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COMING

TOMORROW Park District Fall Fest Commitment To Community

HUMOR: Doing battle with a cagey arachnid. Page 4.

INSIDE: Bradford Pumpkin Show right around the corner. Page 3.

SPORTS: Local golfers compete at district tournament. Page 14.

F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 5 , 2 0 1 2

VOLUME 129, NUMBER 199

w w w. d a i l y c a l l . c o m

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an award-winning Civitas Media newspaper

Briefly Today’s weather High 62 Low 55 Cooler with rain likely. Complete forecast on Page 3.

2nd generation officer retires Jim Taylor, his dad served total of 58 years on Piqua force BY WILL E SANDERS Staff Writer wsanders@dailycall.com

Buck Eyes An inside look at Ohio State football WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

BUCKEYE BRAIN BUSTERS

NAME: Jim Pacenta HOMETOWN: Akron OHIO STATE YEARS: 19731976 HIGHLIGHTS: Pacenta was a seldom-used quarterback who led the Buckeyes to four wins in five games his senior season when starter Rod Gerald was lost to a back injury that kept him out of the final five games of the regular season. Pacenta led OSU quarterbacks with 404 yards passing in 1976. AFTER OSU: Pacenta is a cardiologist in Dayton.

SAY WHAT?

RECRUITING UPDATE

1: How many football national championships has Nebraska won?

Marcus Baugh, a 2013 Ohio State verbal commitment from Riverside (Calif.) North High School, caught a 49-yard touchdown pass in a 51-6 win over Moreno Valley Vista Del Lago last Friday. J.T. Barrett, a 2013 Ohio State verbal commitment from Rider, Tex., completed 8 of 12 passes for 162 yards and a touchdown and rushed 22 times for 130 yards and two TDs in a 50-14 win over Byron Nelson High School last Friday. Montae Nicholson, a safety in the 2014 recruiting class, has received an offer from Ohio State. He also has offers from West Virginia, Penn State, Michigan and others.

2: How many Heisman Trophy

winners has Nebraska had? 3: Which bowl has Nebraska played

in most often? 4: What Youngstown high school

did Nebraska coach Bo Pelini graduate from? 5: What Cleveland high school

did former Nebraska coach Frank Solich graduate from? Answers: 1. Five; 2. Three; 3. Orange Bowl 17 times; 4. Cardinal Mooney; 5. Holy Name

“If you can’t get ready for a game like this, I don’t know why you’re playing football.” — Ohio State linebacker Etienne Sabino about playing Nebraska.

No. 12 Ohio State vs. No. 21 Nebraska, 8 p.m., Saturday, ABC QUARTERBACKS

RECEIVERS

It’s dueling dual-threat quarterbacks with Braxton Miller Corey Brown’s 12 catches against Michigan State tied going against Nebraska’s Taylor Martinez. him for fourth all-time in a single game at Ohio State and Miller has rushed for 933 yards, second overall in the Big was only two short of the record of 14 by David Boston. Ten, passed for 577 yards and eight touchdowns and comBrown (32 catches, 317 yards) has more than doubled pleted 63 percent of his passes. Martinez had thrown for his total of 14 receptions last season. Devin Smith (19 1,059 yards and 11 touchdowns and rushed for 298 yards. catches, 351 yards, 4 TDs) continues to be the big-play Miller ranks second overall in the Big Ten in rushing and his 90 carries are receiver in OSU’s offense. more than all but four Big Ten running backs have. Quincy Enunwa’s 16 catches lead Nebraska, but Kenny Bell (15 catches, 330 Advantage: Ohio State yards, 4 TDs) has been the most productive pass catcher for the Cornhuskers. Advantage: Ohio State

OFFENSIVE LINE OSU coach Urban Meyer says he really likes the Buckeyes’ top five offensive linemen but he sees a significant gap between the starters and their backups. The line played its best game of the season at Michigan State and dominated the Spartans’ defense when Ohio State ran out the last four minutes of the game without having to punt. Nebraska leads the Big Ten in scoring, total offense and rushing. Guards Spencer Long and Seung Hoon Choi and tackle Jeremiah Serles are two-year starters. Advantage: Nebraska

DEFENSIVE LINE Defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins and ends John Simon and Nathan Williams led the way when Ohio State held Michigan State’s Le’Veon Bell to 45 yards on 17 carries. Michael Bennett, who was expected to start this season, got into a game for the first time after being sidelined by a groin injury. OSU and Nebraska are tied for the Big Ten lead in sacks (5). The Cornhuskers, who were shredded for 344 yards rushing in their only loss, 36-30 to UCLA, limited Wisconsin to 60 yards on the ground in a come-from-behind 30-27 win last week. End Cameron Meredith and tackle Baker Steinkuhler are three-year starters and end Eric Martin has 3.5 sacks this season. Advantage: Ohio State

Jim Naveau The Lima News jnaveau@limanews.com 419-993-2087

Play it again, Brutus COLUMBUS — The answer Ohio State linebacker Etienne Sabino gave was exactly what you would expect. Asked how surrendering a 21-point lead and losing 34-27 to Nebraska last season would affect him when Ohio State plays the Cornhuskers on Saturday night at Ohio Stadium, he said, “Last year was last year. I’m not going to forget it but I’m not going to dwell on it.” Football players and coaches always tell you the past doesn’t matter. Until it matters. Nebraska came from 17 points down to beat Wisconsin last Saturday night. And OSU defensive line coach Mike Vrabel has no doubts they were thinking about last year’s Ohio State game. “I’m sure they drew on last year’s Ohio State game at some point in time. Bo Pelini said, ‘Guys we were in this spot against Ohio State, same stadium, same time of night and this is what we did.’ As a player you can say, ‘Yeah coach, you’re right,’” Vrabel said. So, if the past is not really in the past, what are the games in the last 20 years the current or former Ohio State players probably would most like to have a chance to do over? Here’s my list: 1. Ohio State-Michigan 1995. If Ohio State had won, it would have gone to the Rose Bowl and had a shot at a national championship. Instead, the Wolverines won 31-23 in Ann Arbor. Also, surrendering a school-record 317 yards rushing to Tshimanga Biakabutuka still stings. 2. Ohio State-Michigan State 1998. The stunner against which all stunners since then have been measured. If OSU — which led by 15 points in the second half at home — had won, a national championship was within reach. But Michigan State, a sub-.500 team, shocked the unbeaten Buckeyes 28-24. 3. Ohio State-Florida 2006. SEC. Gator Chomp. 41-14. Florida upsets No. 1 Ohio State in the BCS title game. Who knew Urban Meyer would be on the other side just five years later? 4. Ohio State-Michigan 1996. OSU’s offense couldn’t score touchdowns. Shawn Springs slipped. John Cooper changed starting quarterbacks with an unbeaten record. Another national championship dream ended in a 13-9 Michigan win. 5. Ohio State-Penn State 2005. Losing to Texas earlier in the season might not have sunk the Buckeyes’ BCS championship hopes but this 17-10 loss did.

BuckEyes page inside today LINEBACKERS

JOHN SIMON The 6-foot-2, 263-pound senior defensive lineman from Youngstown has helped Ohio State hold opposing offenses to 100.8 yards rushing per game. The Buckeyes are tied for first in the Big Ten in quarterback sacks with five. Simon has a sack and 2.5 tackles for losses.

Etienne Sabino had eight tackles and a sack at Michigan State and Ryan Shazier was singled out by Meyer for his improvement in recent games. Middle linebacker remains a question, with neither Storm Klein or Curtis Grant producing what OSU is looking for at that position. Nebraska’s Will Compton leads the team in tackles (44) and has six tackles for losses. Three of those tackles for loss came against Wisconsin. Like Ohio State, the Cornhuskers have played two linebackers most of the season because they’ve faced few traditional offenses. Advantage: Even

DEFENSIVE BACKS

Bradley Roby came back strong against Michigan State after sitting out the UAB game with a shoulder injury. Safety C.J. Barnett, who has missed the last two games with an ankle injury, is expected to return. OSU is tied for second in the Big Ten in interceptions with seven. Nebraska has only three. But the Buckeyes rank eleventh in the Big Ten in pass defense RUNNING BACKS and Nebraska is fourth, but the Cornhuskers have allowed seven passing TDs, With Jordan Hall expected to be out with a partial tear of compared to five for Ohio State. the posterior cruciate ligament in his knee, backfield depth Advantage: Even is a question for Ohio State. Carlos Hyde, who rushed for 49 yards in a 17-16 win over Michigan State last week, is the only SPECIAL TEAMS proven back the Buckeyes have. Hall’s absence also leaves Ohio State kicker Drew Basil is 2 of 2 on field Ohio State looking for a big-play threat other than Miller in the goals and Nebraska’s Brett Maher is 7 of 12. Sixtybackfield. six percent of Maher’s kickoffs have been touchFor Nebraska, Rex Burkhead (273 yards on 29 carries) rushed for 1,357 yards last backs and 33 percent of OSU’s have been. season but has started slowly this year after missing two games with a knee injury. Advantage: Ohio State Ameer Abdullah (486 yards, 5 touchdowns) has emerged as the top running threat. Advantage: Nebraska

The Ohio State Buckeyes look to remain unbeaten when they host 51for Nebraska. See Page 13 a preview. BIG TEN STANDINGS

Leaders Division Big Ten Overall W L W L Ohio State 1 0 5 0 Penn State 1 0 3 2 Purdue 0 0 3 1 Wisconsin 0 1 3 2 Indiana 0 1 2 2 Illinois 0 1 2 3 Legends Division Big Ten Overall W L W L Northwestern 1 0 5 0 Nebraska 1 0 4 1 Iowa 1 0 3 2 Michigan 0 0 2 2 Minnesota 0 1 4 1 Michigan State 0 1 3 2

WEEKEND SCHEDULE BIG TEN

SATURDAY Nebraska at OHIO STATE, 8 p.m. Michigan State at Indiana, noon Northwestern at Penn State, noon Illinois at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m. Michigan at Purdue, 8 p.m. TOP 25 Kansas at Kansas State, noon Arizona at Stanford, 3 p.m. LSU at Florida, 3:30 p.m. Georgia at S. Carolina, 7 p.m. West Virginia at Texas, 7 p.m. Miami (Fla.) at Notre Dame, 7:30 p.m. Florida State at N.C. State, 8 pm. Washington at Oregon, 10:30 p.m.

2012 OSU LEADERS

OSU SCHEDULE

Passing Yards Braxton Miller .........................933 Kenny Guiton ............................37 Rushing Yards Braxton Miller .........................577 Jordan Hall.............................218 Carlos Hyde.......................... .158 Receiving Yards Devin Smith ...........................351 Corey Brown ...........................317 Jake Stoneburner .....................92 Field Goals Drew Basil...............................2/2 Tackles Ryan Shazier..............................48 Etienne Sabino..........................36 Interceptions Travis Howard..............................3

Sept. 1 ..............Miami of Ohio, 56-10 Sept. 8 ..............Central Florida 31-16 Sept. 15 ................... California 35-28 Sept. 22 ........................... UAB 29-15 Sept. 29 ...... at Michigan State, 17-16 Oct. 6 ..................... Nebraska, 8 p.m. Oct. 13 ...................at Indiana, 8 p.m. Oct. 20 ........................... Purdue, TBA Oct. 27 ............. at Penn State, 6 p.m. Nov. 3 .............................. Illinois, TBA Nov. 17 ...................at Wisconsin, TBA Nov. 24 .......................Michigan, noon

COUNTDOWN

Michigan vs. Ohio State

Content compiled by Jim Naveau and design by Ross Bishoff • The Lima News

Copyright © 2012 The Lima News. Reproduction of any portion of this material is prohibited without express consent.

Days until kickoff

Piqua BOE sets special meeting PIQUA — The Piqua Board of Education will meet in special session at 4:30 p.m. Monday in the board meeting room, 719 Ash St. Discussion and action will be taken on the following: Springcreek Primary School waterline agreement; OSFC PK-3 building blueprint review and personnel.

Fort Rowdy Gathering set COVINGTON — The 2012 Fort Rowdy Gathering will be held this weekend. The Fort Rowdy Gathering Parade will be held at 9:30 a.m. Saturday through downtown Covington. The opening ceremonies are set for 10:30 a.m. Saturday in the Covington Community Park. In the main entertainment of the weekend, Big Daddy Weave will perform at 6:30 p.m. Saturday. The Gathering continues Sunday. There will be a variety of activities both days, along with plenty of foods to choose from at the concession stands.

Lottery CLEVELAND (AP) — Thursday’s lottery numbers: Night Drawings: ■ Rolling Cash 5 11-17-27-34-36 ■ Pick 3 Numbers 1-5-1 ■ Pick 4 Numbers 1-9-2-5 Day Drawings: ■ Midday 3 7-0-6 ■ Midday 4 7-4-8-4

Index

PIQUA — Jim Taylor blazed a career path set forth by a man and role model he admired the most — his father, the late Robert Taylor.

6

7 4 8 2 5

8 2 1 0 1

2

LoFront c al

the time Jim, who worked side-by-side with his father for two years, was on patrol and heard the distress call for emergency come across his police car’s TAYLOR scanner. Mr. Taylor died 12 hours later at See Officer/Page 2

Teachers to undergo new evaluations Educators put to test under system imposed by state BY JENNIFER RUNYON For the Daily Call editorial@dailycall.com Editor’s note: The 2012-13 school year is a year of change for those in education. Many states across the nation including Ohio have adopted new Common Core standards, a new teacher/principal evaluation system must be in place by July of 2013 and the Third Grade Guarantee promises that students will be able to read at grade level before moving on. This three-part series, Academic Makeover, will look at these changes and how they are affecting Covington, Miami East and Piqua school districts. Part two of three focuses on the new evaluation system. MIAMI COUNTY — Students aren’t the only ones being put to the test in schools. State law demands that all districts have an evaluation system for teachers and principals in place by July 2013, leaving many district leaders wanting more information. “We have more questions than answers and when you make contact with someone from the state, they don’t know either. That makes it a challenge to have a program in place by July 1,” Miami East Superintendent Dr. Todd Rappold said. “I think, like many things in education, this was designed with the big picture in mind and then saying, ‘Figure out the details,’” Covington Superintendent David Larson said. With the new evaluations, teachers and principals across

SOURCE: OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The graphic above shows the new teacher performance evaluation process in Ohio.

MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO

Piqua High School teacher Dustin Hornbeck, who is president of the Piqua Education Association, talks to his class. Ohio will be evaluated and rated on a similar basis bringing consistency to the area. The state has issued a framework that all districts must abide by when creating their system. Fifty percent of the evaluation will be based on student growth while the other 50 percent will be made up of teacher performance measurements. Piqua and

Miami East plan to pilot the system this spring. Covington is considering doing the same. “To talk about teaching without student growth is missing the point,” said David Larson, Covington superintendent. “The consistency factor is definitely a positive. The biggest challenge is how do we establish a meaningful, valid student

growth measure.” According to the state’s framework, the student growth measure can be made up of one of three different combinations: 1. Teacher Value-Added scores, meaning how much growth a teacher’s students had from one year to the next according to the Ohio Achievement Assessments, and local growth measures decided by the district. 2. Or, they can chose, vendor assessment results, meaning results of tests the school buys not tests given by the state, and locally decided measures. 3. Or, districts may decide to not use teacher Value-Added or vendor assessments and put all the 50 percent on the local measures. Measuring student growth will be particularly difficult in areas not tested by the state like art, music and physical education as well as elective See Teachers/Page 2

Covington man dies in cycle-semi crash STAFF REPORT

BuckEyes page.................13 Classified.......................9-12 Comics................................8 Entertainment.....................6 Horoscope..........................8 Local....................................3 Obituaries............................2 Opinion................................4 Parenting.............................6 Sports...........................14-16 Weather................................3

Jim, who retired him personally. from the Piqua Police “When I first beDepartment on Sept. came a police officer 28, reflected on his 32 my father was here years of service in a and he was my role Do you have an idea for a line of work that was model,” Jim said. “I Local Front story? filled with its fair Let Susan Hartley know at was a detective and a ext. 14 or e-mail to share of highs and 773-2721 senior patrol officer, shartley@dailycall.com lows. and those were all the Though never attaining rank, same milestones that my dad hit, Jim served as a detective for 14 and I hit them, too. I am content.” years, became a senior patrol ofHis father, the first detective ficer and received numerous let- assigned to the department, sufters of commendation — all of fered a heart attack following a which hold a special meaning to training exercise Nov. 2, 1982. At

BRADFORD — A motorcyclist was killed Thursday after he struck a semi-tractor trailer head-on while traveling down the 10000 block of Klinger Road, east of Bradford, at approximately 1:45 p.m., authorities said. The driver of the motorcycle has been identified as Luther “Mack” Gordon Jr., 63, of Covington, according to the Miami

County Sheriff’s Office. The motorcyclist and another motorcycle driver were traveling eastbound on Klinger Road when Mr. Gordon, for an unknown reason, went left of center and struck the westbound semi truck at 10311 Klinger Road. The victim reportedly was caught underneath the semi and both vehicles MIKE ULLERY/STAFF PHOTO burst into flames. CareFlight was initially This was the scene following a crash at 1:45 p.m. Thursday involving a semi-tractor trailer and a motorcyclist 10311 Klinger Road, east of Bradford. The motorcySee Crash/Page 2 clist, identified as Luther "Mack" Gordon Jr., 63, of Covington, died at the scene.

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CITY

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Romney: ‘Victory is in sight’ GOP hopeful boosted by debate; Obama says foe runs from record BY KASIE HUNT Associated Press DENVER (AP) Buoyed by a powerful debate showing, Mitt Romney said Thursday he offers “prosperity that comes through freedom” to a country struggling to shed a weak economy. President Barack Obama accused the former Massachusetts governor of running from his own record in pursuit of political power. Both men unleashed new attack ads in the battleground states in a race with little more than a month to run, Obama suggesting Romney couldn’t be trusted with the presidency, and the Republican accusing the president of backing a large tax increase on the middle class. The debate reached 67.2 million viewers, an increase of 28 percent over the first debate in the 2008 presidential campaign. The measurement and information company Nielsen said Thursday that 11 networks provided live coverage of the debate. Not even Democrats disputed that Romney was likely to benefit politically from the debate Wednesday night in which he aggressively challenged Obama’s stewardship of the economy and said his own plans would help pull the country out of a slow-growth rut. Still, there was no immediate indication that the race would expand beyond the nine battleground states where the rivals and their running mates spend nearly all of their cam-

STEVE HELBER/AP PHOTO

Republican presidential candidate former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and his running mate Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., wave to supporters during a rally in Fishersville, Va., on Thursday. paign time and advertis- believes in. I see instead a ing industry “I just want ing dollars. prosperity that comes to make sure I’ve got this Debate host Colorado is through freedom.” straight: He’ll get rid of one of them, and Virginia, Another possible pivot regulations on Wall Street, where Romney headed for point in the campaign but he’s going to crack an evening speech, is an- neared in the form of Fri- down on Sesame Street,” other. So, too, Wisconsin, day’s government report Obama said. Obama’s destination for a on unemployment for SepTaxes were a particular mid-day rally. Nevada, tember. Joblessness was point of contention beOhio, Iowa, New Hamp- measured at 8.1. percent tween the two men, alshire, Florida and North the previous month. though they were sharply Carolina are the others. Obama campaigned divided as well on steps Among them, the nine with the energy of a man the cut the deficit, on govstates account for 110 determined to make up for ernment regulation, on edelectoral votes out of the a subpar debate showing. ucation and Medicare. 270 needed to win the Speaking to a crowd not Both in the debate and White House, more than far from the debate hall, on the day after, Obama enough to tip the cam- he said mockingly that a said repeatedly that his paign to one man or the “very spirited fellow” who rival favors a $5 trillion other. stood next to him onstage tax cut that is tilted to the “Victory is in sight,” Wednesday night “does wealthy and would mean Romney exulted in an not want to be held ac- tax increases on the midemailed request for dona- countable for the real Mitt dle class or else result in a tions to supporters. It was Romney’s positions” on spike in federal deficits. a show of confidence by a taxes, education and other Romney said it wasn’t man hoping for a quick re- issues. “Governor Romney so, and counterattacked in versal in pre-debate public may dance around his po- a new television commeropinion polls that showed sitions, but if you want to cial. It cited a report by him trailing in battle- be president you owe the the American Enterprise ground states as well as American people the Institute that said Obama nationally. truth,” he said. and “his liberal allies” Reprising a line from Later, before a crowd of want to raise taxes on the debate, he told an au- tens of thousands in Madi- middle class earners by dience of conservatives in son, Wis., he said Romney $4,000 and that the ReDenver that Obama offers wants to cut federal fund- publican alternative “trickle-down govern- ing for Public Television would not raise the ment.” He added, “I don’t while repealing legislation amount they owe to the think that’s what America that regulates the bank- IRS.

