wrestled real well.” led by Alyssa Stang with versal and pinned his opfore losing an 8-5 decision Desmine Griffis (160), getting past that. It was against Eaton. Dalton Price (170) and 14. about what we did with ponent at 5:17. Monique Booher and “Caje (Kindred) wres“Eric has been Tanner Chambers (182) the matches we wrestled.” Stang added 12 Macy And for the most part, tled real strong all night,” wrestling well all year and went 0-2. points apiece. said. “The kid from Kaye did again tonight,” he Indians will return The Kaye thought the Piqua Olivia Cummings took action Dec. 22, wrestlers showed im- Eaton was a good Kaye said. “The Eaton kid to game scoring honors with was a strong kid. He just wrestling in a tri at Fairprovement despite losing wrestler.” 21 points. Jake Hetzler (285) went got caught in a move in mont. 59-16 to Wayne and 51-20

Piqua making progress

Kindred, Hetzler have perfect nights in Wayne double-dual

Patton takes over as football coach 1918 squad fights inexperience, Spanish flu epidemic For five years, Merlin Ditmer was the head football coach at Piqua High School. He was also the basketball and baseball coach. In two of the football seasons, including 1917, the Red and Blue were undefeated. He was lauded not only as a coach but as an educator and his future looked bright. But when the 1918 football schedule was announced, it was also noted that there was a new head coach on board in the person of R. M. Patton. Ironically, there was no mention of the reason for the departure of Coach Ditmer in the local media. A preview of the season noted that the Red and Blue squad was short on experience. “The Piqua high school football team opens the first game of the season tomorrow afternoon at 1 o’clock, at Stein’s park, playing against its ancient rivals from Greenville high. “Greenville has a strong team this year and an interesting game is expected as Coach Patton has the red and blue in good condition. “It will be noticed that only two of last year’s letter men are on the team, ‘Heavy’ Coffield and Higgins. Piqua high school football teams in the past three years have come through the seasons with flying colors, and the team this year is going to do its

best to keep those colors flying. Come out and root.” On October 4 Piqua opened the season against Greenville. “Piqua 19 – Greenville 0. That is the score by which the Piqua High school defeated the team from Greenville at Stein’s park yesterday afternoon. Although Coach Patton’s boys are light, and several of them new recruits, they showed up splendidly on the field and came through the game with flying colors.” The schedule was altered because of the outbreak of the deadly Spanish flu epidemic that swept across the nation. The Piqua Board of Health closed the schools, the churches and lodges on October 5 in an effort to slow the spread of the flu. The next week Piqua was slated to play West Alexandria, followed by a trip to Dayton Stivers, and then two games against Sidney. Three of those games were cancelled. The first Piquad to succumb to the influenza epidemic was Cassie Elliott. The schools reopened on November 5, and football returned on November 9 with the re-scheduled contest against Dayton Stivers. “Ward’s drop kick from the 35 yard line in the fourth period gave Stivers a 3 to 0 victory over Piqua high Saturday afternoon at Westwood field. “The contest was chuck

DUANE BACHMAN The History of Piqua Athletics A Journal Fall 1918

full of the unexpected and it was anybody’s game until the final whistle settled all doubts as to the outcome. “The Stivers linemen often sifted through Piqua’s defense, but their tackling was so loose they failed to hold after getting hands on him. On offense the local forwards could not open holes for their backs with any consistency. “Then, too, they were guilty of letting the opponents break through. Stivers has a beefy team, which plainly showed the lack of real action such as can only be had in a scheduled game.” The next week Piqua traveled to Troy. “The Piqua high school football eleven met its second defeat of the season at Highland Park, in Troy, at the hands of the Troy eleven to the tune of 27 to 6. “This game was a long, drawn out affair, with only now and then a little excitement. The ball was in the hands of the referee about as much as in the players hands, for he was continually finding some-

For Home Delivery, Call: 773-2725

thing for which to penalize Piqua. “Troy’s team considerably outweighed Piqua, but could not outrun them. “When one of Piqua’s backs carried the ball he invariably took quite a journey, anywhere from three to twenty yards. Piqua lost on her defensive work yesterday, sheer weight carrying the Troy boys through our line.” Piqua was on the road the next week at Miamisburg. “The Miamisburg high school football team mowed Piqua under a defeat, the worst experienced by the local eleven in several years Saturday. The villagers, showing unexpected form and ability, cut the Piquads off at the little end of a 40 to 0 score. “Miamisburg outweighed and outclassed Piqua. Contrary to the game played the week before at Troy when undue roughness and rowdyism was indulged in on the part of the Troy players and supporters, the contest at Miamisburg was the cleanest game played this season. “The officials were efficient and knew what they were doing and the local players and the small group of students who accompanied them to the village have no complaints whatever to offer, being perfectly willing to give to Miamisburg the glory that she has so justly earned.

Defeating Piqua is a big feather in the caps of the village players.” The season finale was played in Piqua on Thanksgiving Day. “The Piqua high school football team came back gloriously in a hard fought game on Thursday afternoon against their old rivals from Troy. “Troy had turned out expecting to play Piqua to a standstill but too much confidence and aggressiveness lost the day for them. The score, 13 to 6, was just close enough to hold the interest of the spectators from start to finish. “Piqua’s team fought with all that was in them, a team much heavier than they and one composed of more oldtimers. “Most of the Piqua boys are new, but their record this year has not been one to ridicule considering conditions under which they have worked. “No roughness or unfriendly spirit was shown in the contest yesterday, and the visitors were treated as ladies and gentlemen are always treated by ladies and gentlemen.” Editor’s Note: Duane Bachman is a retired superintendent of Piqua City Schools and personality for WPTW Radio. His column will appear every other Friday. Much of the information in these columns came from The Piqua Daily Call and Piqua Leader Dispatch.


SPORTS

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Raises stakes for big game LAKE FOREST, Ill. (AP) — Chicago Bears receiver Brandon Marshall lashed out at Green Bay on Wednesday, saying he's never disliked a team as much as the Packers. "I don't like the Green Bay Packers," he said during his weekly session with reporters. "I'm not going to use the word hate, but I really dislike the Green Bay Packers and their players. But the talk, you have to back it up. We'll go out there and we'll do everything we need to do to get a win." The Bears (8-5) clearly need one after dropping four of five heading into Sunday's home game against Green Bay. The Packers (9-4) clinch the NFC North if they beat Chicago, so the stakes already were high. Marshall simply added some more fuel during a lively news conference. "This is personal," he said. He strode to the podium with a small, almost bare Christmas tree with a red ornament dangling from it, as the Peanuts theme played. It was a symbolic statement, that even though things are looking about as ugly as Charlie Brown's Christmas tree at the moment, the Bears still have time. There was nothing symbolic when it came to his comments about the Packers. "I've never felt this strong in sports — versus any team or any players," Marshall said. "I'm going to play like it's my last game." His dislike for them seems to stem from a 2310 loss at Green Bay in Week 2 in which he caught just two passes for 24 yards. Marshall called defensive coordinator Dom Capers the MVP for the Packers and took issue with comments he said several of their players made. He also said he hopes to see one-on-one coverage. "For their players to be over there talking about how awesome of a job they (do) shutting down certain players, I don't respect that, when it's two and three guys on you or other guys," Marshall said. "Coach Capers did an amazing job of game-plan-

ning us and game-planning me. I didn't beat double or triple coverage or they were whatever throwing at us. I take it as a slap in my face when guys talk about my lack of ability to do something against them when they have help all over the place. I'm looking forward to one-on-one coverage. Hopefully, those guys in games like this may go to their coach and say, 'Let me have him. I want Brandon Marshall. I want to stop Brandon Marshall. Let me have him one-onone, press coverage.' And we'll see what happens." Marshall said cornerbacks Tramon Williams and Charles Woodson said some things that bothered him. The most pointed comments from the Packers that night were directed toward Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, with Woodson saying they knew he would throw it to them. Considering they picked him off four times, it was hard to argue. And they did that after Cutler wished the Packers "good luck" trying to match up physically with the Bears' receivers. Woodson did tell FOXsports.com in an article that appeared last month that Marshall "likes to bend and break the rules." "He's one of those guys where he wants you to put your hands on him so he's going to grab you and throw you. I'm like, 'Mr. Ref, he's not fast enough to get on top of me. How do you think he got on top?'" Woodson told the website. Marshall, meanwhile, was asked about the physicality of Green Bay's secondary on Wednesday. "Non-existent," he responded. Marshall added: "Leading up to the game, they were complaining about how big I was and I was a cheater because I grabbed and pushed at the line of scrimmage. I thought that what's bump coverage was about. So they put them off and throw them inside and safety over the top and a linebacker running out to me. They did a bunch of things and it was good. But we won't make that mistake again. We won't force the ball to me." Marshall called this the biggest game of his career.