Teachers Continued from page 1 classes. Covington, Miami East and Piqua all currently have committees in place to determine how their districts will measure student growth and what those local measures will be. “We’re still looking for some guidance from the state on the local measures,” Rappold said. Like many others, Piqua teachers worry that skills learned outside of or in addition to the tested materials, will be overlooked. Piqua Education Association President Dustin Hornbeck offered the following statement, “The new evaluation system relies on scores for standardized tests as a measure of teacher effectiveness. Measuring cognitive skills is a necessity, but other valuable skills that students develop are profoundly important as well.” The statement went on to mention worry felt by many teachers regarding their ratings reflecting factors outside of the

classroom. “While this new evaluation system is still being developed, it is necessary to be mindful about outside elements in the lives of students that teachers cannot control. Teachers work hard every day because we want students to succeed. It is eminently important not to create an environment where teachers are blamed for ineffectiveness because of outside variables.”

Performance

“I think the evaluation system we’re using now has worked well for Covington schools. It (the new evaluation system) was designed by people who thought the system is broken — some were bad so they all must change. At the end of the day, I don’t know that that makes it anymore meaningful. I don’t think it was broken to begin with. We’re going through this and we’re spending our taxpayers’ money because elected officials thought some systems were broken. My problem is with why the system was developed,” Larson said. After combining the evaluation score and the student growth measurement, teachers will earn one of four ratings: Accomplished, Proficient, Developing or Ineffective. These ratings will show up on district report cards. It is estimated that most teachers will score Proficient or Developing.

certified before evaluating teachers. Superintendents will evaluate principals. This training and certification must be done by superintendents also. Like the new Common Core training, this training must be paid for by districts. Miami East and Piqua are using Race to the Top (RttT) funds to pay for the training. Piqua’s Assistant Superintendent Brad Hall said without the RttT money, training would have been paid for out of the district’s general fund. Covington’s general fund is being used to cover the cost of training for their principals and superintendent. The new evaluations will put additional tasks on superintendents and principals. According to Hall, there is much more paperwork and there will be twice the amount of meetings needed. “I guess figuring out a way to do that in a way that manages time well is the challenge,” Hall said.

The other 50 percent of the system will be based on teacher performance. Principals will visit classrooms to evaluate every teacher twice a year. If the teacher is rated Accomplished, the evaluations will be held every other year. The mid-year evaluation will include a conference with the principal to create a Professional Growth or Improvement Plan. Then, at the final review and conference, teachers will be scored on Training their practices in the classroom and how well Principals must go Tomorrow: The Third they met their plan. through training and be Grade Guarantee.

Hundreds at risk in meningitis outbreak NEW YORK (AP) — The potential scope of the meningitis outbreak that has killed at least five people widened dramatically Thursday as health officials warned that hundreds, perhaps thousands, of patients who got steroid back injections in 23 states could be at risk. Clinics and medical centers rushed to contact patients who may have received the apparently fungus-contaminated shots. And the Food and Drug Administration

urged doctors not to use any products at all from the Massachusetts pharmacy that supplied the suspect steroid solution. It is not clear how many patients received tainted injections, or even whether everyone who got one will get sick. So far, 35 people in six states Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, Florida, North Carolina and Indiana have contracted fungal meningitis, and five of them have died, according to the Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention. All had received steroid shots for back pain, a highly common treatment. In an alarming indication the outbreak could get a lot bigger, Massachusetts health officials said the pharmacy involved, the New England Compounding Center of Framingham, Mass., has recalled three lots consisting of a total of 17,676 single-dose vials of the steroid, preservative-free methylprednisolone acetate. An unknown number of

those vials reached 75 clinics and other facilities in 23 states between July and September, federal health officials said. Several hundred of the vials, maybe more, have been returned unused, one Massachusetts official said. But many other vials were used. At one clinic in Evansville, Ind., more than 500 patients got shots from the suspect lots, officials said. At two clinics in Tennessee, more than 900 patients perhaps many more did.

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

Obituaries

Teresa J. Idle PIQUA — Teresa J. Idle, 63, of 1132 Chevy Lane, Piqua, died at 1 : 2 0 a . m . Thursd a y Oct. 4, 2012, at her residence. She w a s IDLE b o r n Aug. 18, 1949, in Cincinnati to the late Richard Q. and Virginia (Heitman) Kiser. She married Edward A. Idle on Oct. 9, 1981, in Piqua; he preceded her in death March 1, 2009. Survivors include five children, Lori (Scott) Saintignon of Bradford, John (Latisa) Richard, Amy Idle and her fiancé David Clark, Casey E. Idle, all of Piqua and Tracy Hollis of Washington, D.C.; five grandchildren; and three sisters, Christine Idle of Piqua, Judy Reed of

Troy and Regina Fahnstock of Phoenix, Ariz. She was preceded in death by two brothers, Rex Kiser and Britt Kiser. Mrs. Idle was a graduate of Piqua Central High School and worked as a home health caregiver for many years. She was a wonderful homemaker, mother and grandmother. In addition to her family she enjoyed reading, working crossword puzzles, and being a member of the Piqua Christian Church. A service to honor her life will begin at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home with Rev. Travis Mowell officiating. Burial will follow at Forest Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be from 12-1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to the Piqua Christian Church, 3869 W. State Route 185, Piqua, OH 45356. Condolences to the family may also be expressed through jamiesonandyannucci.com.

Death notices ANNA — Vandora M. Long, 81, of Anna, passed away at 12:15 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012, at the Fair Haven Shelby County Home. Funeral services will be held Monday at Cromes Funeral Home with the Rev. James Oates officiating. Burial will be at Pearl Cemetery in Swanders.

Officer Continued from page 1 Piqua Memorial Hospital. There hasn’t been a day that goes by that Jim hasn’t thought of his father, who joined the police department in 1956, and the short time they both served their city. “Between my father and I we have put in 58 years of service,” Jim said. “He died within months of retirement. For me to reach this level and move on … it has a special meaning to me.” For Jim, 54, it seems like such a long time ago when he decided at 8 years old he wanted to be a police officer. He graduated from Piqua High School in 1976. Jim joined the department on June 23, 1980. “I have always felt lucky for the time I had with my father, both growing up and also working with him for two years,” he said during an interview in May 2006. “I am very fortunate that I had that.” Among his accomplishments in law enforcement, Jim served as a detective from 1992 through 2006 and was awarded with Rookie of the Year in 1982, Police Officer of the Year in 1994, and in 2005 and 2006 was the recipient of an award named after his father, the Robert C. Taylor Investigator of the Year award. He said it is hard to examine his more than three decades of police service and pick just a few memories that mean the most to him. “I have had two dark days,” he said. “One is the day I lost my father and the other was a shooting I was involved in. But I have had really good days, too. One of my best was meeting my wife. She was hired on as a dispatcher here and we’ve been together for 27 years. … In between those low points and those high points I have had my good days and my successes with criminal

Crash Continued from page 1 called to the scene, but was later called off. The Miami County Coroner was then called to the scene of the fiery crash. The second motorcyclist was not injured. The truck driver was shaken up, but apparently uninjured, authorities said. The investigation into the crash continues.

cases.” Jim and his wife, Diane, reside in Piqua and have six grown children, sons David, Matt, Jason and Joshua and twin daughters, Jennifer and Julie. In addition Jim also has three grandchildren and he is looking forward to more. Jim said he was originally going to retire in January, but then a job opportunity was offered that he said was too good to pass up. Jim will soon be taking a job with the Miami County Prosecutor’s Office as an investigator. “After 32 years, I will not miss the job, but I will miss the people I worked with,” Jim said. “They are my second family and sometimes I was with them more than my regular family. The camaraderie is another thing I am going to miss the most.” Jim’s hard work, presence and enthusiasm will be missed at the Piqua Police Department and the sacrifices the Taylor family have made will always be remembered, according Police Chief Bruce Jamison. “There is no replacement for the kind of experience that Jim has brought to this department, but we are very pleased with his new profession,” Jamison said. “The Piqua Police Department and the city of Piqua will still benefit from that expertise because the county prosecutor has recognized what a find Jim is.” Jamison and Jim served as detectives together for more than a decade investigating and solving serious criminal activity. As a result, Jamison said Jim is a very good friend and described his retirement as bittersweet. “This entire city owes the Taylor family quite a bit with his father dying in the line of duty, but that’s just what police families have to endure because of what us cops have chosen as our profession,” Jamison said. “It is always a sacrifice and hard on a family, but the Taylor family has been doing it for several generations.”

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LOCAL Edison hosts annual college fair PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

PIQUA — Finding the right school can be like putting together the pieces of a puzzle. Things like size, location and cost are all elements that can have a major impact on a student’s decision for where they will attend college and how successful they will ultimately be. Edison Community College will again be helping students and their parents with this monumental decision, by hosting the annual College Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 9, from 12:30-2 p.m. in the Convocation Center of the Piqua Campus. Nearly 50 colleges and universities from Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan will be on Edison’s campus

to talk with students, parents and guidance counselors about opportunities in higher education. Advisors and representatives will be able to address questions regarding courses, tuition, job placement rates for majors, accreditation and the transfer process, and more. “The annual college fair is a great way for students and parents to come in and get a good, well-rounded look at what colleges and universities have to offer,” said Teresa Roth, director of admissions for Edison. “To have so many great institutions coming to one location here on campus is a huge benefit for Edison’s students and to all of our area high schools as well.”

Some of the highlighted schools attending this year’s college fair will be Ball State University, Eastern Michigan University, Hocking College, Indiana Tech, Northern Kentucky University, The Ohio State University, University of Toledo and Wright State University. Edison Community College is a fully accredited two-year institution that offers more than 30 associate’s degrees and one-year certificate programs designed to transfer to fouryear colleges and universities or help launch a professional career. For more information on Edison’s extensive academic catalog, go online to www.edisonohio.edu.

Friday, October 5, 2012

Much cooler weather expected A cold front will bring an increasing chance of rain to the area this afternoon with rain likely tonight and into Saturday morning. Behind the front, much cooler weather moves in for the weekend, with highs in the 50s Saturday through Monday. Another disturbance may spread some rain into the area early Sunday with the best chances to our south. Frost will be likely for Monday morning. High: 62 Low: 55

EXT ENDED FO RECAST

COVINGTON — After hearing an update from Brice Schmitmeyer of Fanning Howey engineers, Covington Village Council on Monday night authorized Busse and Mayor Ed McCord to apply for $120,000 in funds from the Ohio Public Works Commission for Spring Street Phase 1.

The estimate for the project is $249,000. If the grant is approved, the work could begin in late 2013. In other business, council: • Set 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31 as Trick or Treat night in the village. • Reviewed the Covington Planning Commission recommendation of approved exterior colors for the downtown historic dis-

trict. • Heard Linda Lester, the new bar owner for Y’alls Country Club (formerly Crossroad Bar and Grill, 196 N. High St.) about her plans to make improvements, including new windows and door, as well as exterior painting. • Learned from Administrator Mike Busse that an agreement has been re-

ceived from Morton Salt to purchase 175 tons of salt at $71.54 per ton. • Heard Busse report leaf pickup will begin this week; street repair is continuing with the new Durpatcher (although the weather has made scheduling the work difficult) and noted that the first billing cycle using the handheld meter reading units has been completed.

SUNDAY

SATURDAY MUCH COOLER WITH CHANCE OF RAIN

Covington council authorizes funds STAFF REPORT

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HIGH: 53

LOW: 42

PARTLY SUNNY AND COOL HIGH: 53

LOW: 35

REGIONAL ALMANAC Temperature High Yesterday 76 at 3:27 p.m. Low Yesterday 56 at 7:30 a.m. 68 Normal High Normal Low 48 Record High 91x in 1900 Record Low 28 in 1901

Precipitation 24 hours ending at 5 p.m.0.01 Month to date 1.20 0.38 Normal month to date Year to date 25.42 Normal year to date 31.99 Snowfall yesterday 0.00

Foundation offering limited scholarships Nominations sought for MIAMI COUNTY — The Miami County Foundation is making available a limited number of scholarships to the Graduate Academy for Community Leadership at Edison Community College. This community leadership seminar is based on the book “The Board Member’s Guide, Making a Difference on Your Board and in Your Community,” authored by Miami, Shelby and Darke county community leaders in cooperation with the Duke Foundation.

The program is designed for executive directors, board members and volunteers of not-for-profit organizations. “Class participants will learn from experienced and trained professionals about recruiting and selecting board members, staffing, budgeting, evaluation, board meetings, community awareness and collaboration and much more,” said Cheryl Stiefel-Francis, executive director of the Miami County Foundation. Classes

are held the third Wednesday from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. beginning Jan. 16, and concluding on May 15. Dr. Richard N. Adams explained the importance of this leadership course by saying, “Communities characterized by quality are not the result of good luck nor do they occur accidentally. Outstanding communities are created and maintained by a number of factors. Among the most important factors are dedicated not-for-profit board members who per-

form their duties with enthusiasm and competence.” Individuals eligible to apply for scholarship assistance must serve a tax-exempt organization located in Miami County in either a volunteer or paid staff position. Scholarship application deadline is Nov. 1. Registration is limited. To apply for a scholarship, register for the Academy or for more information contact Julie Slattery at Edison Community College, 7787805.

■ Calling Around Bradford

Pumpkin Show right around the corner

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In brief Yoga classes at the YWCA Piqua PIQUA — Join Katie Nardechia for the new 5 week session of Yoga at the YWCA Piqua beginning Oct. 8. Classes will run from 6:157:30 p.m. on Monday nights. Throughout the class a variety of “asanas,” (postures), will be taught and practiced. Some of these postures are seated and some are standing. Classes end with relaxation which leaves those in the class feeling rejuvenated and most importantly, present in the moment. For more information concerning class fees or registration, stop at the YWCA Piqua at 418 N. Wayne St., call (937) 773-6626, or e-mail info@ywcapiqua.com

Garage sale to benefit Hospice TROY — A garage sale to benefit Hospice of Miami County will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at 3078 Piqua-Troy Road. Parking will be located next door between Eldean and five-way stop.

Leggett selected to scholars PIQUA — Amanda Leggett of Piqua has been selected for membership to the National Society of High School Scholars. The society recognizes top scholars and invites students who have achieve academic excellence to join. Membership invites opportunities to apply for scholarships, academic competition, free events and member-only resources.

Josh Hoelscher, Makayla Getz, Luke Hafer, Chelsea Dross, Corey Rench, and Brittany Ross. The King and Queen were crowned Friday night before the football game. Also, congratulations to the high school football team for bringing in another great game and win. I had a the pleasure of seeing quite a few kids in their homecoming attire and everyone looked so beautiful and handsome. I hope the kids had a memorable evening and enjoyed themselves.

records and getting their non-profit status. Until we have those numbers we are unable to process those cards. We are sorry for the slow process. The PTO would also let parents know how much easier it is now to use their Scrip accounts. All www.Shopwithscrip.com student accounts and balances are updated. If you have an account you should be able to view 100 percent of your funds, and the source of your funds. Meaning you will not have to call the school to see how much money is in your accounts. • You may already have your account set up, Ellen Gleason will just need your active email address to complete the process. The PTO would also like to invite you to friend them on Facebook. It’s a great forum to keep updated on what is going on and for you to see if there is anything you can do to help the PTO and in turn help our youth.

Bradford PTO The PTO would like to say how wonderful the kids did raising money during the mum sales. We were exceptionally proud of the eighth graders that took advantage of their one week push to get last minute monies to go towards their Washington D.C. trip. The students involved with the mum sales will be picking up their orders on Wednesday, Oct. 3. They have also been Pumpkin Show asked about the Kroger Pumpkin Show is just cards. The PTO is in the around the corner. Be sure process of updating to check out the chronicle

HEATHER CANAN Columnist to see what events you and your families would like to participate in. This year there will be no house/property decorating contest. But, that does not mean you shouldn’t get as many pumpkins and decorations out into your yards. Let’s show our Pumpkin Show visitors just how proud we are to live in this village. Don’t forget to share your special events with me. I would love to add them to our community column on the first and third Monday of the month. You can email me at callingbradford@yahoo.com or calling (937) 417-4317 and leave a message.

INFORMATION Regional Group Publisher - Frank Beeson Executive Editor - Susan Hartley Advertising Manager - Leiann Stewart ■ History Established in 1883, the Piqua Daily Call is published daily except Tuesdays and Sundays and Dec. 25 at 310 Spring St., Piqua, Ohio 45356. ■ Mailing Address: Piqua Daily Call, P.O. Box 921, Piqua, OH 45356. Postmaster should send changes to the Piqua Daily Call, 310 Spring St., Piqua, OH 45356. Second class postage on the Piqua Daily Call (USPS 433-960) is paid at Piqua, Ohio. E-mail address: editorial@dailycall.com. ■ Subscription Rates: EZ Pay $10 per month; $11.25 for 1 month; $33.75 for 3 months; $65.50 for 6 months; $123.50 per year. Newsstand rate: Daily: $1.00 per copy, Saturday: $1.25. Mail subscriptions: in Miami County, $12.40 per month, unless deliverable by motor route; outside of Miami County, $153.50 annually.

■ Editorial Department: (937) 773-2721 FAX: (937) 773-4225 E-mail: editorial@dailycall.com Production — Dan Chafin Human Resources — Betty Brownlee ■ Circulation Department — 773-2725 Circulation Manager — Cheryl Hall 937-440-5237 Assistant Circulation Manager — Jami Young 937-773-2721 ext. 13 ■ Office hours 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays Saturdays and Sundays at 335-5634 (select circulation.) ■ Advertising Department: Hours: 8 .am. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday To place a classified ad, call (877) 844-8385. To place a display ad, call (937) 773-2721. FAX: (937) 773-2782. VISA and MasterCard accepted. A division of Civitas Media

About Us... The Piqua Daily Call uses soy inks and prints on recycled paper.

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ongratulations to Homecoming King Corey Rench and Queen Makayla Getz. All the seniors looked great! The 2012 Homecoming court included Tyler Huggins, Lindsey Rose, James Canan, Blake Brewer,

Citizen of the Year BRADFORD — The Bradford Lions are seeking nominations for Bradford Lions’ Citizen of the Year. Nominees should be those who have served the community, providing leadership and service, through their church or

other community organizations. Forms are available at the Bradford Library, many Bradford churches, or by calling Joanne Ferree (937) 620-7225. Deadline date for nominations is Oct. 15.

DAR to meet at Heck Yeah! PIQUA — The PiquaLewis Boyer Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) will meet at 10:30 a.m. Oct. 13, at Heck Yeah!, located at 5795 North County Road 25-A near Piqua. This will be the annual meeting and lunch and orders will be taken off the menu. Hostesses are Brenda Cooper, Susan Miracle, Norma Shields, and Cathy Starcher. Bring signed Christmas cards for troops (not sealed) and Innisbrook fundraising orders.

Nominations for teachers for outstanding teaching in American history, citizenship, social studies, or government classes for full-time teachers in Miami and Shelby counties. Deadline for completed applications is end of October. Nominations need to be turned in asap to chapter historian, Annette Stewart or to the principal at your local school. This business meeting is for PiquaLewis Boyer DAR Chapter members only. The next meeting will be Nov. 10.

Drive to Victory at tonight’s game PIQUA — Tonight’s Piqua High School football game against Sidney has been selected as Goodwill Stores Drive to Victory game of the week. What is the Drive to Victory? It’s a competition — to see which school can collect the most clothes, household items, computers, and even vehicles that will be donated to Goodwill. It’s simple. All you have to do is collect items and place them in the “Goodwill Drive to Victory Truck” located in the high school parking lot – you can’t miss it. The donations will be

weighed at noon and the winning school with the most weight will be announced tonight during Touchdown 7 on WHIOTV and win a $200 scholarship. Really, everyone wins, because the items donated will be sold at Goodwill stores and the profits will be used to help people with disabilities right here in our community. So clean your closet out and bring in your donations. Tell your family and neighbors. They can help Piqua beat Sidney and help people with disabilities at the same time.


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Serving Piqua since 1883

OPINION FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2012

Piqua Daily Call

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The “Imagine If” campaign to pay off the Rehab Center building at 1306 Garbry Road, Piqua, continues. For more information or to make a contribution call 7737630. The Center is a 501 C 3 organization. All contributions are tax deductible as permitted by law. Mom of two munchkins and rooter for the underdog that is the ellipsis, Bethany J. Royer can be contacted at bethanyroyer@yahoo.com.

Moderately Confused

www.dailycall.com

Obama-Biden yard signs up in abundance

Mother of the Munchkins

e begin this tale with yours truly having learned her lesson about karma and spiders. I was sitting in the car at the school bus stop with youngest munchkin, Emma, in the backseat. It was Monday morning, and I was sending text messages to the ex … er, Michael … as he sat in the ER. He had been dealing with some chest pain and after massive amounts of goading he finally went to the local hospital. I was really worried, but long story short could not be there so we dealt with the situation via text messages and making $2 bets. He was betting the hospital would arrange an EKG at a later date while I was certain they would hook him up to one on the spot. In the middle of texting I caught from the corner of my eye an enormous black jumping spider crawling across the windshield of the Orange Crusader. Certain he was on the outside, and with quite an evil chuckle, my hand went for the windshield wiper control. Only to discover, he was inside, a stow-away from the assortment of office items from the big PDC move that I had housed in the garage overnight that were now cluttered in the car. All sorts of shenanigans commenced following my “Spider!” Emma made the fastest escape out the backdoor I’ve ever seen while I grabbed the very first thing BETHANY J. ROYER I could lay my hands on. Staff Writer This was a handful of docubroyer@dailycall.com ments, maybe important, maybe not, so as to brush the spider out of the vehicle. Not cause I’m nice, but rather the sudden memory of the last time paper met spider there was a squeal. Of course, the jumping spider lived up to his name, while also throwing up his front legs as if we were about to go a round in the boxing ring. He was acting all tough while I cursed up a storm because he wasn’t any closer to getting out of my car. Also, the bus had turned the corner and Emma was screaming demands from her position at the bus stop. These demands entailed a hug and a kiss, and whether or not I’d gotten the spider out cause she wasn’t setting foot back inside the car until he was annihilated. “I’m working on it!” I called which averted my attention just long enough for the unwanted hitchhiker to disappear. Whether he made it out the door or down into a vent, I’d no idea. Which was a horrid position to be in but one I had no time to dwell on, I had to get a child on the bus and onward to work. What a 30-minute drive, let me tell you. I was certain the spider would be crawling up my pants leg at any moment, or trying to help me steer. You know, a presentation that would be unexpected enough to send me driving into a ditch. Fortunately, I made it to work in one piece and forgot all about him until quitting time. Where I found him sitting on the dash, impatiently drumming his legs. He was ready to go another round but this time, armed with another wad of paper, I managed to get him out the door where he continued to act tough, even when I had every opportunity to squish him underfoot. It just didn’t seem right. Call it karma or the fact the ex got good news that nothing appeared to be wrong with his heart, I don’t know. Either way, the jumping spider went on to live another day. Perhaps freak out a co-worker with a sudden appearance on their car dash. Sorry, guys. Oh, and someone owes me $2.

For information regarding the Opinion page, contact Editor Susan Hartley at 773-2721, or send an email to sharley@dailycall.com

Letters

“Chasten your son while there is hope, and let not your soul spare for his crying.” (Proverbs 19:18 AKJV)

Who knows what lurks in the Orange Crusader

Contact us

To the Editor: I do not know if, or how much, the presence of political yard signs has to do or is predictive of the outcome of an election. But here in Piqua, part of John Boehner’s 8th Congressional District, and an area that historically votes 65 percent Republican, the population of Obama/Biden yard signs is up more than 1,000 percent. Four yeas ago it was extremely rare to see an Obama sign — anywhere. Yesterday, I counted five of them on about half of South Street alone and Boone Street has a bunch. I’ve not driven all over town, but counted these as part of my regular travels. Hopefully, this is good news for President Obama. —George A. Parker Piqua It wouldn’t even be y is 63 and in the enough to get one little midst of a fulltattoo of a crow. If he reblown midlife crisis. ally wanted to be a rene(Yes, midlife. He plans to gade, he’d need a lot more live to be 126.) He told his than a crow. He’d need the wife, Carol, that he was tree where the crow lived thinking of getting a tatand then maybe a scene too. from the movie, and it “Of what?” JIM MULLEN would all have to be held To the Editor: “Oh, I don’t know,” he I would like to thanks together with vines and said. “I was thinking of a Columnist the following people for the mystical symbols that crow.” care they gave me during climb his arm from his wrist to his would Ty has been reading a lot of mysteries that take place in the West and contain shoulder. Then he’d have to start on the my recent illness: Dr. Chris Peters and his staff, Upper Native American mysticism, with birds other side. “I’ve heard it hurts to get a tattoo,” Valley Medical Center and taking on a special meaning. He also likes the Brandon Lee revenge film clas- Carol rattled on. “You know, they use a Miami Valley Hospital staff, Covington Rescue sic “The Crow,” and he was thinking of a little needle gun to do that. Then it scars Squad, UVMC and Inlarge, menacing bird tattooed across his over until it heals. You wouldn’t even get tegrity Ambulance staff, ever-widening, hairy shoulder. The fact a flu shot last year because of the nee- my friends and staff at that Ty is 5 feet 10 inches and 247 dle.” Piqua Manor, Integrity He had forgotten about that. Maybe Home Health Agency and pounds as opposed to Lee’s trim, athletic they could give him some Novocain. No, many thanks to all my body did not seem to be relevant. Carol reads British mysteries, and they do that with a needle. Surely there’s family and friends who birds and tattoos do not play much of a something they could rub on his arm so visited, called, sent cards he wouldn’t feel it. Ty started wondering and offered prayers for me part in most of them. “Why a tattoo? Why a crow? What’s how small a crow he could stand. But if during my recovery. it were too small, no one would see it. going on?” God bless all of you. “A parrot,” said Carol. “Now that “I don’t know,” he said. “I feel like I —Melody Wise would be a crow if I were a bird. It’s a would be something.” Covington A parrot. Well, there is the pirate consymbol. It can mean a lot of different things. I want to be different, not like nection. And the Jimmy Buffett connection. They’re both renegades. But then everybody else.” “Crows are nasty, noisy birds,” Carol there’s the fact that a parrot just repeats said. “Why don’t you get a chicken? I like things that other people say. Ty was starting to rethink the whole chickens.” The Piqua Daily Call Ty was dumbstruck. A chicken? What tattoo thing. A crow. That really wouldn’t kind of a tattoo is that? The whole point say anything except that he got a tattoo. will accept election letof getting a tattoo is to show people how He wanted to send a message that he ters to the editor tough you are, what a renegade you are, might be 63 and have gray hair, but he through Friday, Oct. 26. how you march to your own drummer, didn’t act the way people expect an old Letters concerning canhow you do things your way. Is that what person to act. He may be 63, but he did- didates or issues on the Carol thought he would be if he were a n’t feel it. A sports car would say that. No, Nov. 6 ballot will be pubwith his back, Ty didn’t think he could lished through Saturday, bird? A chicken? Besides, people would laugh at him if get in and out of a sports car. He’d look Nov. 3. All letters MUST he got a chicken tattoo. Ty wanted the like an 8 1/2-month pregnant woman try- be sent by email to editorial@dailycall.com in same kind of tattoo the other renegades ing to get out of a lounge chair. “What about a penguin?” Carol said. “I order to guarantee pubhad. Carol probably meant chickens lication. Letters must be were cute, but Ty didn’t see it that way. really like penguins.” Ty thought about it. “So do I,” he said. 400 words or less and in“What about a turkey?” Carol asked. clude the letter writer’s She was thinking of a wild turkey, tail name, address and a Jim Mullen’s newest book, “How to displayed. Ty pictured a Thanksgiving phone number for verifiLose Money in Your Spare Time — At turkey, golden brown and sitting on a platter. It was not a macho image at all. Home,” is available at amazon.com. You cation purposes. Letters It was obvious that Carol did not keep can follow him on Pinterest at pinter- that do not follow our policy will not be pubest.com/jimmullen. up with current tattoo trends. lished. We will not accept form letters or letters signed by groups. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise Letters should reflect thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to the personal, individual assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. opinion of the writer. Letter writers will be Where to Write limited to one letter per subject matter. Fax: (614) 466-9354 Public officials can be contacted through the following addresses and telephone ■ State Sen. Bill Beagle, 5th District, numbers: Ohio Senate, First Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215; (614) 466-6247; e-mail: ■ Lucy Fess, mayor, 5th Ward Commissioner, ward5comm@piquaoh.org, SD-05@sen.state.oh.us 615-9251 (work), 773-7929 (home) ■ State Rep. Richard Adams, 79th DisFRANK BEESON ■ John Martin, 1st Ward Commistrict, House of Representatives, The G ROUP PUBLISHER sioner, ward1comm@piquaoh.org, Riffe Center, 77 High St. 13th Floor, 773-2778 (home) Columbus, OH 43215, (614) 466-8114, SUSAN HARTLEY Fax: (614) 719-3979; ■ William Vogt, 2nd Ward CommisEXECUTIVE EDITOR sioner, ward2comm@piquaoh.org, district79@ohr.state.oh.us LEIANN STEWART 773-8217 ■ Jon Husted, Secretary of State, 180 E. ADVERTISING Broad St. 15th floor, Columbus, OH ■ Joe Wilson, 3rd Ward Commissioner, MANAGER ward3comm@piquaoh.org, 778-0390 53266-0418 (877) 767-6446, (614)466-2655; ■ Judy Terry, 4th Ward Commissioner, CHERYL HALL ward4comm@piquaoh.org, 773-3189 ■ David Yost, State Auditor, 88 E. Broad CIRCULATION MANAGER St., 5th floor, Columbus, OH 43215, ■ City Manager Gary Huff, ghuff@piquaoh.org, 778-2051 800-282-0370 or 614-466-4514 BETTY BROWNLEE BUSINESS MANAGER ■ Miami County Commissioners: John ■ Mike DeWine, State Attorney Gen“Bud” O’Brien, Jack Evans and eral, 30 E.Broad St., Columbus, OH GRETA SILVERS Richard Cultice, 201 W. Main St., Troy, 43266, (614) 466-4320 G RAPHICS MANAGER OH 45373 440-5910; commission■ U.S. Rep. John Boehner, 8th District, ers@comiami.oh.us 12 S. Plum St., Troy, OH 45373, 339A CIVITAS 1524 or (800) 582-1001 U.S. House ■ John R. Kasich, Ohio governor, Vern MEDIA Office, Washington, D.C., 1020 LongRiffe Center, 77 S. High St., ColumNEWSPAPER worth, HOR, 20515 bus, OH 43215, (614) 644-0813,

The Village Idiot

The pros and cons of a chicken tattoo

T

Area woman appreciates caregivers

Election letter policy outlined

THE FIRST AMENDMENT


ENTERTAINMENT

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

A new ‘Revolution’ from sci-fi mogul J.J. Abrams FRAZIER MOORE AP Television Writer NEW YORK — “There is an inherent evil to the wondrous technology that we embrace blindly,” says J.J. Abrams. It’s a loaded observation that seems simultaneously quizzical, thrilled and circumspect. And it hints at the world view of Abrams, the alliteratively initialed writer-director-producer whose latest series, “Revolution,” airs Mondays at 10 p.m. EDT on NBC. Consider Abrams’ anecdote about a fax machine that demanded his attention when it went on the blink. “For several minutes I was a slave to the machine,” he says, recalling how it displayed step-by-step directions for fixing it. “If an alien had come down and peeked in the window, it would have concluded, ‘Oh, this is a society in which little devices tell those bipedal creatures what to do.’” The notion amuses him as much as gives him pause. “We are in that place right now,” he declares. “We are as much in response to what this thing is telling us to do as it is to us. This is a balancing act, and I’m not sure which side has more weight.” Such a tale helps explain why his new drama, “Revolution,” spoke to him as a series idea. It was created by Eric Kripke (“Supernatural”). But it bears the imprint of Abrams, one of filmdom’s most inventive and recognized names, and his company, tellingly dubbed Bad Robot Productions. “Revolution” tells of a world 15 years after the world inexplicably suffers a power outage. Every electronic gadget, light source, communications means and conveyance is the victim of a seemingly permanent blackout. The upshot? For Abrams, it’s “an epic romantic family quest.” That is, a rogue band of survivors is pitted against an oppressive militia that treats remaining loyalists to the United States as insurgents to be crushed. Meanwhile, modernity is in ruins and overrun by greenery as an agrarian lifestyle reasserts itself. Stars include Tracy Spiridakos, Billy Burke, Zak Orth, Elizabeth Mitchell and Giancarlo Esposito. What intrigued Abrams wasn’t so much the why of the power going out — though he promises the whys will be explained in due time — but rather the saga that results from its absence. Here is a raging new twist on the Swiss Family Robinson, people challenged by the dicey wish fulfillment of a world no longer in thrall to technology. “When the power goes out, the structure of society would shift enormously,” Abrams reasons. “The people who are in control are more likely to fall by the wayside and not know how to handle anything. The have-nots will know how to live in that world and will become the most powerful.” Meeting a reporter in the sort of office high-rise that’s utterly dependent on power (down to the restrooms? electric towel dispensers), Jeffrey Jacob

NBC, BROWNIE HARRIS/AP PHOTO

This image released by NBC shows, from left, Tracy Spiridakos as Charlie Matheson, Billy Burke as Miles Matheson, Daniella Alonso as Nora, and Paras Patel as Albert, in a scene from “Revolution.” The series by J.J. Abrams tells of a world 15 years after the world inexplicably suffers a power outage. Every gadget, light source, communications means and motor vehicle is the victim of a seemingly permanent blackout. It airs Mondays at 10 p.m. EDT on NBC. Abrams, 46, is bespectacled and boyish, an affable thinker excited by ideas and conversation. What seems to engage him most isn’t whys but what-ifs, particularly when his characters face the encroachment of technology. “I think the connection between the flesh and the machine is fascinating and relevant,” he says. “I don’t know what’s more relevant than that today. It’s a big part of ‘Revolution,’ as well as ‘Fringe’ and ‘Person of Interest.’” Abrams’ CBS high-tech drama “Person of Interest,” now starting its second season, harnesses state-of-the-art surveillance gadgetry in New York City and then applies pattern recognition to identify people who will soon be involved in violent crimes — and hopefully prevent them. His Fox sci-fi series “Fringe,” beginning its fifth and final season, is a mind-expanding exploration of “fringe” science, parallel universes and alternate timelines. Both those shows are steeped in the technology they investigate. But “Revolution” (which in its first three airings has averaged 9.8 million viewers and scored a full-season order from NBC) is giving Abrams a chance to address his favorite issues while catching his breath in its more primitive setting. “Today,” he says, “information is instantaneous. People know too much too soon and the whole world witnesses every moment. The more this happens, the harder it is to tell stories. It really undermines the possibility of something being curated, of someone with taste and intellect being able to help you determine a point of view. “What technology allows is a terrifying mess and an amazing miracle of 1s and 0s that let us create and communicate and reach the world,” he says, again savoring a sage ambivalence. “But it’s not that I ever approach any story thinking: What is the moral? Instead, I think: Who’s the character in this story I want to care about?” Of course, Abrams’ depth of involvement in the shows that bear his name varies. On “Revolution,” as with “Person of

Interest,” he explains, “I’m reading and watching and giving my opinion. But I’m not writing the show. I didn’t create it and I’m not running it.” He co-created “Fringe,” then brought in people to run it. Two of his past series, the coming-of-age drama “Felicity” and spy thriller “Alias,” he created and ran. But he created “Lost,” worked on it for a while, then handed it off to others. He directed the upcoming film “Star Trek Into Darkness.” He wrote and directed the recent “Super 8,” his semiautobiographical sci-fi romp about a teenager in 1979 making a home movie with his friends. And there are always more projects in the offing (Abrams mentions several in passing), which prompts the question: How much is too much? The question makes him smile. He invokes an age-old expression about overindulgence — one’s eyes being bigger than one’s stomach — when he replies, “I have big eyes in terms of working with great people and projects. But I’m very lucky to have the chance.” Meanwhile, his family keeps him grounded. “I’m married to the love of my life” — public relations exec Katie McGrath, his wife of 16 years — “and I have three kids who are the result of that love.” Those are the kids heard scolding “Bad robot!” on the animated credit for his company, whose name came from a children’s book he once planned to write. “The thing that keeps my head from exploding,” he says, “is knowing that I have a family that is the real point of everything, and it keeps me from getting sucked into the vortex of projects and madness. I’m the guy who doesn’t work on weekends. Without my family, I would be at the office all the time. “I say ‘no’ to almost everything,” he insists. “But when there’s something that makes me go ‘Ooooh, I want to see that,’ I just know it’s something worth finding time to work on.” Then Abrams takes another whack at flesh and machines. Bad Robot strikes again.

■ Contract Bridge — By Steve Becker

Friday, October 5, 2012

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Sales parties take advantage of loyalties among friends DEAR ABBY: Your column has been a fixture in my life. Thank you for the smiles and the tears. My dilemma: I received yet another invitation to someone’s home for a “product party.” In the past year, I have been considered a prospective buyer of cookware, candles, makeup, toys and vitamins. While I have at times used all these products, the invitations to sales parties that come from friends and sometimes friends of friends, irritate me. When I phone to decline, the hostess invariably says, “Oh, you don’t have to buy anything.” Of course that’s not exactly entirely true because it’s a sales party, and “guests” are pressured in various ways to buy the product. People often buy things they don’t need or want because they fear they’d be disloyal to the hostess if they didn’t. When I was growing up, my father said, “You don’t invite friends to your house to sell them things.” Maybe Dad was on to something. Abby, how should unwanted invitations be handled? — IRKED IN INDIANA DEAR IRKED: Continue to decline the invitations. Tell the hostess you have “a conflict” and cannot change your plans. (You don’t have to give any details.) P.S. To ease your conscience, your “conflict” can be your plan to watch your favorite “I Love Lucy” rerun on TV. DEAR ABBY: I’m wondering what I should do when my biological father dies. He and my mother divorced before I was born. I’ve had little contact with him, but my older sister and brother lived with him growing up and are close to him. My mother died 20 years ago, and afterward I tried to get to know him, but he didn’t want to know me. He never paid child support. Both he and my mother remarried. I was fortunate to have a loving stepfather, and I was very close to him until his death. When the time comes, I am considering not going

ABIGAIL VAN BUREN

Advice to my birth father’s funeral. I have not told my sister how I feel because she thinks he is the greatest. I think he is a dirt ball. What do you advise, under these circumstances? — CONFUSED IN SIOUX CITY DEAR CONFUSED: Funerals are for the living. Go to his funeral and give your siblings the emotional support they will need. I understand why you feel the way you do, but in this situation, it would be an act of kindness to keep your true feelings to yourself. DEAR ABBY: Several years ago, when I read one of your letters about pennies from heaven, I laughed about it to myself. My sister-in-law had died a few months earlier and I said, “OK, Sharyn, if you’re there, send me a penny from heaven.” Abby, the next day when I arrived at work, there on my keyboard was a perfectly placed penny. And for weeks afterward I kept finding more pennies. Finally I had to say, “OK, Sharyn, I get it.” And the pennies stopped. — A BELIEVER NOW IN SOMERS, CONN. DEAR BELIEVER NOW: I’m glad your faith is restored. If you saved them, have them made into charms for a bracelet. Every time you wear it you’ll feel close to the sister-in-law who’s smiling down on you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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jack or queen, win any return and play the king of clubs. The slam becomes certain if North follows suit to the king. The only time this line of play fails is when North has been dealt the singleton jack or queen. If you alternatively attacked the clubs by first cashing the king or ace, you would go down if the next player was either void of clubs or held a low singleton. These cases outnumber those where North started with a singleton honor. Tomorrow: Where there’s life, there’s hope.

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You lead the six of spades, and declarer wins partner’s ten with the jack. South leads a heart to dummy’s jack and returns the queen of diamonds, which you win with the king. How would you continue? 2. You are declarer with the West hand at Six

1. From the play thus far, it is clear that South’s opening notrump bid (15 to 17 points) included the ace of hearts, ace of diamonds and A-K-J of spades (your partner cannot have the ace or king of spades, given his play at trick one). It follows that South cannot have the king of clubs, which would give him 19 points. You should therefore shift to the club three at

this point, confident that partner will win with the king. If partner has another club to return, you will defeat the contract. If you fail to lead a club and instead woodenly return a spade, declarer will score three spade tricks, three diamond tricks and at least three hearts to make the contract. 2. The only problem is how to handle the clubs to give yourself the maximum chance for four tricks in the suit. Best is to win the heart in dummy, lead the club six and play low if South plays low. (If the six wins, continue with the seven.) If the six loses to North’s

2318313


6

PARENTING

Friday, October 5, 2012

■ Keeping It Real s a parent, I’ve been blessed with two daughters. As a teacher, I’ve been privileged to teach hundreds of kids. Both of these roles have been learning experiences for me, and I’ve come to understand that successful children have a solid set of expectations to follow. Telling a child, “Be good,” isn’t enough. What does “good” mean? Children need concrete standards and examples, and those standards are ones that can be used at home and at school. At my school we use a set of standards called the “Four R’s.” These four R’s are respect, responsibility, restraint, and recognizing the rights of others. We use these to help students focus on their behavior and to improve it. These may sound like school strategies, but they can also be successful at home.

A

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Using the four R’s with kids

Respect is the first quality, defined by the dictionary as an attitude of deference. School examples of respect include looking at a person when they speak, being quiet when others share their ideas and opinions, and speaking to each other with kind words and voices even when upset. These examples work just as well at home. Teach your children to show respect to their parents by making eye contact and by following directions immediately. Respect can also be shown at home by listening to other family members and allowing them to voice their opinions. Siblings in a fight? Teach them how to speak to each other with kindness, even when they’re upset. Successful students must be responsible, no matter what their age. At school, we expect students to be responsible for their

own belongings and to come to class prepared. However, learning to be responsible starts at home. Use chores to accomplish this task. Choose age appropriate chores for your kids and develop a regular schedule for completion. For example, a four year old can help an older sibling unload the dishwasher. Middle school kids can begin to learn how to do laundry, along with folding it and putting it away. Teenagers can do all this plus more difficult chores such as mowing and other yard work. You can also put the responsibility for completing homework on your child. Give them a quiet place to get it done, but make this part of their daily routine. For example, my oldest daughter comes home and does her homework and chores before doing anything else. Once a routine is established, and the children have accepted

the responsibility for it, it becomes a regular part of their day. Start these types of routines as early as you can in a child’s life, and they will grow up thinking it is normal. Restraint can be a tough area for kids, especially when they are upset. At home, let children see you model self-control when you are distressed. When they see Mom and Dad controlling anger, or expressing it in a mature way, they begin to see proper restraint in action. They will take their cues from you. Sibling interaction is also a great time to teach restraint. Every brother and sister knows what it’s like to have their space invaded! Teach kids how to express their feelings in a rational way towards siblings who have overstepped their bounds. When siblings are fussing, this is a great opportunity to teach them about self-control.