Hamilton gets big contract with Angels Five-year deal for $125 million LOS ANGELES (AP) — Josh Hamilton is heading to the Los Angeles Angels, lured with a $125 million, five-year contract that steps up the migration of high-profile stars to Southern California. The Angels persuaded the free-agent outfielder to leave the Texas Rangers with their third big-money offseason signing in as many years. Hamilton heads to Anaheim after first baseman Albert Pujols came West for $240 million last December along with pitcher C.J. Wilson — Hamilton's Texas teammate — for $77.5 million. Still, the Angels failed to make the playoffs for the third straight year. They had bulked up their pitching staff earlier in the offseason with the additions of pitchers Joe Blanton and Tommy Hanson, along with relievers Sean Burnett and Ryan Madson. General manager Jerry

Dipoto had said Wednesday that he didn't think a major move was "imminent or required." But owner Arte Moreno pulled off another coup by getting Hamilton. The 2010 AL MVP, Pujols and AL Rookie of the Year Mike Trout combined for 103 home runs and 316 RBIs last season. "It's a great day to be an Angel/Angel fan!" Wilson said on his Twitter account. Rangers general manager Jon Daniels said Hamilton had reached a deal with the AL West rival Angels. Two people familiar with the talks disclosed the amount and length of the contract, speaking on condition of anonymity because the agreement was not yet final. Hamilton's $25 million average salary matches Philadelphia first baseman Ryan Howard for the second-highest .

13

Record Book Football

Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

NFL Glance National Football League All Times EST AMERICAN CONFERENCE East y-N. England N.Y. Jets Buffalo Miami South x-Houston Indianapolis Tennessee Jacksonville North Baltimore Pittsburgh Cincinnati Cleveland West y-Denver San Diego Oakland Kansas City

W 10 6 5 5

L 3 7 8 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .769 .462 .385 .385

PF 472 245 289 240

PA 274 306 352 276

W 11 9 4 2

L 2 4 9 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .846 .692 .308 .154

PF 365 292 271 216

PA 263 329 386 359

W 9 7 7 5

L 4 6 6 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .692 .538 .538 .385

PF 331 278 321 259

PA 273 264 280 272

W L T Pct PF 10 3 0 .769 375 5 8 0 .385 292 3 10 0 .231 248 2 11 0 .154 195 NATIONAL CONFERENCE

PA 257 281 402 352

East

Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (9-3), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At Miami Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (11-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

W 8 7 7 4

L 5 6 6 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .615 .538 .538 .308

PF 373 343 300 240

PA 270 329 314 341

Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

W 11 6 5 4

L 2 7 8 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .846 .462 .385 .308

PF 337 354 348 265

PA 259 308 379 312

Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

W 9 8 7 4

L 4 5 6 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .692 .615 .538 .308

PF 323 308 283 320

PA 279 219 286 342

L T Pct PF W San Francisco 9 3 1 .731 316 Seattle 8 5 0 .615 300 6 6 1 .500 236 St. Louis Arizona 4 9 0 .308 186 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Thursday, Dec. 13 Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Minnesota at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Washington at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Miami, 1 p.m. Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Carolina at San Diego, 4:05 p.m. Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Seattle vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 4:25 p.m. San Francisco at New England, 8:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22 Atlanta at Detroit, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23 Tennessee at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Dallas, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 1 p.m. Oakland at Carolina, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Miami, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. New England at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Denver, 4:05 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m. San Francisco at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.