At school, respecting the rights of others means not touching another person’s property or body without permission. At home it means the same thing! For example, brothers and sisters learn to leave siblings’ belongings alone. This can also mean respecting the boundaries of mom and dad’s belongings. For example, my own children know that my purse is off limits. The same goes for Dad’s wallet. My girls know they may not enter each other’s bedrooms without permission. Sometimes this is difficult to follow, but by responding to these parameters, they show respect for each other. Personal space also falls into this category. We do not allow our students to physically hurt each other. This is a standard that can be replicated at home, as well. Children crave boundaries, and they respond

HOLLY MCELWEE Columnist when parents set limits for them. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and you won’t gain perfect behavior from your kids overnight. Every child is a work in progress, but using concrete standards such as these can help kids understand expectations and start to follow them. Strong expectations build happy, productive, well-adjusted kids. Holly McElwee is a teacher at Wilder Intermediate in Piqua. McElee’s Keeping It Real column will run once a month on the parenting page, giving tips for parents from her perspective as a parent and a teacher.

Initiative launched for military kids

■ Living with Children

Solution for a ‘mistake’ : When I attempt to put my 3-and-onehalf year-old daughter in her room for punishment, she refuses to go. I have to pick her up and take her, during which time she flails her arms, screams, and kicks. My back is paying for the struggle. Her dad doesn’t have this problem with her, by the way. What can I do to make her go on her own without getting physical with her? A: Since you only describe the hassle involved in getting your daughter to go to her room, I’m going to assume that once she’s in there, she will stay until you set her free. If so, then your only “mistake” (the quotation marks are purposeful) is in forcing her to go to her room. Don’t misunderstand me. When you direct her to go to her room, she should go, without struggle, under the power of her own two feet. The mistake is not that you tell her to go, the mistake is that you MAKE her go. Currently, you tell her to go and she refuses, challenging you to force her. You accept the challenge, which means that even though you appear to “win,” you actually lose. How? By letting her define the terms under which she gets to her room. Furthermore, you end up paying more of a price for her misbehavior than she does. In so doing, you’re violating my Agony Principle. It simply states that parents should not agonize over anything a child does or fails to do if the child is perfectly capable of agonizing over it herself. In other words, the emotional consequences of a child’s misbehavior should be borne by the child and the child alone. The solution is for you to

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BY STACY A. ANDERSON Associated Press

Q

JOHN ROSEMOND Columnist stop trying to MAKE your daughter go to her room. Instead, When she misbehaves, and you tell her to go to her room (everything is fine to this point), and she refuses, just shrug your shoulders, say “Okay,” and walk away. That evening, immediately after the evening meal, you and your husband together should tell her that because she wouldn’t go to her room when you told her to go, she has to go to bed right then and there. She will probably cry and protest, but that should be the end of it. Let that be your policy from now on. When she figures out (which should take no more than a few experiences of this sort) that if she doesn’t cooperate in a small consequence during the day, there’s a big one later, she’ll begin cooperating in the small one. This is an application of what I call the Godfather Principle: To move the emotional consequences of misbehavior off of a parent’s shoulders (or back) onto the child’s, simply make the child an offer she can’t refuse. Marlon Brando was a parenting genius. One last word: The next time your daughter refuses to go to her room for punishment, don’t tell her what awaits her after supper. Surprises keep children on their toes, minding their p’s and q’s, and that sort of thing. Family psychologist John Rosemond’s website: www.rosemond.com.

WASHINGTON — Madeline Stevens knows what it’s like to be a military brat. “The first week of school, it’s really hard,” said Stevens, a 17-year-old from Jacksonville, Fla., who has moved eight times with her naval aviator father and attended 10 different schools. “You sit by yourself at lunch; you try and make friends in classes. When you’re younger it’s easier because, you know, you just share crayons, and you’re new best friends.” But in high school Stevens said she’s had to integrate herself into sports and clubs to make friends, many of whom already have known each other most of their lives. The shuffle also has been a strain academically. Moving can be tough for any child, but it can be even harder for children of military families, who, like Stevens, may relocate more frequently. They must leave friends behind and get acclimated to new schools that may have a different curriculum than the one they left behind. And the emotional impact of having a deployed parent can also include worry and anxiety, said Mary Ann Rafoth, dean of Robert Morris University’s School of Education and Social Sciences. “Most of us go through each day not realizing that we’re a nation at war. But those kids do,” she said. “They often feel like they’re carrying that burden alone.” However, educators often don’t have the tools to help military children cope. A new initiative which was launched Wednesday by first lady Michelle Obama and the vice president’s wife, Jill Biden, is designed to better prepare educators instructing military-connected children.

AP FILE PHOTO

In this Sept. 6 file photo, from left, first lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, applaud Joe Biden at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. A new initiative launched Wednesday by Mrs. Obama and Mrs. Biden is designed to better prepare educators instructing military-connected children. “Operation: Educate the Educator” already has a commitment from more than 100 colleges offering teaching degrees. The Obama administration has partnered with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education and the Military Child Education Coalition to help military children as they face social, emotional and learning challenges in the classroom while having an active-duty parent. The colleges that have signed on have agreed to incorporate information about military children in the training curriculums for student teachers, push faculty and student teachers to do research on military children and require student teachers to work with military children as part of their final clinical experience or internship. The guidelines also encourage the colleges to work with admissions offices to identify military children, offer workshops

and seminars to faculty and student teachers, and partner with K-12 schools for joint development programs. There are nearly 2 million students whose parents are either on active duty, members of the National Guard or Reserves or military veterans, according to the Military Child Education Coalition. Students often move six to nine times during their preschool through high school education. More than 80 percent of the 1.1 millionplus K-12 students attend public schools. Biden said she was moved by a story of a little girl who burst into tears when “Ave Maria” played at her school’s Christmas program because the song had also been played at the funeral of father, who died in Iraq. “It was so shocking to me that that teacher really was unaware that this girl had a daddy who was in the military,” she said. “We

have to make sure that we can identify the military children and that we can do things to celebrate military families.” Biden said it was inevitable that the education of military children would become part of Joining Forces, the initiative she launched with Mrs. Obama in 2011 to support military families. The campaign also has helped formerly deployed soldiers seek employment stateside and has aided spouses. “We say, when you have a family member who is in the military service, the families serve too,” she said. “Think of the pressures on the families, and so they’re all in this together.” Robert Morris University, located in Moon Township, Pa., near Pittsburgh, serves a large community of the military children with the nearby Air Force Reserve base. All education majors at Robert Morris attend weekly seminars to discuss the challenges of student teaching with their school faculty. Starting this semester, one of the sessions will be devoted to discussing the needs of children with parents in the military who are deployed, state-side or veterans. Rafoth, who will lead the session, said the constant moving can cause “holes in instruction,” rather than cognitive issues for the student. “This especially happens with math instruction because math curricula vary place to place, and it’s possible you can go around and never get fractions because those are taught in a discrete place in the curriculum,” she said. “Then, boy, are you up a creek when you meet algebra.”

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Friday, October 5, 2012

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October is National

Chiropactic

Over the last 25 years there have been more in neuro-vertebral health. Current schools of than six government studies done on chiropractic thought stress that we are all responsible for our treatments in various countries, including own bodies and that the way we treat them has Canada, Sweden and Australia. All these studies a direct effect on our overall health. Did you have shown that these treatments are safe and know that your posture can reveal a lot about effective. your spinal health? For example, if you have, a It’s no surprise, then, tendency to curve your back that chiropractics has been a recognized profession for when seated; have a rounded several years now, particuupper back; a hip that’s larly given the fact that it higher than the other; a takes a holistic approach to shoulder that’s higher than health and considers the the other; or a tendency to body to have its own natutilt your head forward or keep it slightly ral healing abilities. turned, it With this philosophy in c o u l d mind, chiropractors focus mean that their attention on the relationships the nervous and Chiropractor can help treat neuro-vertebral problems, you have certain musculo-skeletal systems headaches, hypertension and digestive troubles. have with other systems in the body, placing par- problems with your spine. Do ticular emphasis on the spine. not hesitate to consult a chiroOver the years there has been growing interest practor; they can help treat neurovertebral problems, headaches, hypertension and digestive troubles. Relief • Reconstruction • Rehabilitation

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Michael J. Pope, DC Chiropractic Physician 1304 East Main Street Troy, Ohio 45373

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Mitchell Chiropractic Serving Shelby County for over 40 yrs.

402 S. Ohio Avenue Sidney, OH (937) 492-2040

Fort Loramie Chiropractic Drs. Jenny and Rob Huddleston

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Voted one of the "Top 3" Chiropractic Offices in Sidney Daily News Readers Choice Awards!

Good spinal health starts at a young age Just like all other good habits in life, good spinal health starts when we are children. And as we all know, healthy attitudes and behaviours are best learned at an early age. That’s why chiropractors are increasing their efforts to educate youth on this aspect of their health by providing as much information and advice as possible. So why wait until complications arise before consulting a specialist? A visit to your chiropractor can teach your children how to prevent the types of back problems that are so prevalent among adults. Steps as simple as not crossing your legs or not sleeping on your stomach can make a world of difference over the long-run. Learning to lift properly with your legs by bending at the knees rather than letting your back bear all the weight is another valuable lesson that even young children can immediately benefit from. More global aspects can also be addressed during a preventative appointment so that little ones can understand that their body needs to be handled carefully

Do you suffer from any of these conditions? • Muscular back or neck pain • Tennis elbow Radial Pulse Therapy • Golfer’s elbow • Planter fasciitis • Heel spurs • Frozen shoulder • Hip or Knee pain • Shin splints A unique, new therapy may • Bursitis be the answer: • Arthritis Radial Pulse Therapy • Chronic muscle tension

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Good spinal health starts with good habits that are developed at any early age. Talk to your kids about it!

so that it can perform properly. Rest, nutrition, exercise and stress management are other factors that contribute to maintaining good spinal health and overall fitness. You might even learn a thing or two during this performed by Licensed Massage Therapist appointment. Many adults conAlso available but not required is a free initial visit to Troy Chiropractic which includes the tinue their bad initial consultation, examination, x-rays if habits—sometimes necessary and report of findings. without even realThis offer good for new customers only, has no cash value and is not valid with any other offer. Due to federal law, this offer is not valid for izing it. Medicare or Medicaid recipients however, we are providers for both. But we cerTroy Chiropractic tainly feel their reWellness & Massage Center sults! Set a good example for your Dr. Curtis Hoyt, Chiropractic Physician kids—consult a 51 Stanfield, Troy chiropractor! (937) 335-2722 • fax (937) 339-6775

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Friday, October 5, 2012

COMICS

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Don’t be surprised if you have a strong desire in the next two months to get outta Dodge. Suddenly, you’re keen for adventure and eager to learn. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your feelings will be unusually passionate in the next few months, which is great romantic news for some. However, all of you will feel defensive about defining boundaries with shared property. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) For the next few months, fiery Mars is opposite your sign, making you impatient with others. Be aware of this and try to be tolerant and forgiving. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Make a to-do list of things you want to accomplish in the next few months, because you are ready to work! Not only will you be energetic, you’ll delegate to others as well. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Get ready for a playful, fun-loving two months ahead! This is a great time to slip away on a vacation, explore romantic adventures, opportunities in sports and fun times in general. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Don’t be surprised to find out how ambitious you are at home now. In the next few months, you will want to do renovations and start shoving furniture around. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Your powers of persuasion will be strong in the next few months, which is good news for those of you who sell, write, promote, teach or act. Your words will be golden! SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You will work hard during the next two months to boost your earnings. Ironically, you will be working just as hard to spend them! (It was ever thus.) SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) With fiery Mars in your sign for the next few months, you’ll be bursting with energy, enthusiasm and competitiveness! Now is the time to go after what you want. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Work alone or behind the scenes during the next few months, because this is how you will be most productive. Be careful of those who work against your best interests. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Group activities, especially physical sports, will appeal to you during the next few months. Get out and hustle thy buns! PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Your ambition is aroused now. In the next two months, you’ll work hard to make a name for yourself and accomplish your goals. YOU BORN TODAY You are vivacious and adventurous! You live life to the fullest. Anything new and different intrigues you. Ever the romantic, you are equally brave about exploring adventures of the heart. You are witty and entertaining, and a good friend to loved ones. People like your cheerful optimism. In the year ahead, an important decision will arise. Choose wisely. Birthdate of: Elizabeth Shue, actress; Carole Lombard, actress; Jeremy Sisto, actor. (c) 2012 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

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Friday, October 5, 2012

PIQUA DAILY CALL • PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

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REWARD $250. Any information leading to the recovery of a missing 1999 black Cadillac Escalade. Last driver was Carina A. Waters. Please call (937)778-9052 with any info. CONFIDENTIAL

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Freshway Foods of Sidney, Ohio, one of the largest regional freshcut processing companies in the united states is accepting applications for the following positions: MAINTENANCE TECH 3rd Shift- with experience in both electrical and controls PRODUCTION ASSOCIATES With the ability to work overtime Complete an application at: 601 North Stolle Ave. Sidney, Ohio

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Or email resume to: tarnold@freshwayfoods.com

EXPERIENCED ROOFER, Part Time, Must furnish references. Needs own transportation. Call (937)492-8102

FRONT DESK Part-Time, 2nd Shift, Pay based on experience, No phone calls please.

COOK Full-time 37.50 hours/ week 11:00am-7:00pm One year of experience in food production, and high volume restaurant, healthcare setting required. 3 years experience preferred. High school diploma or equivalent required. Benefits offered. Apply online at : www.oprs.org/careers (No phone calls please) Equal Opportunity Employer

Edison Community College invites qualified candidates to apply for the following positions: Development Officer Director of the Physical Therapy Assistant Associate Degree Program English Adjunct Instructor Philosophy Adjunct Instructor Physical Therapy Assistant Adjunct Instructor Chemistry Adjunct Instructor Nursing Adjunct Instructor For a complete listing of employment and application requirements please visit www.edisonohio.edu/employment

EOE/AA Employer

EXPERIENCED TRACTOR/TRAILER MECHANICS Good pay/benefits. Must have DL and own tools. Apply at Herrmann's Service Center 1183 S. Market St; Troy, OH 937-339-4490

Help Wanted:

DOUGH ROOM PRODUCTION MACHINE OPERATOR Must be able to lift 50 lbs. No weekends Apply at: Piqua Pizza Supply Company Inc. 1727 W High St Piqua, OH 45356

Please apply in person at: The Comfort Inn 987 East Ash St Piqua, Ohio 45356

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RECEPTIONIST Faulkner, Garmhausen, Keister & Shenk, a Legal Professional Association, is seeking a receptionist to work at its Sidney, Ohio office. This individual will be responsible for answering the telephone and greeting clients along with various administrative responsibilities. Applicant must have excellent communication and administrative/typing skills and be proficient in Microsoft office software including Word, Excel and Outlook. Qualified individuals must be detail-oriented, energetic, and self-motivated. The position offers a competitive salary and other benefits in a positive work environment. Interested and qualified persons should send their resume to: Thomas J. Potts at Faulkner, Garmhausen, Keister & Shenk Suite 300, 100 South Main Avenue Sidney, Ohio, 45365 or email: tpotts@fgks-law.com.

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To learn more about our organization, please visit our website: www.fgks-law.com

LEAD ELECTRICIAN

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Slagle Mechanical Inc, an established HVAC & Plumbing construction/ service company is currently seeking qualified Electricians to better serve our growing customer base. This new opportunity will provide steady employment with industry leading benefits to allow the right individual many opportunities for growth in a new department.

◆◆◆◆◆◆◆ NOW HIRING! ◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆ LABORS: $9.50/HR CDL Drivers: $11.50/HR APPLY: 15 Industry Park Ct., Tipp City (937)667-6772

240 Healthcare

Applicants must have a minimum of 5 years experience or more, have an excellent knowledge of the Electrical Code, Safety Processes, and hold applicable licenses. Work experience to include commercial & industrial construction, maintenance, and service work, Residential experience a plus, Must be proficient with low voltage to 600 volt applications. High Voltage experience a plus. Competitive Wage and benefit package based on experience, References required. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer Submit resume to: Electrician Slagle Mechanical PO Box 823 Sidney, Ohio 45365 Shop Help Wanted. Cleaning & Assembly. Weekdays Approx. 30 hours. $8/hr & up. Apply at 8620 Casstown-Fletcher Rd., Fletcher, Wednesday or Thursday, October 10 &11 from 9am to 12 noon.

~DEPENDABLE~ Home Health Aides All shifts available! Needed in Miami, Shelby and Darke counties. Must have High school diploma or GED, have 2 good job references, and be career oriented. STNA or 1 year experience a must. Every other weekend required. Previous applicants need not apply.

SERIOUS INQUIRIES CALL HOLLY:

(937)339-8200

POLICY: Please Check Your Ad The 1st Day. It Is The Advertiser’s Responsibility To Report Errors Immediately. Publisher Will Not Be Responsible for More Than One Incorrect Insertion. We Reserve The Right To Correctly Classify, Edit, Cancel Or Decline Any Advertisement Without Notice.

Thurs - Weds @ 5pm Sat - Thurs @ 4pm

PART-TIME and PRN STNA Positions

MACHINISTS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

1st, 2nd & 3rd shifts

Concept Machine & Tool is seeking experienced individuals for the following 1st & 2nd shift positions. 40 hours PLUS Overtime.

If interested, please apply online at: www.oprs.org/careers

3003 W. Cisco Rd. Sidney, OH 45365

Make Someone’s Day Tell Them

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Call Us At 877-844-8385 or Stop By Our Office

TOOL ROOM MACHINISTS: Boring Mill, Manual Mill, Lathe & OD Grinding experience desired for 1st & 2nd shift positions. Concept Machine & Tool, Inc. provides TOP wages with excellent benefits (100% Employee Heath Coverage) including 401K & uniforms in an AIR CONDITIONED facility.

Apply in person at: Concept Machine & Tool, Inc. 2065 Industrial Court Covington, Ohio 45318 (937)473-3334

245 Manufacturing/Trade

ConAgra Foods, Inc. is one of North America's leading food companies, with brands in 97 percent of America's households. Our production facility located in Troy, OH, is currently seeking applicants for the following position. MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN(S) 2ND & 3RD SHIFT These individuals will assist the Maintenance team in maintaining food processing equipment by overhauling, repairing and testing high speed production equipment such as ovens, packaging machines, mixers, cartoners, baggers, stuffers, etc., throughout the facility. Technicians are responsible for PM's, mechanical repairs, and troubleshooting. Must have knowledge of PLC operations, Motor Control, Fabrication, Hydraulics, and Pneumatics (air valves and controls) with the ability to define problems, collect data, and establish facts and draw valid conclusions. Qualifications/ Education/ Experience/Skills: High School Graduate or GED necessary (Associates Degree and up preferred), 4+ years of prior maintenance experience in a production environment. Must have a solid understanding of, but not limited to: Drive Trains (belts, pulleys, sprockets and chain), electrical (110 single phase and 480 & 230 v 3 phase), PLC Operation & Servo's, Motor Controls, Fabrication (welding, grinding and assembly), Hydraulics (motors, pumps, and valves), Pneumatics (air valves and controls). We offer a competitive wage & benefits package: Medical, Dental, Vision, 401k match, Life & Disability, paid holidays/ vacation/ personal days, company store among many other benefits. Qualified candidates, who have demonstrated a good work history and have proven they can work in a team environment, should apply by emailing a resume or faxing to:

MA/LPN/RN needed for weekly part-time/PRN position. Must be flexible. Apply in person at: 530 Crescent Dr. Troy

CNC LATHE & CNC MILL: Large & small part machining. Setups required. Programming experience is a plus. (2nd Shift hours Monday - Thursday).

brad.holmes@ conagrafoods.com Fax (937)339-8024

An Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer

PLANT MAINTENANCE 1ST SHIFT Experience in some or all of the following areas: Electrical 480V Hydraulics Plumbing Welding Fabrication Will work on all equipment PM's, repairs and general maintenance. A minimum of 3 years experience is required. Starting pay based on experience level. A complete benefit package including 401K, Health and Life Insurance, Holiday and Vacation Pay is included. Mail or email your resume in confidence to, or apply at: Mechanical Galv-Plating Corp. 933 Oak Ave PO Box 56 Sidney, Ohio 45365 (937)492-3143

877-844-8385

R# X``#d

280 Transportation LANES TRANSFER LIMA OHIO

PRODUCTION ASSOCIATES ConAgra Foods, Inc. is one of North America's leading food companies, with brands in 97 percent of America's households. Consumers find Banquet, Chef Boyardee, Egg Beaters, Healthy Choice, Hebrew National Hunt's, Marie Callender's, Orville Redenbacher's, PAM, Peter Pan, Reddi-wip, Slim Jim, Snack Pack and many other ConAgra Foods brands in grocery, convenience, mass merchandise and club stores. The Production Associates at our premier Slim Jim and school lunch pizza production facility located in Troy, OH, will be responsible for bakery and/or meat processing activities. Job positions may include the following: • Machine Operator • Production Line Worker • Mixer • Packer • Sanitation Worker Position requirements: • Must have a High School Diploma or GED. • Must be able to communicate and work effectively in a team environment. • Ability to frequently lift and/or carry items from 35-50 lbs. • Ability to work in a noisy, hot and/or cold work environment. • Ability to stand for an extended period of time. • Must be able to work any shift and/or on weekends and holidays. • It is preferred; applicants have at least 6+ months of continuous work experience in a manufacturing or for industry environment. • Candidates must be willing and able to work in a fast paced manufacturing environment. Applications for employment will ONLY be accepted at the Miami County Job Center office located at 2040 N. County Rd 25A, Troy, OH 45373 from Monday - Friday (10/1 thru 10/5 and 10/8 - 10/12) from 8:00am to 4:30pm. Please note: Applications will not be accepted at the plant. An Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer

robboller@mechanical galv-plating.com

275 Situation Wanted

in

that work .com

235 General

CAREGIVER, Willing to provide care in your home. Call (937)203-5883

235 General

HIRING OTR DRIVERS ***SIGN ON BONUS***

• • •

Must have 2 years experience Class A CDL Clean MVR ***Home weekends***

***Benefits available*** Please call (419)222-8692 Monday-Friday 8am-5pm

300 - Real Estate

For Rent

305 Apartment 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

1 BEDROOM, upstairs, 431 West Ash, stove, refrigerator, no pets $335, Credit check required, (937)418-8912

105 Announcements

NOTICE Investigate in full before sending money as an advance fee. For further information, call or write:

Better Business Bureau 15 West Fourth St. Suite 300 Dayton, OH 45402 www.dayton.bbb.org 937.222.5825 This notice is provided as a public service by A newspaper group of Ohio Community Media

2325617

105 Announcements

WOOD FRAMERS Local/ Commercial Carpentry Contractor seeking experienced Wood Framers. Must have own transportation. Good pay and benefits. Immediate openings. Pre-employment drug screening Call: (937)339-6274 Or apply in person at: 1360 S. Co. Rd. 25-A Troy, Ohio

Mon - Thurs @ 5pm Weds - Tues @ 5pm Fri - Thurs @ 5pm

Piqua Daily Call

CAUTION Whether posting or responding to an advertisement, watch out for offers to pay more than the advertised price for the item. Scammers will send a check and ask the seller to wire the excess through Western Union (possibly for courier fees). The scammer's check is fake and eventually bounces and the seller loses the wired amount. While banks and Western branches are Union trained at spotting fake checks, these types of scams are growing increasingly sophisticated and fake checks often aren't caught for weeks. Funds wired through Western Union or MoneyGram are irretrievable and virtually untraceable. If you have questions regarding scams like these or others, please contact the Ohio Attorney General’s office at (800)282-0515.

2325616

100 - Announcement

)44g`# pnuBS@ fn]q>Z1NBgq>Z }1J

Human Resource Director The Council on Rural Services, a non-profit organization, serving 9 counties in Ohio is seeking a highly-skilled and experienced Human Resource Director to join our leadership team in Piqua, Ohio. The ideal candidate must be energetic, hardworking, motivated, and reflect the leadership traits that support excellence throughout the agency. Ideal candidates will have a Master’s degree in Human Resource Management or related field and 4 or more years of related experience (PHR/SPHR certification is a plus). Skills must include ability to implement strategic plans that ensure compliance with state, federal and other regulatory requirements and provide operational oversight of the HR Department, hiring practices, benefit programs, professional development, and ability to create, understand and interpret all organizational policies and procedures. We offer a comprehensive benefit package and a minimum starting salary of $68,778.

To apply please send cover letter and resume to wmoorman@councilonruralservices.org or visit our website at

www.councilonruralservices.org 2326681

www.dailycall.com

All Display Ads: 2 Days Prior Liners For:

Find your next car

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE-24/7

GENERAL INFORMATION

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS:


10

Friday, October 5, 2012

305 Apartment EVERS REALTY TROY, 2 Bedroom Townhomes 1.5 bath 1 car garage, $695 (937)216-5806 EversRealty.net

305 Apartment

305 Apartment

320 Houses for Rent

535 Farm Supplies/Equipment

560 Home Furnishings

577 Miscellaneous

2 BEDROOM in Troy, Move in special, Stove, refrigerator, W/D, A/C, very clean, no pets. $525. (937)573-7908

TROY, 2 Bedroom ranch, near I-75. Newly refurbished, A/C, appliances, w/d hookup, patio $550 (937)750-1220

PIQUA, 3 bedroom, 112 South Main, 1.5 bath, stove, refrigerator, $500 monthly, No pets, Credit check required, (937)418-8912

WANTED: Used motor oil for farm shop furnace. Will pick up 50 gallons or more. (937)295-2899.

309 1/2 South Wayne, 1 Bedroom, stove, refrigerator, no pets, $325 monthly, Credit check required (937)418-8912

TROY, 567 Stonyridge, 2 bedroom, stove, refrigerator, NO PETS. $450 month, $450 deposit. Credit check required, (937)418-8912.

CURIO CABINET, solid medium oak, sliding glass doors on side, glass shelves, lighted interior, bottom storage. Like brand new. $400 (937)773-2536.

400 - Real Estate

FIREWOOD, All hardwood, $150 per cord delivered or $120 you pick up, (937)726-2780

HOT TUB ThermoSpas 54-Jets, Heats to 105 degrees, 5 persons, big 6.5 HP, 2 water pumps, 1 air pump, 5 headrests, dual therapy seats, doublewide lounge cover, EZ cover lift, handrail brown synthetic, wood cabinet retired home in Florida, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJzYwhAjhvM, $2000 (937)498-9309.

$595, PIQUA'S Finest, all brick, 2 bedroom apartment, attached garage, appliances, CA, (937)492-7351 Nice,2-BR, unfurnished apt in Covington. No pets. $475/month plus utilities, $25 application fee (937)216-3488. PIQUA, 2 bedroom, upper, stove, refrigerator. All utilities furnished. $560 a month, $140 weekly. (937)276-5998 or (937) 902-0491

1'ST MONTHS RENT FREE

PIQUA, 439 Adams, downstairs, 2 bedroom 1 bath, stove, no pets! $450 Monthly, Credit check required, (937)418-8912

CALL FOR DETAILS

• Close to 75 • Toddler Playground • NEW Swimming •

Pool Pet Friendly

PIQUA, 439 1/2 Adams, upstairs, 1 bedroom, Stove, refrigerator, no pets! $315 Monthly, Credit check required, (937)418-8912

ARROWHEAD VILLAGE APARTMENTS 807 Arrowhead, Apt.F Sidney, Ohio (937)492-5006 ✦ ● ✦ ● ✦ ● ✦ ● ✦ ●✦ 2 BEDROOM, 313-1/2 Broadway, upstairs, w/d hookup, stove included, $385, No Pets, Credit check required (937)418-8912

PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedrooms, appliances, CA, water, trash paid, $425 & $525 monthly. Special 1st Month $200 with Paid Deposit (937)673-1821

TROY, 701 McKaig, nice duplex, Spacious 3 bedrooms, w/d hookup, appliances, $700. No pets, (937)845-2039 TROY area, 2 bedroom townhouses, 1-1/2 bath, furnished appliances, W/D hookup, A/C, No dogs $475. (937)339-6776.

For Sale 410 Commercial TROY/TIPP ADDRESSES, private owner, info PO Box 181, Tipp City, Ohio 45371.

500 - Merchandise

320 Houses for Rent 610 ROBINSON, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, remodeled, new appliances and flooring. Basement. Rent $650, same deposit. (419)394-8509 HOUSE for rent in the country. PIQUA schools. No pets. Non-smoking. $650 monthly. ( 9 3 7 ) 5 7 0 - 0 8 3 3 (937)418-7225 IN COUNTRY Covington School District, 3 bedroom trailer, 2 car garage, ( 9 3 7 ) 4 1 7 - 7 1 1 1 (937)448-2974 PIQUA, 818 Vine. 2 bedroom, no garage, $500 mo., plus deposit. (937)773-1668.

FIREWOOD for sale. All seasoned hardwood, $150 per cord split/ delivered, $120 you pick up. ( 9 3 7 ) 8 4 4 - 3 7 5 6 (937)844-3879 FIREWOOD: half cord for $49. 5 cords available. (937)216-8012 FIREWOOD! Hurry winter is almost here. $115 per cord. Split - great size for indoor burning. (937)726-7801.

310 Commercial/Industrial EAGLE PLAZA in Minster Ohio has 2 vacancies. (2700sqft & 4700sqft.) right next door to McDonald's. Call Fred for details 800-463-1706

545 Firewood/Fuel

505 Antiques/Collectibles FREIGHT TRAIN, Lionel 1965, original boxing including platform and buildings, photos, $375 or bargain, Piqua, (248)694-1242.

FIREWOOD, split seasoned delivered (local) $145 cord; $75 rick. (937)559-6623 call anytime. Thanks

525 Computer/Electric/Office

FIREWOOD SPLIT, seasoned, delivered (Miami County) $145 cord. Thank you, (937)615-0986.

COMPUTER SET, Windows XP, loaded, CDROM, DSL Internet, USB. 90 day warranty on parts, $100. (937)339-2347.

HARDWOOD, Seasoned hardwood for sale. $125 a cord. Will deliver. (937)301-7237

535 Farm Supplies/Equipment FARMER with total production management plan, with knowledge and purpose behind each decision. Crop acreage available? Truck for rent, 400 Bashel Parker roll tarp, diesel automatic. Disc with subsoiler $17.00 acre. Till October 11th (937)829-6748

SEASONED FIREWOOD. Hurry only 4 cord left! All hardwood. $120 if you pick up. Will deliver for $135. (937) 570-0045

570 Lawn and Garden COMMERCIAL MOWER, Dixon zero turn, Estate model, very good condition, $2000 obo, (937)726-5761

577 Miscellaneous (2) PC QUEEN pillowtop mattress set, new in plastic, $175. Can deliver. 937-765-6529. CRIB, changing table, highchair, cradle, guardrail, pack-n-play, car seat, gate, tub, blankets, clothes, walker, doorway swing, travel bassinet. (937)339-4233 CRIB, real wood, good condition, stationary sides, $75 (937)339-4233 EARRINGS, diamond, 1 stone .63carat, other stone, .70carat. Mounted in 14K gold with screwback posts, $1200 OBRO. STEREO/RECEIVER, Onyko, 65w x5, 100w RMS with 2 100w Realistic floor speakers, 3 way with 15" woofer, amplified antennae, $250, (937)773-3636. Can be seen at 806 Brook Street, Piqua.

LONGABERGER BASKET and Degenhart Glass collections (937)216-8798 PEDESTAL TABLE with 6 chairs and leaf. Oak entertainment center, electric range (flat-top), couch, recliner, microwave. Excellent condition. ( 9 3 7 ) 5 9 6 - 0 5 6 2 (937)441-9784 WALKER, adult, folds, adjustable height, good condition, $20. (937)339-4233 WALKER, with or without wheels, tub, shower & transfer benches, commode chair, toilet riser, grab bars, canes, entertainment center, bears, dolls. (937)339-4233 WHEELCHAIR, Quantum 1121, Power wheel chair, seat raises & reclines, must sell, asking $600, (937)418-2150

583 Pets and Supplies

SEASONED FIREWOOD $155 per cord. Stacking extra, $125 you pick up. Taylor Tree Service available (937)753-1047

HOSPITAL BED, Invacare Semi-electric. High impact bed and end panels. New condition. 2 months old. Paid $1700, $500 OBO. (937)602-5118

BOSTON TERRIER, Puppies, 8 weeks old, vet checked, 1st shots, dew claws removed, wormed, 1 male & 1 female, (937)394-8745

105 Announcements

105 Announcements

105 Announcements

Meet the

Class of

Pictureit Sold To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Picture it Sold please call: 877-844-8385

555 Garage Sales/Yard Sales

555 Garage Sales/Yard Sales

555 Garage Sales/Yard Sales

555 Garage Sales/Yard Sales

CASSTOWN, 5104 East State Route 55. Friday and Saturday 9am-6pm Large indoor/outdoor multi family, new, used, and vintage items, puzzles, books. dolls, adult clothing, lamps, jewelry, luggage, pegboard, tack, linens, craft/sewing supplies, hand tools, china, glassware, collectibles: Avon, Barbie, Harley Davidson, Home Interiors, NASCAR, Tupperware. Free items. No baby items or kids clothes. No early birds!!

PIQUA, 1535 East State Route 36 (2 miles East of Walmart on the left, just past Fairview Road), October 5 and 6, 9am-4pm. Barn Sale - Antiques, household goods, furniture, tools, water rower machine.

PIQUA 490 E US St Rt 36. October 6th only 9-? Bo-Flex, duck decoys, hutch, bike, winter clothes, lots of childrens clothing and toys.

TROY, 2684 Piqua Troy Road. Saturday 9am-5pm and Sunday 9am-12pm Washer and Dryer, adult and boys clothes, Kathy Van Zealand purses, shoes, Reese hitch for GM SUV, teacher resource books, children books, lots of miscellaneous

PIQUA, 1423 West Grant Street (off Sunset or McKinley), Thursday, Friday & Saturday 9am-5pm, SUPER SALE!!!, Fall and winter clothing, baby items, furniture, lots of miscellaneous PIQUA, 1516 Nicklin Ave. (In alley). Beside Kenmar. Thursday, Friday 9am-6pm, Saturday 9am-2pm. Big screen TV, dryer, air compressor, antiques and lots of miscellaneous.

PIQUA 408 Lambert Drive. Saturday only! 9am-2pm. Cleaned out the attic! Cleaned out the basement! Toys, books, shelves, tv, left handed golf clubs, antique wooden table w/ 2 ladder back chairs, Little Tikes Country Kitchen and Tool Bench, picture frames, movies, surround sound, area rug, miscellaneous household items. PIQUA, 422 Second Street, October 5th and 6th 9am-? Furniture, TV's, computer, boys and girls winter clothes (newbornsize 8) carseat, baby swing, swimming pool, and lots of miscellaneous.

PIQUA, 9545 Country Club Road, Friday & Saturday, 10am-4pm. New coats, clothing, miscellaneous household items, 2 boats, lawn equipment, Christmas decor, Something for everyone!!!

TROY, 998 Brookwood Drive, Thursday & Friday 9am-4pm and Saturday, 8am-Noon. Awesome Sale! Dressers, twin bed, new bedding sets, women's, girls (6-7/8), boys size 4 clothes, shoes, toys, decor, household.

TROY/CASSTOWN 524 N. Childrens Home Rd. Friday 8:30-5 & Saturday 8:30-12:30. Antiques, fishing/boating items, patio furniture, flute, oak chairs, band and table saws, country decor, glassware, junior clothes and more.

So Long Summer… Get ready to

O N ON PICTURE IT SOLD L Y Limit of 1 vehicle per advertisement. Valid only on private party advertising. No coupons or other offers can apply.

Nicklin Learning Center

2 first year of school. 0 HaveWea great are so proud of you! 2 Love, Dad, Mom, and Joseph 4 Class of 2 0 2

2 0 2 4

Shown actual size

Limit of one child per keepsake.

TROY. 2371 Murphy Lane West, Saturday, 10/6 8am-2pm. Queen Bed, living room furniture, boy clothes NB-3T, toys, baby gear.

Through October 31 (ad must begin by this date)

Benjamin Lavey

2 0 2 4

Just $10 for this full color keepsake TROY, 510 Birchwood Court (off Broken Woods/ Merrimont), Saturday, October 6, 9am-1pm. Furniture, golf clubs, luggage, outdoor tools, quality, cute girls/ twins clothes (includes costumes, boots, holiday dresses) - sizes 0-3 years, men's & women's quality clothing, DVD rack, miscellaneous.

½ PRICE

Class of

into

Send photo, form & payment to: Class of 2025 Sidney Daily News 1451 North Vandemark Road Sidney, Ohio 45365 Or email to: myagle@classifiedsthatwork.com

Will appear in all four publications for just $10 Pre-payment is required. We accept: Visa, Mastercard, Discover & AmEx

Name of School: __________________________________ Message: ________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Your Name: ______________________________________ Address: ________________________________________ City, State, Zip: ___________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________ Credit Card No.: __________________________________ Exp. Date: _______________________________________

You liked it so much, we’re offering this special one more month!

30 NTH FOR 1 MO

AVAILABLE ONLY BY CALLING 877-844-8385 OR VISITING ONE OF OUR OFFICES IN SIDNEY, PIQUA OR TROY

Publishes: October 26, 2012 Deadline: October 10, 2012

Child’s Name: ____________________________________

CASH

$

Feature your 2012-2013 Kindergartner in this Special Section

2307112

COVINGTON, 6255 & 6275 West US 36 (between Piqua and Covington). Thursday and Friday 9-5, Saturday 9-4. HUGE GARAGE SALES!! Furniture, appliances, dog cages and much more.

PIQUA, 226 RM Davis Parkway. Saturday only 9am-? BLANKENSHIP'S STORAGE UNITS SALE/GARAGE SALE!!!! Furniture, household items, exercise machine, antiques, books, tools, and lots of miscellaneous. Sell-by boxes.

PIQUA, 8750 Looney Road, October 5 & 6, 9am-6pm. HUGE garage sale! Antique furniture, household items, wheel barrow, yard cart, lawn mower, bolts of material, clothing, puzzles, some Christmas items, many miscellaneous items.

TROY, 392, 443, 445 Shaftsbury Road Thursday, Friday 9am-6pm, Saturday 9am-1pm Lamps, new carpet, baby bed with mattress, working antique wall clocks, glass patio table 4 chairs, red Ryder wagon, tricycle, antiques, clothes boys infant to size 4, junior, ladies, men's on racks, and miscellaneous

2 0 2 4 0 2 3

2325628

COVINGTON, 307 Richeson Street, Thursday, Friday, Saturday 9am-6pm. Antiques, glassware, snow blower, lathe, tools, clothes

PIQUA 217 Third Street Thursday, Friday 9am-6pm, and Saturday 9am-3pm Estate sale, household goods, wood crafts supplies Grapevine wreaths, tools, dishes, clothing women's 10-14, men's and young men's, kitchen table and chairs two sets,

PIQUA, 701 Boone Street (corner of Boone and College), Saturday, October 6, 8:30am-? MOVING SALE! Outside dog cage, camping equipment, grill, precision machinist tools & metal removing tools, tables, lamps, storage units, clothing: boy's 6M-3 years, lots of miscellaneous items.

2025


Friday, October 5, 2012

PIQUA DAILY CALL • PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

&

DIRECTORY

Service Business To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Service & Business Directory please call: 877-844-8385 660 Home Services Let us help

K I D S P L AC E

937-418-1361

Call today for FREE estimate Fully Insured Repairs • Cleaning • Gutter Guard

1144 Fisher Dr., Piqua, OH 45356

2319576

660 Home Services

2325892

& Service All 69 Check Heating Systems

$

CALL TODAY! (937)418-4712 or (937)710-5277 625 Construction

1002 N. Main St. Sidney, Ohio 45365

Special

• 1st, 2nd and 3rd shift • Tax Claimable • Price Negotiable for more than one child • Meals and snacks provided • Close to Nicklin & Wilder School District • Mornings, before and after school

CHILDREN 2 YRS AND UP 40 HOURS $70 WEEK 25 HOURS AND LESS $30 WEEK

Gutter & Service

24 Hour Service All Makes Service Sales, Service, Installation

1-937-492-8897

Sparkle Clean HERITAGE Cleaning Service GOODHEW • Metal Roofing • Sales & Service Tammy Welty • Standing Seam (937)857-4222 Snap Lock Panels 660 Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured

2306129

INFANTS 0-2 YEARS 40 HOURS $70 WEEK 25 HOURS AND LESS $30 WEEK

Heating & Cooling

2323440

that work .com

620 Childcare

DC SEAMLESS

Glen’s

CLEAN OUT your garage

Home Services

AK Construction Commercial / Residential

A&E Home Services LLC

“WE REPAIR METAL ROOFS”

Roofing • Drywall • Painting Plumbing • Remodels • Flooring

765-857-2623 765-509-0069

A simple, affordable, solution to all your home needs.

2320623

• New Roof & Roof Repair • Painting • Concrete • Hauling • Demo Work • New Rubber Roofs All Types of Interior/Exterior Construction & Maintenance

Eric Jones, Owner

Insurance jobs welcome • FREE Estimates Mention this ad and get $500 OFF of $4,995 and up on Roofing and siding

Licensed Bonded-Insured

640 Financial

2004 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER 4x4

BUY $ELL SEEK

starting at $

(See Us For Do-It-Yourself Products) For 75 Years

Since 1936

655 Home Repair & Remodel

that work .com

937-493-9978 Free Inspections

2317891

Call to find out what your options are today! 2309527

00

159 !!