PA 184 202 279 292

N.Y. Giants Washington Dallas Philadelphia South y-Atlanta Tampa Bay New Orleans Carolina North Green Bay Chicago Minnesota Detroit West

Bowl Glance College Football FBS Bowl Glance Subject to Change All Times EST Saturday, Dec. 15 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Nevada (7-5) vs. Arizona (7-5), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho Toledo (9-3) vs. Utah State (10-2), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 20 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego San Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 21 Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl At St. Petersburg, Fla. Ball State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 22 New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (7-4), Noon (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu SMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Central Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Washington Bowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San Diego Baylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 9:45 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Virginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At Houston Minnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Rice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco Arizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New York Syracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Texas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), Noon (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), 2 p.m. (CBS)

Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Miami Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 19 East-West Shrine Classic At St. Petersburg, Fla. East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN) Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. North vs. South, TBA (NFLN)

Basketball

NBA Standings National Basketball Association All Times EST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 16 5 .762 — 12 9 .571 4 Boston Brooklyn 12 9 .571 4 Philadelphia 12 10 .545 4½ 4 19 .174 13 Toronto Southeast Division W L Pct GB 14 6 .700 — Miami Atlanta 13 6 .684 ½ Orlando 8 13 .381 6½ 7 14 .333 7½ Charlotte Washington 3 16 .158 10½ Central Division L Pct GB W Chicago 12 9 .571 — Milwaukee 11 9 .550 ½ 11 11 .500 1½ Indiana Detroit 7 17 .292 6½ Cleveland 5 18 .217 8 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 18 5 .783 — 14 5 .737 2 Memphis Dallas 11 11 .500 6½ Houston 10 11 .476 7 5 16 .238 12 New Orleans Northwest Division W L Pct GB 18 4 .818 — Oklahoma City Utah 13 10 .565 5½ Minnesota 10 9 .526 6½ 11 12 .478 7½ Denver Portland 9 12 .429 8½ Pacific Division L Pct GB W L.A. Clippers 16 6 .727 — Golden State 15 7 .682 1 9 13 .409 7 L.A. Lakers Phoenix 8 15 .348 8½ Sacramento 7 14 .333 8½ Wednesday's Games Brooklyn 94, Toronto 88 Indiana 96, Cleveland 81 Atlanta 86, Orlando 80 L.A. Clippers 100, Charlotte 94 Chicago 96, Philadelphia 89 Golden State 97, Miami 95 Houston 99, Washington 93 Minnesota 108, Denver 105 Oklahoma City 92, New Orleans 88 Milwaukee 98, Sacramento 85 Boston 117, Dallas 115,2OT Phoenix 82, Memphis 80 Utah 99, San Antonio 96 Thursday's Games Charlotte at Atlanta L.A. Lakers at New York San Antonio at Portland Friday's Games Dallas at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Indiana, 7 p.m. Golden State at Orlando, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Houston, 8 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Utah at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 10:30 p.m. Saturday's Games Golden State at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Chicago, 8 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Boston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. Memphis at Utah, 9 p.m.

Men’s Schedule College Basketball Schedule Friday, Dec. 14 EAST Maine at Army, 7 p.m. SOUTH Charlotte at Miami, 7 p.m. UCF at Old Dominion, 7 p.m. ETSU at Mississippi, 8 p.m. FAR WEST LSU at Boise St., 9 p.m. E. New Mexico at Cal Poly, 10 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15 EAST W. Carolina at Georgetown, Noon