665 Lawn, Garden, Landscaping “All Our Patients Die”

655 Home Repair & Remodel

103,000 miles, excellent condition and runs great! Must see. Nonsmoker. $9000 OBO

COOPER’S BLACKTOP

2321989

PAVING, REPAIR & SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

(937)615-0194

937-875-0153 937-698-6135

2318757

Bankruptcy Attorney WE KILL BED BUGS! Emily M. Greer, Esq. KNOCKDOWN SERVICES

I am a debt relief agency. I help people file for bankruptcy relief under the United States Bankruptcy Code.

2000 COACHMAN CATALINA 27 FOOTER Awning 1yr old, refrigerator 2yrs old, everything comes with camper: Hitch, Tote tank, Patio lights, VERY CLEAN!, $6500 obo, (937)596-6028 OR (937)726-1732

665 Lawn, Garden, Landscaping

A-1 Affordable

TREE & LAWN CARE & ROOFING & SIDING SPECIALIST Providing Quality Service Since 1989

YEAR ROUND TREE WORK

2004 FORD F-250 XLT Extended cab, short bed, Power stroke V-8 Turbo Diesel, 6.0 liter, 4WD, automatic, Bed liner, towing package, cloth interior, 108,000 miles, $14,500 (937)778-1665

937-492-ROOF

GLYNN FELTNER, OWNER • LICENSED • BONDED • FULLY INSURED

Cell: 937-308-6334 • Office: 937-719-3237 2319458

Roofing, Windows, Siding, Fire & Water Restoration

OME IMP ROVEM AL H EN T T TO

Residential Commercial Industrial

2319331

937-335-6080

Stone

TICON PAVING

INSURED

BONDED

ALL YOUR NEEDS IN ONE

937-489-8558

ROOFS • KITCHENS • BATHS • REMODELING WINDOWS SIDING

660 Home Services

PORCHES GARAGES

Asphalt

Piqua, Ohio 937-773-0637

Install - Repair Replace - Crack Fill Seal Coat

2319581

DRYWALL ADDITIONS

2005 KAWASAKI VULCAN MEAN STREAK 10,000 miles. Excellent condition. 1600cc, fuel injected, Vance and Hines pipes, power commander, new tires. $5300 OBO. (937)638-9070

660 Home Services 2316156

Senior Homecare Personal • Comfort

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992 Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

937-573-4737 www.buckeyehomeservices.com

• Spouting • Metal Roofing • Siding • Doors

#Repairs Large and #Room Additions #Kitchens/Baths #Windows #Garages

Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

Sold

(937) 339-1902 or (937) 238-HOME Free Estimates • Fully Insured • 17 Years of Home Excellence

BEWARE OF STORM CHASERS!!! Shop Locally

Affordable Roofing & Home Improvements ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS: Seamless Gutters • Re-roofs • Siding• Tear Offs New Construction • Call for your FREE estimate

I it for more than I ever made playing it.

2007 BASS TRACKER Pro Team 170TX, powered by 2007 50hp Mercury, Trolling motor, Trail Star trailer, Custom cover, superb condition $8900. (937)394-8531

COOPER’S GRAVEL

875-0153 698-6135

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts 2316153

2316219

2322048

Small #Basements #Siding #Doors #Barns

2007 FORD TRUCK FX4WD, silver metallic clear coat with black sport cloth bucket seats, well maintained, super cab with bed liner, new brakes, rotors, and calipers, clean car fax provided, 102,644 miles, $12,900. (937)789-8473

thing. If ic wasn’t my VIOLIN. Mus this ing musician, you’re a budd for you. ill be perfect instrument w ne. tu r to play in Just remembe

60+k miles, must sell! Will sacrifice. 2321536

(937)570-9463

(937)726-5761

PUBLIC NOTICE DIRECTORY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS MIAMI COUNTY, OHIO Case No.: 12CV00126 Judge: Christopher Gee

The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of the CWABS, Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-4 Plaintiff,

LEGAL NOTICE IN SUIT FOR FORECLOSURE OF MORTGAGE

FirstPlus Bank, whose last known address is 18302 Irvine Blvd., #300, Tustin, CA 92780 and the unknown Successors, Assigns and Surviving Entities of FirstPlus Bank, all of whose residences are unknown and cannot by reasonable diligence be ascertained, will take notice that on the 22nd day of February, 2012, The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of the CWABS, Inc., AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2005-4 filed its Complaint in the Common Pleas Court of Miami County, Ohio in Case No. 12CV00126, on the docket of the Court, and the object and demand for relief of which pleading is to foreclose the lien of plaintiff's mortgage recorded upon the following described real estate to wit: Property Address: 423 Glenwood Avenue, Piqua, OH 45356

and being more particularly described in plaintiff's mortgage recorded in Mortgage Book 1626, page 359, of this County Recorder's Office.

All of the above named defendants are required to answer within twenty-eight (28) days after last publication, which shall be published once a week for three consecutive weeks, or they might be denied a hearing in this case.

Susana E. Lykins, Trial Counsel Ohio Supreme Court Reg. #0075603 LERNER, SAMPSON & ROTHFUSS Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 5480 Cincinnati, OH 45201-5480 (513) 241-3100 attyemail@lsrlaw.com

9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012 2321939

INVITATION TO BID

This aforementioned scope of work will be let under one (1) contract. Owner:

Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority 1695 Troy-Sidney Road Troy, OH 45373 937.339.1431

Architect: RDA Group Architects, LLC 7945 Washington Woods Drive Dayton, OH 45459 937.610.3440 Copies of the bidding documents may be obtained upon request from MRC Reprographics, 587 Congress Park Drive, Dayton OH, 45459, Phone 937.428.7831 for the amount of $30.00 [plus applicable shipping and handling], made payable to: MRC Reprographics, for each set of documents requested. Bidders may examine the bid documents at the following locations: Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority and RDA Group Architects. A pre-bid conference will be held at 11:00 AM on October 16, 2012, at Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority Offices, 1695 Troy-Sidney Road, Troy, OH. The scope and details of the proposed project work will be discussed. Attendance is recommended. A certified check or bank draft, payable to Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority, Par Value US Government Bonds or satisfactory bid bond executed by the acceptable sureties in an amount equal to five percent of the bid shall be submitted with each bid.

2008 CHEVY IMPALA

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645 Hauling

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The Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority, Troy, Ohio will receive sealed bids for the BATHROOM RENOVATIONS AT THE MORRIS HOUSE at 11:00 AM on November 6, 2012, at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud.

725 Eldercare

675 Pet Care

2004 FORD MUSTANG Cobra SVT, Super charged V8, Number 859 of 1896 convertibles made (only 167 torch red made) beautiful car, only 3,100 miles, must see, $27,000 obo Call (937)658-0318

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H D TRAILER

Timothy L. Chester, et al. Defendants.

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To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Picture it Sold please call: 877-844-8385

1996 TERRY 5TH WHEEL TRAILER 32.5 ft, clean, set up at Kozy Campground Grand Lake, comes with 8x8 shed, picnic bench, and other misc., or can be moved. (937)773-6209 or (937)418-2504

710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding

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600 - Services

Picture it Sold

11

Call (937)418-8296 or (937)418-9696

Attention is called to the provisions for equal employment opportunity, and payment of not less than the prevailing salaries and wages, as set forth in the Contract Documents, that must be adhered to on this project. Any questions or concerns should be addressed to Mr. Jack Baird, Executive Director, at Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority at 937.339.1431 Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any informalities in the bidding. No bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days subsequent to the opening of bids without the consent of Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority. Sealed bids are to be submitted to the attention of: Mr. Jack Baird, Executive Director / Contracting Officer at Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority, 1695 Troy-Sidney Road, Troy, OH 45373 WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Phone: 937.339.1431 Fax: 937.339.8905 TDD: 937.335.7921 10/5, 10/12-2012

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12

Friday, October 5, 2012

583 Pets and Supplies

PUBLIC NOTICE DIRECTORY

CATS/ KITTENS, 6 weeks old, black, assorted barn cats of all ages. All free! (937)773-5245. LAB PUPPIES Full blooded. 3 chocolate males, one black female, 3 black males. 8 weeks old. $250 OBO (937)638-2781 MINIATURE DACHSHUND, AKC, 6 puppies, 8 weeks, 1 shot, both sexes, various colors/ coats, will be small, adorable, $ 2 7 5 - $ 3 2 5 , (937)667-1777 OBEDIENCE CLASSES by Piqua Dog Club Starts October 15th at Piqua Armory. Bring current shot records but No dogs the first night www.piquadogclub.com (937)663-4412

586 Sports and Recreation PING-PONG TABLE, standard size, 4 paddles & balls. Like new - hardly used. Would be a great Christmas gift! Please call after Noon to look at. $125 saltbench@aol.com. (937)606-2235.

590 Tool and Machinery SAWS, 2 Craftsman. 10" table saw & 10" radial arm saw. Both in excellent condition. Original owners manual plus extra blades. Call and leave message, Troy area, (937)658-0906. TOOLS, Retired tool maker selling machinist tools, see at 202 North Linden, Anna during garage sales, September 28th-29th or call (937)394-7251

800 - Transportation

805 Auto 2001 OLDSMOBILE Silhoutte, green with tan interior, 157,000 miles. FWD, V6, 3.4L, gas, automatic, very clean, well maintained minivan loaded with power features, leather interior. Second owner. $4600. (937)497-0694 2007 SEBRING Chrysler, 4 door sedan, navy blue, 4 cylinder automatic, 21,500 miles, excellent condition, $11,500 (937)524-7584 2011 BUICK Lucerne, 18k miles, most all bells & whistles, leather interior, On Star, quick silver color, (937)570-6699

850 Motorcycles/Mopeds 2002 HARLEY DAVIDSON ELECTRA GLIDE. Low mileage, Shriner's bike. White with black leather seat. Beautiful bike. (937)339-8833

875 Storage Indoor Storage Boats ......... $25 month Cars ............ $25 month Excellent facility (937)417-2508

890 Trucks 1986 GMC, 1 ton dully, 350 cubic inch, power steering and brakes, cruise control, 410 rear end, new paint, brakes, calipers, nice truck $2500 (937)689-6910 2001 DODGE, Dakota Sport, 76k miles, V6, Automatic, A/C, power locks, tilt, cruise, extra nice, $5000 firm, (937)492-4743 or (937)726-1764 2004 FORD F150, extended cab, mostly highway brand new tires, good, $7500 (937)657-1649.

4WD, silver, miles, runs OBO,

PLACE YOUR AD IN THE CLASSIFIEDS THAT WORK 877-844-8385 OR ON THE WEB AT WWW.DAILYCALL.COM • PIQUA DAILY CALL

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-395 U.S. Bank, NA vs. Roger D. Kirkland, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-027890 Prior Deed Reference: General Warranty Deed, Volume 774, Page 121, Filed 06/20/206 Also known as: 1514 Madison Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Seventy Eight Thousand and 00/100 ($78,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Charles V. Gasior, Attorney 9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012 2322126

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-219 Fifth Third Bank vs. Irene L. Cavender, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Village of Covington, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: H19-011448 Prior Deed Reference: Deed Volume 589, Page 255 Also known as: 580 South High Street, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Seventy Seven Thousand and 00/100 ($77,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Erin E. McConnell, Attorney 9/21, 9/28 10/5-2012

2324937

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-353 Bank of America, NA vs. Alan C. Wintrow, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-029080 Also known as: 704 Cottage Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Forty Five Thousand and 00/100 ($45,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Jeffrey R. Jinkens, Attorney 9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012 2322129

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-190 The Bank of New York Mellon vs. Henry D. Hitchcock, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Village of Covington, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: H19-002270 Prior Deed Reference: Quit Claim Deed, Book 678, Page 170 filed 05/23/1997 Also known as: 307 South High Street, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Forty Nine Thousand and 00/100 ($49,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Robert R. Hoose, Attorney 9/21, 9/28 10/5-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-528 Wright-Patt Credit Union, Inc. vs. Jennifer R. Bolton, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on November 7, 2012 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-063670 Prior Deed Reference: Book 606, Page 585 Also known as: 1508 Margene Drive, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Eighty One Thousand and 00/100 ($81,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Charles V. Gasior, Attorney 2324940 10/05, 10/12, 10/19-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-023 JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA vs. Michael R. Penny, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 31, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-031190 Prior Deed Reference: Deed Book 548, Page 637 and Deed Book 652, Page 661 Also known as: 902 West Grant Street, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Sixty Thousand and 00/100 ($60,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Kelly M. McKoy, Attorney 9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012 2322117

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-382 Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA vs. Ryan D. Hicks, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Newberry, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: H16-011400 Prior Deed Reference: Official Record 749, Page 259 Also known as: 10795 State Route 36, Bradford, Ohio 45308 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Forty Five Thousand and 00/100 ($45,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. John E. Bowers, Attorney 9/21, 9/28 10/5-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-446 Bank of America, NA vs. Kelly J. Coffey, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-032130 Also known as: 713 Leonard Street, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Fifty Four Thousand and 00/100 ($54,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. George J. Annos, Attorney 9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-445 Bank of America, NA vs. David Bell, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-072650 Also known as: 1800 Carlyle Drive, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Seventeen Thousand and 00/100 ($117,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. George J. Annos, Attorney 9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012 2322119

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-375 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation vs. Matthew R. Minnich, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Township of Newton, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: I20-049050 Prior Deed Reference: Book 723, Page 729 Also known as: 9590 West State Route 718, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Fifty Thousand and 00/100 ($150,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Ellen L. Fornash, Attorney 9/21, 9/28 10/5-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-126 The Bank of New York Mellon vs. Timothy L. Chester, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-061600 Prior Deed Reference: Deed Book 796, Page 15 Also known as: 423 Glenwood Avenue, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Thirty Nine Thousand and 00/100 ($39,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Susana E. Lykins, Attorney 9/28, 10/5, 10/12-2012

SHERIFFʼS SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 11-367 Union Savings Bank vs. John J. Karpinski, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on October 24, 2012 at 10:00 oʼclock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-076937 Prior Deed Reference: Volume 7, Page 817 Also known as: 8940 North Troy Sidney Road, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at One Hundred Fifty Nine Thousand and 00/100 ($159,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. Maria Divita, Attorney 9/21, 9/28 10/5-2012

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-410 Bank of America, NA vs. Matthew C. Myers, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on November 7, 2012 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the Village of Covington, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: H19-004440 Also known as: 503 East Walnut Street, Covington, Ohio 45318 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Ninety Thousand and 00/100 ($90,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. George J. Annos, Attorney 10/05, 10/12, 10/19-2012 2324936

SHERIFF’S SALE MIAMI COUNTY COMMON PLEAS Case No.: 12-484 Bank of America, NA vs. Jill Kiser, et al Pursuant to the command of an Order of Sale in the above name cause to me directed by the Court of Common Pleas of Miami County, Ohio, I will offer at Public Sale in the lobby of the Sheriff on November 7, 2012 at 10:00 o’clock in the a.m. the following described premises, to-wit: Situated in the City of Piqua, in the County of Miami, and in the State of Ohio Parcel Number: N44-048110 Also known as: 514 Second Street, Piqua, Ohio 45356 A full legal description may be obtained in the Office of the Recorder of Miami County, Ohio. Appraised at Forty Five Thousand and 00/100 ($45,000.00) Dollars and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraisement. TERMS OF SALE: 10% of appraised value down time of sale and .5% of appraised value for conveyance and recording, balance within 30 days of confirmation. George J. Annos, Attorney 10/05, 10/12, 10/19-2012

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BUCKEYES

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Friday, October 5, 2012

13

Buck Eyes An inside look at Ohio State football WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

BUCKEYE BRAIN BUSTERS

NAME: Jim Pacenta HOMETOWN: Akron OHIO STATE YEARS: 19731976 HIGHLIGHTS: Pacenta was a seldom-used quarterback who led the Buckeyes to four wins in five games his senior season when starter Rod Gerald was lost to a back injury that kept him out of the final five games of the regular season. Pacenta led OSU quarterbacks with 404 yards passing in 1976. AFTER OSU: Pacenta is a cardiologist in Dayton.

1: How many football national championships has Nebraska won?

SAY WHAT?

RECRUITING UPDATE Marcus Baugh, a 2013 Ohio State verbal commitment from Riverside (Calif.) North High School, caught a 49-yard touchdown pass in a 51-6 win over Moreno Valley Vista Del Lago last Friday. J.T. Barrett, a 2013 Ohio State verbal commitment from Rider, Tex., completed 8 of 12 passes for 162 yards and a touchdown and rushed 22 times for 130 yards and two TDs in a 50-14 win over Byron Nelson High School last Friday. Montae Nicholson, a safety in the 2014 recruiting class, has received an offer from Ohio State. He also has offers from West Virginia, Penn State, Michigan and others.

2: How many Heisman Trophy

winners has Nebraska had? 3: Which bowl has Nebraska played

in most often? 4: What Youngstown high school

did Nebraska coach Bo Pelini graduate from? 5: What Cleveland high school did former Nebraska coach Frank Solich graduate from? Answers: 1. Five; 2. Three; 3. Orange Bowl 17 times; 4. Cardinal Mooney; 5. Holy Name

“If you can’t get ready for a game like this, I don’t know why you’re playing football.” — Ohio State linebacker Etienne Sabino about playing Nebraska.

No. 12 Ohio State vs. No. 21 Nebraska, 8 p.m., Saturday, ABC QUARTERBACKS

RECEIVERS

It’s dueling dual-threat quarterbacks with Braxton Miller Corey Brown’s 12 catches against Michigan State tied going against Nebraska’s Taylor Martinez. him for fourth all-time in a single game at Ohio State and Miller has rushed for 933 yards, second overall in the Big was only two short of the record of 14 by David Boston. Ten, passed for 577 yards and eight touchdowns and comBrown (32 catches, 317 yards) has more than doubled pleted 63 percent of his passes. Martinez had thrown for his total of 14 receptions last season. Devin Smith (19 1,059 yards and 11 touchdowns and rushed for 298 yards. catches, 351 yards, 4 TDs) continues to be the big-play Miller ranks second overall in the Big Ten in rushing and his 90 carries are receiver in OSU’s offense. more than all but four Big Ten running backs have. Quincy Enunwa’s 16 catches lead Nebraska, but Kenny Bell (15 catches, 330 Advantage: Ohio State yards, 4 TDs) has been the most productive pass catcher for the Cornhuskers. Advantage: Ohio State

OFFENSIVE LINE OSU coach Urban Meyer says he really likes the Buckeyes’ top five offensive linemen but he sees a significant gap between the starters and their backups. The line played its best game of the season at Michigan State and dominated the Spartans’ defense when Ohio State ran out the last four minutes of the game without having to punt. Nebraska leads the Big Ten in scoring, total offense and rushing. Guards Spencer Long and Seung Hoon Choi and tackle Jeremiah Serles are two-year starters. Advantage: Nebraska

DEFENSIVE LINE Defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins and ends John Simon and Nathan Williams led the way when Ohio State held Michigan State’s Le’Veon Bell to 45 yards on 17 carries. Michael Bennett, who was expected to start this season, got into a game for the first time after being sidelined by a groin injury. OSU and Nebraska are tied for the Big Ten lead in sacks (5). The Cornhuskers, who were shredded for 344 yards rushing in their only loss, 36-30 to UCLA, limited Wisconsin to 60 yards on the ground in a come-from-behind 30-27 win last week. End Cameron Meredith and tackle Baker Steinkuhler are three-year starters and end Eric Martin has 3.5 sacks this season. Advantage: Ohio State

LINEBACKERS

JOHN SIMON The 6-foot-2, 263-pound senior defensive lineman from Youngstown has helped Ohio State hold opposing offenses to 100.8 yards rushing per game. The Buckeyes are tied for first in the Big Ten in quarterback sacks with five. Simon has a sack and 2.5 tackles for losses.

RUNNING BACKS With Jordan Hall expected to be out with a partial tear of the posterior cruciate ligament in his knee, backfield depth is a question for Ohio State. Carlos Hyde, who rushed for 49 yards in a 17-16 win over Michigan State last week, is the only proven back the Buckeyes have. Hall’s absence also leaves Ohio State looking for a big-play threat other than Miller in the backfield. For Nebraska, Rex Burkhead (273 yards on 29 carries) rushed for 1,357 yards last season but has started slowly this year after missing two games with a knee injury. Ameer Abdullah (486 yards, 5 touchdowns) has emerged as the top running threat. Advantage: Nebraska

BIG TEN STANDINGS Leaders Division Big Ten Overall W L W L Ohio State 1 0 5 0 Penn State 1 0 3 2 Purdue 0 0 3 1 Wisconsin 0 1 3 2 Indiana 0 1 2 2 Illinois 0 1 2 3 Legends Division Big Ten Overall W L W L Northwestern 1 0 5 0 Nebraska 1 0 4 1 Iowa 1 0 3 2 Michigan 0 0 2 2 Minnesota 0 1 4 1 Michigan State 0 1 3 2

WEEKEND SCHEDULE BIG TEN SATURDAY Nebraska at OHIO STATE, 8 p.m. Michigan State at Indiana, noon Northwestern at Penn State, noon Illinois at Wisconsin, 3:30 p.m. Michigan at Purdue, 8 p.m. TOP 25 Kansas at Kansas State, noon Arizona at Stanford, 3 p.m. LSU at Florida, 3:30 p.m. Georgia at S. Carolina, 7 p.m. West Virginia at Texas, 7 p.m. Miami (Fla.) at Notre Dame, 7:30 p.m. Florida State at N.C. State, 8 pm. Washington at Oregon, 10:30 p.m.