D OUG M ARINE M OTORS

Elon at UMass, Noon Wright St. at Hofstra, 2 p.m. Delaware St. at Penn St., 2 p.m. SMU at Rhode Island, 2 p.m. Cleveland St. at St. Bonaventure, 2 p.m. Princeton vs. Fordham at the Barclays Center, 2:30 p.m. Coppin St. at Wagner, 4 p.m. St. Francis (NY) vs. St. John's at the Barclays Center, 5 p.m. La Salle at Bucknell, 7 p.m. Bethune-Cookman at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Duquesne at Robert Morris, 7 p.m. Canisius at Syracuse, 7 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Towson, 7 p.m. Mount St. Mary's at Loyola (Md.), 7:30 p.m. Michigan vs. West Virginia at the Barclays Center, 8 p.m. SOUTH East Carolina at North Carolina, Noon Lipscomb at Kentucky, 12:30 p.m. Cincinnati at Marshall, 2 p.m. Georgia Southern at Virginia Tech, 2 p.m. Louisville at Memphis, 2:30 p.m. Missouri Valley at Northwestern St., 3 p.m. Liberty at Howard, 4 p.m. Alabama at VCU, 4 p.m. Iona at Georgia, 5 p.m. Stetson at Richmond, 6 p.m. Florida A&M at Clemson, 7 p.m. UNC Wilmington at Davidson, 7 p.m. The Citadel at Gardner-Webb, 7 p.m. Norfolk St. at NC State, 7 p.m. Jacksonville St. at Presbyterian, 7 p.m. Grambling St. at Southern Miss., 7:30 p.m. Furman at Auburn, 8 p.m. Sam Houston St. at Samford, 8 p.m. Georgia St. at Troy, 8 p.m. Alabama A&M at Vanderbilt, 8 p.m. MIDWEST Akron at Detroit, Noon UNC Asheville at Ohio St., Noon E. Michigan at Ill.-Chicago, 2 p.m. Butler vs. Indiana at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis, 2 p.m. Savannah St. at Marquette, 2 p.m. Winthrop at Ohio, 2 p.m. Alabama St. at Evansville, 2:05 p.m. Iowa vs. N. Iowa at Wells Fargo Arena, Des Moines, Iowa, 2:30 p.m. Purdue vs. Notre Dame at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis, 4:30 p.m. Drake vs. Iowa St. at Wells Fargo Arena, Des Moines, Iowa, 5 p.m. FAU at Dayton, 7 p.m. Indiana St. at IUPUI, 7 p.m. Belmont at Kansas, 7 p.m. S. Illinois at Green Bay, 8 p.m. Mississippi St. at Loyola of Chicago, 8 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. UT-Martin at Saint Louis, 8 p.m. Ball St. at South Dakota, 8 p.m. Valparaiso at Missouri St., 8:05 p.m. Tuskegee at Michigan St., 9 p.m. SOUTHWEST Texas A&M at Oklahoma at Chesapeake Energy Arena, Oklahoma City, 2 p.m. Tulsa at UALR, 3 p.m. Lubbock Christian at Stephen F. Austin, 7 p.m. Alcorn St. at Arkansas, 8 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Houston, 8 p.m. Hartford at Rice, 8 p.m. Texas St. at Texas, 8 p.m. Lamar at Texas-Pan American, 8 p.m. FAR WEST Dartmouth at Arizona St., 3 p.m. Nebraska at Oregon, 4:30 p.m. UC Davis at Stanford, 5 p.m. Nebraska-Omaha at Denver, 6 p.m. San Francisco at Nevada, 6 p.m. New Mexico St. at New Mexico, 6 p.m. UC Riverside at Southern Cal, 7 p.m. Jackson St. at Washington, 7 p.m. BYU-Hawaii at Long Beach St., 7:05 p.m. Santa Clara at Pacific, 8 p.m. Kansas St. vs. Gonzaga at KeyArena, Seattle, 9 p.m. S. Dakota St. at Montana, 9 p.m. Prairie View at UCLA, 9 p.m. BYU at Weber St., 9 p.m. Utah St. at Utah Valley, 9:05 p.m. Florida at Arizona, 10 p.m. La Verne at CS Bakersfield, 10 p.m. UC Irvine at Fresno St., 10 p.m. San Diego at San Diego St., 10 p.m. San Diego Christian at UC Santa Barbara, 10 p.m. Walla Walla at Idaho, 10:05 p.m. George Fox at Portland St., 10:35 p.m. Creighton at California, 11 p.m. Chaminade vs. Hawaii at Molokai High School Gym, Ho'olehua, Hawaii, 12:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 EAST UAB at Rutgers, Noon New Hampshire at Boston College, 1 p.m. Quinnipiac at Boston U., 1 p.m. NC A&T at Seton Hall, 1 p.m. Maine at Marist, 2 p.m. Vermont at Niagara, 2 p.m. Fairfield at Drexel, 4 p.m. Manhattan at LIU Brooklyn, 4 p.m. Delaware at Villanova, 4 p.m. SOUTH UNC Greensboro at James Madison, 2 p.m. Mercer at Chattanooga, 3 p.m. W. Michigan at High Point, 3 p.m. W. Kentucky at Murray St., 3 p.m. Charlotte at Kennesaw St., 4 p.m. Texas A&M-CC at South Alabama, 5:05 p.m. LeMoyne-Owen at Tennessee St., 8 p.m. MIDWEST Appalachian St. at UMKC, 2:05 p.m. N. Illinois at DePaul, 5 p.m. Morgan St. at Illinois St., 5:35 p.m. E. Kentucky at Illinois, 6 p.m. SOUTHWEST SE Louisiana at North Texas, 2 p.m. Cal St.-Fullerton at Texas Southern, 3 p.m. Austin Peay at Arkansas St., 3:05 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Oklahoma St., 4 p.m. McNeese St. at Texas Tech, 6 p.m. FAR WEST Chicago St. at Oregon St., 7 p.m. Cent. Michigan at Pepperdine, 8 p.m.