Etienne Sabino had eight tackles and a sack at Michigan State and Ryan Shazier was singled out by Meyer for his improvement in recent games. Middle linebacker remains a question, with neither Storm Klein or Curtis Grant producing what OSU is looking for at that position. Nebraska’s Will Compton leads the team in tackles (44) and has six tackles for losses. Three of those tackles for loss came against Wisconsin. Like Ohio State, the Cornhuskers have played two linebackers most of the season because they’ve faced few traditional offenses. Advantage: Even

DEFENSIVE BACKS Bradley Roby came back strong against Michigan State after sitting out the UAB game with a shoulder injury. Safety C.J. Barnett, who has missed the last two games with an ankle injury, is expected to return. OSU is tied for second in the Big Ten in interceptions with seven. Nebraska has only three. But the Buckeyes rank eleventh in the Big Ten in pass defense and Nebraska is fourth, but the Cornhuskers have allowed seven passing TDs, compared to five for Ohio State. Advantage: Even

SPECIAL TEAMS Ohio State kicker Drew Basil is 2 of 2 on field goals and Nebraska’s Brett Maher is 7 of 12. Sixtysix percent of Maher’s kickoffs have been touchbacks and 33 percent of OSU’s have been. Advantage: Ohio State

2012 OSU LEADERS Passing Yards Braxton Miller .........................933 Kenny Guiton ............................37 Rushing Yards Braxton Miller .........................577 Jordan Hall.............................218 Carlos Hyde.......................... .158 Receiving Yards Devin Smith ...........................351 Corey Brown ...........................317 Jake Stoneburner .....................92 Field Goals Drew Basil...............................2/2 Tackles Ryan Shazier..............................48 Etienne Sabino..........................36 Interceptions Travis Howard..............................3

OSU SCHEDULE Sept. 1 ..............Miami of Ohio, 56-10 Sept. 8 ..............Central Florida 31-16 Sept. 15 ................... California 35-28 Sept. 22 ........................... UAB 29-15 Sept. 29 ...... at Michigan State, 17-16 Oct. 6 ..................... Nebraska, 8 p.m. Oct. 13 ...................at Indiana, 8 p.m. Oct. 20 ........................... Purdue, TBA Oct. 27 ............. at Penn State, 6 p.m. Nov. 3 .............................. Illinois, TBA Nov. 17 ...................at Wisconsin, TBA Nov. 24 .......................Michigan, noon Content compiled by Jim Naveau and design by Ross Bishoff • The Lima News Copyright © 2012 The Lima News. Reproduction of any portion of this material is prohibited without express consent.

Jim Naveau The Lima News jnaveau@limanews.com 419-993-2087

Play it again, Brutus COLUMBUS — The answer Ohio State linebacker Etienne Sabino gave was exactly what you would expect. Asked how surrendering a 21-point lead and losing 34-27 to Nebraska last season would affect him when Ohio State plays the Cornhuskers on Saturday night at Ohio Stadium, he said, “Last year was last year. I’m not going to forget it but I’m not going to dwell on it.” Football players and coaches always tell you the past doesn’t matter. Until it matters. Nebraska came from 17 points down to beat Wisconsin last Saturday night. And OSU defensive line coach Mike Vrabel has no doubts they were thinking about last year’s Ohio State game. “I’m sure they drew on last year’s Ohio State game at some point in time. Bo Pelini said, ‘Guys we were in this spot against Ohio State, same stadium, same time of night and this is what we did.’ As a player you can say, ‘Yeah coach, you’re right,’” Vrabel said. So, if the past is not really in the past, what are the games in the last 20 years the current or former Ohio State players probably would most like to have a chance to do over? Here’s my list: 1. Ohio State-Michigan 1995. If Ohio State had won, it would have gone to the Rose Bowl and had a shot at a national championship. Instead, the Wolverines won 31-23 in Ann Arbor. Also, surrendering a school-record 317 yards rushing to Tshimanga Biakabutuka still stings. 2. Ohio State-Michigan State 1998. The stunner against which all stunners since then have been measured. If OSU — which led by 15 points in the second half at home — had won, a national championship was within reach. But Michigan State, a sub-.500 team, shocked the unbeaten Buckeyes 28-24. 3. Ohio State-Florida 2006. SEC. Gator Chomp. 41-14. Florida upsets No. 1 Ohio State in the BCS title game. Who knew Urban Meyer would be on the other side just five years later? 4. Ohio State-Michigan 1996. OSU’s offense couldn’t score touchdowns. Shawn Springs slipped. John Cooper changed starting quarterbacks with an unbeaten record. Another national championship dream ended in a 13-9 Michigan win. 5. Ohio State-Penn State 2005. Losing to Texas earlier in the season might not have sunk the Buckeyes’ BCS championship hopes but this 17-10 loss did.

COUNTDOWN

Michigan vs. Ohio State

51

Days until kickoff

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INFORMATION Call ROB KISER, sports editor, at 773-2721, ext. 209, from 8 p.m. to midnight weekdays.

SPORTS

Piqua Daily Call • www.dailycall.com

INSIDE ■ OSU remembers painful loss, page 15. ■ Miami East wins CCC soccer, page 16.

14

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2012

IN BRIEF ■ Basketball

Piqua youth hoop signups Piqua Youth League basketball singups will be held next week for boys and girls in grades 5-6. Signups will be held from10-11:30 a.m. Oct. 6 at Piqua Junior High School. Cost is $40. More information on the league will be provided at signups.

Russia seeks frosh coach The Russia freshman boys basketball program is looking for a freshman coach for the upcoming season. Anyone interested should contact Russia boys varsity coach Paul Bremigan or Russia athletic director Todd Wion at (937) 526-3156.

ROB KISER/CALL PHOTOS

Versailles’ Brandon Groff watches his approach shot on the seventh hole of the Highlands nine Thursday.

Groff, Raiders come close

■ Football

Piqua frosh drop game

Just miss qualifying for state golf BY ROB KISER Sports Editor rkiser@dailycall.com

The Piqua freshman football team lost a close game to Trotwood-Madison 25-21. Quarterback Ruppert Delacruz was 12-for-23 passing for 179 yards with two touchdowns, a twopoint conversion, and one interception. He also had eight rushes for 35 yards and one touchdown. Ike Karn had four rushes for 19 yards. Derrick Gullett had six receptions for 126 yards with one touchdown and a two-point conversion. He also had 13 rushes for 74 yards. Jack Schmiesing had two receptions for 37 yards, while Nash Black added two receptions for 13 yards and one touchdown. Piqua will return to action Saturday. The Indians will host Sidney at Alexander Stadium/Purk Field.

■ Baseball

Pitching camp at Greenville The Phiten Advanced Pitching Camp will be held Oct. 14 at The Academy on Riffle Avenue in Greenville. The camp is for ages 14-18 and will run from noon to 5 p.m. Cost is $55. For more information, call (937) 423-3053.

STUMPER

What was the Q: Ohio State football team’s record last year?

A:

6-7

QUOTED "It's a looooong flight. I went through it last year. It's not fun at all.” —Bradley Roby on last year’s loss to Nebraska

John Copella watches a tee shot Thursday.

WEST MIDDLETOWN — Versailles coach Pete DiSalvo knew the odds were stacked against his boys golf team at the Division II district tournament Thursday at Weatherwax Golf Course. But, senior Brandon Groff nearly defied those odds. Groff carded a 78 to lead Versailles to a ninth-place finish and missed advancing to state as an individual by just one shot. “Brandon played super,” DiSalvo said. “He just had a couple bad holes and you can’t have that down here.” Groff got off to a fast start, shooting a one-over par 37 on the Highlands nine. But, on the Woodside nine, he had a double and triple bogey and carded a 41. “You take away those two holes, he was one over par,” DiSalvo said. “He played great all day, with the exception of those two holes.” The rest of the Versailles scores were Tyler Drees 84, Ryan Knapke 91, Mitchell Stover 98, Alex Stucke 98. The Tigers had a 351 team total. “We came in as ta four seed,” DiSalvo said. “That puts us in the

nine-12 area and that is right where we were. We have everyone but Brandon (Groff) back next year.” ■ Russia coach Paul Bremigan had been there before in the Division III district tournament. But, he knows sooner or later the Raiders will knock the state tournament door down. Russia finished third with a 340 total, with just two teams advancing on to state. “We have been third a lot,” Bremigan said. “But, this is our sixth straight year at district. It shows us we are doing the right things and eventually, we are going to make it to state.” Russia scores included Austin Tebbe 82, Treg Francis 83, Luke Dapore 87, Zach Sherman 88, Bryce Dues 94. The Raiders shot 165 on the Meadows nine and were just two shots out of first. But, the Raiders score went up on the Valley View nine. “I don’t know that there is any one reason why,” Bremigan said. “We just didn’t play as well the second nine. That happens.” ■ Lehman’s John Copella got off to a good start with a 38 on the Meadows nine, but he came in See GOLF/Page 16

Piqua has successful hoop season Indians advance to state semifinals in 1917 The Piquonian staff tried to get the fans ready for the 1917 basketball season. “The efforts of Coach Dittmer and Captain Ellerman will do much to bring out a good basketball squad again this year. The question is – will the school work with them, will the student body do their share? It is not – what can you do, but – what will you do to help them? Why not help as much as possible? Just because we are not all athletes is no sign we can’t help. We are all endowed with voices --- the majority of them rather loud. So even if we can’t help the boys with the team work we can’t forget that our presence is needed at the games. “You freshman can soon learn our yells. Then come out and yell yourself hoarse. It is all for the good cause. Here are two who are working together for the old school and for you, its students. Are they going to receive your aid?

Let’s all get together and make the answer ‘yes’ for the interest of ‘Old P.H.S.” The season opener was against Greenville. “Piqua High opened her basket ball season last evening in the P.H.S. gym, defeating Greenville High by a 40-10 score. The visitors were dangerous at no time and most of the time appeared to be playing out of their class. “An enthusiastic crowd of High school students saw the game. Every inch of space in the gym was occupied by a zealous admirer of the red and blue. The home team lacked nothing in the form of support and encouragement.” For the first time Versailles appeared on the schedule. “After meeting Versailles last night in the P.H.S. gym, the red and blue wrote ‘victory’ after the score, 46-30. As usual a big bunch of high school students saw the game. “The work of P.H.S. was not consistent, otherwise the score would have been

DUANE BACHMAN The History of Piqua Athletics A Journal Winter 1917

very much more than it was. The boys started off in the first half like a house afire, in the second they seemed to weaken measurably, especially on the defense.” Sidney was the third game of the season. “It is sad not to realize one’s expectations. So it was with Sidney when they came to Piqua expecting to win. “The game was practically a run-away as our pass-work and team-work showed. “The final score showed fifty-one to our opponents eleven points.” Still undefeated, St. Marys appeared next on

For Home Delivery, Call: 773-2725

the schedule. “The contest with St. Marys High School proved a very satisfactory practice game. When the butchering was over we had ninety-two points to our opponents seventeen. “The team went in with the old time fight, and from the beginning there was no doubt that the Red and Blue would be victorious. With plenty of confidence and nerve they took away their opponents breath by their nervy shooting.” Piqua traveled to Troy for the next contest. “P.H.S. went to Troy last night to play basket ball and came home on the short end of a 25-21 score. “The game might have been called indoor football. Both teams played with unnecessary roughness which killed all hopes for the real basket ball, and slowed up the game. There are several reasons for Piqua’s defeat. “It was the team’s first game on a strange floor. Troy’s gridiron tactics pre-

vented clean play, good pass work is impossible on Troy’s floor, and the referee s seemed to favor our opponents. “Besides, Troy executed some of the luckiest flukes ever performed. A large crowd was out, all seats being taken and many standing. “Piqua sent down a large student delegation, accompanied by a number of teachers, and Troy turned out in fine number. Seats had to be placed along the sides of the gym which made it still narrower, but the public seemed satisfied even to get in.” The game with Springfield was cancelled. “On account of the danger of an epidemic of small-pox in the high school, it was absolutely necessary that Manager Alexander should cancel our date with Springfield. “The primary reason was that one member of the squad had been ill

See HISTORY/Page 15


SPORTS

PIQUA DAILY CALL • WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

Friday, October 5, 2012

15

Buckeyes haven’t forgotten loss Look to even score with Cornhuskers for last year COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — It was a game that went into the Nebraska record books — and the Ohio State memory banks. The Cornhuskers mounted the biggest comeback in school history a year ago, finishing with a 24-0 flurry to erase a 21point, second-half deficit, to beat the Buckeyes 3427 in the first Big Ten game ever played in Lincoln, Neb. It's a new year but Ohio State hasn't forgotten. Heading into Saturday night's showdown at Ohio Stadium, a number of the 12th-ranked Buckeyes believe some payback is due

to the No. 21 Cornhuskers for what happened then. "I have heard them talk," said Ohio State coach Urban Meyer, who wasn't around for last year's wild, up-and-down struggle at Memorial Stadium. "I haven't brought it up. But I hear them say that 'We owe this team.'" It's clear that the Buckeyes have taken note. "It's a looooong flight," safety Bradley Roby said of the return trip after a road defeat like the one at Nebraska. "I went through it last year. It's not fun at all. So that's what we're trying to send them back with."

stops and forcing them to kick field goals and then things just started to steamroll and pile up on you. And there was not a play to be made to stop anything." Fifth-year senior Joe Bauserman came on but things had changed. Nebraska's Blackshirts defense was now much more active, much more inspired. And Huskers quarterback Taylor Martinez regained his footing. Martinez ran for a touchdown and passed for two others and running back Rex Burkhead exploded to total 119 yards on 26 carries.

Record Book

History

Baseball

Continued from page 14 with the small-pox, necessitating vaccination for the members of the team. However, the danger is past and the scare has blown over without injury.” The tournament at Delaware was billed as the “state championships” and Piqua was in the field. “The Piqua High school basket ball team will hook up with the West Lafayette five at the state championship tournament at Delaware late this afternoon, the game scheduled at 3:30 p.m. “The Piqua team made good connections at Columbus and arrived in Delaware at 6 p.m. The Pleasant Hill five accompanied the P.H.S. lads on the train from Piqua to Columbus and the Grove City, Xenia and Cumberland teams on the train from Columbus to Delaware. “The teams proceeded at once to the Edwards gym where they were assigned to hotel accommodations. The Piqua team is staying at the Franklin Hotel.” “In Piqua’s first game in the basket ball tournament they defeated the West Lafayette five 20 to 8. The game was not extra fast, although both teams played as though for life. “At the end of the first half the score stood 8 to 6, Piqua’s favor, but in the second half West Lafayette proved easy meat and were easily drawn into camp.” “The P.H.S. delegation at Delaware is happy. And no wonder. They pulled the dope on Springfield and beat them 19 to 11. “This was one of the second round of games. Today (Saturday) noon Piqua plays Bellaire in the third round. Little or no sensational stuff was pulled off in the Springfield game. “Ellerman shot a basket from far afield, and was the only single play worthy of special note. Troy in the gallery, rooting for Springfield, had the extreme disappointment to see us win.” “The game which cost Piqua her place in the final contests was played Saturday noon between Piqua and Bellaire. “Neither team played extra good basketball, Piqua’s playing being far poorer than in the game with Springfield the night before. “At one time during the last half, about two minutes before the final whistle to be exact, Piqua had a lead of five points. Then luck turned and Bellaire, in the remaining two minutes, made up the five points and added another. It was tough to lose a game 19 to 18 that was nearly won.” Piqua returned to

able to return. "We had a good game plan, things went well, and in the second half I just messed up my ankle," Miller recalled. Asked if he felt the game shifted at that point, he nodded and said, "Yeah." It wasn't just the players who felt that way. Mike Vrabel, then and still a defensive assistant coach, felt the momentum shift. "Our quarterback went down and our guys on defense felt like that was going to be it — they said that after the game," Vrabel said. "We were getting

the season could go either way. When the Buckeyes bolted to a 20-6 halftime lead, quieting a crowd of 85,426, it appeared that perhaps the program might be able to weather the storms battering it from outside and within and still have a successful season. But then Miller went down. He had completed 5 of 8 passes for 95 yards, including a 32-yard touchdown pass to Jake Stoneburner, and had run for 91 yards on 10 carries. Everything seemed to be clicking until he sprained his right ankle and wasn't

Funny, but at halftime the game appeared to be a high point for the Buckeyes, who were muddling through a transitional season after Jim Tressel was forced out for knowingly playing ineligible players. Several Buckeyes were suspended for the Nebraska game because of NCAA violations and the final sanctions had yet to be handed down. Assistant Luke Fickell was serving as interim coach, Ohio State had a true freshman quarterback in Braxton Miller playing every down and there was a feeling that

MLB Playoff Glance Miami County and prepared for the Sidney game. “The Red and Blue journeyed to the county seat of Shelby County last night and returned home with the bacon. This is Sidney’s second defeat at the hands of Piqua this year and in neither game has the Orange and Black been a very serious proposition for our Piqua boys to handle. “The score last night was 37 to 14. If Piqua had played any real basket ball in the first half the score would be somewhat larger. But for all of that, we won. As usual, a large number of students accompanied the team and lent their melodious voices upon favorable occasions. The gym was well filled and school spirit ran high.” The season ended with the Troy game. “Biff! Bang! Boom! Piqua wound up her basket ball schedule in whirlwind style last evening, defeating the mighty Trojans by a 34-25 score. “Troy’s quintet found the pace too fast and were never but once in the lead. Perhaps, by this time, they have come to realize that the Red and Blue are their equals, if not their superiors, in the game of basket ball. But by no means was last night’s game a cinch, for Troy played a hard, fast game. “The contest was exceedingly rough, but Referee Harris of Ohio Wesleyan handled it in splendid style and called only such fouls as could not possibly be excused; this made the game interesting for the spectators. “The gym held a crowd of about 300 enthusiastic rooters. Troy sent up quite a little delegation but they seemed to lack confidence I their team and little was heard from them in the line of cheering. “Piqua, however, was out in large numbers and Cheerleader Tabler led the bunch in their yells. There was no added extra attraction last evening, something was going to happen between halves, but certain circumstances prevented it. “To pass the time during the intermission the Piquads fastened their gazes on the scoreboard, while Troy looked at the floor.” Editor’s Note: Duane Bachman is a retired superintendent of Piqua City Schools and personality for WPTW Radio. His column will appear every other Friday. Much of the information in these columns came from The Piqua Daily Call and Piqua Leader Dispatch.

Postseason Baseball Glance All Times EDT WILD CARD Friday, Oct. 5 National League: St. Louis (Lohse 16-3) at Atlanta (Medlen 10-1), 5:07 p.m. (TBS) American League: Baltimore (Saunders 9-13) at Texas (Darvish 16-9), 8:37 p.m. (TBS) DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5; x-if necessary) American League Series A Oakland vs. Detroit Saturday, Oct. 6: Oakland at Detroit (Verlander 17-8), 6:07 p.m. (TBS) Sunday, Oct. 7: Oakland at Detroit (TBS or MLB) Tuesday, Oct. 9: Detroit at Oakland (TBS) x-Wednesday, Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland (TBS or MLB) x-Thursday, Oct. 11: Detroit at Oakland (TBS) Series B New York vs. Baltimore-Texas winner Sunday, Oct. 7: New York at Baltimore-Texas winner (TBS or MLB) Monday, Oct. 8: New York at Baltimore-Texas winner (TBS) Wednesday, Oct. 10: Baltimore-Texas winner at New York (TBS or MLB) x-Thursday, Oct. 11: Baltimore-Texas winner at New York (TBS) x-Friday, Oct. 12: Baltimore-Texas winner at New York (TBS) National League Series A Cincinnati vs. San Francisco Saturday, Oct. 6: Cincinnati (Cueto 19-9) at San Francisco (Cain 16-5), 9:37 p.m. (TBS) Sunday, Oct. 7: Cincinnati (Arroyo 12-10) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 16-11) (TBS or MLB) Tuesday, Oct. 9: San Francisco at Cincinnati (Latos 144) (TBS) x-Wednesday, Oct. 10: San Francisco at Cincinnati (Bailey 13-10) (TBS or MLB) x-Thursday, Oct. 11: San Francisco at Cincinnati (TBS) Series B Washington vs. Atlanta-St. Louis winner Sunday, Oct. 7: Washington (Gonzalez 21-8) at St. Louis-Atlanta winner (TBS or MLB) Monday, Oct. 8: Washington (Zimmermann 12-8) at St. Louis-Atlanta winner (TBS) Wednesday, Oct. 10: St. Louis-Atlanta winner at Washington (TBS or MLB) x-Thursday, Oct. 11: St. Louis-Atlanta winner at Washington (TBS) x-Friday, Oct. 12: St. Louis-Atlanta winner at Washington (TBS)

MLB Final Standings Major League Baseball Final Standings National League East Division x-Washington y-Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami Central Division x-Cincinnati y-St. Louis Milwaukee Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division x-San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 98 94 81 74 69

L 64 68 81 88 93

Pct .605 .580 .500 .457 .426

GB — 4 17 24 29

W 97 88 83 79 61 55

L 65 74 79 83 101 107

Pct .599 .543 .512 .488 .377 .340

GB — 9 14 18 36 42

W 94 86 81 76 64

L 68 76 81 86 98

Pct .580 .531 .500 .469 .395

GB — 8 13 18 30

American League East Division x-New York y-Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto Boston Central Division x-Detroit Chicago Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota West Division x-Oakland y-Texas Los Angeles Seattle

W 95 93 90 73 69

L 67 69 72 89 93

Pct .586 .574 .556 .451 .426

GB — 2 5 22 26

W 88 85 72 68 66

L 74 77 90 94 96

Pct .543 .525 .444 .420 .407

GB — 3 16 20 22

W 94 93 89 75

L 68 69 73 87

Pct .580 .574 .549 .463

GB — 1 5 19

Final MLB Leaders FINAL MAJOR LEAGUE LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Posey, San Francisco, .336; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .327; Braun, Milwaukee, .319; YMolina, St. Louis, .315; Pacheco, Colorado, .309; Craig, St. Louis, .307; Scutaro, San Francisco, .306; DWright, New York, .306. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 108; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 107; JUpton, Arizona, 107; Rollins, Philadelphia, 102; Harper, Washington, 98; Bourn, Atlanta, 96; Headley, San Diego, 95; Holliday, St. Louis, 95; Pagan, San Francisco, 95. RBI—Headley, San Diego, 115; Braun, Milwaukee, 112; ASoriano, Chicago, 108; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 105; Pence, San Francisco, 104; Posey, San Francisco, 103; Holliday, St. Louis, 102. HITS—AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 194; Braun, Milwaukee, 191; Scutaro, San Francisco, 190; Prado, Atlanta, 186; AHill, Arizona, 184; Reyes, Miami, 184; SCastro, Chicago, 183. DOUBLES—ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 50; AHill, Arizona, 44; Votto, Cincinnati, 44; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 43; Prado, Atlanta, 42; DWright, New York, 41; DanMurphy, New York, 40. TRIPLES—Pagan, San Francisco, 15; SCastro, Chicago, 12; Reyes, Miami, 12; Fowler, Colorado, 11; Bourn, Atlanta, 10; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 10; Colvin, Colorado, 10. HOME RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 41; Stanton, Miami, 37; Bruce, Cincinnati, 34; LaRoche, Washington, 33; Beltran, St. Louis, 32; IDavis, New York, 32; ASoriano, Chicago, 32. STOLEN BASES—EvCabrera, San Diego, 44; Bourn, Atlanta, 42; Reyes, Miami, 40; Victorino, Los Angeles, 39; CGomez, Milwaukee, 37; Pierre, Philadelphia, 37; Altuve, Houston, 33. PITCHING—GGonzalez, Washington, 21-8; Dickey, New York, 20-6; Cueto, Cincinnati, 19-9; Lynn, St. Louis, 18-7; Hamels, Philadelphia, 17-6; 7 tied at 16. STRIKEOUTS—Dickey, New York, 230; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 229; Hamels, Philadelphia, 216; GGonzalez, Washington, 207; ClLee, Philadelphia, 207; Gallardo, Mil-

waukee, 204; Strasburg, Washington, 197. SAVES—Kimbrel, Atlanta, 42; Motte, St. Louis, 42; AChapman, Cincinnati, 38; Papelbon, Philadelphia, 38; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 36; Axford, Milwaukee, 35; Putz, Arizona, 32; Clippard, Washington, 32. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .330; Trout, Los Angeles, .326; Beltre, Texas, .321; Mauer, Minnesota, .319; Jeter, New York, .316; Fielder, Detroit, .313; TorHunter, Los Angeles, .313; Butler, Kansas City, .313; Cano, New York, .313. RUNS—Trout, Los Angeles, 129; MiCabrera, Detroit, 109; Cano, New York, 105; Kinsler, Texas, 105; Hamilton, Texas, 103; AJackson, Detroit, 103; AdJones, Baltimore, 103. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 139; Hamilton, Texas, 128; Encarnacion, Toronto, 110; Willingham, Minnesota, 110; Fielder, Detroit, 108; Butler, Kansas City, 107; Granderson, New York, 106. HITS—Jeter, New York, 216; MiCabrera, Detroit, 205; Cano, New York, 196; Beltre, Texas, 194; Butler, Kansas City, 192; AGordon, Kansas City, 189; AdJones, Baltimore, 186. DOUBLES—AGordon, Kansas City, 51; Pujols, Los Angeles, 50; Cano, New York, 48; NCruz, Texas, 45; Choo, Cleveland, 43; Kinsler, Texas, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 40. TRIPLES—AJackson, Detroit, 10; Andrus, Texas, 9; Rios, Chicago, 8; Trout, Los Angeles, 8; JWeeks, Oakland, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 7; AEscobar, Kansas City, 7; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 7; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 7. HOME RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 44; Granderson, New York, 43; Hamilton, Texas, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 42; ADunn, Chicago, 41; Beltre, Texas, 36; Willingham, Minnesota, 35. STOLEN BASES—Trout, Los Angeles, 49; RDavis, Toronto, 46; Revere, Minnesota, 40; Crisp, Oakland, 39; AEscobar, Kansas City, 35; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 31; Kipnis, Cleveland, 31; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 31. PITCHING—Price, Tampa Bay, 20-5; Weaver, Los Angeles, 20-5; MHarrison, Texas, 18-11; Sale, Chicago, 178; Verlander, Detroit, 17-8; Scherzer, Detroit, 16-7; Darvish, Texas, 16-9; Kuroda, New York, 16-11; PHughes, New York, 16-13. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 239; Scherzer, Detroit, 231; Shields, Tampa Bay, 223; FHernandez, Seattle, 223; Darvish, Texas, 221; Price, Tampa Bay, 205; Sabathia, New York, 197. SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 51; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 48; RSoriano, New York, 42; CPerez, Cleveland, 39; Nathan, Texas, 37; Nathan, Texas, 37; Valverde, Detroit, 35.

Football

NFL Standings National Football League All Times EDT AMERICAN CONFERENCE East N.Y. Jets New England Buffalo Miami South Houston Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee North Baltimore Cincinnati Pittsburgh Cleveland West San Diego Denver Kansas City Oakland

W 2 2 2 1

L 2 2 2 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .500 .500 .500 .250

PF 81 134 115 86

PA 109 92 131 90

W 4 1 1 1

L 0 2 3 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .333 .250 .250

PF 126 61 62 81

PA 56 83 97 151

W 3 3 1 0

L 1 1 2 4

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .750 .333 .000

PF 121 112 77 73

PA 83 112 75 98

W L T Pct PF 3 1 0 .750 100 2 2 0 .500 114 1 3 0 .250 88 1 3 0 .250 67 NATIONAL CONFERENCE

PA 71 83 136 125

East Philadelphia Dallas Washington N.Y. Giants South Atlanta Tampa Bay Carolina New Orleans North Minnesota Chicago Green Bay Detroit West

W 3 2 2 2

L 1 2 2 2

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .500 .500 .500

PF 66 65 123 111

PA 83 88 123 84

W 4 1 1 0

L 0 3 3 4

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .250 .250 .000

PF 124 82 80 110

PA 76 91 109 130

W 3 3 2 1

L 1 1 2 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .750 .500 .250

PF 90 108 85 100

PA 72 68 81 114

L T Pct PF PA W Arizona 4 0 0 1.000 91 61 San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 104 65 St. Louis 2 2 0 .500 79 91 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 70 58 Thursday, Oct. 4 Arizona at St. Louis Sunday, Oct. 7 Baltimore at Kansas City, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Miami at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Seattle at Carolina, 4:05 p.m. Chicago at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m. Buffalo at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. Tennessee at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 4:25 p.m. San Diego at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m. Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 8 Houston at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11 Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14 Oakland at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Miami, 1 p.m. Dallas at Baltimore, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. New England at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. Minnesota at Washington, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at Houston, 8:20 p.m. Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New Orleans Monday, Oct. 15 Denver at San Diego, 8:30 p.m.

College Schedule College Football Schedule All Times EDT (Subject to change) Friday, Oct. 5 EAST Pittsburgh (2-2) at Syracuse (1-3), 7 p.m.

FAR WEST Cal Poly (4-0) at Weber St. (0-5), 8 p.m. Utah St. (4-1) at BYU (3-2), 10:15 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6 EAST Boston College (1-3) at Army (0-4), Noon Albany (NY) (4-1) at Bryant (0-5), Noon Northwestern (5-0) at Penn St. (3-2), Noon UConn (3-2) at Rutgers (4-0), Noon Robert Morris (1-3) at St. Francis (Pa.) (2-3), Noon South Florida (2-3) at Temple (1-2), Noon Dartmouth (2-1) at Yale (1-2), Noon Columbia (1-2) at Lehigh (5-0), 12:30 p.m. Georgetown (3-2) at Fordham (3-2), 1 p.m. Cornell (2-1) at Harvard (3-0), 1 p.m. Bucknell (1-3) at Holy Cross (0-4), 1 p.m. Brown (2-1) at Rhode Island (0-4), 1 p.m. Wagner (2-3) at Sacred Heart (1-3), 1 p.m. Maine (1-3) at Delaware (4-1), 3:30 p.m. William & Mary (1-4) at Penn (1-2), 3:30 p.m. Princeton (1-2) at Lafayette (3-1), 6 p.m. Charleston Southern (1-3) at Stony Brook (4-1), 6 p.m. Richmond (3-2) at Villanova (4-1), 6 p.m. SOUTH Arkansas (1-4) at Auburn (1-3), Noon Boise St. (3-1) at Southern Miss. (0-4), Noon Mississippi St. (4-0) at Kentucky (1-4), 12:21 p.m. Virginia Tech (3-2) at North Carolina (3-2), 12:30 p.m. Dayton (1-4) at Davidson (0-4), 1 p.m. Florida A&M (2-3) at Howard (3-1), 1 p.m. Towson (2-2) at James Madison (3-1), 1 p.m. Jacksonville (4-1) at Morehead St. (1-3), 1 p.m. Presbyterian (2-3) at VMI (1-3), 1:30 p.m. Furman (2-3) at Wofford (4-0), 1:30 p.m. Texas Southern (1-4) at Alabama St. (3-2), 2 p.m. E. Kentucky (4-1) at Tennessee St. (5-0), 2 p.m. Southern U. (2-2) at Alcorn St. (1-4), 3 p.m. Virginia (2-3) at Duke (4-1), 3 p.m. Alabama A&M (5-0) at MVSU (1-3), 3 p.m. The Citadel (3-2) at Samford (3-1), 3 p.m. SE Louisiana (2-3) at UAB (0-4), 3 p.m. E. Illinois (3-2) at UT-Martin (3-2), 3 p.m. Elon (2-3) at Appalachian St. (3-2), 3:30 p.m. Georgia Tech (2-3) at Clemson (4-1), 3:30 p.m. LSU (5-0) at Florida (4-0), 3:30 p.m. New Hampshire (3-2) at Georgia St. (0-5), 3:30 p.m. Gardner-Webb (0-4) at Liberty (0-4), 3:30 p.m. Tulsa (4-1) at Marshall (2-3), 3:30 p.m. Wake Forest (3-2) at Maryland (2-2), 3:30 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe (2-2) at Middle Tennessee (3-1), 3:30 p.m. Georgia Southern (3-1) at W. Carolina (1-4), 3:30 p.m. NC A&T (2-2) at Bethune-Cookman (3-2), 4 p.m. Delaware St. (1-3) at Norfolk St. (2-3), 4 p.m. Tulane (0-4) at Louisiana-Lafayette (3-1), 5 p.m. Murray St. (2-3) at Austin Peay (0-5), 7 p.m. UNLV (1-4) at Louisiana Tech (4-0), 7 p.m. Rice (1-4) at Memphis (0-4), 7 p.m. Texas A&M (3-1) at Mississippi (3-2), 7 p.m. Lamar (2-3) at Northwestern St. (2-3), 7 p.m. Morgan St. (2-2) at Savannah St. (0-4), 7 p.m. Georgia (5-0) at South Carolina (5-0), 7 p.m. Florida St. (5-0) at NC State (3-2), 8 p.m. Jacksonville St. (2-2) at Tennessee Tech (2-3), 8 p.m. MIDWEST Michigan St. (3-2) at Indiana (2-2), Noon Kansas (1-3) at Kansas St. (4-0), Noon Buffalo (1-3) at Ohio (5-0), Noon Kent St. (3-1) at E. Michigan (0-4), 1 p.m. San Diego (2-2) at Drake (3-2), 1:30 p.m. Bowling Green (2-3) at Akron (1-4), 2 p.m. S. Illinois (2-3) at Illinois St. (5-0), 2 p.m. Youngstown St. (4-0) at N. Dakota St. (4-0), 2 p.m. Butler (3-2) at Valparaiso (0-4), 2 p.m. UMass (0-5) at W. Michigan (2-3), 2 p.m. SC State (2-3) vs. NC Central (2-2) at Indianapolis, 2:30 p.m. N. Illinois (4-1) at Ball St. (3-2), 3 p.m. W. Illinois (2-2) at South Dakota (1-3), 3 p.m. Cent. Michigan (2-2) at Toledo (4-1), 3 p.m. Missouri St. (0-5) at Indiana St. (3-2), 3:05 p.m. Illinois (2-3) at Wisconsin (3-2), 3:30 p.m. Michigan (2-2) at Purdue (3-1), 4 p.m. Miami (Ohio) (3-2) at Cincinnati (3-0), 7 p.m. Vanderbilt (1-3) at Missouri (3-2), 7 p.m. Miami (4-1) vs. Notre Dame (4-0) at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Nebraska (4-1) at Ohio St. (5-0), 8 p.m. SOUTHWEST Iowa St. (3-1) at TCU (4-0), 3:30 p.m. Oklahoma (2-1) at Texas Tech (4-0), 3:30 p.m. Stephen F. Austin (2-3) vs. Sam Houston St. (2-2) at Houston, 4 p.m. Jackson St. (2-3) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (3-2), 7 p.m. Nicholls St. (1-2) at Cent. Arkansas (3-2), 7 p.m. North Texas (2-3) at Houston (1-3), 7 p.m. Grambling St. (0-4) vs. Prairie View (0-5) at Dallas, 7 p.m. West Virginia (4-0) at Texas (4-0), 7 p.m. SMU (1-3) at UTEP (1-4), 8 p.m. FAR WEST Navy (1-3) at Air Force (2-2), 11:30 a.m. Sacramento St. (3-2) at S. Utah (2-3), 3 p.m. Arizona (3-2) at Stanford (3-1), 3 p.m. Montana (2-3) at N. Colorado (1-3), 3:35 p.m. New Mexico St. (1-4) at Idaho (0-5), 5 p.m. Texas St. (2-2) at New Mexico (2-3), 6 p.m. Washington St. (2-3) at Oregon St. (3-0), 6 p.m. Fresno St. (3-2) at Colorado St. (1-4), 7 p.m. Montana St. (5-0) at UC Davis (2-3), 7 p.m. Wyoming (1-3) at Nevada (4-1), 7:05 p.m. Hawaii (1-3) at San Diego St. (2-3), 8 p.m. North Dakota (3-2) at E. Washington (3-1), 8:05 p.m. Idaho St. (1-3) at Portland St. (1-4), 8:05 p.m. UCLA (4-1) at California (1-4), 10 p.m. Washington (3-1) at Oregon (5-0), 10:30 p.m.

Basketball

WNBA Playoffs WNBA Playoff Glance All Times EDT CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-3) (x-if necessary) Eastern Conference Connecticut vs. Indiana Friday, Oct. 5: Indiana at Connecticut, 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 8: Connecticut at Indiana, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 11: Indiana at Connecticut, 8:30 p.m. Western Conference Los Angeles vs. Minnesota Thursday, Oct. 4: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7: Minnesota at Los Angeles, 3:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, Oct. 10: Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

Bowling

Brel-Aire Scores Club 523 200 games (Men) — D. Morris 223. STANDINGS Morris Htg. & Cooling Here 4 Beer Sidney Tool & Dye Tom’s Boys We Don’t Care We Hate Bowling Marty Joe Thoma Jewelers

14-2 10-6 10-6 8-8 8-8 8-8 4-10 2-14


16

SPORTS

Friday, October 5, 2012

WWW.DAILYCALL.COM

PHOTO PROVIDED BY MKB PHOTO

Miami East defeated Twin Valley South 6-0 Thursday to wrap up its second straight CCC title.

• PIQUA DAILY CALL

ROB KISER/CALL PHOTOS

Covington’s Sam Slusher lines up a putt Thursday.

Making clean sweep of CCC Lady Vikings wrap up title with 6-0 win over TVS CASSTOWN— With a 6-0 win over Twin Valley South, Miami East has swept the Cross County Conference for the second year in a row. And they did so in impressive fashion, not giving up a goal in league play. "Not only going 6-0 in the league, but not allowing a goal in league play says a lot about the depth on our team,” Miami East coach Lil Carson said. “I was able to get everyone in in most of the league games and able to move them around, and we never missed a beat." Though it did take the Vikings a bit longer than expected to get started. With 8:37 left until the break, Katrina Sutherly took a corner kick that Katelyn Gardella bodied into the goal. At the 5:23 mark, Montana Hahn lobbed one over the keeper's head off a cross field pass from Sutherly. And with that assist, Sutherly broke the school record for assists in a single season, previously 18. "I don't think Kit really knew how close she was to breaking the record and we didn't make a big deal out of it. I called her over to the sideline before the kickoff and told her con-

night with a cross to Hahn who one-touched it in. With 3:45 left to play, Ellie Gearhart deflected a ball up the middle and Morgan Jess put it in the net for the final score of the night. With less than two minutes to play, Lindsey Roeth made a big save in the goal for the Vikings to preserve the shutout. The Vikings now have 10 shutouts on the season. "We were really slow getting started tonight, but once we got on the board, we relaxed and started playing much better,” Carson said. “ Several girls got on the board, which is great to see as the tournament approaches." With the win, the Vikings are now 13-1, 6-0 in the CCC. East will host MiltonUnion on Saturday.

Newton wins 5-0 PHOTO PROVIDED BY MKB PHOTO

Katrina Sutherly broke another assist record. gratulations. Then it was back to business." The second half was more of the same. Sutherly got her third assistof the night as she send a threw ball up the middle for Emily Holicki. Holicki held her ground and fended off two defend-

ers before she slipped it past the keeper 13 minutes into the second half. With 14:56 left to play, Rian Kingrey sent one into the box that was deflected in by a Panther defender. With 12:08 left to play, Sutherly finished out her

PLEASANT HILL — The Newton girls soccer team improved to 7-5-1 with a 5-0 win over Natioanl Trail Wednesday. Billy Lavy and Jenny Beacom both had one goal and one assist. Mariska Kleman and Madison Tebows both scored goals for Newton, while Katie Houk had two assists.

Lehman boys tie Greeneview Earhart records 10 saves in goal XENIA — The sevenmth-ranked Lehman Catholic boys soccer team took on the fifth-ranked Greeneview High school at the Athletes In Action fields in Xenia last night and battled to a 1-1 tie. The scoring started quickly in the first half when Bryce Woods crossed a ball to Jacob Mickle who put the ball in the back of the net with only twominutes gone in the first half. "That goal was a mistake on our part" said Lehman Coach Tom Thornton. "We missed and assignment and did not mark the player on the weak side and he had a wide open net to shoot in to". The first half ended with Lehman down 1-0. Then with four minutes

and score to tie the game. After this it turned into a defensive struggle and with Lehman keeper Nick Earhart making 6 saves in the second half and the game ended 1-1. "Louis (Gaier) did a great job getting to the ball and scoring the tying goal,’ Thornton said. “ Wehave been working on finishing all week. “We had other chances in the second half but we just did not finish well. “We got outshot 17 to 4 tonight and we have to improve on this." Lehman goalie Nick PHOTO PROVIDED Earhart finished with 10 Nick Earhart deflects the ball over the goal. saves. Lehman, 5-1-4, plays at gone in the second half Louis Gaier was in posiGreenon Saturday. Lehman tied the score. tion to get the rebound Zach Taylor took a throw from the keeper and sent a ball thru the defensive line and when the Greeneview goalie misplayed the ball. 2322065

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Golf Continued from page 14 with a 45 for 83, that included a double and a triple on the Valley View nine. “He just had a couple of big holes and that will kill you down here,” Lehman coach Joe Harrmann said. “He played well. “He was one over par after eight holes, but the big holes cost him.” Covington’s Samuel Slusher had an outstanding career end, shooting 86.

He had 40 on the Meadows nine, before coming in with a 46 on the Valley View nine. “He played well early,” Covington coach Bill Wise said of Slusher, who was just two-over par after six holes. “His putter cost him. “He lost his pace on the putts on the back nine.” Houston’s Jaron Howard had a tough day. The Wildcat finished with a 122.

Top 10 Reasons to Attend the Taste of Home Cooking School at Hobart Arena on Tuesday, October 30th, 2012 at 6:30pm 10.

Economical Entertaining Evening

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2326578


10/05/12