Women’s Schedule Women's College Basketball Schedule All Times EST Friday, Dec. 14 SOUTH Oral Roberts at Louisiana Tech, 8 p.m. Alabama A&M at Memphis, 8 p.m. FAR WEST Fresno St. at Portland, 8:15 p.m. Louisville at Colorado, 9 p.m. Weber St. at Wyoming, 9 p.m. Carroll (Mont.) at Idaho St., 9:05 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15 EAST Binghamton at Syracuse, 1 p.m. Howard at George Washington, 2 p.m. SOUTH Campbell vs. Jacksonville St. at UNF Arena, Jacksonville, Fla., 1 p.m. Stetson at FAU, 2 p.m. N.C. A&T at Liberty, 2 p.m. Ohio at Marshall, 2 p.m. Presbyterian at N.C. State, 2 p.m. Norfolk St. at UNC Greensboro, 2 p.m. Alabama at Troy, 3 p.m. Md.-Eastern Shore at North Florida, 3:30 p.m. Tuskegee at MVSU, 4 p.m. Winthrop at N.C. Central, 4 p.m. Albany (N.Y.) at Delaware St., 5 p.m. Loyola (NO) at Southern Miss., 5:30 p.m. Dartmouth at FIU, 6 p.m. Grambling St. at Florida St., 7 p.m. MIDWEST Cincinnati at Akron, 2 p.m. W. Michigan at Michigan, 2 p.m. Wright St. at Xavier, 2 p.m. Jamestown at North Dakota, 3 p.m. E. Michigan at UMKC, 3 p.m. E. Illinois at Wisconsin, 3 p.m. Arkansas St. at Missouri St., 3:05 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff at Wichita St., 3:05 p.m. Peru St. at South Dakota, 6 p.m. N. Illinois at DePaul, 8 p.m. Toledo at Marquette, 8 p.m. SOUTHWEST Stephen F. Austin at Rice, 3 p.m. Texas St. at Texas A&M-CC, 8 p.m. FAR WEST Texas A&M at Southern Cal, 3 p.m.

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14

SPORTS

Friday, December 14, 2012

U.S. bringing back Watson

WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Kindred Closes In On Pin

Will captain Ryder Cup team for second time in 2014 NEW YORK (AP) — The Americans are bringing back Tom Watson as Ryder Cup captain with hopes of ending two decades of defeats in Europe. "We're just really tired of losing the Ryder Cup," PGA of America President Ted Bishop said Thursday during a news conference at the Empire State Building. Watson faces a tall order. The Americans have lost seven of the last nine Ryder Cups and have not won away from home since 1993, when Watson was the captain at The Belfry in England. They are coming off a staggering loss this year at Medinah, where Europe strung together a remarkable rally from a 10-6 deficit going into the final day to win by one point. Watson is the first repeat captain for the U.S. team since Jack Nicklaus in 1987, when the Ryder Cup was played on his home course of Muirfield Village in Ohio. Watson, one of the most respected figures in golf worldwide, becomes the seventh U.S. captain to get more than one shot. His selection received an immediate endorsement from Tiger Woods, whom Watson has strongly criticized because of Woods' behavior. "I'd like to congratulate Tom Watson on his selection as Ryder Cup captain," Woods said in a statement. "I think he's a really good choice. Tom knows what it takes to win, and that's our ultimate goal. I hope I have the privilege of joining him on the 2014 United States Team." Watson had said Woods needs to "clean up his act" in the months after Woods' personal life fell apart after being caught in multiple extramarital affairs, though the Stanford alums have never been particularly close. Watson went out of his way Thursday to praise Woods as "the best player maybe in the history of the game." "My relationship with Tiger is fine," he said. "Whatever has been said before is water under the bridge. No issues." Watson breaks the PGA of America's prototype in a big way. The eight-time major

champion will be 65 when the 2014 Ryder Cup is played at Gleneagles in Scotland, making him the oldest captain in Ryder Cup history. Sam Snead was 57 when he was captain in 1969, and the oldest European captain was John Jacobs (56) in 1981. Watson has not been back to the Ryder Cup since that '93 victory at The Belfry, though he sounded as if he couldn't wait to get started. The PGA of America first contacted him more than a year ago about the job, Watson, with that familiar gap-tooth grin, replied: "Boy, I've been waiting for this call for a long time." The matches will be played in Scotland, contributing to Watson's selection. As much as he is beloved around the world for his timeless game, epic duels with Nicklaus and graciousness in any outcome, the Scots consider him one of their own. Watson won his first major at Carnoustie in 1975 when he quickly understood how to play links golf. He won five British Open titles, the most of any American, with four of those in Scotland. He nearly made it six claret jugs three years ago, when at 59, he came within an 8-foot par putt on the last hole from winning at Turnberry. Watson missed the putt, and then lost to Stewart Cink in a playoff. The ovation he heard that week in Turnberry might be different at Gleneagles. "They're going to be cheering against me," he said during a brief appearance on the "Today" show to announce his captaincy. The PGA of America broke from its model of taking former major champions in their late 40s who still play the PGA Tour and are in touch with the players. Watson last played a full schedule in 1998, though the PGA of America had to wonder if perhaps the young captains were too close to the players. As for the pressure of bringing back the Ryder Cup? "This responsibility is a challenge," Watson said. "But I've been there before, and I love it."

PHOTO PROVIDED BY NICKI HOGSTON

Piqua’s Caje Kindred (138 pounds) closes in on a pin against Eaton Thursday night. For more on the Wayne double-dual, see page 12.

Bengals trail Eagles at half Philadelphia rallies from early 10-0 deficit PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Nick Foles threw an 11yard touchdown pass to Riley Cooper and the Philadelphia Eagles rallied from a 10-point deficit to take a 13-10 lead over the Cincinnati Bengals at halftime. The Eagles snapped a drought of 22 quarters without a turnover by recovering two fumbles in the second. Both led to field goals by Alex Henery. BenJarvus Green-Ellis scored on a 1-yard TD run in the first quarter for Cincinnati. Coming off a 20-19 loss to Dallas on a last-second field goal, the Bengals (76) looked to rebound against another NFC East opponent. But the inspired Eagles (4-9) weren't going to be pushovers. The Bengals entered tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers for the last playoff spot in the AFC. Their game at Pittsburgh next week is far more important in the standings, however. Win or lose against the Eagles, the Bengals still get in by winning their last two games. The Eagles are playing out the string in a lost season. They beat Tampa Bay on a last-second TD last week to snap an eightgame losing streak. Foles, who threw for 381 yards to lead that comeback against the Bucs, hit Cooper for a score to cut it to 10-7. Foles connected with Jeremy Maclin on a 46-yard pass during the drive.



AP PHOTO

BenJarvus Green-Ellis scores a first-quarter touchdown Thursday night. The Eagles then forced their first turnover since Nov. 5 against New Orleans. Brandon Graham sacked Andy Dalton, the ball popped loose and Trent Cole recovered at the Bengals 29. An unnecessary roughness penalty on Adam "Pacman" Jones a few plays later gave the Eagles a first down at the 3, but Foles threw three straight incomplete passes. Henery kicked a 22-yard field goal to tie it at 10. After the two-minute warning, Cullen Jenkins sacked Dalton and knocked the ball away. Darryl Tapp recovered and ran 4 yards to the

Bengals 12. But the drive stalled at the 1 and Henery kicked a 20-yarder for the lead. Foles made his fifth straight start for Michael Vick, who just returned to practice this week after sustaining a concussion on Nov. 11. Just two plays in, the Eagles committed their league-leading 30th turnover. Maclin, who caught the winning TD against the Buccaneers, fumbled after a 6-yard catch. Carlos Dunlap recovered and the Bengals started at the Eagles 44. Green-Ellis ran 29 yards on first down and scored a few plays later for a 7-0

lead. It got uglier for Philadelphia on the next possession. Mat McBriar punted into his own blocker, Daniel Herron picked it up and ran 3 yards to the Eagles 11. But Graham sacked Dalton and Cincinnati settled for Josh Brown's 24-yard field goal that made it 100. The Eagles were again without running back LeSean McCoy and tight end Brent Celek also sat out. Both players also are recovering from concussions. McCoy missed his fourth straight game, but returned to practice this week with Vick.

                



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